web analytics

Labour’s principles redux

Written By: - Date published: 10:00 am, July 11th, 2015 - 40 comments
Categories: labour - Tags: ,

Sometimes you’re wrong in a way which completely proves the point you were making! So it was with yesterday’s post, lamenting the lack of a clear set of principles for the Labour Party to build its policy and campaigning around.

Well, as commenter Scintilla pointed out, the Labour Party does have a clear set of principles, right there on its website (somewhat unhelpfully under the heading “Our Vision”. Vision is future, principles are the starting point, people.)

And they’re pretty good. I could handle them being a bit stronger, but we are meant to be a broad tent, so I won’t demand ideological purity. And maybe a little shorter, but sometimes you really need to spell things out.

But they raise more questions. Why couldn’t I – or pretty much anyone else besides the eagle-eyed Scintilla – bring these principles to mind when talking about what direction the party should take? Why don’t I always see these principles reflected in the policies of our party, or the behaviour of some of its members?

Once again, I don’t have all the answers prepped. But I think everyone in the Labour Party could get value (sorry for the pun) from taking a long, hard look at these principles, and considering what kind of party these principles should support – and even if that’s the right party for you.

The Labour Party accepts the following democratic socialist principles:

All political authority comes from the people by democratic means including universal suffrage, regular and free elections with a secret ballot.

The natural resources of New Zealand belong to all the people and these resources, and in particular non-renewable resources, should be managed for the benefit of all, including future generations.

All people should have equal access to all social, economic, cultural, political and legal spheres, regardless of wealth or social position, and continuing participation in the democratic process.

Co-operation, rather than competition, should be the main governing factor in economic relations, in order that a greater amount and a just distribution of wealth can be ensured.

All people are entitled to dignity, self-respect and the opportunity to work.

All people, either individually or in groups, may own wealth or property for their own use, but in any conflict of interest people are always more important than property and the state must ensure a just distribution of wealth.

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document of New Zealand and that the Treaty should be honoured in government, society and the family.

Peace and social justice should be promoted throughout the world by international co-operation and mutual respect.

The same basic human rights, protected by the State, apply to all people, regardless of race, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, religious faith, political belief or disability.

40 comments on “Labour’s principles redux”

  1. RedLogix 1

    The hard part about values is having the integrity to stick to them even when it is not in your interests to do so.

    And the higher you set the bar the more you have set yourself up for failure. So most people content themselves with one set of values they talk about in public, and another more wobbly set they actually live by. This way they find it easier to live with themselves.

    But there is a crucial counterpoint to this. People also find it much easier to do hard things when in a group. For instance – I enjoy tramping on my own, but I actually tackle tougher trips more often with some mates.

    The democratic socialist principles outlined above are a perfectly decent summary of a much wider human conversation spanning religions, philosophy and politics for thousands of years. But as individuals we’re very prone to cynically shove them off into the ‘too hard basket’.

    But as a community we can inspire each other by the example we set to each other. And that is where actions always speak louder than words. Basic stuff really – but absolutely needed Steph.

  2. Bill 2

    Huge gulf between ‘accepting (the following) democratic socialist’ principles and ‘adhering to’ or practicing them.

    See all those ‘shoulds’ in the text that would be ‘will’ if the principles were being reified?

    The first thing that sprung to my mind by way of parallel was some homophobic joker announcing how they ‘accepted’ that some people are gay.

  3. just saying 3

    Interesting that our human rights law lists several grounds on which it is unlawful to discriminate against persons.
    The ones that aren’t covered in Labours “vision” are: employment status, including being unemployed or in receipt of a benefit, ethical belief, and family status.

    Considering employment status is one of the bigggest, and growing forms of discrimination in NZ, I would have thought it would get a mention. I wonder why it was overlooked?

    • Chris 3.1

      Because Labour hates beneficiaries, as they showed voting with keys and the government on their last legislative attack on the poor. Two more government social security Bills sitting there in the house now. Let’s see if Labour votes with keys and co on those ones. Probably won’t but only because they don’t need to. If Labour ever becomes the government again, before it implodes that is, just watch more and more of this shitty behaviour come pouring right out of Labour’s arse. You ask “Why don’t I always see these principles reflected in the policies of our party, or the behaviour of some of its members?” What a fucking joke. Because Labour is essentially a bunch of uncaring right-wingers, that’s why.

      • b waghorn 3.1.1

        What would you have labour do for beneficiaries ?

        • Chris 3.1.1.1

          1. Stop voting with the government for Bills that attack the poor.
          2. Raise the minimum wage to a living wage.
          3. Remove conjugal status from our benefit system.
          4. Set basic benefit rates to the cost of living.
          5. Relax abatement rules around how income affects the rate of benefit.
          6. Factor the cost of child care into the cost of employment.
          7. Replace current statutory focus of social security on pushing people into employment with meeting of basic need.
          8. Remove all punitive provisions from the Social Security Act.
          9. Restore the discretionary special benefit to ensure adequate safety net.
          10. Start talking seriously about the need for a universal basic income.
          11. Remove all people with stupid or nasty attitudes towards beneficiaries who work at the front line of Work and Income’s benefit delivery unit.

          How’s that for starters? Only 11 easy steps! What’s really sad, though, is that these simple things are completely anathema to what current Labour stands for. Very, very sad indeed.

          • Jenny Kirk 3.1.1.1.1

            To Chris at 3.1.1.1 – Labour IS working on providing just the sorts of policies you are looking for. The following is from our Policy Platform – which will form the basis of those policies (and btw, Labour has previously announced support for a living wage, along with other welfare matters).

            Labour wants to see all New Zealanders able to reach their potential knowing that if real hardship and tragedy happens, there will be real social security and a pathway to opportunities for them. Labour wants New Zealand to be a country where disadvantage is not produced and reproduced across generations. To break this cycle, Labour wants:

            · healthy, affordable housing

            · access to healthcare

            · support for disability

            · access to childcare and adequate time to spend with children

            · equal educational opportunities moving from education into work

            · a living income

            · security of income in old age.

            • Charles 3.1.1.1.1.1

              Yeah you see, the difference between the phrases you’ve posted and the ideas Chris has posted is his are specific, whereas Labour are ambiguous. Which is the argument: Labour say something ambiguous, and in practice it becomes the right wing/destructive definition of the phrase instead of the constructive left wing definition – or nothing at all. e.g.

              “healthy affordable housing”.

              Pretty vague. Healthy, as measured by what? Affordable, to who? Where exactly? Places there are no jobs or transport? Three ambiguous words don’t inspire hope or present vision.

              “a living income”.

              Everyone is alive, till they die, then they don’t need income. So is “living” meant to say poverty is ok? Labour can do better than that. But they don’t. Why?

              “support for disability”

              To what level? Who qualifies as disabled? What do they have to do in return?

              “access to healthcare”

              Well shit, if the hospital has a door then people have access to healthcare. But can they afford it? Will they be victims of prejudice?

      • leftie 3.1.2

        That stinks of trollism.

        Your account of Labour is more indicative of the National Government.

        • Chris 3.1.2.1

          “…Labour is more indicative of the National Government.”

          That’s the problem we have with Labour at the moment, together with die-hard Labour supporters who haven’t got a clue what Labour’s done or what Labour now stands for.

  4. red-blooded 4

    I would have thought that, “All people are entitled to dignity, self-respect and the opportunity to work” and “All people, either individually or in groups, may own wealth or property for their own use, but in any conflict of interest people are always more important than property and the state must ensure a just distribution of wealth” should cover your concerns about employment status as an issue, including the provision of reasonable benefits. Plus, the statement, “The same basic human rights, protected by the State, apply to all people, regardless of race, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, religious faith, political belief or disability” does specifically mention what you are calling “ethical beliefs” and they are calling religious or political beliefs. Besides “all people” means ALL PEOPLE; the list that follows isn’t exclusive, it’s illustrative.

    I think it’s a pretty good overview of the values that define the Labour Party. Do I think everyone in the party lives up to these values all of the time? No, I don’t. People are people and that means imperfection. It’s still a good defining list of principals, though, and something that people in the party can use to inform their decisions, actions and statements and that others can refer to when considering these.

    • just saying 4.1

      Why list any specific grounds when referring to human rights, in the vision statement, then?

      I wasn’t specifically commenting on the ethical belief ground. Like you, many would see it as encompassed by political or religious belief. Of course it isn’t, but I was prepared to give them that one. It’s the employment status non-mention that seems significant to me.

      • I suspect there’s a few factors in play in the specific grounds listed. One is that the principles were likely designed-by-committee, which always involves adding additional bits and pieces that various people feel need extra emphasis. The other is that the first factor is often motivated by a very real concern that those specific bits-and-pieces have a history of being erased or ignored from the discussion.

        • Jenny Kirk 4.1.1.1

          We all had the opportunity to input into the Party Principles, and then – yes, Stephanie, a committee of some sort put it all together. And then these were approved at a recent annual conference. So they had a good airing within the Party – but obviously not outside it. The Party just has to somehow summarise them down to a few 10-second speech slots and get them out into the public arena – not easy to do.

          • Chris 4.1.1.1.1

            Any discussion on ways to make sure the principles are adhered to? Ways to monitor whether its policies are consistent with the fruits of its big picture talk-fests? Apologies for the cynicism but to me the hypocrisy within Labour at the moment, and that’s of course been with us for a long time now, is simply unforgivable. Just keep dusting that picture of Michael Joseph Savage and everything will be okay.

          • Chris 4.1.1.1.2

            Yes, I’d imagine it’d be quite difficult for a bunch of right-wingers to come up with, let alone agree on, a set of left-wing principles they’re personally sickened by and who’d prefer every poor person to be lined up at dawn and shot. Quite difficult indeed.

  5. Sable 5

    Labout did have principles but they lost them in the 1980’s and have been looking for them ever since.

  6. les 6

    ‘if you dont’t like my principles…I have others’!(The Nats must have borrowed this from Groucho Marx.)

  7. maui 7

    The natural resources of New Zealand belong to all the people and these resources, and in particular non-renewable resources, should be managed for the benefit of all, including future generations.

    Applying current policy to these principles is interesting. I wonder how Labour’s tacit support for deep sea oil drilling fits in with the ^above.

  8. adam 8

    Liberalism as a ideology spills out in many directions. The fact is, we live in a society dominated by liberalism. Pākehā always had liberalism as the dominate ideology, Maori not so much, till Pākehā came to supremacy. Even the first labour government, was just a variation on the fundamentals of liberalism.

    I’m arguing – until we break away from liberalism, we are doomed to follow it down the path of destruction. So any talk of values, principles, or ethics is moot – till we decide to look at the underlying economics, and power differentials which govern society.

    Another way of saying this:

    The ideas which rule our society, are killing us, and the world we live in. The economics which govern, are destructive: on a social and real world level. This, along side a set ideals about power, and our relationships within society – have to be addressed. We understand power, It’s our economics which is holding us back. We understand our relationships, its’ our economics which are holding us back. We understand the destruction, its’ our economics which are holding us back.

    Economics, or political economy has been the tool of choice to strangle any, and all voices of opposition to liberalism. What ever guise liberalism takes.

    You know the attack, consciously, or unconsciously – if your not espousing liberalism, your nuts, and/or incomprehensible.

    And just in case you missed it. There is a lot of “should’s”in that “Vision” statement from labour. Reminds me of one of my favourite sayings. ” Shoulda coulda woulda “

  9. rhinocrates 9

    To paraphrase Harry S. Plinkett, “I don’t want to read it on the fucking webzone, I want to see it on the screen!”

    So they’re on the website. Some jobsworth has typed them and checked off a list and whenever someone asks about them, another passive-aggressive drone sneers and says “look at the website!”

    Those principles aren’t meant to be on the website to be given lip service. They’re meant to be in the house and out on the street every day.

  10. Save NZ 10

    The natural resources of New Zealand belong to all the people and these resources, and in particular non-renewable resources, should be managed for the benefit of all, including future generations.

    This seems different to their stance on TPP?

    Co-operation, rather than competition, should be the main governing factor in economic relations, in order that a greater amount and a just distribution of wealth can be ensured.

    Different to Neoliberalism?

    All people, either individually or in groups, may own wealth or property for their own use, but in any conflict of interest people are always more important than property and the state must ensure a just distribution of wealth.

    TPP?

    Peace and social justice should be promoted throughout the world by international co-operation and mutual respect.

    Occupation on Iraq, Spying on our neighbours and our own people, in the Pacific?

    In short, some of their decisions on policy seem different to their stance on this issues!

  11. Charles 11

    I don’t see how you were “wrong” Stephanie. You lamented a lack of clear values, and now you and others prove that Labour’s values are written down, but not embodied. What could be less clear? Are not values lived? Were you wrong to think that you were wrong? Clearly there is what we say we believe and what we do.

    Rhinocrates nails it:

    “…principles aren’t meant to be on the website to be given lip service. They’re meant to be in the house and out on the street every day.”

    I think people know what Labour stand for, the good, the bad, plus a bit of wiggle room. The vision, yeah, that’s the rub. Principles, values, vision, actions, words, it should all be “self-evident”, interconnected, an extension of the other, obvious. Sux to not have a party that presents a ready-made ideal image of “the people”, but at least socially conscious people can sense where the ideal might be.

    • Chris 11.1

      “but at least socially conscious people can sense where the ideal might be”… Just ain’t with Labour.

      • leftie 11.1.1

        People haven’t been socially conscious in their support of National.

        Do National have values and principles?

        • Chris 11.1.1.1

          Yes. A belief that they don’t makes saying anything else about them pretty much impossible.

  12. Ad 12

    Hilarious to hear Jenny Kirk stating that it’s not easy to summarise Labour’s principles to the public. And we wonder why we lose elections.

    The taxpayer pays each one of the Labour caucus over $150,000 a year to do that in Paliament.
    Since so few of them can do that, it’s well time they refunded us.

    Stephanie’s obvious point is that the content is all there, but the Labour caucus have been incapable of communicating them to voters. For 7 years.

  13. fisiani 13

    Given that Labour had the same principles in 2008 and 2011 and 2014 there seems a long history of not communicating the principles or that most people do not share such principles. Such principles do not fit for people who have personal aspirations. No wonder most Chinese have abandoned Labour and after today it will be close to 100%. Are such principles popular with more than 25% of the population. I doubt it.

    • leftie 13.1

      It appears people do not care about values and principles, dirty politics from the PM’s office kept National in power.
      It is not as if National haven’t shown over the past 7 years, that it doesn’t have any values or principles.

      • Chris 13.1.1

        National has values and principles and you’re going to have to know all about them if you think you’ve got anything to say about National.

  14. SHG 14

    “All the people” – unless their surnames sound Asian.

    Labour, racists since ages ago

  15. rhinocrates 15

    Memo to Little: Socialism isn’t racism.

    • Colonial Viper 15.1

      Sexist inferences appealing to Waitakere Man are verboten – but it appears that anti-Chinese ones are all good.

  16. Graham White 16

    Can someone please explain how Phil Twyford’s xenophobia (as displayed on “The Nation” this weekend) is consistent with the the party’s values and principles?

    • ian 16.1

      [You are banned. Later – MS]

      • McFlock 16.1.1

        How do you tell people you’re racist?

        Easy. You tell people you vote national and support the senseless sentencing crowd.

        protip: worrying about selling the country to international capital isn’t xenophobia or racism. It’s a genuine concern that ten or twenty years later the IMF will be trying to overrule your country’s democratic elections and referenda. Or even that council zoning changes to save significant trees will end up going through TPPA legal action.

        edit: oh dear, he’s gone.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

No feed items found.

  • Government to deliver family carers $2000 pay rise, expand scheme to spouses this year
    The Coalition Government is delivering this year the changes to Funded Family Care the disability sector has long-asked for, says Associate Minister of Health Jenny Salesa. “Today we are announcing the details of our big changes to Funded Family Care, including an annual average pay boost of $2,246.40 for funded ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • Ko te reo kua mū: Piri Sciascia
    Minister for Māori Development Nanaia Mahuta joins te ao Māori in their sorrow as they learn of the loss of one of the great orators and spokespersons of a generation – Piri Sciascia.  “The son of Pōrangahau was a staunch advocate for Māori development and served his people for over ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Minister opens new ecosanctuary at Cape Farewell
    A new ecosanctuary with a predator proof fence on Golden Bay’s Cape Farewell, which will restore a safe home for sea birds, rare native plants, giant snails, and geckos, was officially opened today by the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage. “There has been a fantastic community effort supported by the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Pacific partners work together to provide additional support to Australia
    The NZDF continues to support the Australian Defence Force (ADF) as it battles fires in Victoria and New South Wales, including by transporting Republic of Fiji Military engineers from Nadi to Australia, announced Defence Minister Ron Mark. On Saturday morning a NZDF Boeing 757 will depart New Zealand to uplift ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Kaikōura $10.88 million boost in tourism & business
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is investing $10.88 million to boost business and tourism opportunities in Kaikōura, Parliamentary Undersecretary for Regional Economic Development, Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. As part of the Kaikōura Marina Development Programme, the following two projects will receive PGF funding: A $9.88 million investment to begin the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Govt accounts in surplus, debt remains low
    The Government’s books are in good shape with the accounts in surplus and expenses close to forecast, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. The Treasury today released the Crown accounts for the five months to November. The operating balance before gains and losses (OBEGAL) was above forecast by $0.7 billion resulting ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Auckland focus for first Police graduation of 2020
    The number of Police on the Auckland frontline is increasing with the graduation today of a special locally-trained wing of new constables. Police Minister Stuart Nash says the graduation of eighteen officers from Recruit Wing 333-5 means that more than 1900 new Police have been deployed since the Coalition Government ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Wairarapa gets $7.11m PGF water boost
    The Provincial Growth Fund is putting $7.11 million into creating a sustainable water supply for Wairarapa, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. The following two projects will receive Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) funding: A $7 million investment in Wairarapa Water Limited for the pre-construction development of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Progress with new Police station in Mahia
    Community safety and crime prevention in the East Coast community of Mahia has moved forward with the opening of a new Police station to serve the growing coastal settlement. Police Minister Stuart Nash has officially opened the new station, which was relocated almost 20 kilometres along the coast from the nearby ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Plans to protect the future of whitebaiting announced
    With several native whitebait species in decline the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage has today released proposals to standardise and improve management of whitebait across New Zealand. “The need for action for a healthy whitebait fishery has never been greater,” Eugenie Sage said.  “Four of the six whitebait species are ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New resource for schools to increase awareness and understanding of climate change
    A new Ministry of Education resource available for schools in 2020 will increase awareness and understanding of climate change, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “The resource, Climate Change – prepare today, live well tomorrow, will help students understand the effects of climate change at a local, national and global ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Getting more out of our most productive firms
    Finance Minister Grant Robertson has approved the terms of reference for an Inquiry into the economic contribution of New Zealand's frontier firms. Frontier firms are the most productive firms in the domestic economy within their own industry. “These firms are important as they diffuse new technologies and business practices into ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZDF sends more support to Australia
    The New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) is sending an Environmental Health Team, a Primary Health Care Team and a Chaplain to Australia, boosting New Zealand support for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) as it battles bush fires in Victoria and New South Wales, Defence Minister Ron Mark announced today. The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand joins partners in calling for full investigation into air crash in Iran
    Acting Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Rt Hon Winston Peters says that developments suggesting a surface-to-air missile is responsible for the downing of the Ukrainian International Airlines flight in Iran is disastrous news. “New Zealand offers its deepest sympathies to the families of the 176 victims. It is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Staying connected to Australian agriculture
    Agriculture Minister, Damien O’Connor, says the Ministry for Primary Industries is continuing to stay connected to federal authorities in Australia as devastating fires affect the country.  “The Ministry is using an existing trans-Tasman forum for discussions on the agricultural impact of the fires and the future recovery phase,” says Damien ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Investment in schools – a commitment to communities
    Thousands of school-age children, their teachers and wider communities are benefiting from the Government’s multi-million dollar investment upgrading and renewing schools, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “We want New Zealand to be the best place to be a child and that means learning in warm, comfortable and modern classrooms,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand Defence Force sends support to Australia
    Minister of Defence Ron Mark today announced New Zealand is sending three Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 helicopters and crew, and two NZ Army Combat Engineer Sections as well as a command element to support the Australian Defence Force efforts in tackling the Australian fires.  The New Zealand Defence Force ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Better access to books for blind and low vision citizens on World Braille Day
    "Today is World Braille Day and I am delighted to announce that an international treaty giving blind and low vision New Zealanders access to books and literary works comes into force today,” Minister for Disability Issues Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “Today the Marrakesh Treaty and the associated amendments to the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand to send further firefighter support to Australia
    The New Zealand Government is sending a further 22 firefighters to help fight the Australian fires. “The devastation caused by these fires is taking a substantial toll on our Australian neighbours and we will continue to do what we can to assist as they deal with this extremely dynamic, dangerous ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Reducing the cost of education
    Twenty-two more schools have opted into the Government’s policy of providing $150 per child to schools who don’t ask parents for donations– bringing the total number of schools in the policy to 1,585. The Ministry of Education has accepted late opt ins past the November 14 deadline from schools that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Road deaths lower in 2019, but still more work to do
    “As we enter the new decade, my thoughts are with the families, friends and communities of the 353 people who lost their lives in road crashes last year. While the number of deaths is lower than in 2018 (377), this is still a staggering loss of life,” Duty Minister Iain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • PM congratulates New Year 2020 Honours recipients
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has congratulated the diverse group of New Zealanders recognised for their contributions to the country and their communities in the New Year 2020 Honours List.   The list of 180 honours recipients includes three Dames and three Knights Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Justice Minister congratulates first Māori Supreme Court judge on New Year’s Honour
    Justice Minister Andrew Little has congratulated The Honourable Justice Joe Williams for receiving a knighthood for services to the state. Sir Joe Williams has been appointed as a Knight Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit in the New Year 2020 Honours List. “Sir Joe Williams has made an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • New Year honours for top sportspeople
    Twenty-one of New Zealand’s top sportspeople, coaches and leaders in the sporting community have been recognised in the New Year 2020 Honours List. The Silver Ferns coach Noeline Taurua has been made a Dame Companion and the former All Blacks Steve Hansen has been made a Knight Companion of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Leading architect of Zero Carbon Bill honoured
    It’s great to see ordinary New Zealanders doing extraordinary things, Minister for Climate Change James Shaw today said in response to the news that Lisa McLaren is included in the New Year 2020 Honours List for her exceptional work leading the campaign for the Zero Carbon Bill. Lisa McLaren was ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Social entrepreneurs and innovation leads Pacific contribution
    Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio says the New Year 2020 Honours List highlights the valuable contribution Pacific social entrepreneurs and innovators make to New Zealand, the Pacific region and the world. “The standout common factor that underlines their contribution to Aotearoa is the value they place in their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Service to birds and bush recognised in New Year Honours
    Decades of dedication to Aotearoa’s unique birds, landscapes, and native eels is recognised in the New Year 2020 Honours List said Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage. “I’m delighted that the decades of dedication to conservation, and fantastic leadership in giving nature a helping hand is being acknowledged,” said Eugenie Sage. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago