Denier dissected 2

Written By: - Date published: 3:30 pm, September 27th, 2010 - 38 comments
Categories: climate change - Tags: ,

Christopher Monckton has been one of the “highest profile” climate change deniers. We’ve written about him here once or twice (or more). Well, it looks like his days as poster pinup for the denier movement are well and truly over. He’s busted:

‘Chemical nonsense’: Leading scientists refute Lord Monckton’s attack on climate science

Nine ‘profoundly wrong’ claims made by Ukip deputy leader refuted by climate experts in a document filed with US Congress

A coalition of leading climate scientists yesterday filed a 48-page document to the US Congress refuting an attack on climate science made earlier this year by the Ukip deputy leader, Lord Christopher Monckton.

The detailed rebuttal addresses nine key scientific claims made by Monckton, a prominent climate sceptic, to a house select committee hearing in May. It includes the responses of 21 climate scientists who variously conclude that Monckton’s assertions are “very misleading”, “profoundly wrong”, “simply false”, “chemical nonsense”, and “cannot be supported by climate physics”. …

“For those without some familiarity with climate science, [Monckton’s] testimony may appear to have scientific validity,” said yesterday’s response to Monckton’s claims . “We have therefore undertaken the task of soliciting responses from highly qualified climate scientists in each of the areas touched upon in Monckton’s testimony … In all cases, Monckton’s assertions are shown to be without merit – they are based on a thorough misunderstanding of the science of climate change.” …

Oh – and just by the way:

During his congressional testimony in May, Monckton was mocked by a Democratic congressman for claiming that he was a member of the House of Lords during a previous committee hearing appearance in 2009. Last month, the clerk of the parliaments, wrote to Monckton, a hereditary peer, stressing that he should stop referring to himself as a member of the House of Lords.

Monckton is now shown to be a liar at every level. Let’s hope that’s the last that we ever hear of him.

38 comments on “Denier dissected 2 ”

  1. Monckton is now shown to be a liar at every level. Let’s hope that’s the last that we ever hear of him.

    I sort of agree although I will miss those twisted calculated misrepresentations of the science and the utterly conclusive responses issued in response.

  2. rich 2

    I think he’s cruising for a beheading.

    The 1325 law that allows for headlopping of bogus peers was never really repealed, y’know. I can hear the squelch now.

  3. Ten Miles Over 3

    It always pays to discount the outliers. Monckton on one side, Gore on the other. I’ve always considered them mirror images. It appears to be startling symmetry – IIRC a judge ruled there were 9 errors in Gore’s Inconvenient Truth.
    As with all issues, the truth is usually nearer the middle than the extremes.

    • So where is the “middle of the extremes”?

      That our world will be stuffed in 100 years if we do not take urgent action rather than in 50?

      • Ten Miles Over 3.1.1

        There is the real question… take what action? Start carbon trading? Given we’ve (maybe) just come out of a global financial crisis based on trading made-up commodities how could we have any expectation that creating another commodity market would have a good outcome?

        • nzfp 3.1.1.1

          Hey Ten Miles Over.
          Your question “take what action”? Well consider my post below and have a read of this article Sustainable Energy Development: How Costs Can Be Cut In Half”.

          The best way to resolve the enviroment question is to resolve the economic question which is at the root of all of our social problems.

          Resolving the economic quetion is easy. Stop voting National or Labour until they start promoting real alternatives to neo-liberal Washington consensus monetarism along with real tax reform.

    • Draco T Bastard 3.2

      Actually, I don’t think the truth is ever in the middle. Normally it’s fairly extreme from the consensus view. The existence of Climate Change only appears extreme from where our culture sits in its greed and destruction of the environment. Stopping that greed in destruction is seen as extreme and yet it is no less than simple fact.

      • nzfp 3.2.1

        “Stopping that greed in destruction is seen as extreme and yet it is no less than simple fact.” absolutely!

        It has been demonstrated by many economists and politcal economic commentators that in our current neo-liberal economic climate it is an economic imperative to be as wasteful and destructive as possible. without waste we cannot have growth and without growth we cannot sustain our current economic activity.

        I assert that the solution to the problem of ecological destruction would start with a fundamental change to our economic paradigm. Anything else (Al Gores ETS scheming) is simply window dressing and small patches and will achieve nothing more then the shift of wealth from labour to the wealthy.

        It is well past the time of debating whether or not Climate Change exists or doesn’t exist, whether it is human caused or not. What we do know, and is undeniable is that our current human activity is destructive to the environment and must be addressed.

        The manufactured dichotomy of AGW proponents (Gore) vs Climate Change deniers (Monckton) is another media led distraction, like Maori vs Pakeha, White vs Black to keep us distracted from the solution – a change in economics.

    • NickS 3.3

      /facepalm

      The errors in Gore’s docu were minor compared to the multitude of fractally wrong crap Monckton et al have produced. To even call them similar is so utterly stupid I’m having trouble understanding how you can use a computer without destroying it.

      As for extremes, the research to date on positive feedback loops in climate change is worrying simply because they’re very real, rather than conjectures waiting to be tested. The only thing against them is further research to gauge the forcing and account for any negative feed-back loops that are or may occur to continue to refine the climate change models we have. But besides all that, the present models all posit 2-4 degree temperature increases, with sea levels dependent on what happens to Greenland + West Antarctic Ice sheets, leading to sea level increases of anywhere from 30cm upwards towards 14m+ for the worst case scenarios. So really, taking the middle in this case, as in many others is merely a sign of your own laziness and inability to think, on top of it also being an informal fallacy.

      • mickysavage 3.3.1

        The errors in Gore’s docu were minor compared to the multitude of fractally wrong crap Monckton et al have produced

        Agreed NickS. I was trying to suggest that the notion of “balance” meant that we are still going to hell, just not as fast as some are saying we are …

      • nzfp 3.3.2

        NickS grow and put your “/facepalm” rubbish in the bin where it belongs.

      • Ten Miles Over 3.3.3

        Yeah, whatever. Fractals are so vitally important to the debate I guess.

  4. deemac 4

    Ten Miles Over seems confused; there is no equivalence between (1) being wrong on the science (Monckton) and (2) making a few descriptive errors (Gore).

    • Ten Miles Over 4.1

      deemac – there are plenty of more credible hero’s than Gore. Come on, this is the guy who said the earth is millions of degrees inside. Why do you think he doesn’t take audience questions? He’s a front man, the face not the brains.

  5. MrSmith 5

    Unfortunately there is another Monckton just around the corner, I blame most of the denial over climate change on religion, I fair chunk of the worlds people still think that they can do whatever they like with the environment, as the earth was created as there play thing and what ever happens the big man will come and straighten it all out for them in the end. Here is a quote I picked up from Hot topic that I like. “In short, this is what denialism is – a willful refusal to rationally consider the evidence and draw the appropriate conclusions”. This quote nicely describes most religious people for my mind.

    • Redlogix 5.1

      This quote nicely describes most religious people for my mind.

      Describes virtually all fundamentalists…who in my book understand neither the science, nor their religion at all well.

      • Anne 5.1.1

        Hear hear. Fundamentalists of all kinds are loopheads, nutcases extraordinaire. They should be herded together and incarcerated on islands where they can scream and holler to their hearts content and nobody can hear them. The rest of us can then get on with saving the planet.

        I’m only half joking 😉

        anti-spam: contribution.

      • Clarke 5.1.2

        Religious fundamentalism – of whatever stripe – should be treated as the mental illness that it so clearly is.

  6. Kevin Campbell 6

    What crap you lot talk. Are you left wing or something?

    • Maynard J 6.1

      Phew, that’s pursuasive, k-dog. Maybe Climate Change is a myth after all.

      This guy is good.

      • billy fish 6.1.1

        Sold me totally on the idea – I’m off to burn some fossil fuel while pissing toxins into the water supply

  7. Anne 7

    Kevin Campbell has just proved the point 😀

  8. Kevin Campbell 8

    The warm climate change is good, its the cold climate change we can see coming I am worried about.

  9. Kevin Campbell 9

    He takes a well earned bow 🙂

  10. billy fish 10

    Can I recomend you all have a check of
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKUPUznJZoE

    For one of the best statements ever on climate change.
    Nicely sums a lot of the PR issues up

  11. Corey 11

    What a load of bollox the hysterical claims of suicidal anthropomorphic climate change is.

    I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume it is happening…

    How can we be so sure it will result in disastrous effects predicted? Weather/climate forecasters dont know whats happening next week let alone in 100 years! Is global warming even a bad thing? Some very significant scientific and moral questions are still very much unanswered.

    This “debate” has been hijacked to the point where any skeptical view is shredded and discounted without considering the facts of that view. This is anti-Enlightenment and anti-scientific. Its the behaviour of cults and fanatical groups to discount any criticism without giving it proper consideration. No wonder people like Monckton have to appeal to (their own) extremes.

    • lprent 11.1

      The main reason most skeptics get dissected is because they don’t understand the basic science, and are running arguments based on faith aimed at discrediting the science. That is clearly tbe case with the silly peer who is argues without any understanding of the basis of earth sciences (I did a degree in it, makes it easy to recognize ignorant blowhards). Science is based around skepticism and rechecking. However it isn’t based around taking entertaining comedians like monckton too seriously when they can’t offer anything apart from their opinion and a habit of producing meaningless munged graphs.

      • Corey 11.1.1

        Thanks for taking the time to reply.

        My opinion on this is that the truth is somewhere in the middle of both extremes.

        Having said that, I was hoping you could respond to my point about weather/climate forecasting as you are a custodian of the sciences. I will give you the moral high ground to start with by admitting that my field, economics, is not a science.

        When it comes to forecasting, not even the most complex models in economics can predict how an economy will have grown in 6 months time. Given the complexity and inter-relatedness of the eco-system (which I compare in complexity with a nation’s macroeconomy) how can we have any faith at all in climate forecasting in 100 years? Without knowing the statistics behind climate modelling I can only imagine the errors are so large that the exact opposite climate impacts could be equally likely to occur.

        I must say that I will sit firmly on the fence while others tear their hair out about alarmist projections. I think the very same critiques a number of posters make here about economics are equally valid for climate change.

        • NickS 11.1.1.1

          /groan

          1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument_to_moderation
          – basically to determine the factual nature of a scientific argument etc, you actually need to understand the evidence, instead of merely being lazy and going for the easy route of the middle ground. It also helps to understand how science works, instead of merely only paying attention to news and denialist blogs.

          2) Climate Modelling is Not Economics Modelling.
          – Two very different systems, of which economics is still a very much dismal science, which has failed to actually critically examine it’s various “foundational” assumptions. Indeed, I’d argue economics is closer to ecology, in which we can already and do predict what’s going to happen, or may happen under different variables in terms of population change, species interactions and nutrient/energy flows.

          – Anyhow, your argument is effectively one from ignorance, as you fail to even bother considering, let alone reading up on climate modelling, and I doubt very much if I started to mention absorption spectra and basic quantum physics behind why greenhouse gases are greenhouse gases that you’d be able to understand it. But also not be able to manage the all important trick of integrating it with other knowledge, something which is vital to understanding complex science properly and not at ye olde “C’s get degrees” levels.

          – As for long term modelling, climate models look at the long term average, not the yearly, decadal or multi-decade climate cycles, unless they impact on climate change mechanisms. Leading to relatively robust long-term predictions, simply because they average out all the noise. And for fucks sake, they can also model 5 year averages if aforementioned climate cycles are added into the models. Which Mann et al showed back in the 90s, and earlier mechanistic fluid models before the advent of powerful computers also gave fairly decent predictions.

          3) Fuck morals.
          – Show us well evidenced scientific arguments, or better yet, go read the key papers, or even the wikipedia bits and then come back here. Because after years of dealing with creationists and watching other types of denialists, it’s readily apparent that morality is used as an excuse to not bother with the whole evidence thing. There’s a wealth of free papers out there, from the major journals like Nature and Science, and a large pool of climate science bloggers with either the intelligence or the scientific background to understand and explain climate change in all it’s wondrous complexity, and utterly simple core.

          4) Lastly:
          – The same argument schema your using, if applied to economics, or to say the well evidence science of Biological Evolution, or even HIV causing AIDS, would get you laughed at within the science-based community, and more so if you tried to use such a schema in court, or in an academic setting. So why the fuck are even bothering with it, as you should have the academic training to be able to notice it’s wrong in the first place. Although this maybe misplaced optimism on my part, given the number of science grads one can causally observe making dumb, to fractally wrong arguments.

          __________________________
          Yes, the writing bug is coming back to me! Muwahahahahaha.

          • Corey 11.1.1.1.1

            “basically to determine the factual nature of a scientific argument etc, you actually need to understand the evidence, instead of merely being lazy and going for the easy route of the middle ground.”

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsifiability

            “Anyhow, your argument is effectively one from ignorance, as you fail to even bother considering, let alone reading up on climate modelling, and I doubt very much if I started to mention absorption spectra and basic quantum physics behind why greenhouse gases are greenhouse gases that you’d be able to understand it.”

            – that’s a rather bold claim to make given you have absolutely no idea who I am don’t you think? I wonder if you have an opinion on anything which you haven’t received some sort of qualification for?

            A moral question I had in mind was something like: “Do we as a species have a moral obligation to maintain the atmosphere at a steady-state level such that the temperature over a long-term period does not change at all. Similarly, if we were in an anthropomorphic period of global cooling, should we deliberately heat the atmosphere to maintain a flat-line temperature?

            Note that I’ve never said that I’m a climate denier. I just have a hard time accepting the validity of alarmist projections as I think they are justified to (often) support ideological biases.

            http://itia.ntua.gr/en/docinfo/864/

            (Here is something I have read and understood which you may or may not choose to respond to. I liked the references it has to Popperian falsifiability)

        • lprent 11.1.1.2

          I don’t work in science these days, but I program a lot of simulations for various reasons from economic to traffic control. Generally in most modeling, longer term trends in complex systems are easier to model than short term chaotic effects. That is as true in economics as it is in climate science. It is extremely difficult to predict the market in the next few days, but relatively easy to predict a 5 year trend.

          In climate science the minimum period that is worth looking at is about a decade because that evens out all of the chaotic noise of weather and short term cyclic effects. As I keep pointing out, weather is not climate.

          We pretty sure that we know the major drivers for climate, and there are a lot of people refining that knowledge by looking into the present and far past. So far everything points to raising greenhouse gases gives you very fast (in geological terms) changes in tempatures. It has happened in the past. The only real question is how fast it will go – natural sources of change aren’t as extreme as what has happened over the last couple of hundred years

          As for it being better – it is very unlikely to be so. The entirety of our current agricultural technology arose during a very stable climatic period over the last 10 k years. It is founded on climate stability and when that stability fails we have famines. Even under tbe most optimistic projections like the IPCC, we’re likely to 2 degree average shifts in tempatures worldwide by the end of the century with the associated shifts in climate patterns. But that is an average. The polar and near polar regions are likely to shift more like 5-10 degrees, continental climates more like 4 degrees, and maritime and ocean regions a degree or less. That means we’re going to get quite rapid climatic and weather pattern shifts that our agricultural systems don’t know how to handle. With our current population, we’re pretty borderline on our food now.

          Whatever way it goes, sitting on the fence isn’t going go be an option. Either we change our polluting behaviors now and reduce the effects, or we don’t do enough and get the larger die backs later this century. Either way you can expect to get an increasingly chaotic economic system with the wars and disruption over diminishing resources. The only question is how much

    • Draco T Bastard 11.2

      Monckton appeals to his own extremes because he doesn’t believe in reality. The scientists are actually doing the science – Monckton is just lying.

    • KJT 11.3

      We can predict climate change over time better than we can predict daily weather for the same reason we can predict how a thousand people will react better than we can predict how one will behave.

      When every known indicator s that we have shows steadily rising average temperatures over time correlating to a rise in greenhouse gases. Simple physics says greenhouse gases are the reason why earth is warmer. You can show it yourself on a kitchen table experiment. Without them we would be frozen. It is proven that an increase will warm the earth. In fact the IPCC is optimistic. Most of the temperature indicators say we are warming faster than the models used until recently.

      The best scientific knowledge we have at the moment say AGW is happening. Those who deny it have a vested interest in doing so or have their heads in the sand.

      The scary part is what we do not know. What temperature is a tipping point where warming runs away altogether.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Government improves mass arrival management
    The Government has strengthened settings for managing a mass arrival, with the passing of the Immigration (Mass Arrivals) Amendment Bill today.  “While we haven’t experienced a mass arrival event in New Zealand, it is an ongoing possibility which would have a significant impact on our immigration and court systems,” Immigration ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    24 hours ago
  • Super Fund to get more investment opportunities
    Finance Minister Nicola Willis has welcomed the passage of legislation giving the New Zealand Superannuation Fund a wider range of investment opportunities. The New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Controlling Interests) Amendment Bill passed its third reading in Parliament today. “The bill removes a section in the original act that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Crown and iwi settle three decades of negotiations
    Three decades of negotiations between iwi and the Crown have been settled today as the Whakatōhea Claims Settlement Bill passes its third reading in Parliament, Treaty Negotiations Minister Paul Goldsmith says. “While no settlement can fully compensate for the Crown’s past injustices, this settlement will support the aspirations and prosperity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand to support PNG landslide response
    New Zealand will support Papua New Guinea’s response to the devastating landslide in Enga Province, Foreign Minister Winston Peters and Defence Minister Judith Collins have announced.   “Ever since learning of the horrendous landslide on Friday, New Zealand has been determined to play our part in assisting Papua New Guinea’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government to consult on regulation of shooting clubs and ranges
      The Government is consulting New Zealanders on a package of proposals for simple and effective regulation of shooting clubs and ranges, Associate Minister of Justice, Nicole McKee announced today.   “Clubs and ranges are not only important for people learning to operate firearms safely, to practice, and to compete, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Successful New Caledonia repatriation winds up, need for dialogue remains
    Over 300 people have been successfully flown out of New Caledonia in a joint Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) and New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) operation.   As of today, seven New Zealand government aircraft flights to Nouméa have assisted around 225 New Zealanders and 145 foreign nationals ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Minister to Singapore for defence, technology talks
    Defence and Science, Innovation and Technology Minister Judith Collins departs for Singapore tomorrow for defence and technology summits and meetings. First up is the Asia Tech X Singapore Summit, followed by the Five Power Defence Arrangements Defence Ministers Meeting and wrapping up with the Shangri-La Dialogue for Defence Ministers from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Major investment in teacher supply through Budget 24
    Over the next four years, Budget 24 will support the training and recruitment of 1,500 teachers into the workforce, Education Minister Erica Stanford announced today. “To raise achievement and develop a world leading education system we’re investing nearly $53 million over four years to attract, train and retain our valued ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Joint statement on the New Zealand – Cook Islands Joint Ministerial Forum – 2024
    1.  New Zealand Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Rt Hon Winston Peters; Minister of Health and Minister for Pacific Peoples Hon Dr Shane Reti; and Minister for Climate Change Hon Simon Watts hosted Cook Islands Minister of Foreign Affairs and Immigration Hon Tingika Elikana and Minister of Health Hon Vainetutai Rose Toki-Brown on 24 May ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Middle East, Africa deployments extended
    The Government has approved two-year extensions for four New Zealand Defence Force deployments to the Middle East and Africa, Defence Minister Judith Collins and Foreign Minister Winston Peters announced today. “These deployments are long-standing New Zealand commitments, which reflect our ongoing interest in promoting peace and stability, and making active ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Climate Change Commission Chair to retire
    The Climate Change Commission Chair, Dr Rod Carr, has confirmed his plans to retire at the end of his term later this year, Climate Change Minister Simon Watts says. “Prior to the election, Dr Carr advised me he would be retiring when his term concluded. Dr Rod Carr has led ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Inaugural Board of Integrity Sport & Recreation Commission announced
    Nine highly respected experts have been appointed to the inaugural board of the new Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission, Sport & Recreation Minister Chris Bishop says. “The Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission is a new independent Crown entity which was established under the Integrity Sport and Recreation Act last year, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • A balanced Foreign Affairs budget
