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Labour Greens joint State of the Nation livestream and discussion

Written By: - Date published: 1:30 pm, January 29th, 2017 - 121 comments
Categories: greens, labour - Tags: , ,

The speeches are livestreaming from 2pm on the Labour and Greens Facebook pages.

Green Party Co-leader Metiria Turei and Labour Leader Andrew Little will speak about their priorities for the year, and will discuss the social and economic challenges and opportunities facing the country and present a vision of the stable, responsible, alternative the parties will offer New Zealand.

Updated: lprent

The Mt Albert War Memorial is overflowing with many turned away. Good atmosphere

However in the sign of the times, I had to leave to drop these pictures back home and to watch it on a stream. Spark’s internet data on cellphones and much of the rest of their network is still in a shambles at 1430.

The speeches are good and clear.

 

Update: Video here.

Green Party press release – Green Party and Labour outline new vision for New Zealand

Andrew Little’s speech transcript.

Metiria’s speech,

Tihei Mauriora!

Welcome, everyone, to our first ever joint State of the Nation speech! Tena korua, Andrew and Annette, and our Greens and Labour family.

It’s wonderful to see every single one of you here. I want to talk to you today about one of my greatest inspirations – Mana Wahine.

Mana wahine, fierce women, women who stand up for what they believe in, who protect and care for our people, for our rights, for our planet; my mother and my daughter, it is the fierce women, the mana wahine in this room who inspire and motivate me and James, and all of us in the Green Party.

When I became a mum, holding my baby daughter, I realised the work of Niniwa i te Rangi, Kate Sheppard and all those fierce women who had gone before, was a long way from finished.

And it’s the Aotearoa New Zealand that we are all working to create.

Because we live in a country where too many live in substandard homes – or no home at all. Where many have no jobs, or are stuck in low wage jobs.

Where 150,000 kids miss out on milk, meat, and veges. Where third world diseases are rampant – we have chronic lung disease at 7 times the average of most other developed countries.

It’s a New Zealand where our rivers, our lakes and beaches aren’t clean enough to swim in, where some can’t trust the water that comes out of the tap. Where the government won’t stop or even prepare for climate change.

That is not the Aotearoa we want.

To change that we must keep working together to strengthen women’s voices, in families, in communities, in work, and in politics. To support amazing young women like Julie Anne Genter and Jacinda Adern.

We must keep building and using our political power.

Today I honour two fierce women who did exactly that. They stood up for what they believed in, wore their values as a badge of honour and who, in their different ways, still lead us.

Helen Kelly.

The daughter of two fierce campaigners for social justice, Helen’s early life was steeped in the most important causes of her time – the peace movement, education and, of course, workers’ rights.

She was fierce, she was loyal and she was effective. She never shied away from a fight. And she had a kind word for everybody. Well, almost everybody.

2016 was a difficult year for many reasons, and losing Helen Kelly was one its biggest blows. He mihi aroha ki a koutou katoa, te whanau Labour. We in the Greens understand well the extent of your loss.

It was no surprise that Helen kept fighting for causes close to her heart in her final weeks. She was steadfast in demanding safety for forestry workers, for the return to the Pike River families of their loved ones. And I will always love her for standing up for those who are sick and deserve compassion, not the long arm of the law.

And it’s because Helen knew her values. She lived her values. And she stood by them, even when the cause was unpopular. Even when her opponents were influential businessmen who had the Government’s ear. Even when others were saying ‘there’s nothing more we can do here’.

Helen was a relentless advocate for working people. She believed that no matter what you did to earn a living, you deserved respect, good working conditions and fair pay. You deserved to come home safe from your job to your families every day. For Helen, it was values that mattered, that drove her to act. You never needed ask whose side Helen was on.

Another woman still working every day for what she believes in is Jeanette Fitzsimons.

When she entered Parliament in 1996, she called out our country’s politicians for their neglect of the environment; whether it was GE, climate change or against an economy that demands the environment bears the cost of its pollution.

It’s hard to put it better than Jeanette did when she said “just because New Zealand is travelling first class on this planet does not mean that the ship is not sinking”. She has not always made herself popular for challenging the myth of New Zealand’s clean, green image.

But Jeanette was and still is, fiercely determined to hold polluters and complicit government to account. Just last week, she and other grandmas chained themselves to Fonterra’s fence because they are still using coal.

You never need to ask whose side Jeanette is on.

The Green Party continues this work – we put environmental issues on the agenda 25 years ago – as we do today. We know how important a restored and thriving environment is to our community and to our economy.

Helen and Jeanette were and are motivated by compassion and love for others and our planet. As a result, they achieved so much, although the odds were against them. They were unafraid to be disliked in the pursuit of truly meaningful change.

When we look back on Helen Kelly and look to Jeanette Fitzsimmons now, we know that they fought for us. Helen never stopped fighting. Jeanette hasn’t stopped. And neither will we.

Standing up for the values you believe in is the true measure of leadership, even when it’s hard. Especially when it’s hard. If you bend your values in times like these, then what are they worth?

Some of you might remember when your Labour and Green women MPs refused to be silenced when National Party men used rape as a political weapon. We walked out of Parliament and straight into your arms. You told us that we had walked out for you, spoken out for you, stood up for you against an insidious rape culture. For each of us it was the very personal made political and it was hard.

I want to thank every one of those Green and Labour women MPs today. That was a moment when our parties stood together and stood up for our values.

I don’t need to ask the values of the people here. Or to look up feminism in the dictionary, unlike Bill English. I don’t need to ask whose side we are on.

Our Green values of upholding Te Tiriti o Waitangi, ecological wisdom, social justice, democracy and peace are values New Zealanders share with us. These values drive all our political work.

Granted, it’s not always easy. There are few easy solutions in politics.

But when you can’t rely on your Minister of Women’s Affairs to stand up on behalf of women who are victims of sexual assault, who can you rely on? If the Minister for the Environment won’t stand up for healthy, swimmable rivers, lakes and beaches, then who will? If the Minister for Social Development won’t apologise to vulnerable children who were abused in state care, then who will?

Now we have a new Prime Minister who believes Government can do no more. A Prime Minister who won’t end poverty. A Prime Minister who is the architect of the housing crisis. A Prime Minister who accepts locking out an entire generation from warm, safe and affordable housing.

What we have learned from National in the past nine years is that they might do what is easy, but they won’t do what is right.

The Green Party will do what’s right, even when it’s not easy.

We have the skills, knowledge and values to help shape Aotearoa; to make our great little country even better. To address the most urgent issues affecting families. To create a modern New Zealand economy where we all thrive, not just the privileged few.

That’s what we – myself, James, Andrew and Annette are going after in 2017. That’s why the Greens and Labour have signed the Memorandum of Understanding.

To see our parties, the Greens and Labour working together to deliver for our children, our communities, our environment.

To see Andrew Little become our new Prime Minister.

So, let’s all make this commitment together:

We will do what’s right, not just what’s easy. We will use our voices to speak up for those who need us. We will build a movement that speaks truth to power, driven by a fierce compassion. We will use our votes to change the Government.

The people of Aotearoa New Zealand are going to change the government. We are all going to change our country for the better.

We will have rivers, lakes and beaches we can swim in and safe water to drink. We will value parenting. We will have fair wages and decent incomes, where everyone will have enough to put a roof over their children’s head and food on the table. We will uphold Te Tiriti o Waitangi. We will definitely have better, warmer, and more affordable housing.

We will end the scourge of homelessness that is this country’s great shame.

I am inspired.

By Helen Kelly and Jeanette Fitzsimons.

By the mana wahine who fight for indigenous rights here and around the world. By the women who marched for equality and human rights. By solo mums and working mums. By the women, like Jeanette, who put their bodies on the front line to defend our environment.

By the women who weave wahakura and knit booties for our babies. By the women who protect whanau from violence. By the women who raised me and who I have raised.

I am inspired. By all of you.

My commitment to them, to you, is that you will be my inspiration when the Green Party and the Labour Party form a new Government in 2017.

121 comments on “Labour Greens joint State of the Nation livestream and discussion ”

  1. millsy 1

    Prepare to be underwhelmed, on a time that we really need then to take the inititive.

    Like what Brash did at Owera. His speech may have been toxic, but it allowed National to chart a course to near victor in ’05 and victory in ’08.

  2. Draco T Bastard 2

    Apparently will be live on Greens Facebook.

  3. BobInAkl 3

    Stream quality seems an issue, drop outs and delays. Number of viewers is dropping.

    (is not my connection, I have a high speed link)

  4. BobInAkl 4

    Stream looks to failed entirely now.

  5. weka 5

    Lots of people are commenting on the Greens FB page, I assume they’re mostly on the stream rather than at the event.

  6. Cinny 6

    Meti 😀 wonderful speech, how sad is it that we need a change of Government to be able to swim in our rivers etc again? Thats messed up.

    Guy Williams is outstanding as MC

    Summer has arrived 😀

    Hope Alpha does his growl rev thing, love when he emphasises words with that sound, its very powerful

  7. fisiani 7

    Streams not working.

    • Cinny 7.1

      Maybe you need an upgrade fizzy? Stream worked fine for me. all over now, you can catch it on the news tonight no doubt, hope you are not too gutted that you missed out.

      Hugs Cinny

      • seeker 7.1.1

        Stream worked fine for me on Green Party site.
        Metiria’s speech was stunning, fierce, principled and majestic. What an inspiring leader!

  8. billmurray 8

    Could not make meeting, live streaming Greens facebook is very good, bit of loading, stilt, but good.
    Metiria, bit long, but a very good speech and well supported by the crowd.
    Great atmosphere.

  9. lprent 9

    I am getting the labour stream fine at home. Bit jerky on video.

    • weka 9.1

      I got it briefly at the start, then nothing at all on either page. Speedtests at my end were fine. They really need to sort this out. There were people on FB saying they couldn’t get it either.

  10. Ad 10

    “Join our movement to change the government”

    Liked that.

    Also, liked the Mt Albert context, fully recognizing Genter and Ardern as together part of a future government.

    Prostate cancer mention was tactfully used and expanded on.

    Well structured speech Andrew.

    • lprent 10.1

      Both of us were impressed. And it is always a hard sell to the cynic on the sofa

    • Cinny 10.2

      Yes yes yes, loved how both of them supported both candidates like that. That’s real class and maturity, and it makes them shine

  11. Cinny 11

    Well done Alpha you are an ace speaker, goosebumps bro, you’re our man, no doubt about it, looking forward to the leaders debates, bring on the election.

    Due to comments i saw here about peeps streams, i took it upon myself to broadcast this event through my 9 speaker stereo system, outside, to our neighbourhood, cause I’m thoughtful/cheeky like that 😀

    Time for the beach me thinks, laters 😀 Love the event JS 😀

    • Leftie 11.1

      Lol Cinny “i took it upon myself to broadcast this event through my 9 speaker stereo system, outside, to our neighbourhood, cause I’m thoughtful/cheeky like that”

      Love that!! Good for you!!!

    • Macro 11.2

      i took it upon myself to broadcast this event through my 9 speaker stereo system, outside, to our neighbourhood, cause I’m thoughtful/cheeky like that 😀

      Hehehe.
      Well done.

  12. billmurray 12

    Well spoken Andrew, warmly applauded, I hope its enough to turn the worm.

  13. Go Andrew, full of determination speech ,which along with a lantern jaw tells me he means business.–not tory waffling exercise.

  14. Leftie 14

    Really enjoyed it, very impressed and I’m extremely pleased with the Labour and Green alliance working together. The crowd loved it.

  15. fisiani 15

    “On health, we’ll reverse Bill English’s $1.7 billion of heath cuts.

    Q -Is that a pledge to spend $1,500,000,000 extra on Health

    If we vote to change the government this year, then a decade from now every New Zealander will be able to afford a GP visit. Everyone who needs specialist treatment will actually get it. And Kiwis will have the most effective medicines.

    Q- What is an affordable GP visit? In a decade will that be $100 or $200 or $20? Does he know how much that would cost?
    Everyone who needs specialist treatment will get it. Does he have a clue about what that slogan actually means? How many extra urologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and psychiatrists are required and were are they?

    You know, Labour built the public health system in this country. We fixed it after National tried to tear it down in the 1990s. And we’ll fix it again.

    Q Does he really believe that National tried to tear down the public health system 20 years ago? Any evidence for such a bizarre claim?

    On education, we’ll make sure that schools get the funding they need so they don’t have to beg parents for donations. And we’ll deliver three years free post-school education and training.
    Q -and the cost of this bribe is how many billion?????

    If we vote to change the government this year, then a decade from now children all across the country will get a world-class education. Young people will be able to get the skills they need without crippling study debt. And the next generation will be prepared to face the future of work in a rapidly changing world.

    Q -is he claiming that children all across the country are not getting a world class education?

    But if we vote for more of the same, we’ll be setting our kids up to fail in the new economy.

    Q- Does he not know that the new Education Minister, probably Nikki Kaye, will not just be more of the same? It will be even better than the excellent system we currently have.

    Labour has a proud history in education. We introduced free secondary school. We fixed National’s student loans debacle. Now, we’ll fix the schools, again.

    Q -What does fix mean?

    We can afford all this.

    Q- Where does the more than $20,000,000,000 price tag for such largesse come from?

    Cliches and sound bites are just emotional . Show me the money! How much more tax will hard working Kiwis have to pay to give to students who will go on to earn more than them?

    I actually hoped that the speech would be realistic. New Zealand democracy requires a competent Opposition.

    • Macro 15.1

      Q- Where does the more than $20,000,000,000 price tag for such largesse come from?

      It’s coming out of your pocket fisi … 🙂

      Just like the $15 b US is coming out of US pockets for their wall.

    • Barfly 15.2

      Wow Fisi your handlers seem to be shitting themselves !!

    • Ad 15.3

      Lordie Fisiani.
      You must bee too young to remember the government before this one.

      The 1999-2008 government completed solutions to far bigger problems than the ones you mention, with more detail, and brought government debt down, and brought unemployment down, and fixed NZSuper, and essentially could walk and chew gum at the same time.

      The current government has long since given up on walking, let alone doing nothing else at the same time.

      Clearly you can’t remember what competent and effective government is actually like.

    • Skeptic 15.4

      Although you’ve picked two of the big five critical issues that a new government needs to address, you’ve not asked the right questions, and worse you’ve framed your quasi-answers within the neo-lin/neo-con limitations.

      Fact – this country produces enough wealth and income both internally and externally, for all NZ to re-build our nation to what it used to be and , better, to its full potential. The problem is the cake hasn’t been shared equally since 1987, which has meant a lot of our taxpayer funded wealth has been stolen, both by overseas MNCs and home-grown rip-off agents. This needs addressing at Ministerial level – starting with a complete overhaul of Treasury by sacking each and every Chicago School of Economics graduate/adherent.

      Education can be solved at a stroke by nationalization, fully funded teacher tertiary education in return for bonded service. So too with health and dental services – fully funded education in return for bonded community service – private health and private insurance outlawed in this country. At a stroke problems solved – this has worked in other countries – look up Cuba which now exports doctors and nurses.

      Wage and employment and training regimes can easily be solved by removing them out of the profit motivated hands and to where it belongs – people are a national resource and should be treated that way. Private enterprise merely exists as an add on – a necessary add on – but an add on nonetheless, to government control of all national resources.

      This is real left wing policy – not the current wishy-washy centerish-leftish bullshit. We all should have a say in our resources – not just the privileged few. Let’s pressure OUR politicians to return power to the people.

      • Draco T Bastard 15.4.1

        This is real left wing policy – not the current wishy-washy centerish-leftish bullshit. We all should have a say in our resources – not just the privileged few.

        QFT

      • Adrian Thornton 15.4.2

        @ Skeptic, a good set of alternatives there to think about, thanks.
        Your first point, to my mind, is really one of the biggest problems facing the Left today, many people of the Left don’t seem to be able to extract their own political ideas and aspirations from the neo liberal framework, while at the same time Liberal MSM won’t even allow there to be open discourse on any alternative to free market neoliberalism, which really compounds this problem.

        Just google Jeremy ‘Corbyn wage cap’ and see how all media immediately shut that idea down, not one were willing to even consider having an informed hypothetical discussion on that one.
        No,talk like that is straight out heresy to the neo liberal believers.

        Luckily many younger people have seen though the neo liberals thin veil of decency, and quite rightly worked out that it offers them nothing.

        Turn Labour Left!

    • millsy 15.5

      Well, we now know what you support the imposition of a US style health care on us.

  16. Skeptic 16

    What I’m not hearing in this is any sort of commitment from either leader to address the single underlying cause of most ills in this country – the income/wealth gap and underfunded public sector services through a skewed taxation regime.

    We all know that the income gap has increased by a factor of three – the minimum wage today should be $33/hr to be on par with 1984 $NZ. Current minuscule adjustments to the minimum wage and benefit levels nowhere near makes up for the savage cuts imposed by the 1991 benefit cuts and the Employment Contracts Act. We need a government that will tackle these to deficiencies head on and at source. To restore income levels to anything like those necessary to restore confidence and inclusiveness for anyone earning less than $100,000 pa, there needs to be a mandatory change to the income structure of the country – enforced by punitive legislation if necessary.
    (a) tie the minimum wage and benefit level to a percentage of the average top 10% income bracket.
    (b) ban all labour hire companies and temporary employment firms – make employers hire directly on a permanent basis and put the rip-off recruitment firm out of business.
    (c) set the taxation levels permanently at a level that meets the needs of our state services – especially the core ones.

    Any left wing party that fails to adopt policies to tackle all of these factors simultaneously will fail badly. As a result NZ suicide levels won’t fall, 3rd world diseases won’t reduce, starving children & pensioners will continue, and NZ HQLI will continue to deteriorate. It’s what’s in the back pocket of the ordinary working person compared to his or her boss, that ultimately determines fairness and whether ordinary people feel included in society or not. At the moment, they don’t. I haven’t seen or heard anything from our two main left wing parties to date that gives me any confidence the next election will be any different. Until I do, I won’t hold my breathe that my grandchildren will see a better future.

    • Adrian Thornton 16.1

      @Skeptic, I like the cut of your jib….

    • Leftie 16.2

      Your grandchildren certainly won’t have a brighter future under National Skeptic. That’s for sure. Even the Gnats have dropped that line some time ago. It was a state of the nation speech. It will be during the election campaign that you will hear of policy from Labour and the Greens.

      • Skeptic 16.2.1

        True – oh so true – but unless there’s a radical, fully explained return to tradition left policies by Labour & Greens voters won’t have a real choice – will they?

        • Leftie 16.2.1.1

          “Ours is a community movement, it’s powered like people like you, mums and dads, students and teachers, workers and their families, you and me, our movement wins when we bring thousands of committed people with us, now I wouldn’t want it any other way.

          New Zealanders have a clear choice in this election. We can choose a tired government with no new ideas, or we can choose a new positive vision for a better New Zealand. This is not going to be an easy fight, not by any stretch of the imagination, it’s going to be close, and it’s going to be tough. But as I have already said to you, I have faced tough fights before; this is one fight we simply have to win.

          We have to win, we have to win so more young couples get to own their own home, we have to win so that everyone can get the health care that they need, we have to won so that all our children can get a world class education and be prepared for the success for the future. Here’s my message to New Zealanders this year, if you want better housing, better health, better education, if you share our vision for a better New Zealand, join our movement to change the government. Thank you. “

          Andrew Little.

        • Psycho Milt 16.2.1.2

          …unless there’s a radical, fully explained return to tradition left policies by Labour & Greens voters won’t have a real choice…

          Bullshit. They have the choice of voting for one of the proper socialist or communist parties. Only, they don’t. If you can’t bear the fact that the overwhelming majority of the population doesn’t share your views, it’s your problem, not Labour’s and not the Green Party’s.

          • Sacha 16.2.1.2.1

            Joe Carolan is offering a new socialist alternative in the Mt Albert election, and he and his team were actively leafletting arrivals in the park around the hall today: http://thedailyblog.co.nz/2017/01/16/q-a-with-joe-carolan-socialist-candidate-for-the-auckland-electorate-of-mt-albert-beware-eco-fascism-lovely-liberals/

          • Skeptic 16.2.1.2.2

            Suggest you look at Labour’s 1935 manifesto, then compare it to recent offerings. The problem, Psycho is that there has been two generations grow up hearing nothing except “free market” economics and Neo-lib/Neo-con social philosophy. Both Labour and the Greens need to check their policies, encapsulate the key points, ensure the economics/ figures work with easily understood calculations – all to show that left-wing policies can, do and will work. You are partly right in that a majority – not a an overwhelming one – but a slim one – don’t trust left wing promises and policies to date. This is because they have been poorly explained or badly promoted, consequently the likes of Steven Joyce and Bill English have been able to drive a truck through them. That sort of thing has got to stop if there’s to be a Labour/Green victory. But the key points are that 1) there must be a clear and substantial differences between us and them, and 2) those difference must be economically viable, and 3) they must be clearly and unequivocally explained.

  17. Adrian Thornton 17

    I thought Little he had some good stuff, and some pretty average stuff.
    But nicely delivered, packed a bit more punch than usual.

    It was interesting to see he used the term “Labour and the Left’ separating them from each other.

    Liked his attack on Nationals record around Health, that was positive, and felt decisive, he will be able to score points there this year.

    I didn’t realized ‘low productivity’ was a problem in NZ, the numbers don’t seem to indicate it as being a problem?
    http://www.tradingeconomics.com/new-zealand/productivity

    Bit disappointing to hear him talk about a ‘fair wage’, but not a living wage.

    Housing as usual sounds good on the surface, but as I have said before, it leaves the working class facing a life time of renting, with no mention of a solution to their long term housing security at all…building $500-600, 000 ‘affordable’ houses is just not a solution, even if you build 100,000 of them.

    Guess it was a pretty good speech if you are middle class or aspiring to that….I guess I am just not middle class enough or aspirational enough in that direction for Labour 2017 to resonate.
    But then hey, they are better than National that’s for sure…. and if that’s your yard stick, then it would have been a great speech.

    • Leftie 17.1

      He also used Labour and the Greens. It was a state of the nation speech, showing the direction, it’s not a platform for policy announcements. Can you cover everything in a 30 min speech?

      • Adrian Thornton 17.1.1

        @Leftie, Well I would expect him to use Labour AND Greens as they are of course two distinct entities, and I guess I shouldn’t be surprised the Labour is also distancing itself from directly being seen as a party of the Left, more a party of the centre with some distant, but sometimes helpful ties to the Left?

        I understand that he couldn’t cover policies in more depth in 30 minutes, I was incorporating what he said in his speech with the policies that are outlined in the Labour manifesto on their website.

        • Leftie 17.1.1.1

          The state of the nation speech is not about policy though, and I did not get that impression from Andrew Little’s speech that “Labour is distancing itself from directly being seen as a party of the Left” quite the opposite, in fact. Maybe you should have another listen to his speech.

        • red-blooded 17.1.1.2

          Adrian, when he says “Labour and the Left”, he’s including the Greens (and any others who define as “Left” – Mana voters, people who identify as left but aline themselves strongly with any party…). That’s a perfectly reasonable way to frame a discussion which is about building an alliance that will change the government.

          • Adrian Thornton 17.1.1.2.1

            @ Red Blooded, you could be right, although I wouldn’t really class the Greens as very Left myself.
            also remember he also used ‘Labour and the Greens’, but anyway I don’t want to split hairs, and as I say, you could well be right, I guess we will all get to see more clearly in this election year where Labour places itself on the spectrum.

  18. JRobinJ 18

    Andrew looking really comfortable in his own skin. A clever combination of warmth, policy and inspirational counters to Trumpism. Great to see the speeches in Herald and Stuff on main page and alongside another example of English’s lack of real leadership regarding Trump bigotry, good timing Ms Roche! Well done all speakers and speech writers, enjoyed Meteiria too. Off to a strong and principled start with good clear messages and values. Congratulations.

    • Leftie 18.1

      Many +1’s JRobinJ.

      I noticed Vernon Small was being his usual dishonest self by putting in his own take in there. He was a bit twisted and economical with what Andrew Little actually said.

  19. xanthe 19

    meteria thinks more identity politics is the answer
    also I see that environment has been toppled by te tirity

    What a sad , sorry , outcome.

    • Macro 19.1

      You are aware that underlying the four main Principles of the Green Charter of Aoteraroa is Te Tiriti.

      The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand accepts Te Tiriti o Waitangi as the founding document of Aotearoa New Zealand; recognises Maori as Tangata Whenua in Aotearoa New Zealand; and commits to the following four Principles:

      Ecological Wisdom:

      The basis of ecological wisdom is that human beings are part of the natural world. This world is finite, therefore unlimited material growth is impossible. Ecological sustainability is paramount.

      Social Responsibility:

      Unlimited material growth is impossible. Therefore the key to social responsibility is the just distribution of social and natural resources, both locally and globally.

      Appropriate Decision-making:

      For the implementation of ecological wisdom and social responsibility, decisions will be made directly at the appropriate level by those affected.

      Non-Violence:

      Non-violent conflict resolution is the process by which ecological wisdom, social responsibility and appropriate decision making will be implemented. This principle applies at all levels.

      • Xanthe 19.1.1

        Yes i am aware of the green party principles, what do they mean to you?

        • Macro 19.1.1.1

          They mean what they say – and Te Tiriti is the founding document of Aotearoa, and is confirmed as such within the Charter. So it is entirely appropriate for Metiria to refer to it in her speech.
          vis

          Our Green values of upholding Te Tiriti o Waitangi, ecological wisdom, social justice, democracy and peace are values New Zealanders share with us. These values drive all our political work.

          Frankly I think you are showing a rather bigoted view in your comment here.
          All Green Policy must be considered in terms of Te Tiriti – that is what being a founding document means, and what the Charter says. Ask any Green MP, and I’m sure they will confirm what I am saying.

          • Xanthe 19.1.1.1.1

            Oh yes i am sure any green MP will agree with you…. or they wouldent be MP’s

            • Macro 19.1.1.1.1.1

              🙄
              Well just bear in mind that those are the Principles with which all Green Party members agree to uphold when joining the Party.

              • Xanthe

                Ahh actually many joined before the preamble was appended to the principles in the constitution . And it would appear that the preamble has now elevated itself to a value. … things evolve.. sometimes they become the antithisis of what was envisioned. Any structure that sets out to overcome a problem can evolve into the problem. have you asked yourself if the waitangi tribunal may be the final victory of colonialism

                • Macro

                  I shall check that comment’s veracity with Jeanette or Catherine when I see them tomorrow.
                  In the meantime I note that:

                  The charter is the founding document of The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand.

                  My bold.
                  Which would strongly suggest that the recognition of Te Tiriti has always been there.
                  Frankly I’m not sure what you are on about. If the Ti Tiriti is the founding document of Aotearoa – and it is – and it sets out the relationship between the Crown and Tangata Whenua – then all Policies must recognise that fact. That the current administration choose not to consult with their Maori counterparts on many occassions has lead to some monumental f**kups such as this.

                • Macro

                  Well as I said above – I did check with Catherine D – who was instrumental in appending the pre-amble and she tells me that it was done in 2001. That’s 15 – 16 years ago. The Preamble does not change the 4 principles it simply underlies them and places them in the context of what it means to be a New Zealander.
                  I would say the large majority of members have joined since 2001. and yes; there are some who are around since before then, but most accept this amendment as strengthening the Charter not diminishing it.

                  • Xanthe

                    Yes thats the history and yes the preamble does/should not alter the principles it is the water the fish swims in not the fish! The important thing is that that preamble does not tie the party to a particulat interpretation of ti tirity
                    So setting aside the preamble as just that, a preamble, what does the four principles say to you? Specifically the words and the setting of those four principles. How do you see the relationship between the four principles?

                    • Macro

                      I think I have already answered that question several times.
                      And sorry – the pre-amble is not just a group of words at the beginning they are also important to the interpretation and ultimate implementation of the 4 core principles.
                      Take for instance the issue I linked to above – the Kermadec debacle.
                      Here was an issue that goes to the very heart of the heart of the first 3 principles of the Charter – Ecological Wisdom, Social Responsibility, and Appropriate Decision Making. Unfortunately the Government thought they could ride rough shod over the very people who had an interest in this matter and were guaranteed that right under the Treaty. Had they taken the time to consult and work with Tangata Whenua the outcome I’m sure would have been far more satisfactory to all.

  20. Tamati Tautuhi 20

    What happened to the “Brighter Future” under National and Crosby Textor, in my opinion that was just marketing B/S.

    We need to rebuild this country, it has been Asset Stripped by the Merchant Bankers and sold off offshore. A Labour/Greens/NZF Coalition will work in the best interests of all New Zealanders.

    • greg 20.1

      Brighter Future just marketing B/S but iam quite happy to ram it down a nats throat
      when this bubble debt driven economy sinks we should be unreasonable to the max in the demand that the nats the economic super men deliver there into there 9th year the hour is late

  21. Morrissey 21

    I’ve just seen Andrew Little on the television news saying he thinks our country should keep helping the United States in the massive, controversial Five Eyes spying operation.

    He then went on to warmly endorse that right wing dolt Greg O’Connor as the likely Labour candidate for Ohariu-Belmont.

    No vision, no integrity, no courage.

    Three more years in opposition, I’m afraid.

    • millsy 21.1

      Actually, I think GOC would be a pretty shewed choice. He would be able to make a compelling case to end poverty and lift living standards by relating the experiences of those who have to deal with the effects every day,

      • Morrissey 21.1.1

        Have you listened to O’Connor talking? He shows no empathy for poor people, and less understanding. His views about drug laws are destructive and ignorant and sound exactly like another ex-cop, who by the way became a National MP—Mike Sabin.

        I don’t know how many times I’ve heard O’Connor defending the most extreme police brutality, and guffawing conspiratorially with the likes of Larry “Lackwit” Williams on radio and Paul Henry on television. The fact that Labour appears to be seriously considering him as a candidate is depressing and infuriating.

        • red-blooded 21.1.1.1

          Greg O’Connor may not be your first choice, Morrissey, but I think we have to consider context here. The electorate he’s wanting to stand in has returned Peter Dunne to parliament again and again and again, and he’s propped up this government for long enough. It’s clearly a pretty conservative electorate – not likely to vote in anyone seen as strongly left-wing. O’Connor may well appeal to the good folk of Ohariu-Belmont. He’d definitely be one of the more conservative Labour MPs, but he’s chosen Labour and that presumably means he identifies more with Labour values than National (and I’m sure they would have been very glad to welcome him into the fold).

          • Morrissey 21.1.1.1.1

            …he’s chosen Labour and that presumably means he identifies more with Labour values than National…

            That’s what they said about such duds as Shane Jones, Phil Quin and Nick Leg-it. De Cleene, Moore, Douglas, Prebble, Shirley and the rest of that miserable razor gang were all assumed to “identify with Labour values”.

            There’s nothing wrong with being tough, there’s nothing wrong with being an ex-policeman. There ARE good people who fit those descriptions. Greg O’Connor, who I’ve repeatedly heard and seen defending the cruellest and most violent police brutality, is not one of those people.

            We’ve been down this road before. If Labour is reduced to selecting someone as backward-thinking and openly hostile to young people and Māori as Greg O’Connor is, then it is condemning itself to the wilderness.

            http://brianedwardsmedia.co.nz/2010/08/its-time-for-greg-oconnor-to-stop-defending-the-indefensible/

            • red-blooded 21.1.1.1.1.1

              A few comments, Morrissey:
              1) I’m not an O’Connor acolyte. In fact, I haven’t heard much from him that I like.
              2) However, I don’t live in Ohariu-Belmont or vote United Future. The people who do aren’t likely to vote for your (or my) first-preference politician.
              3) Have another look at your list, mate. The only one who’s been a Labour MP in recent times was Shane Jones. Again, I wasn’t all that keen on him, but he represented a constituency within the wider party and he was a good communicator. (Note, he didn’t “poison” Labour – he lost the leadership vote and left.) Phil Quin and Nick Legit have never been Labour MPs. Legit wanted endorsement for the Wellington mayoralty and didn’t get it. Most of the rest of your list were from the 80’s and – believe it or not – Labour has learnt a lesson or two since that time.
              4) It’s fine for there to be a contest of ideas within a party, so long as there are clear, shared values, healthy democratic systems and a good team culture. The debate occurs within the party, and once a decision is made is owned by everyone. Labour has opened its party systems up a lot in recent years and is much more accountable to its members. There’s plenty of debate – great – but also a decent team culture under the current leadership team.
              5) Note that your link is from 2010.

              I admit that I flinched a bit when I first heard about Greg O’Connor as a possible candidate. However, I do think we have to see things like this in their wider the context – and in this case, that context is pale blue Ohariu-Belmont.

              • Morrissey

                I never assumed you were an O’Connor acolyte, my friend.

                Your points are all well made. If O’Connor gets the nomination, then I’ll (reluctantly) support him. I’m sure he’s got a good side as well.

              • Adrian Thornton

                @Red Blooded, I really do acknowledge your commitment to Labour, and your obvious depth of knowledge around it’s structures and history, so I always take your comments seriously.
                So I have to ask this question, you say you flinched at the news of Greg O’Connor as a possible candidate, which I think most thinking progressives would have done, and I would say your instinctive negative reaction was the correct one, if this is how you felt, then what message does Greg O’Connor send to all the undecided voters on the Left? I know though my shop/family/friends that probably half the vote on the Left that I know of, are either undecided or unsure at this point.
                And if Labour are worried about not looking strong enough on crime, remember they have Nash banging on about it all the time around here, so I am pretty sure they have that base well covered.
                This reminds me (just slightly) of the disastrous decision made last year by the DNC strategists to invite radical Republican war hawks into the fold, rather than the progressive left.

              • greg

                i agree Dunbo is labours target its a clever move . that would remove one of the nats support pillars

        • millsy 21.1.1.2

          Those views are problematic, I have to admit,

          I have to admit,the Police Association is probably the reason why the NZ Police has avoided major privatisation/outsourcing over the past 30 years or so.

    • weka 21.2

      Out of curiosity, who will you be voting for Morrissey?

      • Morrissey 21.2.1

        I have always voted Labour, with the exception of 2014 when, like many many other people, I was disgusted by the sight of Labour MPs, clearly acting under instruction from some strategic genius—Josie Pagani? Phil Quin?—kept calling Nicky Hager’s book Dirty Politics “a distraction.”

        I want to vote Labour, and so do hundreds of thousands of other people. But unless the Party leadership displays a bit of character, we will simply not vote, or vote Green, or TOP, or Kim Dotcom. All the banner-waving and smiling we saw this afternoon will have as much value as a degree from Trump U. if the same moral cowardice and foolishness continues from Labour HQ.

        • Leftie 21.2.1.1

          “We”? Did you vote Labour under Helen Clark? And is Dotcom running?

          • Morrissey 21.2.1.1.1

            I’m afraid I DID vote Labour under Clark’s regime, AKA the Great Terror.

            As for Dotcom, I’ve read several items claiming he’s going to set up another party.

            • Xanthe 21.2.1.1.1.1

              Why would Dotcom set up another party when the Internet Party is still registered? I think those items you read may have been misinformed

              • Morrissey

                Sorry, Xanthe, you’re correct. I’ve heard and read several times that he’s thinking of making a comeback. As you point out, it could be a revival of the Internet Party.

            • Leftie 21.2.1.1.1.2

              If “Clark’s regime” that you voted for, was “the Great Terror” what do you call the current National government of the last 9 years?

              • Morrissey

                It was a joke, Leftie. Yes, the National-ACT-Maori-Bouffant regime has been, and still is, a continual outrage—far worse than the Clark government.

                However, we do need to assess the Helen Clark and her government honestly. I can’t forget or forgive her and her cronies for their persecution of the Algerian parliamentarian refugee Ahmed Zaoui. She willfully told lies, recycling the most outrageous nonsense from French intelligence operatives—and she used up her entire retinue of rock-splitting glares and angry frowns in her attempts to (unsuccessfully) intimidate journalists like Alistair Thompson and Mr Zaoui’s lawyer Deborah Maning. Her aggressive and relentless stance encouraged the more thuggish of her MPs, like David Benson-Pope, to bawl “Send ‘im HOME!” whenever Zaoui’s case was addressed in parliament.

                Clark set the tone for a level of dishonesty and personal aggression that would have made Robert Muldoon blanch. Her deputy Michael Cullen on more than one occasion delivered sleazy attacks against one of the few decent people in parliament, the Green MP Keith Locke, falsely claiming, with a sneering chuckle, that he had supported the Khmer Rouge. This was always done to try to derail him from one of his critiques of Labour’s failure to say anything serious about Iraq, or Afghanistan, or Gaza.

                And who can forget, or forgive, her foolish decision to respond to Brash’s Māori-baiting Orewa speech by making the Labour Party more hostile to Māori? It didn’t take long for the likes of Trevor Mallard to suddenly start issuing statements that they were tired of sitting through “over long” karakia at public events, and Clark dismissed 20,000 protestors in Wellington by sniffing that they were “haters and wreckers.”

                This all came back to bite her, of course, when it was brought up during her attempt to become U.N. Secretary General.

                • Leftie

                  But you continued to vote for Labour? Why did you vote for a person and party you obviously detested? Agreed that the treatment of Ahmed Zaoui was shocking and he was vindicated in 2005. But Andrew Little and the current Labour party are not Helen Clark and the 5th Labour government. Like Andrew Little said, he can’t see how he can be personally held responsible for the actions of his predecessors. So why tar the current Labour party and leadership with the same brush, without giving them a chance first?

          • red-blooded 21.2.1.1.2

            Dotcom can’t “run” – he’s not a NZ citizen.

    • Xanthe 21.3

      Yes thats a total failure. Greg is an arshole who by blindly supporting every unethical practise has helped make thing intolerable for those many fine cops who want to serve the public. Andrew is out of touch if he endorses greg

      • Fisiani 21.3.1

        Greg O’Connor would make a great sacrificial candidate for Labour. He will not be elected of course and will be far down the list. Dunne will win again and Hudson will again be the list MP.

        • Psycho Milt 21.3.2.1

          So, a fuckwit in a probably-stolen (otherwise the cops wouldn’t be having to advertise the assistant perp’s tatts on TV to find out who she is) car hits two other vehicles and injures three people who were minding their own business until fuckwit arrived, and it’s somehow Greg O’Connor’s fault? Did he cause the Kaikoura earthquake as well, or was that the neoliberals?

          • Xanthe 21.3.2.1.1

            Police pursuits should have ended a long time ago. Greg does have some responsibility that they have not.

            • Psycho Milt 21.3.2.1.1.1

              This particular fuckwit killed himself and ruined other people’s lives within a kilometer of where he was requested to stop. That’s about as long as it takes to establish that no, the fuckwit isn’t going to stop. You might prefer it if the Police left car thieves, drunks and dangerous drivers to go about their business unmolested, but the public generally doesn’t.

              • gsays

                hi pm, also you may prefer the cops to play judge, jury and executioner at 10.30 at night in sth auckland, but i certainly don’t.

                all the power, decisions and resources are with the authorities, so does most of the responsibility.

                • Cops flashing their lights at a speeding car to get the driver to pull over doesn’t constitute the authorities playing judge, jury and executioner. If fuckwit decides to drive even more dangerously because he saw a cop, every single aspect of the responsibility for the resulting carnage lies with him.

                • mauī

                  +1 gsays. I get the same feeling when police surround someone holed up in a house. The chances of a needless suicide or death by police goes up significantly then.

  22. Sacha 22

    I was touched by this explicit and generous declaration of MMP intent from Metiria’s speech, and by the mutual respect of the two parties’ supporters in the room as well as on the stage:

    That’s what we – myself, James, Andrew and Annette are going after in 2017. That’s why the Greens and Labour have signed the Memorandum of Understanding.

    To see our parties, the Greens and Labour working together to deliver for our children, our communities, our environment.

    To see Andrew Little become our new Prime Minister.

    So, let’s all make this commitment together …”

  23. Sabine 23

    I am very much liking the partnership between Labour and the Greens.
    It will be easy to support these two party into the election and beyond.

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    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Supplier Diversity Aotearoa Summit: Navigate 2021
    *** Check with delivery *** A mihi to all who have contributed to making today a success – starting with you! As you have explored and navigated government procurement today you will hopefully have reflected on the journey of our people so far – and how you can make a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pukemiro School to close
    Pukemiro Primary School near Huntly will close following years of declining roll numbers, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. “I’ve consulted with the School Commissioner, and this decision acknowledges the fact that the few remaining students from last term are now settled at other nearby schools. “I want to thank ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago