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Hosking poll shows overwhelming support for cycle lanes

Written By: - Date published: 8:04 am, June 19th, 2018 - 54 comments
Categories: Environment, social media lolz, sustainability, the praiseworthy and the pitiful, transport, you couldn't make this shit up - Tags:

poor mike hosking

It looks like Mike Hosking is losing his mojo.

The Mike Hosking Breakfast Facebook page recently put up a poll “what do you think, are cycle lanes and paths good for the community?” I suspect he thought the vote would be a resounding No. After all how can you drive your Ferrari on one?

And he has gone on the record to express his visceral hatred for cycleways. As an example he had this to say in a recent Herald column:

I find it hard to believe what we are seeing when it comes to cycleways. Cycleways are by and large a waste of time – and I cycle, by the way. Well, not entirely. The tourist trail is good news. Specific places to explore, individual places where cycles can roam free, are no bad idea.

But cycleways have been ideologically captured by clip-boarders who can’t see the wood for the trees. It’s all theory, no reality. I have, of course, been saying this for years.

However, there are now – can you believe it – protests against cycleways. From Auckland to Wellington to Christchurch, people are literally on the march against dumb councils who don’t get it. Pieces of road and footpath sliced off and up – all in the vain attempt to convince us that cars are bad and bikes are good.

Bikes are good, but just not when they prevent cars moving or buses moving or people doing business.

In two separate parts of Auckland, that I am aware of anyway, businesses are screaming about lost custom as roads are chopped up and punters prevented from shopping.

Christchurch, same story. You can’t get in the door for all the road works. And when the road workers have packed up and gone home, as they did in their original major cycleway in Auckland, the famous – or is that infamous? – $18 million pink monstrosity in the centre of town.

When they’ve gone home, what then? No bikes. I look out my window every day. No bikes.

Lanes and infrastructure for people who will never cycle by.

It seems that Hosking’s view from his office may not provide him with a, shall we say, reality based impression.

Because it appears that more Aucklanders are cycling than ever before.  This was posted on Auckland Transport’s website yesterday:

38 per cent of Aucklanders are riding bikes in 2018, according to Auckland Transport’s latest Active Modes Research.

That is up three percentage points on last year, with 518,000 Aucklanders now riding regularly or occasionally.

The research, which is done annually by TRA on behalf of Auckland Transport, continues to show cycling’s growth in Auckland.

“52,000 people started bike riding this year, compared to 46,500 last year,” says Kathryn King, AT’s Manager Walking, Cycling and Road Safety.

“We are seeing a lot of growth in areas where people have access to safe cycling infrastructure, especially around central and west Auckland.

“We are really pleased to see that the investment in infrastructure is translating into more people riding bikes, with half a million Aucklanders taking to two wheels.”

More people are riding bikes to and from work, with 19 per cent of Auckland bike riders regularly commuting. As well as work, many other key trips are being made by bike. During these trips, 69 per cent of people are stopping at local shops and cafes en route to their destination.

And it looks like the people of Auckland disagree with Hosking.  Because an overwhelming number of them voted to support cycleways.

54 comments on “Hosking poll shows overwhelming support for cycle lanes ”

  1. saveNZ 1

    Cycle lanes are great. How Auckland Transport on behalf of Auckland council are implementing them is not! Two different issues! 2nd poll should have been, are you happy with how cycle ways are being implemented in Auckland?

    Saying that, these polls are pretty much lolly water, Because they are not exactly scientific or to a wide audience.

    It would be interesting if you polled a less affluent demographic, such as Otara or Meth capital, West Auckland, or the Texas values of Auckland aka North Shore, and see if they have the same ideas.

    • mickysavage 1.1

      Retrofitting is never an easy task. But I don’t think the heat AT received over Grey Lynn was deserved.

      • saveNZ 1.1.1

        Easy to see when you don’t live there. I know people who do, who love cycle lanes and are very liberal and they were less than impressed, because among other things there are already very wide footpaths and a lot of people exiting out of drives, visibility issues, lack of options presented aka there was an idea of possibly putting it in the road centre which is clearly MUCH less disruptive to both parking, local business, about the same for safety in terms of the drive visibility issues and so forth especially if they made it wide enough…

        AT and Auckland council just do what ever pops into their head, but pretend to be following a process. There is not point even bothering to work with them as they shut down democracy. Everyone is a NIMBY to those in Auckland council apparently. They should stop pretending to do democracy, if Auckland council hides it’s own million dollar reports aka stadium from the rate payers and their own councillors, it is dysfunctional as an organisation.

        Time to stop defending them, and take on board how their actions and the results are not acceptable.

      • One Two 1.1.2

        The ‘heat’ was entirely deserved…Grey Lynn planning and implementation processes were a farce..

        AT is a renegade operation, which answers not a jot to the public…

        • DB 1.1.2.1

          Grey Lynn planning = nonexistent. Consultation ermmm so they say???

          Council deserved more abuse than they got.

    • Kevin 1.2

      The big problem with the implementation of cycle lanes up and down the country is it is being done by organisations with no experience of doing it in the past.

      A painted line is not a cycle lane, it does not prevent drivers parking on it or using it as a means of getting around waiting in line for traffic.

      The people designing this infrastructure need to be looking at best practice from Europe where this has been honed to perfection, and engaging with cycling groups at the design stage to make sure it it fit for purpose.

  2. Chris T 2

    I never particularly had a problem with cycle lanes

    And then I lived in Island Bay

  3. tc 3

    A great example of just how out of touch Hoskins is with a) akl , b) how modern cities work and c) his own demographic.

    Unlike his idol Key, he has to wear that rather than have a ‘convenient’ poll result which suits his prebaked memes.

    He’s a professional spinner so he’ll work it baby as akl desperately needs measures to alleviate congestion…even if wankers in fast cars don’t like it.

  4. DH 4

    This looks like bollocks to me. 98,000 Aucklanders commuting on bikes? Pull the other one.

    • mickysavage 4.1

      The report says “regularly” not “exclusively”.

      • DH 4.1.1

        Of course it’s not exclusively, biking is largely a fine weather pursuit. It’s still 98,000 regularly commuting on bikes and frankly I don’t believe that even if their definition of ‘regular’ is once a year like clockwork.

        There aren’t enough bikes on the roads to support those numbers.

        • Carolyn_Nth 4.1.1.1

          38% or 518,000 of Aucklanders are now riding bikes “regularly or occasionally” according to the quote in the post. How would you know how many bikes people have (that are not always on the road)?

          In my block of flats with 10 residents, one guy commutes by bike, another has a bike on his balcony, but I have never seen him ride it. That’s 20%; of residents.

          Plus there’s this ride share/rental bike system, in Auckland:

          And this one.

          To counter the downside of bikes being dumped in places that cause a nuisance, Auckland Council now requires bike rental companies to be licensed and to follow their code of practice.

          • DH 4.1.1.1.1

            I don’t know how they come up with their numbers now but up until 2015 AT did a manual bike count survey. Their morning count was conducted on a clear March week day and counted 7700 cycle movements. The evening count was much the same. They calculated that out to an annual daily average traffic of 20,000 which included morning and evening.

            I’m sure one could drill that down and extrapolate 20,000, maybe even 30,000, ‘regular’ commuters but 98,000 in 2018… can’t see it getting within a bulls roar of that.

            • Carolyn_Nth 4.1.1.1.1.1

              And what area were they doing the manual count in?

              Now they do an online survey and have done so since 2016. This year this resulted in extrapolating from 1,459 Aucklanders who responded, covering the whole of Auckland Council area, up to North Rodney, and down to Franklin. A Representative sample by location and other demographic factors.

              https://at.govt.nz/media/1977266/tra_at_activemodes_publicrelease-1.pdf

              The responses indicated 51% of Aucklanders own a bike.

              • DH

                They did the count at many sites, I assume ones which were calculated to capture the bulk of cyclists in each ward. You can download it here;

                https://at.govt.nz/media/1153528/AT-Regional-Cycle-Monitoring-Regional-Summary-2015.pdf

                “The responses indicated 51% of Aucklanders own a bike.”

                It’s possible but I’m doubtful it’s that high. MOTs 2015 survey had 32% of the population nationwide using a bike at least once in the past year and 9% in the last month. It also held that rural & town people cycle more than those in urban centres.

                • Carolyn_Nth

                  Thanks. Well the 2 methods of calculation, 2015 compared with surveys 2016-2018, seem fairly consistent.

                  The latest one has the percentage increases year by year since 2015, in cycling to and from work (p15). The percentage of cyclists travelling to and from work by bike was 12% in 2015, and 13% in 2016. The greatest increase was in the last year: 16% in 2017 and 19% in 2018.

                  On p14 it says the greatest increases in frequent cycling have been in areas where there has been investment in infrastructure: west and central Auckland. the greatest increases in occasional cycling has been north Auckland.

    • Draco T Bastard 4.2

      Yeah, you’re going to have to do better than I simply don’t believe their statistical analysis as that is no more nor no less than talking out your arse.

  5. Peter 5

    Hosking looks out to not see cycles everywhere and that upsets him. What would bring joy to his heart is seeing wall to wall seized up traffic because there are no cycleways and public transport has been got rid of.

    Mind you he mightn’t see it out of an office window in the middle of town as the middle of town won’t have space for offices, it’ll just be a labyrinth of roadways under over through.

    • saveNZ 5.1

      @Peter have you not heard the solution in the east for congestion?

      In Singapore and Tokyo they charge approx $50k for a 10 year licence for a car or carpark… so it really is something for the wealthy only.

      They can’t do that in NZ as there is no public transport and it’s super expensive on our low wages, so the solution in low wage unequal countries is that citizens bike, as even our public transport is one of the most expensive in the world apparently.

      NZ seems to be going one step further, and encouraging poor and middle class people to just move out and abandon Auckland and allow the 55,000 slave workers in, to build the dream city for the dream elite – while the rest of the taxpayers subsidise the construction and infrastructure of course.

  6. R.P Mcmurphy 6

    he is wrong about everything.

  7. wayne mapp 7

    Given the question, I would be surprised if Hosking really thought the answer would be “no”. Even people who have a beef about cyclists are unlikely to say get rid of cycle lanes.

    I am for them, especially when they are properly separated from traffic, as the newer ones seem to be. The better designed they are the more likely cyclists will use them.

    There is also quite a boom in electric bikes, bikes that make commuting in Auckland, at least some of the time, a practical proposition without having to have two sets of clothes! Also perfect for people with flexible jobs.

    • Molly 7.1

      “Also perfect for people with flexible jobs.”

      Why?

    • Sacha 7.2

      Given Hosking’s previous mouthfarts on the topic and his constant claims to be channelling popular sentiment, I bet he did think the answer would be ‘no’. Maybe his producers will take some notice.

    • justpassingthrough 7.3

      You wouldn’t be so for them if you knew how much they cost. You do know how much they cost don’t you?

  8. Wayne 8

    Given the question, I would be surprised if Hosking really thought the answer would be “no”. Even people who have a beef about cyclists are unlikely to say get rid of cycle lanes.

    I am for them, especially when they are properly separated from traffic, as the newer ones seem to be. The better designed they are the more likely cyclists will use them.

    There is also quite a boom in electric bikes, bikes that make commuting in Auckland, at least some of the time, a practical proposition without having to have two sets of clothes! Also perfect for people with flexible jobs.

  9. AB 9

    For Hosking life is all about the indulgence of his own appetites. Anything that cuts across that is an affront. Other people don’t figure in his world-view.

  10. Pat 10

    Dont know about Auckland, but whats occurring in Christchurch strikes me as a huge waste of resources….recently upgradesd roads being re dug up to incorporate cycle lanes that remove roadside parking, narrow the area for cars/trucks and dont appear to offer any safety benefit.
    I suspect a reduced speed limit on designated roads and making helmets optional would have a far greater impact on cycle use and consequently reduced congestion…and would be far easier and fiscally responsible….not to mention remove the years of ongoing roadworks.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/101672430/christchurch-cycleways-to-cost-252m-as-city-council-proposes-delaying-completion

    Cycle trails a different story.

  11. What really needs to happen to protect cyclists is the cycle lanes to the left of cars ie between the parked cars and footpaths. I’d far rather avoid an opening door than be crushed by passing trucks.

    • John up North 11.1

      This is the type of layout that incensed people in Island Bay.

      I’ve ridden this exact layout in Europe and it works in many different countries, must be just us kiwi’s that can’t/won’t get our heads around it. Much, much safer than being squeezed between the parked vehicles and moving traffic.

      • Kevin 11.1.1

        Sometimes change just needs to be forced onto people John.

        A few year ago the Hastings District Council started painting cycle lanes on most of the main arterials in the city and other roads to a huge uproar from the general populace. Although not ideal, as roundabouts especially seem to baffle the road engineers, everyone now accepts them and you never hear a peep out of anyone about them and more are being added each year.

    • Draco T Bastard 11.2

      I doubt that riding between the kerb and parked cars will decrease the danger from opened doors. Probably increases it as the passengers in cars don’t have mirrors that they can check.

      And hitting an open car door can kill you just as easily as getting hit by a truck.

  12. One Two 12

    38% is a made up number…

    Just like the 60 jobs figure of the water and coal stories…

    Hosking is correct in certain respects regarding the cycleways…

    • John up North 12.1

      Hosking is a self obsessed gobshite with a megaphone. Never heard any sense from his mouth.

    • Draco T Bastard 12.2

      Hosking is correct in certain respects regarding the cycleways…

      No he’s not.

      Unfounded assertion debunking an unfounded assertion.

      • One Two 12.2.1

        Unfounded…nah…either you’ve not read the article or you’ve not been able to comprehend some of the comments…

        Which were, in certain respects…correct

  13. Tricledrown 13

    Sitting in a traffic jam in gridlock makes more sense to Hosking.
    3/4s disagree with him showing he is a Fringe looney as well as a Narcissist.
    Power and lauding it over other’s perfection image stubborn adherence to Dogmas their opinion is always right even if evidence proves otherwise.
    Trophy wlfe elitism flash cars clothes.
    But mentally deep insecurities are the reasons for the outward facade.

  14. roy cartland 14

    I was in China more than a decade ago and one extremely inspiring place was the city of Xi’an. With waaaaay more people than AK, Xi’an has managed to create beauty from horribly big streets:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=main+street+of+xian&safe=active&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj8tPzQw97bAhUHEpQKHX05D60Q_AUICygC&biw=1484&bih=1316#imgrc=RHlxgdOAfzqYQM:

    the first few images in the above search shows you that there are up to five rows of trees, arterial lanes, side roads for taxis, tuktuks and bikes, footpaths with space for stalls.

  15. peterh 15

    I used to think cycleways, walkways, big waste of money,then I had a stroke and started walking walkways hello my narrow vision changed

  16. If Hoskings moaning about cycle-ways , then we should implement horse-ways as well .

    That’ll f@ck him !

  17. Incognito 17

    The key reason for the high level of cycling in the Netherlands, he says, is the high standard of cycling infrastructure.

    https://blogs.crikey.com.au/theurbanist/2013/06/13/are-dutch-motorists-strictly-liable-if-they-collide-with-a-cyclist/

    Worth a read for a number of reasons.

  18. Pete 18

    Sitting in a traffic jam in gridlock makes more sense to Hosking because he reckons he will have a captive audience.

  19. 76% YES vote!!

    Oh lordy, that made my day!! I hope Hosking didn’t choke (much) on his smashed avocado on imported Parisian Rye Bread when he read the poll result that morning!!

    Goddess Karma was in a mirthful mood that day, it seems.

    I would luv to see a cycleway built around Hoskings’ residence; completely encircling his house. Like a moat. But keeping him and his prized Ferrari IN, rather than the enraged peasants OUT. Oh well, maybe in a Parallel Universe…

  20. SeanD 20

    As an overseas kiwi for the last couple of decades ( mostly in the US ) – I find the NZ Herald almost unreadable at this point in time . Shallow , biased journalism if you can even call it that anymore and folks like Mike Hosking letting us know what he thinks – without comments enabled presumably so he does not have to hear the noise of those who disagree with his rather skewed opinions . The latest piece today complaining about biased media in the USA really is just astounding . I though a related piece on the NYT’s was particularly applicable to Mike Hosking and his opinions :

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/25/opinion/free-speech-just-access.html

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