web analytics

No future in English & Brash’s neoliberal plans

Written By: - Date published: 10:57 am, June 7th, 2011 - 14 comments
Categories: bill english, budget 2011, don brash - Tags:

In recent weeks Don Brash has been complaining in the media that the Government has no plan to deal with the number of issues our economy and our society face. Brash of course will argue that he does have the solutions. Bill English set out in the budget what he believes amounts to a plan for New Zealand over the next few years. The reality, I think, is that both have plan however there is little or no future in either plan. Neither Brash nor English have laid out a plan which deals with the present and quite near problems we will face.

There are some important differences to the Brash plan and the English plan. Brash may focus more on meaningful activity whereas the English plan adopts a more cross your fingers and hope attitude. Brash will be more extreme and ideological in his endeavors whereas English tends to be more measured and somewhat more realistic. Those issues aside, the end game for both Brash and English are generally the same. Their plans amount to less government, more free market, deregulation, and lower taxes (with a resultant a transfer of wealth upward) and promotion of the competition state. The pathway there for both may be different but the destination is proximate.

The problems with this plan can be argued on many levels and individual policy settings can be picked apart and criticized. I am going to concentrate on three broad issues which I see as failings of the Brash-English approach (from here on referred as the neo-liberal plan). The plan will be unfit to cope with the challenges we (all collectively) face but actually present some significant future risks to the relative health of society.

The first failure of the neo-liberal plan is growth and a resources constrained future. The plan demands that growth occur and a waterfall effect distributes wealth (unevenly) down the economic food chain. The rising water level raises every boat, albeit with a concentration of wealth in the upper echelons. They get wealthiest but the rest of us get something as well. Due to various resource constraints, real world forecasts for continuous economic growth are not optimistic however. The most immediate crunch may be the global supply of oil however other resource maximization and depletion sit behind. Low or nil economic growth is a challenge for all modes of growth which are growth reliant, Keynesianism approaches included. The significant weakness for the neo-liberal plan is that it relies on a sufficient magnitude of growth to fill the pockets of the wealthiest such that some falls out for the people below. If there is less wealth in circulation then the wealthy need to hang on to more of it to service their essentials of life. There is less for everybody else.

The second failure of the neo-liberal plan is economics. If neo-liberal economics was ever relevant following the global melt-down of 2008, it is not so any more. As much as it pains neo-liberals to face this reality (and they strenuously attempt to deny it), de-regulation and reliance on the proper operations of the market failed. The explanations for this have been well rehearsed by others so I will not attempt to do so yet again. A general observation will suffice. The neo-liberal policy settings facilitated the severing of ties between the enchanted world of money and the real economy. The resultant unstable edifice of credit and debt was typified by various terminology we have heard post 2008 such as ‘derivatives’, ‘fractional lending’, ‘credit swaps’, ‘securitization’, ‘financial bubbles’ and so on.

The third and last failure of the neo-liberal plan is very similar to the first, the creation of wealth, but here pertains to how that wealth is distributed through society. We already have gross distortions between the accumulation of wealth. A process which relies of trickle down as growth is stalling threatens to intensify that inequity. Not only would this be unfair and unacceptable, it could also be dangerous. Declining living standards for the many, as the few maintain or even increase their living standards, would put at risk the fabric of society unless wealth was more evenly spread around. A redistributive political economy would be required to maintain social cohesion in the face of significant challenges. The neo-liberal plan cannot deliver this as it is premised on selfish accumulation of wealth and a maxim of ‘line my pocket first’.

There are no ready-made solutions to these challenges. We do have some of the tools to find a viable future option however it is a work in progress rather than an off the shelf project. The danger, in light of a ready to go solution, is that the likes of Brash and English can continue to pretend for a little while longer that they have the plans we require. Continuing with that option will make it that much harder and more expensive to clean up the mess and then get things right.

– george.com

14 comments on “No future in English & Brash’s neoliberal plans”

  1. ZeeBop 1

    Wait up but we can always sell the best cuts and milk? well the japanese thought that putting six reactors in a line up against the ocean was safe. The far right-wing is delusional thinking its in control, or has much control now the money (influence) isn’t around. Markets have a habit of taking their own indicators and the staggering naivety of English, Key, Brash, is that there is any political pay off in trying to get out in front and claim a recovery, or competent control of events. We are living through interesting times. What fools are these people who are in government.

    • Colonial Viper 1.1

      Best cuts to the Koreans, best cheese to the Chinese

      New Zealanders can eat cat food.

  2. ropata 2

    Are they fools or are they puppets of the IMF?
    In any case we (the electorate) are suckers.

  3. randal 3

    neo liberals seem to have forgotten what liberalism was originally all about. now they are just grabbers. the only way they can measure themselves against others is by the quantity of their venal acquistiveness which is what theya ll ASPIRE to. I say quantity because ultimately they have no taste or class or discernment but what the market tells them. The only way they can be happy is to get a leaf blower and stick it where the sun dont shine.

    • ZeeBop 3.1

      Cheap energy meant we all let out our belts. The less informed went on a borrowing spree,
      forgetting the old maximum never be a debtor be. The mediocre parasite class appeared that made fees off peddling yet more uninformed nonsense about free markets naturally forming without legislation, that legislation also did not produce winners (them). So cheap energy produced a group think by mediocre thinkers who forgot that diversity of thought is a societies insurance not its enemy, this is now termed as neo-liberalism and is rampant in the right-wing and parts of the left-wing who believe they must sell out to get elected.

      Its the new normal that the elites seem unable to grasp. That energy will continue to get more expensive, that any economic growth will come from saving energy, making our world more efficient, less heating costs, less commuting, local over region, regional over global, grass roots thinking, less pollution because it will cost more to clear up – prohibitively more! So because the crisis is so severe, and delayed dealing with the crisis by fiscal impudence (Bush II – if only Osama had not attacked the twin towers the market crash would have happened for the right reasons – pre-peak oil). So why the road building?

      Janet Frame suffered from ?social phobia?, she was told by an expert psychologist after
      she narrowly escaped a scheduled lobotomy that she should avoid social contact if it made her anxious. Something seemingly bleedingly obvious she was do anyway. Its pretty much the same with John Key Nasty National, they’ve scheduled an economic lobotomy for the NZ economy and all we needed was an expert to tell us that avoiding anxiety causing neo-liberalism, which we were doing already was the proper course. i.e. be happy don’t worry, your not insane, you actually are pretty smart and will go on to create exports of your books and draw tourists to come to see where you lived. Janet Frame was an export winner, and yet Key today would force her into social anxiety creating situations that would have led to her NOT becoming the export winner she was, she returned far more to the taxpayer coffers that all the welfare her and her family received. Unlike Key who can avoid most taxation quite easily.

      Key, English, Brash, the three stooges, are the veneer of desperate men trying to keep up in a sphere of public service they do not have the skill to, or any admitted desire for service, and they know it. Their prescriptions start with the shock doctrine and end with the shock doctrine. Oh, look Brash tried to trip Key up, now English hits himself, and Key falls on his face.

  4. Afewknowthetruth 4

    Capitalism was a short term aberration in the grand scheme of things, and free market neoliberalism was an even shorter term aberration in the grand scheme of things.

    Rule 1. Without energy nothing happens.

    Rule 2. Without a stable global environment you don’t have an economy.

    Capitalsm has been squandering energy capital and degrading the environmenta for hundreds of years, and neoliberlaism put the assualt on the Earth into ‘hyper-drive’.

    Payback time is approaching very quickly.

  5. ropata 5

    I’d love to know what role John Key plays in this book:

    Crash of the Titans: Greed, Hubris, the Fall of Merrill Lynch, and the Near-Collapse of Bank of America

    With one notable exception, the firms that make up what we know as Wall Street have always been part of an inbred, insular culture that most people only vaguely understand. The exception was Merrill Lynch, a firm that revolutionized the stock market by bringing Wall Street to Main Street, setting up offices in far-flung cities and towns long ignored by the giants of finance.

    With its “thundering herd” of financial advisers, perhaps no other business, whether in financial services or elsewhere, so epitomized the American spirit. Merrill Lynch was not only “bullish on America,” it was a big reason why so many average Americans were able to grow wealthy by investing in the stock market.

    Merrill Lynch was an icon. Its sudden decline, collapse, and sale to Bank of America was a shock. How did it happen? Why did it happen? And what does this story of greed, hubris, and incompetence tell us about the culture of Wall Street that continues to this day even though it came close to destroying the American economy? A culture in which the CEO of a firm losing $28 billion pushes hard to be paid a $25 million bonus. A culture in which two Merrill Lynch executives are guaranteed bonuses of $30 million and $40 million for four months’ work, even while the firm is struggling to reduce its losses by firing thousands of employees.

    (H/T Scoopit)

  6. tc 6

    Sideshow played the role laid out for them all……enjoy the ride you’re making a killing, never mind what happens next you’ll be sweet as.

    If you don’t look to hard or ask tough questions then it’s plausible deniability all the way home…..oink oink.

    • Georgecom 6.1

      Thats the Enron economy. Keep talking up the share price even as everything around you starts to unravel.

  7. Craig 7

    Oh, there’s a “future”, all right. But it’s a brutal, dystopian one reminiscent of a retrofitted turbocharged Charles Dickens, with welfare provision privatised, homelessness, family disintegration, youth crime, suicide and drug abuse skyrocketing and…yep, that’s right, the United States after a decade of Bush era neoconservatism. Do we really want to emulate that deeply troubled nation, when the New Right mantras devised there have so manifestly failed?

    • Colonial Viper 7.1

      Do we really want to emulate that deeply troubled nation, when the New Right mantras devised there have so manifestly failed?

      Yeah it’ll be like Dickens over there real soon, problem is that Oliver Twist and his mates didn’t all have semi-auto firearms.

  8. Jenny 8

    This is an intelligent and very well laid out treatise, warning us all of the pressing dangers of Climate change, resource depletion, economic collapse, and the inadequacy of market driven solutions as a solution to this impending multi-headed crisis.

    There is a growing consensus amongst the wider left of the reality of the impending combined crisis, even from those like -george.com, who is obviously close to the Labour Party.

    What is clear from this essay is that even though the Labour Party leadership aren’t mentioned, and the point is never made. The same criticisms of the Brash and English plan, (or lack of plan) to deal with the combined crisis, could just as easily apply to current Labour Party policy too. For Labour to meet the challenges of the combined crisis there will need to be some massive change of policy direction within Labour as well.

    I look forward to many more posts from -george.com to see how he further expounds his views.

    I would genuinely be interested to read his suggestions on the way forward for the Labour Party and the wider left.

    Bravo, a great post and a significant contribution to the ongoing debate, I will be disapointed if there is not more to come.

    • Georgecom 8.1

      Jenny, I am Labour whilst Labour remains the best opportunity to repel the forces of myopia which is the Brash (especially) and English (to a lesser extent perhaps) plan. I am Labour whilst they represent the opportunity for a more positive future. That future is not Labour alone but includes the Green Party and somewhere Mana has to fit in as well. If the Maori Party wants to make a contribution, and even Winston if he makes it back, that is their prerogative however I think the door should be open for them.

      I am encouraged by signs that I am seeing (I think) within labour of a need to rethink the neo-liberal economic consensus. I’ll term this the narrative of the competition state – where a national economy is aligned with maintaining ‘market confidence’ and a ‘competitive economic advantage’ within the global economy of competition states. I have some faith that this rethink is too shortly produce some policies which mark a change in the Labour Party approach. The Clark Government made a significant effort to rebuild the public sector from years of neglect after Douglas-Richardson-and subsequent followers on. It relied on a ‘third way’ approach to do this, maintaining the economic approach of the competition state whilst fixing up some of the social fallout from that project.

      I think I know, in general terms, what a sustainable future might look like. At least I would like to think that I know. There is a wealth of literature expounding on this in far more detail than I am ever able to comprehend however what exactly the future could be is not yet clear to me anyway. I think Peter Conway, CTU economist, has summed things up as eloquently as anyone else I have seen when he stated in a CTU economic bulletin that ‘there is not yet any new ‘ism’ but we need to put forward a political economy which joins the dots between neo-liberalism, globalism, poverty and climate change (I’d add to that resource depletion/limits) and which puts people and the planet first’.

      There is no off the shelf alternative at present to the morass neo-liberal globalised capital has led us into. That alternative political economy narrative is a work in progress. But, some things I will be looking for in the near future, as the start of a progressive left consensus are agreement on a capital gains tax (or other financial speculation, in an ideal world a Tobin type tax, but probably not at this point), a roll out of more energy efficiency programmes (such as the housing insulation programme) and a commitment to cancelling some of the loss making RoNS and investing that money into public transport (the rail tunnel as the litmus test of that commitment but also including other regional PT projects). In the near term, but highly likely not this election, I am hoping to see things like a legislative commitments to promoting urban gardening (on quite a large scale), worker owned collectives, a realistic attitude to dealing with climate change (I am uncertain that a cap and trade approach is going to be successful at mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and am favouring a straight carbon tax. For one reason, it can be recycled back through the economy), a plan for a more equitable spread of wealth through society (a better, simpler WFF type scheme, even maybe a UBI) and a plan to deliver flexicurity of income – a meshing of work and income security.

      That type of future needs the Labour party on board. I am almost finished rereading a book titled “After the Wasteland” – A Democratic Economics for the year 2000″ by radical US economists Bowles, Gordon and Weisskopf. That book deals with the failures of neo-liberal global capitalism and raises several of the solutions above to effect a more negotiated and inclusive economy for the US. The book was written in 1990.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Vaping legislation passes
    Landmark legislation passed today puts New Zealand on track to saving thousands of lives and having a smokefree generation sooner rather than later, Associate Health Minister, Jenny Salesa says. The Smokefree Environments and Regulated Products (Vaping) Amendment Bill regulates vaping products and heated tobacco devices. “There has long been concern ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Government repeals discriminatory law
    A discriminatory law that has been a symbol of frustration for many people needing and providing care and support, has been scrapped by the Government. “Part 4A of the New Zealand Public Health and Disability Amendment Bill (No 2) was introduced under urgency in 2013 by a National Government,” Associate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • More competitive fuel market on the way
    Kiwi motorists are set to reap the benefits of a more competitive fuel market following the passing of the Fuel Industry Bill tonight, Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods says.  “This Act is where the rubber meets the road in terms of our response to the recommendations made in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Government delivers on rental reforms promise
    The Government has delivered on its promise to New Zealanders to modernise tenancy laws with the passing of the Residential Tenancies Amendment (RTA) Bill 2020 today, says Associate Minister of Housing (Public Housing), Kris Faafoi. “The Residential Tenancies Act 1986 was out-dated and the reforms in the RTA modernise our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • New rules in place to restore healthy rivers
    New rules to protect and restore New Zealand’s freshwater passed into law today. Environment Minister David Parker and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor welcomed the gazetting of the new national direction on freshwater management. “These regulations deliver on the Government’s commitment to stop further degradation, show material improvements within five years and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • Foreign Minister announces new Consul-General in Los Angeles
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters has announced the appointment of Jeremy Clarke-Watson as New Zealand’s new Consul-General in Los Angeles. “New Zealand and the United States share a close and dynamic partnership, based on a long history of shared values and democratic traditions,” Mr Peters said. “Mr Clarke-Watson is a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • Rental reforms provide greater support for victims of family violence
    Victims of family violence can end a tenancy with two days’ notice Landlords can terminate tenancies with 14 days’ notice if tenants assault them Timeframe brought forward for limiting rent increases to once every 12 months Extension of time Tenancy Tribunal can hear cases via phone/video conference Reform of New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Apprenticeships support kicks off today
    Two employment schemes – one new and one expanded – going live today will help tens of thousands of people continue training on the job and support thousands more into work, the Government has announced. Apprenticeship Boost, a subsidy of up to $12,000 per annum for first year apprentices and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Infrastructure to transform Omokoroa
    The Government is funding a significant infrastructure package at Omokoroa which will create 150 new jobs and help transform the Western Bay of Plenty peninsula, Urban Development Minister Phil Twyford announced today. Phil Twyford says the Government is investing $14 million towards the $28 million roading and water package. This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Bill passes for managed isolation charges
    The Bill allowing the Government to recover some costs for managed isolation and quarantine passed its third reading today, with charges coming into force as soon as regulations are finalised. Putting regulations into force is the next step. “The COVID-19 Public Health Response Amendment Bill and its supporting regulations will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Unemployment drop shows Govt plan to protect jobs and support businesses is working
    Today’s unemployment data shows the Government’s plan to protect jobs and cushion the blow for businesses and households against the economic impact of COVID-19 was the right decision, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. Stats NZ said today that New Zealand’s unemployment rate in the June quarter – which includes the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • New role to champion reading for children
    A new role of New Zealand Reading Ambassador for children and young people is being established, Prime Minister and Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Jacinda Ardern and Minister for Internal Affairs and for Children, Tracey Martin announced today. The Reading Ambassador, announced at a Celebration of Reading event at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • Funding boost for Community Law Centres
    Community Law Centres will receive a funding boost to meet the increased need for free legal services due to COVID-19, Justice Minister Andrew Little said. The $3.5m funding is for the next three financial years and is additional to the almost $8 million for Community Law Centres announced in Budget ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • New Zealand joins initiative to boost women’s role in global trade
    New Zealand has joined Canada and Chile in a new trade initiative aimed at increasing women’s participation in global trade. Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker, together with Canada’s Minister for Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade Mary Ng, Chile’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Andrés Allamand, and Chile’s Vice ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Government provides $2.2m to heritage buildings for quake strengthening
    Building owners around New Zealand have benefited from the latest round of Heritage EQUIP funding with grants totalling $2,230,166. “The Heritage EQUIP grants for seismic strengthening assist private building owners to get the professional advice they need to go ahead with their projects or support them to carry out the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Better hospital care for Northland babies and their whānau
    •    New paediatric facilities, including a Special Baby Care Unit •    Up to 50 extra inpatient beds  •    New lab facilities  Northland babies and their whānau will soon have access to improved hospital care when they need it with Health Minister Chris Hipkins today confirming new paediatric facilities and more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Green light for Wellington and Wairarapa in $220m nationwide cycleways package
    People walking and cycling between Featherston and Greytown, or along Wellington’s Eastern Bays will soon have a safe shared path, as part of a $220 million shovel-ready cycleways package announced by Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter. “During lockdown we saw many more families and kids out on their bikes, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • New Zealand expresses condolences on passing of Vanuatu High Commissioner
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters today extended New Zealand’s condolences following the death of Vanuatu’s High Commissioner to New Zealand, Johnson Naviti, who passed away yesterday afternoon in Wellington. “Our thoughts are with the High Commissioner’s family and colleagues during this difficult time. This is a terrible loss both to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government announces allocation of three waters funds for councils
    The Government has today set out the regional allocations of the $761 million Three Waters stimulus and reform funding for councils announced by Prime Minister Hon Jacinda Ardern this month.  "I want to thank Councils around the country for engaging with the Central Local Government Steering Group who have been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Funding boost for students with highest learning support needs
    Students with high and complex learning needs, as well as their teachers and parents, will benefit from a substantial increase to Ongoing Resourcing Scheme (ORS) funding, Associate Education Minister Martin announced today. “Nearly $160 million will go towards helping these students by lifting their base support over the next four ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Govt connecting kiwis to affordable, healthy food
    Funding for innovative projects to connect Kiwis with affordable, safe and wholesome food, reduce food waste, and help our food producers recover from COVID-19 has been announced today by Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. “COVID-19 has seen an increasing number of families facing unprecedented financial pressure. Foodbanks and community food service ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Getting infrastructure for housing underway
    Eight shovel-ready projects within Kāinga Ora large-scale developments, and the Unitec residential development in Auckland have been given the go-ahead, Minister for Housing Dr Megan Woods announced today. Megan Woods says these significant infrastructure upgrades will ensure that the provision of homes in Auckland can continue apace. “The funding announced ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Napier walk and cycleway to improve safety
    The Government is funding a new separated walking and cycleway path along Napier’s Chambers and Ellison streets to provide safer access for local students and residents across Marine Parade and State Highway 51, Transport Minister Phil Twyford and Police Minister Stuart Nash announced today. Funding of $2.7 million has been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • PGF creates more than 10k jobs, success stories across NZ
    More than 13,000 people have been employed so far thanks to the Coalition Government’s Provincial Growth Fund, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has today announced. The number of jobs created by Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investments has outstripped the 10,000 jobs target that the Government and Provincial Development Unit ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Inaugural seafood awards honour sustainability
    Scientists and innovative fishing operators from Stewart Island and Fiordland to Nelson, Marlborough and Wellington have been honoured in the first ever Seafood Sustainability Awards. Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash has congratulated the winners of the inaugural Seafood Sustainability Awards held at Parliament. “The awards night honours six winners, from a wide ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Climate resilience packages for regions
    The Government is providing an investment totalling more than $100 million for regions to protect against and mitigate the effects of climate change, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones have announced. Six regions will receive funding from the $3 billion allocated to infrastructure projects from the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Southern Waikato shovel ready projects get the green light
    Three major local projects at Te Kuiti and Otorohanga have been given the money to get moving after the impact of Covid 19, says the Minister of Māori Development Hon Nanaia Mahuta.  The projects range from a Sports Centre for Te Kuiti, a redevelopment of the Otorohanga  Kiwi House and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand extends Middle East and Africa peace support deployments
    The Coalition Government has extended three New Zealand Defence Force deployments to the Middle East and Africa by two years, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters and Defence Minister Ron Mark announced today.  “These deployments promote peace in the Middle East and Africa by protecting civilians and countering the spread of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Govt progress on climate change essential, risk assessment shows
    The release of the National Climate Change Risk Assessment shows that the progress this Government has made to solve the climate crisis is essential to creating cleaner and safer communities across New Zealand. “Because of this report, we can see clearer than ever that the action our Government is taking ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • $10m sport recovery fund open for applications
    The second round of the Community Resilience Fund is now open for applications for sport and recreation organisations experiencing financial hardship between 1 July and 30 September 2020. “The fund opens today for five weeks – closing on September 6. The amount awarded will be decided on a case-by-case basis ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Rakitū Island declared latest predator free island
    Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage today declared Rakitū Island, off the coast of Aotea/Great Barrier Island, predator free. “I’m delighted to announce that with rats now gone, Rakitū is officially predator free. This is a major milestone because Rakitū is the last DOC administered island in the Hauraki Gulf Marine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Funding to restore significant Māori sites in the Far North
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing $8.75 million to restore significant historic sites at Ōhaeawai in the Far North, upgrade marae and fund fencing and riparian planting. Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones made the announcements following a service at the historic St Michael’s Anglican Church at Ōhaeawai today.  Just ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Big boost for Chatham Islands’ economy
    The Chatham Islands will receive close to $40 million for projects that will improve its infrastructure, add to its attraction as a visitor destination, and create jobs through a planned aquaculture venture, Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has announced. “The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on the islands, first ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • More initiatives to reduce energy hardship
    The Government is delivering more initiatives to reduce energy hardship and to give small electricity consumers a voice, Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods said today. “In addition to the initiatives we have already delivered to support New Zealand families, we are responding to the Electricity Price Review with further ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Turning the tide for hoiho/yellow-eyed penguin
    Government, iwi, NGOs and rehabilitation groups are working together to turn around the fortunes of the nationally endangered hoiho/yellow-eyed penguin following a series of terrible breeding seasons.  The Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage helped launch the Five Year Action Plan at the annual Yellow-Eyed Penguin symposium in Dunedin today. “I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Taskforce ready to tackle tourism challenges
    The membership of the Tourism Futures Taskforce has now been confirmed, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis announced at an event at Whakarewarewa in Rotorua today. “The main purpose of the independent Tourism Futures Taskforce is to lead the thinking on the future of tourism in New Zealand,” Kelvin Davis said. Joining ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Investing in the tourism sector’s recovery
    More than $300 million in funding has been approved to protect strategic tourism businesses, drive domestic tourism through regional events and lift digital capability in the tourism industry, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. A $400 million Tourism Recovery Package was announced at Budget 2020, and with today’s announcements is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Permits to be required for exporting hard-to-recycle plastic waste
    From 2021 permits will be required for New Zealanders wanting to export hard-to-recycle plastic waste. The Associate Minister for the Environment, Eugenie Sage, today announced the requirements as part of New Zealand’s commitments to the Basel Convention, an international agreement of more than 180 countries which was amended in May ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Growth in new building consents shows demand is still high
    The building and construction sector is still showing strong growth, with the number of new dwellings consented up more than 8 per cent compared to last year, reflecting a welcome confidence in the Government’s COVID-19 response package, Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa says. “While it is still too ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • $23 million for Bay of Plenty flood protection
    Government investment of $23 million for Bay of Plenty flood protection will allow local communities to address long-standing flood risks and provide jobs, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced in Rotorua today. These projects are being funded by the Infrastructure Reference Group’s (IRG) shovel ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago