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No Right Turn: Ending dairy in Canterbury

Written By: - Date published: 7:10 am, September 3rd, 2019 - 146 comments
Categories: Environment, farming, water - Tags: , , , ,

Cross posted from No Right Turn

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Environment Canterbury has finally proposed nitrogen limits to stop dairy farmers from poisoning Christchurch’s water supply. And naturally, farmers are whining about it:

A proposed move by Environment Canterbury (ECan) to protect Christchurch’s drinking water by setting tough – some would say, draconian – nitrate reductions in the decades ahead and stop the nasties creeping below the Waimakariri River has some dairy farmers in states of high anxiety.

There are about 1.3 million dairy cattle in the region, a doubling from 2003 made largely possible by the expansion of irrigation schemes.

[…]

Some farmers consider the schedule of reductions beyond 2030 as a disincentive to keep going or encourage the next generation into the business.

Good. Nitrate kills children and increases long-term risks for bowel cancer. If it gets into Christchurch’s drinking water supply, it will be a public health catastrophe. And while farmers are following the climate change playbook and trying to pin the blame elsewhere (the canterbury foothills, mate), we simply didn’t have this problem before their cows started shitting everywhere during the dairy boom.

On climate change, on freshwater quality, and now on nitrate toxicity, the message is clear: if we want to survive, we need to massively cut back on dairy farming. Farmers simply need to find something else to do with their land. And if they’ve loaded up on debt to bail in to peak dairy on some of the hottest and dryest land in the country, they made a poor business decision, and they deserve to pay the price for that (Seriously: Canterbury is a terrible place to grow cows. The only stupider places are the Mackenzie Country and Hawke’s Bay, and anyone stupid enough to do that deserves to lose their money). As for what they can do instead, I hear trees are reliably profitable now. Or they can always move to a city and get a job in an industry that doesn’t rely on destroying the planet for private profit.
 

146 comments on “No Right Turn: Ending dairy in Canterbury ”

  1. millsy 1

    We really need to bring back sheep farming as the Canterbury staple.

  2. Sanctuary 2

    NRT is right to point out the potential future public health catastrophe that high nirate levels in groundwater and drinking water could cause. It is simply incredible the media gives so much space to whining farmers, yet has not really given any exposure the potential of Canterbury turning into our very own Flint, Michigan moment.

  3. Cinny 3

    In my opinion the Canterbury plains are better suited to horticulture than agriculture by a long shot. Bring back the wheat fields.

    • KJT 3.1

      Canterbury wheat went for stock feed. We always imported from Oz for human consumption.

      Better than imported palm kernel I think.

      • Cinny 3.1.1

        Crikey, thanks for that info.

        • Robert Guyton 3.1.1.1

          The Canterbury plains as a light-woodland-with-glades, studded with hamlets, embellished with fish and eel-rich wetlands, all managed by Cantabrians harvesting food of all sorts from the varied landscape, providing food and materials for local artisans to fashion for use and export to other regions; the water would become clean, the bird-song, native and exotic, would ring-out, trees, native and exotic, would multiply, the awful Cantabrian winds would abate, and the angst the city of Christchurch is famous for, would dissipate like the morning dew with the rise of the sun.

          • alwyn 3.1.1.1.1

            My goodness Robert. You appear to have a view of Canterbury that is like a non-religious version of Blake's view of England.

            "And did those feet in ancient time
            Walk upon Englands mountains green:
            And was the holy Lamb of God,
            On Englands pleasant pastures seen!”

            etc etc for 3 more verses.

            Just replace England with Canterbury and we would have your vision.

            https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/54684/jerusalem-and-did-those-feet-in-ancient-time

            • AB 3.1.1.1.1.1

              Blake was a visionary radical who as a child saw angels in the trees at Peckham Rye and makes our Robert look like a plodding Alwynish conservative in comparison.

              "Enslaved the daughters of Albion weep…" Substitute ‘Aotearoa’ for ‘Albion’ and then you have the flavour of it.

              • Robert Guyton

                Blake's were doors of perception and mine merely a cat-flap?

                • Poission

                  You cant change the nor' wester (unless you move NZ latitude and level the southern alps)

                  Among the dreary mountains, far up above the gorge, There lives a potent demon, ever working at his forge; A worker at the winds is he, a flatulent old buffer, And he sends his manufactures down that man and beast may suffer.

                  I’ve witnessed all the winds that blow, from Land’s End to Barbadoes— Typhoons, pamperos, hurricanes eke terrible tornadoes. All these but gentle zephyrs are, which pleasantly go by ye To the howling, bellowing, horrid gusts which sweep down the Rakaia.

                  https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/LT18520508.2.19

                  • alwyn

                    Wow. The author of that poem really didn't like the weather did he(?)

                    I've never heard of the poem before today. Thank you for bringing it up.

                    • weka

                      there's a theme that runs through early NZ settler and post-settler culture that shows up in literature, which is a macho antipathy towards nature in their new land. All that fear and intense dislike of the wildness of the place.

                    • greywarshark

                      weka I know that feeling of antipathy to the weather – when I have been struggling up a Wellington hill with the wind and rain blowing in my face. I can imagine and have sympathy for how the early people would have felt at times.

                    • KJT

                      If they tried to live in Wellington, it is perfectly understandable.

                      I wonder if the Neo-liberal meanness of our politicians would have reduced, if we let them live somewhere more pleasant.

                  • greywarshark

                    Thanks Poission for finding that descriptive and historic poem in the archives. A 'Nugget of gold’, also from the archives that you will have heard.

                • weka

                  “Blake’s were doors of perception and mine merely a cat-flap?”

                  roflnui.

                • Blake's were doors of perception and mine merely a cat-flap?

                  Perhaps for a very generously-proportioned cat?

                  • Robert Guyton

                    "Perhaps for a very generously-proportioned cat?"

                    Fat-cat councillor, eh!

                    Going straight for the jugular! Love it!

                • (something else re blake:..)

                  'A vegetarian from his teenage years, Shelley's pamphlet On the Vegetable System of Diet (1813)-

                  – equated rearing livestock and eating meat with man's murderous urge to war and dominion'

                  (can't argue with that..)

                  • (correction: shelley yes – blake not so much..)

                    ' Blake maintained temperate appetites, eating cold mutton and drinking pints of porter from the local pub.'

                  • The Al1en

                    Well you can, but clearly not to resolve conflict with a pious religious zealot, unless you want to sustain a perverse pleasure of mocking the afflicted.

            • Robert Guyton 3.1.1.1.1.2

              That's right, Alwyn, I do, only overlaid with native plants and other living things, populated by native humans and others as well. Not so much of the pastures though.

          • weka 3.1.1.1.2

            I can see that Robert.

      • greywarshark 3.1.2

        I seem to remember that the grain we grew was not as fine for baking bread as the Australian type. But we did have one that is still grown here and available starting with K. I'll look it up on google.

        EFFECTS OF SOWING RATE AND NITROGEN FERTILIZER ON TILLERING OF "KARAMU" AND "KOPARA" WHEATS https://www.agronomysociety.org.nz/files/1977_17._Tillering_Karamu_and_Kopara_wheats.pdf

        1976 Journal of Agricultural Research 1976: info on google keywords – nz wheat type Karamu?:

        1982 Quality in the New Zealand wheat and flour … – Research@Lincoln
        https://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz › bitstream › handle › aeru_dp_65
        by MM Rich – ‎1982 – ‎Cited by 1 – ‎Related articles
        quality supplies of N.Z. grown wheat and flour, in order to suggest … the qualities of Karamu wheat. A further ….. inclusive) or is made from the Karamu variety.

        More info on wheat.
        https://www.bakeinfo.co.nz/Facts/Wheat-Milling/Wheat/NZ-Wheats

        .
        Looking at records of crop yields – NZ beats world.

        For barley – https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/cropping/68146316/ World barley yield record set by Timaru farmers 2015

        For wheat – https://www.cropscience.bayer.co.nz/articles/record-breaking-wheat-crop | New Zealand farming couple grow record breaking wheat crop 2017
        …Eric puts his success down to his partnership with Bayer and Yara. Bayer, for its agronomy advice and range of crop protection herbicides and fungicides; and Yara, for its soil nutrition input….

        “In particular, the Canterbury region is demonstrating that it not only has the best arable growing conditions in the world, but also the best and most knowledgeable arable farmers in the world.

        The Watsons are using a fair amount of irrigation to get that harvest!
        (Ashburton cropping farmers Eric and Maxine Watson (Rangitata Holdings) were the South Island’s original Precision VRI pioneers, now with seven irrigators fitted with Precision VRI. – https://zimmaticanz.com/case-studies/eric-watson)

        .
        They have been leaders in irrigation technology apparently. So what was originally achieved on the Canterbury Plains without large water drawn off and advanced technology as referred to below?

        https://www.waterforce.co.nz/eric-watson-a-waterforce-telemetry-and-system-monitoring-solution
        Case Studies – Eric Watson – A WaterForce telemetry and system monitoring solution

        Eric Watson - A WaterForce telemetry and system monitoring solution

        Telemetry and monitoring in action

        Eric Watson is a leading farm innovator in the Mid-Canterbury region, having been recognised, along with his wife Maxine, as the Lincoln University/Rabobank farmer of the year for 2006. Eric has installed some of the first linear move irrigators in the country, as well as one of the first installations of Variable Rate Irrigation, a product which is being offered by leading irrigation companies, including WaterForce on Valley irrigators.

        Determining the effectiveness of these technologies, both in terms of water saved and cost-effectiveness required accurate monitoring of flow rates, water usage and soil conditions on Eric’s property. This required some innovative solutions to metering challenges, including mounting travelling flow meters and the use of a blend of cellular and radio technology.

        Just to remind us of what and how we are today.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agriculture_in_New_Zealand
        For the year ended March 2002, agricultural exports were valued at over $14.8 billion. New Zealand is unique in being the only developed country to be totally exposed to the international markets since subsidies, tax concessions and price supports for the agricultural sector were removed in the 1980s.[2] However, as of 2017, the New Zealand Government still provides state investment in infrastructure which supports agriculture.[3]

        Pastoral farming is the major land use but there are increases in land area devoted to horticulture.

        New Zealand is a member of the Cairns Group, which is seeking to have free trade in agricultural goods.[4]

        • KJT 3.1.2.1

          I love how the idea that subsidies were withdrawn from farming in the 80's, keeps getting repeated. Repeat a lie often, enough, Eh.

          It is absolute bull.

          • greywarshark 3.1.2.1.1

            KJT

            Sounds like that bull is sterile! I thought it was true that subsidies had been withdrawn. I remember that skit, was it Fred Dagg's, where a farmer took a polly round his farm with sheep dotted all over the hills which were being subsidised, the sheep i mean but I guess also the farm. Only they were stones painted white. I thought that was just bull, or ramnuts, if you will!

            • KJT 3.1.2.1.1.1

              No. Farming in New Zealand is still subsidized, by billions in tax payers dollars, tax rebates to farmers, including the lack of CGT, and other parts of the economy we have sacrificed for farming.

              The names of the subsidies were changed, to satisfy free trade agreement requirements, but the amounts that the rest of us pay to help farmers has, as far as I can see, increased.

            • KJT 3.1.2.1.1.2

              No. Farming in New Zealand is still subsidized, by billions in tax payers dollars, tax rebates to farmers, including the lack of CGT, and other parts of the economy we have sacrificed for farming.

              The names of the subsidies were changed, to satisfy free trade agreement requirements, but the amounts that the rest of us pay to help farmers has, as far as I can see, increased.

            • KJT 3.1.2.1.1.3

              It is not like they pay much tax for it, either.

              https://www.interest.co.nz/rural-news/53495/dairy-farmers-pay-lower-tax-couple-pension-ird-says-fonterra-gets-tax-credits-fair

              When I put that up a while ago a farmer said that was a bad year. I said fair enough we will look at a good year then. The average per farm owner was still less than $2000.
              Less tax than a beneficiary, pays.

      • patricia 3.1.3

        Our baker son confirmed that many years ago. Our wheat made a wet heavy dough.

        Australian wheat was far superior.

        Now Australia is short of water, in drought in these important food areas.

  4. KJT 4

    New Zealand has been subsidizing farmers poor business decisions since the country began.

    If you borrowed to buy any other business for unsustainable multiplies of earnings in the expectation of a tax free gain on sale, and it failed, or failed to insure against entirely predictable events such as rain, expecting others to pay, we would all say, "tough".

    Farming is such a sacred cow, sic, that is not going to end anytime soon.

    After all National sacked Environment Canterbury to ensure dairy farming could proceed on totally unsuitable land.

    It won't be Canterbury dairy farmers who pay, when the water table is poisoned, the soil blown away and all the river and nearby sea life is dead.

    Not to mention the losses to more sustainable farms, when the market for dairy is flooded with subsidized milk.

  5. mike 5

    Reserve Bank governor in TV interview talked about aggressive lending policies by banks in the last ten years. i.e. pushing farmers to borrow more. Turns out the figures show that 80% of the loans are to 15% of farmers. In other words ordinary farming families have not taken up the loans. Who has. That's right, Queen Street lawyers and million dollar accounting firms in Dunedin. These super wealthy and influential 'farmers' are leading the attacks against reasonable calls to save our water quality by halting expansion of factory dairy farming. Like all cowards, they hide behind the skirts of mr and mrs farmer, family farm, and farm futures rubbish. Corporate extremists are the bane of our existence. Put the brakes on their greed, political influence and ability to pay for headlines that suit them.

    • weka 5.1

      Wow, that's a great synopsis, thanks. Do you remember where/when the interview was?

    • Morris 5.2

      This begs another question: where does the money for these loans come from? Not China by any chance?

      • greywarshark 5.2.1

        From banks and financiers who have scooped up all the cash they can and are looking to turn gold into straw! That is money being a medium of exchange/barter must keep its value or buy something physical that has value. There is plenty of that type of money sloshing about operating in a different strata to the one available to the ordinary Jo.

      • Hanswurst 5.2.2

        It does invite the question as to where the money comes from. It doesn't invite immediate speculation (based on three tenths of f*** all) that it might be China, like some knee-jerk, racist bigot.

        • Morris 5.2.2.1

          Wow touched a nerve there.

          So the China Construction Bank doesn't have big mortgages over a lot of the Canterbury Plains? Looks like it does, keeping China supplied with milk powder.

      • Robert Guyton 5.2.3

        Out of thin air?

    • WeTheBleeple 5.3

      Well said Mike.

  6. mauī 6

    Agree, time for the nitrate to be sent… Preferably back into the cow.

  7. esoteric pineapples 7

    Canterbury can grow more milling wheat for flour for bread so New Zealand is self-sufficient instead of importing three quarters from drought stricken Australia

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=12233017

    • weka 7.1

      True and we should really be looking at resiliency and food security re climate change.

      Canterbury is drought prone now though. I think we need to first be thinking about mass tree planting to protect the aquifers, make the local climate more favourable, reduce the impact from drought, increase biodiversity.

      Lots of ways to grow food and other resources that way, and we can grow grains too, but the crops need to be integrated into other systems or we will just be buying a new set of problems down the road.

    • greywarshark 7.2

      esoteric Have done a piece on wheat at 3.1.2 that goes into aspects of it here in NZ with references for anyone who thinks of taking that further when the profit has been squeezed out of dairy, and the teats run dry, maybe.

      But I noted the entries relating to the irrigation of wheat crops; as weka mentions it is a dry area. That allows for ripening of wheat, but also sets a cautionary note about not expanding it at the expense of integrating with growing other crops in ways that are water conserving.

  8. Ad 8

    To really put some force into regulating the machine that actually drives this unending thirst for dairy production, send in a submission in about the Dairy Industry Restructuring Bill.

    Supposedly this intends to promote a more efficient dairy market within in New Zealand.

    Proposed amendments to the Act seek to do the following:
    • provide Fonterra (as the dominant market player) with more flexibility to manage some aspects of its operations
    • support and encourage better environmental performance of the dairy industry
    • provide increased clarity on aspects of the regulatory regime for Fonterra and other dairy industry stakeholders
    • remove some regulatory requirements that are no longer necessary

    Those who wish to be heard will go before the Primary Production Committee. That's all parties on that one, so that's where the political contest is for the bill.

    I'm sure local government in Canterbury has its uses, but it's even more awkward and long-term in its controls than the Fresh Water Policy Statement the government put out last month.

    The legislative proposals as they stand are pretty damn weak.

    Get in there people and put some welly about.

  9. bwaghorn 9

    ""And if they’ve loaded up on debt to bail in to peak dairy on some of the hottest and dryest land in the country,""

    So what? They did it legally and fully supported be government.

    Your argument is no better than the right wing argument of people who have kids they cant afford should make better life choices.

    If you whining greenies want real lasting change gtfu, get round the table ,show real leadership and take the farmers with you on the journey.

    • gsays 9.1

      " …get round the table ,show real leadership and take the farmers with you on the journey. " I agree with that. The key is that the farmers are aware and keen for the journey to occur.

      Perhaps the state can put it's money where it's mouth is ie subsidies, grants, tax relief for the changes needed.

      Perhaps grain (craft beer explosion here and overseas), hemp, cannabis, wheat….

      • solkta 9.1.1

        Yes and cigarette companies should be paid compo also.

        • gsays 9.1.1.1

          How is that relevant?

          • solkta 9.1.1.1.1

            It is another industry that causes a lot of harm where regulations have been introduced that have cost the companies involved a lot of money.

            • gsays 9.1.1.1.1.1

              Where as the dairy farmers are citizens and businesses that were actively encouraged to farm in Canterbury by the state.

              Dairy farmers are not foreign multi nationals, peddling nicotine. They are our neighbours, friends and colleagues.

              To compare them with tobacco companies is taking othering to an extreme.

        • greywarshark 9.1.1.2

          solkta You're sounding mean again. Do the attacks come on at random, or when you have eaten something the doctor advised against?

          • The Al1en 9.1.1.2.1

            What's the point of that post if it's not an attack of your own?

            Come on, don't be that whiny [deleted] people eye roll and skim over. 🙄

      • Sacha 9.1.2

        Perhaps the state can put it's money where it's mouth is ie subsidies, grants, tax relief for the changes needed.

        Does letting them spread the cost over a couple of decades already count?

        • gsays 9.1.2.1

          "Does letting them spread the cost over a couple of decades already count? "

          I am not sure what you mean.

          Are you are talking about the 'externalities' of farming eg repair of damaged roads, use of water from the commons etc?

    • weka 9.2

      I gather that's what Shaw is doing but honestly, the power vested in people who want to keep fucking the environment is substantial. Farmers (some of them) can attack greenies but the tide has turned and there will be little sympathy for the farmers/businessmen that tried to stop that, trading water safety/quality for money.

      If the argument here is that the govt backed this and it was legal, what's the problem with ECan leading on this and protecting the environment legally?

      • bwaghorn 9.2.1

        Shaw maybe on the right track but headlines like "ending dairy in Canterbury " are fucking unhelpful.

        You lefties lump all farmers together and I'm picking most dairy cockies cant distinguish between sensible lefties and raving activists.

        • weka 9.2.1.1

          "You lefties lump all farmers together"

          Did you intend that to be ironical?

          I/S is not known for mincing his words, but I quite regularly differentiate between the different kind of farmers. So there's an example of lefties thinking differently.

        • KJT 9.2.1.2

          Had an friendly discussion with a cocky on Facebook, yesterday.

          Actually he was pretty pissed with federated farmers claim, that their business model depends on being able to pollute for free. Giving farmers a bad name.

          A bit worried about compliance costs, if he has to fence off streams further away than he has already. His comment was the corporate farmers have the power and money to avoid compliance costs. Vocational farmers don't.

          I said myself, as one of those "Greenies" I am fine with helping farmers like him, being assisted to more sustainable farming.

    • So what? They did it legally and fully supported be government.

      Yep. Never vote Tory, kids!

      • bwaghorn 9.3.1

        I seem to remember they started pulling the pines out for dairy north of taupo in the Clark years but yip alot of Canterburys problems can be laid at nationals feet.

    • Gabby 9.4

      You gettin morality and legality all confuzzled up in yer wee noggin there waggles?

      • bwaghorn 9.4.1

        That's why ya need good law makers . Most people have less morals than an ally cat.

        • vto 9.4.1.1

          National were not good law-makers when they made the law to stop elections in Canterbury. So they could steal the water.

          That was not good law. That was shit law. And is why this issue continues…

          Bad law – bad result

          Eh mr wags

          • bwaghorn 9.4.1.1.1

            What happened to ecan wen the Nats got in is a blot on nzs political history. They have no shame the scum .

  10. Wayne 10

    In practical terms, how would this actually be done. In other democratic societies farmers have to be paid to withdraw land from production, basically the opportunity cost of doing so. Otherwise the state doesn’t get the consent and cooperation of the farmers. And that is necessary unless you want a full scale civil disobedience campaign, as regularly occurs in France. When the date severely interferes with people’s livelihoods (beyond the normal range of regulation) there is apt to be a large scale reaction. The Left surely knows all about that.

    Such a compensation scheme would be the sort of the opposite of the SMP regime of the 1970’s when farmers were paid to increase sheep numbers.

    If society wants a particular part of society to provide a widespread community benefit, then society as a whole has to pay the particular sector fo that.

    Though I do wonder if there are other alternatives than such an overt interference in property rights. For instance, would 3 to 5 meter (as opposed to the current 1 meter) buffers from water course make a difference? Would partial housing of cows make a difference?

    • solkta 10.1

      widespread community benefit

      They are causing widespread community harm. Only a nat could twist that like you just did.

    • weka 10.2

      In practical terms, how would this actually be done. In other democratic societies farmers have to be paid to withdraw land from production, basically the opportunity cost of doing so.

      Who said anything about withdrawing land from production? If farmers don't know how to transition off dairying, they can get better advice or they can sell up, just like any other business that is failing. Plenty of people in NZ that what to farm sustainably.

      Otherwise the state doesn’t get the consent and cooperation of the farmers. And that is necessary unless you want a full scale civil disobedience campaign, as regularly occurs in France. When the date severely interferes with people’s livelihoods (beyond the normal range of regulation) there is apt to be a large scale reaction. The Left surely knows all about that.

      Really? Because the state has regularly fucked the lives of low income people for a long time and I don't recall that big an outcry. What you appear to be suggesting is backmail.

      Such a compensation scheme would be the sort of the opposite of the SMP regime of the 1970’s when farmers were paid to increase sheep numbers.

      I've long argued that the govt should subsidise farmers to convert to sustainable landcare. Needs to be actually sustainable though, not the faux sustainability that Fed Farmers is edging towards. My patience is rapidly running out for farmers who believe they have a god or state given right to pollute, so there's a limit to how much subsidising should go on. I don't think we should be bailing out poor financial decisions eg anyone converting to dairying from now on.

      If society wants a particular part of society to provide a widespread community benefit, then society as a whole has to pay the particular sector fo that.

      I'd quite happily take a drop in my standard of living to have drinkable rivers again. I don't think it would take a huge drop.

      Though I do wonder if there are other alternatives than such an overt interference in property rights.

      Lol. No-one is interfering with their property rights. They don't own the commons, we do.

      For instance, would 3 to 5 meter (as opposed to the current 1 meter) buffers from water course make a difference? Would partial housing of cows make a difference?

      Yeah, nah. We were talking about this stuff a decade ago and Fed Farmers said no, because it would reduce stock numbers. We're past that point now. Had they done something sensible back then the redress now wouldn't have to be so extreme. I hold regional councils also responsible for that, and in the case of Ecan, that is clearly traceable back to the National Party.

      • Wayne 10.2.1

        Weka,

        "What you are suggesting is blackmail." It is the nature of democratic societies to try and avoid wide scale civil disobedience. Because the state/government knows if it forcibly interferes with property rights in a serious way without compensation, there will be a reaction from those affected. Which is why it doesn't occur in democratic societies.

        The state forcing farmers to abandon existing dairy farming is about as large an interference in property rights as one could imagine in a society like New Zealand. You saying that it is not so won't convince anyone, especially those directly affected.

        However, it seems you basically agree with me about subsidies if land is removed from production (or compulsorily required to be used for a lower value use). As you well know it is the way it is done in the EU and in the US, with such subsidies now being a significant part of farming economy. Contrasted to the Soviet Union shooting the kulaks!

        • solkta 10.2.1.1

          Polluting the environment is not a property right. Farmers can keep doing what they do if they can stop the piss from leaving their property.

        • Sacha 10.2.1.2

          If farmers still have their land, how is protecting the public from pollution interfering with property rights?

          There is no 'right' to pollute. Find another source of value from the land that meets society's needs as well as the bank's.

          Wonder if the Canterbury plains are suitable for producing the feedstock for plant-based proteins?

          Ah, snap.

          • weka 10.2.1.2.1

            what happens on the Canterbury Plains should take its direction from the geography and the climate, with reference to increasing drought cycles and big weather events (gale force wind would be my pick as an issue). Large scale industrial monocropping might be somewhat less polluting, but it's not resilient. Also not sustainable where it relies on industrial irrigation.

        • Psycho Milt 10.2.1.3

          The state forcing farmers to abandon existing dairy farming is about as large an interference in property rights as one could imagine in a society like New Zealand.

          That's certainly how some farmers would interpret the government forcing them to stop polluting people's drinking water, yes. It's a very disingenuous and self-serving interpretation, which would be unlikely to garner much popular sympathy – everybody drinks water, after all.

          • Wayne 10.2.1.3.1

            You are all seriously underestimating the amount of wrath that would be caused by the government forcibly stopping farmers from dairying. The anger you would see in the provinces would be immense. The "fart tax" protests of the early 2000's would be trivial in comparison. You can't just destroy hundreds of thousands and millions of dollars per farmer in a highly targeted way (billions across the whole sector) and think that could be done easily.

            How would it would be enforced? Do you think the farmers would meekly see all/most of their cows taken from them? Would it mean hundreds of police entering farms and removing cows and destroying farm buildings? Prosecutions up and down the country? Farmers being jailed when they don't comply?

            I personally don't think any New Zealand government would be so stupid as to try such an approach. Not even a Green dominated government.

            If you are serious about this, the only practical way is a compensation/subsidy package that will pay farmers to reduce the stocking rate. Just as the EU and the US do. As an example it is why there is a compensation package for the semi auto guns. Governments in New Zealand know they just can’t expropriate without compensation.

            • weka 10.2.1.3.1.1

              it's a 60 year plan, with a decade for the first stage. Why can farmers not transition off industrial dairying in that time?

              As for force, it's Ecan, and they already have the power to set regulations. Whether they would have the balls to enforce compliance is another matter, given how poorly regional councils have been doing this historically. But I can't see how it's not possible. One farm at a time just like they do now.

              • Andre

                A possible dairy farming response would be to transition to the style of industrial dairying overseas: keep the cows indoors, grow vegetable matter on the land, then harvest it and feed it to the cows. In some german operations, all the shit and piss is collected into biodigesters to produce biogas, before what's left gets sprayed back out as fertiliser.

                • weka

                  Industrial dairying, as a model, is inherently unsustainable and a problem for GHG emissions. Why not just transition to long term, sustainable and resilient farming?

                  Cows indoors is factory farming and an animal welfare fail imo.

                  • Wayne

                    Weka,

                    I think we are likely to see more housing of cows. Probably not in the way it is done in Germany, that is all the time, but for a significant proportion, especially when the land is water soaked from rain. I understand some farmers are already doing this.

                    It does reduce the problems of pollution, and soil damage. So putting aside my point about farmer protests and expropriation, it may be a way for farmers to modify existing practises and improve water quality without reducing production.

                    On bad weather days it may be better for the animals than the current practise of leaving animals out on cold wet days. Many European visitors are pretty unimpressed with the way New Zealand farmers leave animals outside in all sorts of bad weather. And in my experience, the animals in Holland and Denmark did seem to be in better condition than cows in New Zealand. They are outside a fair proportion of the time. I guess the animal welfare issues are also dependent on the quality of the sheds.

            • Stuart Munro. 10.2.1.3.1.2

              The industrial farmers are big on wrath. And poo, they make a lot of poo too. And like blackmailers you want to give them compensation to stop poisoning the aquifers. It's a good job no-one ever sent a muppet like you to get us trade deals – you'd give away the farm. Oh, wait…

            • vto 10.2.1.3.1.3

              i know how you feel wayne it would be like having someone shit in your drinking water

              • Poission

                Well he is drinking the water ex waikato river.

                Fitzsimons says it would be expensive to have two different reticulation systems around Auckland and it also poses the risk of "getting them mixed up".

                There are a number of large industries in South Auckland which use large quantities of water for non-food related uses, she says, and a separate pipe to them could be justified much more easily.

                Last month Fitzsimons went further saying "the Waikato Pipeline must be put on hold until the Ministry of Health can give quality advice to Watercare Services about gender bender hormones in drinking water".

                https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=1793136

            • Psycho Milt 10.2.1.3.1.4

              You are all seriously underestimating the amount of wrath that would be caused by the government forcibly stopping farmers from dairying.

              Au contraire. I can only assume that Shakespeare wrote "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned" because he never saw the far more impressive example of hell having no fury like a New Zealand farmer not getting his own way.

              The government would not be forcibly stopping farmers from dairying, it would be stopping them from poisoning people's drinking water. They'd still be free to run dairy farms, as long as that patently reasonable and unremarkable condition was met. The ones who couldn't meet that condition would have to sell up or transition out of dairying, and yes hell would have no fury etc, but the idea that we should put up with polluted drinking water because otherwise dairy farmers will be angry is just ridiculous – who apart from farmers would vote for a government with that as its policy? (NB: rhetorical question – obviously, upwards of 40% of the NZ population will vote for a party with that as its policy).

            • KJT 10.2.1.3.1.5

              I think we will be using subsidies to change to sustainable farming.

              Because farming is such a sacred cow, so to speak.

              No one gave a shit about the thousands of extra costs on businesses such as building and manufacturing, because of changes to safety and pollution requirements.

              But farming thinks they are, "special".

        • weka 10.2.1.4

          Wayne, I'm not seeing the state intending to force farmers off their land, so your premise founders there. I also don't see why the land needs to be removed from production, but then my understanding of production is probably broader than yours.

          Re blackmail, as far as I can tell the issue here is the right to farm however they want. No-one in NZ has property rights like that.

        • KJT 10.2.1.5

          Just transition is a Green party policy. Any one sector, or bunch of workers are not expected to bear the whole cost of change.

          There is evidence that in many cases destocking,reducing the dependency on imported feed and fertilizer along with improved farming practices, can even improve farming lifestyles and incomes.

    • Robert Guyton 10.3

      "Though I do wonder if there are other alternatives than such an overt interference in property rights."

      How, Wayne, is requiring metres of buffer not interfering with property rights?

    • patricia 10.4

      Wayne, Government offered Kiwi fruit growers money to pull their crops to grow something else, so I agree this is one suitable solution to lowering stock numbers.

    • vto 10.5

      Wayne, your various posts above are rejected entirely, and I am disappointed at the twist you have put on the issue. It is dishonest Wayne.

      In the early 90's the Canterbury farmers were told that if dairy is intensified then waterways will be degraded and drinking water will be polluted. Then YOU LOT fucking ignored that, and intensified dairy (by sacking Ecan, thieves). Now waterways are degraded and drinking water is polluted. Wankers.

      Bring on civil disobedience Wayne, go on. Watch the backlash against farmers to an even greater extent.

      YOU LOT SHAT IN OUR DRINKING WATER – INTENTIONALLY…

      Keep your shit on your own property and stop dumping it in the public estate.

      "Farmer's wrath"… pfftt… you have no idea the wrath bubbling away inside Canterbury home's about this… it is discussed, and resented, far more often than you know… have a go Wayne, have a go

      Dairy can fuck off out of Canterbury – it doesn't deserve to stay

      • weka 10.5.1

        Righteous. I think Wayne underestimates the sentiment of so many people about rivers and lakes. Farmers might rebel, but I think they will lose sympathy fast. Could get nasty though and I agree with what some farmers are saying about the stress. Not an excuse but a suggestion that we still have some choices here about how this goes down.

        Wayne looks like his job here is to sow seeds on the left that farmers should now be paid out to stop them polluting. Lead balloon.

  11. Ian 11

    As with the boy who called wolf,liars are not beleivable. Where are the dead children? Canterbury has a vast range of dairy farming systems.The vast majority of dairy farms in Canterbury are family owned and operated.TheAvon is the most polluted river in Canterbury. The selwyn river is flowing swift and clean at state highway 1.Managed aquifer recharge is lowering nitrate levels and raising watertables.Frogs ,longfin eels,native mussels abound on many Canterbury dairyfarms. Whinging greenies giving the vast majority the shits.

    • weka 11.1

      I wonder if you can back any of that up?

      Tell us how long it takes for nitrates to get from the top of the pasture to the water table, across 3 different land types on the Plains?

      • Ian 11.1.1

        I don't need to back it up because I speak the truth.So many lies are being told about dairying in Canterbury the rabid mob is starting to beleive it's own bullshit.

        • Robert Guyton 11.1.1.1

          Astonishingly, I support Ian's challenge, "Where are the dead children?"

          Serious discussions should have integrity, through and through.

    • Where are the dead children?

      Your starting point for considering whether or not to stop polluting Canterbury's drinking water is "Have any children died?" Reminds me of "A modest proposal." Have you considered standing for election to ECAN? The country needs public-spirited men like yourself to ensure the protection of the environment.

    • Morris 11.3

      Canterbury has one of the highest rates of bowel cancer in the world. Can you explain how this is NOT linked to high nitrate levels?

      • phillip ure 11.3.1

        red/processed meat is cited as a leading cause of bowel cancer..

        so big red/processed meat eaters in canturbury are giving themselves a double-whammy..

        • Stuart Munro. 11.3.1.1

          Time was NZ was number one in skin cancer, and left the bowels for Asia, so meat wasn't really the problem, unless it's meat and contemporary lifestyle. My medical mates there pointed the finger at helicobacter pylori, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322532/ and a traditional food culture that saw many spoons going into the same pot.

          • weka 11.3.1.1.1

            If red meat was the leading cause of cancer we'd see high rates in traditional meat diet cultures. But we don't.

            That H pylori theory is interesting. Looking at another chronic health issue arising from poor gut health. Eat more ferments, less refined foods.

            • Stuart Munro. 11.3.1.1.1.1

              “To ferment your own food is to lodge a small but eloquent protest – on behalf of the senses and the microbes – against the homogenization of flavors and food experiences now rolling like a great, undifferentiated lawn across the globe. It is also a declaration of independence from an economy that would much prefer we remain passive consumers of its standardized commodities, rather than creators of idiosyncratic products expressive of ourselves and of the places where we live, because your pale ale or sourdough bread or kimchi is going to taste nothing like mine or anyone else's.” ~ Michael Pollan Cooked

              • Robert Guyton

                Michael Pollan: good stuff!

                • Stuart Munro.

                  There are a few things we understand about the revolution:

                  It will not be televised

                  A revolution without dancing is a revolution not worth having

                  And (I think) it must be celebrated with whole pig barbeques, lactofermented pickles, gathered seafood, and tart home brewed cider, perry, or the like.

                  • Robert Guyton

                    I'll bring kimchi, gin-soaked sloes, slack-ma-girdle cider and a zither; let's revolve!

            • The Al1en 11.3.1.1.1.2

              Wine and cider being my favoured choices

          • phillip ure 11.3.1.1.2

            @ munro..

            do you have the medical knowledge/expertise to refute the oft-repeated warnings from those that have that medical knowledge/expertise to issue the warnings that bacon/processed-meat (esp.) cause bowel cancer..?

            or is this just something you 'feel'..?

            • Stuart Munro. 11.3.1.1.2.1

              It's more of an observation – historically NZ was a very high meat eating country, but not a bowel cancer stand out. Of course you may well argue that folk were dying of cardio vascular problems before the bowel cancer had a chance to exhibit.

              • oh..!..it's more of 'an observation'..eh..?..(a.k.a. – an orifice-pluck..?)

                guess/best we should treat it as such – and return to what those with the requisite medical-expertise say..

                eh..?

                'cos when they issue those red-meat/bacon/processed-meat = bowel-cancer warnings – unlike you – they probably aren't just orifice-plucking..

                eh..?

                • so….animal-based bacon = bowel-cancer..

                  whereas plant-based 'bacon' looks/tastes/smells/chews the same as the animal one…but doesn't cause bowel-cancer..

                  will you really still insist on yr rights – (to give yrslf bowel-cancer..?..)

                  • The Al1en

                    And you know what it tastes, looks, smells and chews like, even though you've not eaten it.

                    That seems like reliable opinion lol

                    • do try to keep up with this subject allen..

                      (so you know they ran tasting tests @ hamilton fielddays abt a yr ago..?

                      where plant-based steak vs animal-based steak were both cooked up by a chef..

                      then offered to passing farmers to taste/compare..

                      they couldn't tell the difference between the two – none of them doubting it was 'meat' – and some preferring the plant-based..

                      so..can we take the tastes etc the same as a given..?

                      which brings me back to my original question..

                      will you really still insist on the side-dish – of possible bowel-cancer..?

                      with yr bacon..?

                      (not to mention the enviro-damage – and the animal-suffering..eh..?..(‘cos we don’t talk about that do we..?..esp. the animal suffering..

                      ir’s all really about what you (and others )like to eat..eh..?

                      nothing else really matters..eh..?

                    • The Al1en

                      Again, someone who doesn't eat the product, who relies on anecdotal evidence for their sermon, isn't really qualified to make sweeping statements.

                      As for the animal, I eat them, they are food. Your spin, the cow concentration camps as you've called it, doesn't bother me in the slightest. We've done the suffering argument just recently, so no need to play that game on repeat, as much as you have to try.

                      I do enjoy a bacon sandwich, but as I only eat the good stuff which is expensive, it's a treat more tHan a staple. The cancer risk is not really a worry to me, certainly not as much as it should be to a long term weed smoker for example.

                • Stuart Munro.

                  It's a funny thing but observation is not overruled by opinion, however authoritative.

                  As for health warnings – there's not much they haven't warned about, or worse, called safe and had to retract, somewhere along the line – that's the beauty of empiricism.

                  • oh..ok..so you just go with yr 'feelings' on such matters..

                    and what i have cited to you re bacon = bowel-cancer isn't an 'opinion' of mine – as such..eh..?

                    i am not saying it..

                    i am just reporting what those with the requisite medical-expertise are saying – as a fact..

                    try not to confuse the two..

                    and will you answer that question:

                    if it looks/tastes/smells/chews the same – will you still insist on those three side-dishes of enviro-impact/animal-suffering/poss. bowel-cancer..

                    with yr 'bacon'..?

                    (we are getting close to the nub of this matter – i feel..

                    this is what it boils down to..)

    • mauī 11.4

      Ah the crystal clear waters of the Selwyn just happen to empty into one of the most polluted lakes in the countries…. what awfully "bad luck" for such a clean river… cool

      …is only one of the measures needed to clean up Lake Ellesmere, which is described as the second most polluted lake in the country.

      https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/65159/change-to-conservation-order-for-lake-ellesmere

    • Gabby 11.5

      They're in the cold hard ground Enny, unless they were cremated.

  12. would it be really radical to suggest these dairy farms be converted to growing vegetables etc..?

    • The Al1en 12.1

      Not radical, but still a bit stupid to suggest land like Canterbury, with regards to water use and nitrate leeching, unsuitable for dairy could be replaced by vegetable growing. Best leave the unsuitable areas and farm the best bits.

      https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/108956057/replacing-cows-with-vegetables-actually-wouldnt-be-better-for-our-waterways-at-all

      Many people will be surprised to know that market gardening leaches three times more nitrogen than dairy farming.

      There are plenty of papers out there showing leaching of over 170 kg N/ha/yr for various vegetable crops.

      How can it be, that vegetables leach more than dairy cows?

      Market gardeners apply quite high rates of nitrogen fertiliser to each crop.

      Vegetables are generally fast-growing crops. That means they harvest multiple crops and therefore they are cultivating their paddocks multiple times every year.

      Cultivation increases N leaching.

      • Robert Guyton 12.1.1

        Canterbury is not dairy or vegetable country, both being monocultures.

        Canterbury would be Eden, if planted as a woodland; mixed cropping; that's the future.

        There can be animals in there too; if the stock-people get their scat together!

        • The Al1en 12.1.1.1

          Yep, I was going to edit my post to say 'leave it to the forests and fit in around it’

        • weka 12.1.1.2

          So much potential! I bet there's all sorts of people on the Plains already doing lots of interesting things in that geography and climate.

        • Ian 12.1.1.3

          .Why do you feed the urban taliban with lies about dairyfarming.Whydo you call dairying a monoculture .A Canterbury woodland and a 1975 norwester .You are mad.

          • Robert Guyton 12.1.1.3.1

            "urban Taliban"

            Who, exactly, is mad?

            • Ian 12.1.1.3.1.1

              Robert. You cherry pick the argument. You deliberately distort the truth when you descibe Canterbury dairy farming as a monoculture. You Know full well that woodlands on the Canterbury plains have a a major threat of windblow and because you seem to have a guru status among many urbanites they all get sucked in by your pseudo academic dribble. Try and be honest and stick to the truth. You may even get re elected

              • weka

                How many animal species are there on a dairy farm?

                • Incognito

                  Two

                • Ian

                  We have humans,bovines,chickens,dogs,cats,stoats,wild pigs,wild deer,hares,rabbits,other birds including Quail,pheasant,paradise duck,shoveller duck,teal,blue heron,native oyster catcher,spur wing plover,yellow hammers waxeyes,fantails,bellbirds,pukekos,thrushes,blackbirds,,magpies,pigeons,rats,mice,possums

                  Then there is all the invertabrets including many native species including grass grub and porina and of course our native skinks that are thriving along the shelter belts that we don't get carbon credits for some obscure reason.