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters confirmed today that Vote Foreign Affairs in Budget 2024 will balance two crucial priorities of the Coalition Government.    While Budget 2024 reflects the constrained fiscal environment, the Government also recognises the critical role MFAT plays in keeping New Zealanders safe and prosperous.    “Consistent with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New social housing places to support families into homes
    New social housing funding in Budget 2024 will ensure the Government can continue supporting more families into warm, dry homes from July 2025, Housing Ministers Chris Bishop and Tama Potaka say. “Earlier this week I was proud to announce that Budget 2024 allocates $140 million to fund 1,500 new social ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand’s minerals future
    Introduction Today, we are sharing a red-letter occasion. A Blackball event on hallowed ground. Today  we underscore the importance of our mineral estate. A reminder that our natural resource sector has much to offer.  Such a contribution will not come to pass without investment.  However, more than money is needed. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government sets out vision for minerals future
    Increasing national and regional prosperity, providing the minerals needed for new technology and the clean energy transition, and doubling the value of minerals exports are the bold aims of the Government’s vision for the minerals sector. Resources Minister Shane Jones today launched a draft strategy for the minerals sector in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government progresses Māori wards legislation
    The coalition Government’s legislation to restore the rights of communities to determine whether to introduce Māori wards has passed its first reading in Parliament, Local Government Minister Simeon Brown says. “Divisive changes introduced by the previous government denied local communities the ability to determine whether to establish Māori wards.” The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • First RMA amendment Bill introduced to Parliament
    The coalition Government has today introduced legislation to slash the tangle of red and green tape throttling some of New Zealand’s key sectors, including farming, mining and other primary industries. RMA Reform Minister Chris Bishop says the Government is committed to  unlocking development and investment while ensuring the environment is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government welcomes EPA decision
    The decision by Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) to approve the continued use of hydrogen cyanamide, known as Hi-Cane, has been welcomed by Environment Minister Penny Simmonds and Agriculture Minister Todd McClay.  “The EPA decision introduces appropriate environmental safeguards which will allow kiwifruit and other growers to use Hi-Cane responsibly,” Ms ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Speech to Employers and Manufacturers Association: Relief for today, hope for tomorrow
    Kia ora, Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou kātoa Tāmaki Herenga Waka, Tāmaki Herenga tangata Ngā mihi ki ngā mana whenua o tēnei rohe Ngāti Whātua ō Ōrākei me nga iwi kātoa kua tae mai. Mauriora. Greetings everyone. Thank you to the EMA for hosting this event. Let me acknowledge ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government invests in 1,500 more social homes
    The coalition Government is investing in social housing for New Zealanders who are most in need of a warm dry home, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. Budget 2024 will allocate $140 million in new funding for 1,500 new social housing places to be provided by Community Housing Providers (CHPs), not ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • $24 million boost for Gumboot Friday
    Thousands more young New Zealanders will have better access to mental health services as the Government delivers on its commitment to fund the Gumboot Friday initiative, says Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Mental Health Minister Matt Doocey.  “Budget 2024 will provide $24 million over four years to contract the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill passes first reading
    The Coalition Government’s Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill, which will improve tenancy laws and help increase the supply of rental properties, has passed its first reading in Parliament says Housing Minister Chris Bishop. “The Bill proposes much-needed changes to the Residential Tenancies Act 1986 that will remove barriers to increasing private ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Montecassino Commemorative Address, Cassino War Cemetery
    Standing here in Cassino War Cemetery, among the graves looking up at the beautiful Abbey of Montecassino, it is hard to imagine the utter devastation left behind by the battles which ended here in May 1944. Hundreds of thousands of shells and bombs of every description left nothing but piled ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First Reading – Repeal of Section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act 1989
    I present a legislative statement on the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill Mr. Speaker, I move that the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill be now read a first time. I nominate the Social Services and Community Committee to consider the Bill. Thank you, Mr. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First reading of 7AA’s repeal: progress for children
    The Bill to repeal Section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act has had its first reading in Parliament today. The Bill reaffirms the Coalition Government’s commitment to the care and safety of children in care, says Minister for Children Karen Chhour.  “When I became the Minister for Children, I made ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • China Business Summit 2024
    Kia ora koutou, good morning, and zao shang hao. Thank you Fran for the opportunity to speak at the 2024 China Business Summit – it’s great to be here today. I’d also like to acknowledge: Simon Bridges - CEO of the Auckland Chamber of Commerce. His Excellency Ambassador - Wang ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Assisted depatures from New Caledonia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has confirmed a New Zealand Government plane will head to New Caledonia in the next hour in the first in a series of proposed flights to begin bringing New Zealanders home.    “New Zealanders in New Caledonia have faced a challenging few days - and bringing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Assisted departures from New Caledonia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has confirmed a New Zealand Government plane will head to New Caledonia in the next hour in the first in a series of proposed flights to begin bringing New Zealanders home.  “New Zealanders in New Caledonia have faced a challenging few days - and bringing them ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government to rollout roadside drug testing
    The Coalition Government will introduce legislation this year that will enable roadside drug testing as part of our commitment to improve road safety and restore law and order, Transport Minister Simeon Brown says.  “Alcohol and drugs are the number one contributing factor in fatal road crashes in New Zealand. In ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Minister responds to review of Kāinga Ora
    The Government has announced a series of immediate actions in response to the independent review of Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. “Kāinga Ora is a large and important Crown entity, with assets of $45 billion and over $2.5 billion of expenditure each year. It ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pseudoephedrine back on shelves
    Associate Health Minister David Seymour is pleased that Pseudoephedrine can now be purchased by the general public to protect them from winter illness, after the coalition government worked swiftly to change the law and oversaw a fast approval process by Medsafe. “Pharmacies are now putting the medicines back on their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand-China Business Summit
    Tēnā koutou katoa. Da jia hao.  Good morning everyone.   Prime Minister Luxon, your excellency, a great friend of New Zealand and my friend Ambassador Wang, Mayor of what he tells me is the best city in New Zealand, Wayne Brown, the highly respected Fran O’Sullivan, Champion of the Auckland business ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New measures to protect powerlines from trees
    Energy Minister Simeon Brown has announced that the Government will make it easier for lines firms to take action to remove vegetation from obstructing local powerlines. The change will ensure greater security of electricity supply in local communities, particularly during severe weather events.  “Trees or parts of trees falling on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani win top Māori dairy farming award
    Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani were the top winners at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy awards recognising the best in Māori dairy farming. Māori Development Minister Tama Potaka announced the winners and congratulated runners-up, Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, at an awards celebration also attended by Prime Minister Christopher Luxon and Finance Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • DJ Fred Again – Assurance report received
    "On the 27th of March, I sought assurances from the Chief Executive, Department of Internal Affairs, that the Department’s correct processes and policies had been followed in regards to a passport application which received media attention,” says Minister of Internal Affairs Brooke van Velden.  “I raised my concerns after being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • District Court Judges appointed
    Attorney-General Judith Collins has announced the appointment of three new District Court Judges, to replace Judges who have recently retired. Peter James Davey of Auckland has been appointed a District Court Judge with a jury jurisdiction to be based at Whangarei. Mr Davey initially started work as a law clerk/solicitor with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Unions should put learning ahead of ideology
    Associate Education Minister David Seymour is calling on the Post Primary Teachers’ Association (PPTA) to put ideology to the side and focus on students’ learning, in reaction to the union holding paid teacher meetings across New Zealand about charter schools.     “The PPTA is disrupting schools up and down the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Craig Stobo appointed as chair of FMA
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Andrew Bayly today announced the appointment of Craig Stobo as the new chair of the Financial Markets Authority (FMA). Mr Stobo takes over from Mark Todd, whose term expired at the end of April. Mr Stobo’s appointment is for a five-year term. “The FMA plays ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Budget 2024 invests in lifeguards and coastguard
    Surf Life Saving New Zealand and Coastguard New Zealand will continue to be able to keep people safe in, on, and around the water following a funding boost of $63.644 million over four years, Transport Minister Simeon Brown and Associate Transport Minister Matt Doocey say. “Heading to the beach for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago

Page generated in The Standard by Wordpress at 2024-05-29T18:49:53+00:00