                  Then we have the frogs and the long finnedeels and the native freshwater mussels and of course the mudfish and the giant kokopu. ALL thriving on Canterbury dairyfarms.

                  The list goes on and on.

                  • weka

                    Not your typical dairy farm then. What's in the paddock that the cows are in?

                    • Ian

                      Rotational grazing is something we are good at. The cows get to meet everyone over time. I often wonder what they think of the tourists shitting in the shelter belt alongside the main road.

                    • weka

                      Lol.

                      How many cows do you have Ian?

                      Having all those species makes you different from many dairy farms. The ones I am familiar with are still cutting down trees and fitting as many cows on as possible. I have sympathy for anyone that feels the stress of public opprobrium. I think the problem farmers have just gone on too long and people feel powerless to stop it. I can't stand that the rivers I love are polluted or that we are still cutting down trees to put in industrial irrigation. It's just wrong, and unnecessary, there are other ways to farm.

                  • marty mars

                    "ALL thriving on Canterbury dairyfarms."

                    lol except when the shit is hosed into the waterways, or sprayed on the paddocks.

              • Robert Guyton

                "You Know full well that woodlands on the Canterbury plains have a major threat of windblow"

                That's because there's too few of them: join them up and they won't blow over. Underplant them with a mix of supportive shrubs, herbs and vines and they'll be rock-solid in the face of any gale. Dairy farms lack diversity, despite the plaintive wails of industry spinmeisters. Pre-agricultural Planet Earth was rich, rich I tells ya, in life. We've stripped the place all-but-clean and we're still stripping as fast as we can go. How many native frogs live on dairy farms in NZ? How many geckoes, titi, peripatus, kahukaura, kahikatea and so on? Precious few.

                • Ian

                  Christchurch was a swamp.Lets demolish all the buildings ,recycle the concrete and steel and restore the original wetlands.You have got to be nuts.Dairy farms are developing diversity rapidly ,Robert . Not that you would notice or give any recognition too.I hear your plea ,but your at the extreme end of the spectrum,but probably not when I read the absolute bollocks the urban Taliban come up with. You guys need to be a lot more considerate to the wellbeing and mental health of the people you are attacking.It is not easy being a dairy farmer at the moment.

                  • Stuart Munro.

                    "Lets demolish all the buildings ,recycle the concrete and steel and restore the original wetlands."

                    Brownlee did that – called it the "Red Zone" like something out of The Stalker.

                  • vto

                    Ian, you're full of shit, and pretty much every one of your points above in the various posts are demonstrably untrue.

                    I will repeat again – you lot were told in the 90's that if dairy was intensified then the waterways will be degraded and the drinking water will get polluted. You lot ignored that and went ahead anyway – now the waterways are degraded and the drinking water is polluted. What a bunch of c&%#s.

                    Dairy has not earned a place in Canterbury. It does not deserve to stay.

                    Take your shit elsewhere. The resentment at your actions since the 90's is intense

                    • Ian

                      Abuse is all you are good at. How about some facts to prove I am wrong. Your full of soundbites, angst and envy and you better believe the resentment building from rural NZ towards the urban Taliban you represent is intense.

                      [lots of soundbitey, angry people on both sides. And abuse. ‘Full of shit’ and ‘urban Taliban’ are both terms designed to provoke a reaction. Maybe both Ian and vto can post support for their arguments rather than this degenerating into a flame war. Thanks – weka]

                    • weka

                      mod note for Ian and vto above.

          • phillip ure 12.1.1.3.2

            'urban taliban'…

            (i feel a t-shirt coming on..say it loud – and say it proud..!)

    • bwaghorn 12.2

      You need to import several million more people or it would go to waste . A very small % of the land around ohakune grows carrots yet many tonnes of 2nd grade carrots get fed to stock.

  13. Pat 13

    "There’s an obvious need to offer a just transition for dairy and tourism workers too, because they are both industries where cuts will have to be made. It’s not something either industry wants to hear and there’ll be resistance, but if we can at least start talking about how we can look after dairy and tourism workers into the future then that’s a good thing.”

    Oosterman says it’s not an easy message to deliver, but the sooner we start talking about it as a country the better.

    “In order to mobilise people to support this vision and to address big picture stuff, we will need a shift towards a fairer taxation system and more generous social welfare. It’s certainly not straightforward, and it’s urgent – we don’t have long to do this.”

    https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2019/09/04/788463/climate-despair-and-eco-anxiety

    The observation that the reforms of the 80s were necessary but poorly executed has been forwarded by the PM during and since the election and any future radical transition requires better protections for those negatively impacted…a view supported by those discussing globalisation in general….IF (and that is yet to be decided) we are going to attempt to address CC then we must present a roadmap that addresses the concerns of the vested interests…that is not to say we roll over and give everything demanded but a viable exit strategy must be offered for whether we like it or not the productive sector has always been the primary concern of governments and economists…and it needs to occur yesterday.

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    Howard Hurst, University of Central Lancashire and Jack Hardwicke, University of Winchester Competitive road cycling is a demanding and unique sport. One where crashing is inevitable – especially at the professional level. While the risk of head injury is relatively low in cycling – approximately 5-13% – compared to contact ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    5 days ago
  • The coming US shitshow
    Today President Trump once again refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses the US election. Coincidentally, The Atlantic has a long article on exactly what that means, from voter suppression by armed thugs in the name of "ballot security", to refusing to allow the vote ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    5 days ago
  • A moral void
    That's the only way to describe the SIS, who - like their British counterparts - decided to look the other way on child abuse: The SIS knew a young woman was being sexually abused by her father but failed to lodge a complaint with the police, effectively allowing the ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    5 days ago
  • When will Goldsmith resign?
    The National Party’s campaign has gone from bad to worse with a further two large miscalculations being uncovered in their alternative fiscal plan. Firstly, National’s economic spokesperson and list MP, Paul Goldsmith, used May's Budget figures instead of last week's PREFU numbers, and came up with a whopping $4.3 billion ...
    5 days ago
  • The Adventures of Annalax: Part IX
    The initial session was a struggle. Annalax and Magni tried sorting out the details with the Isaac twins (the people pursuing the mountain trip). Annalax happened to mention his devotion to Lolth… whom the Isaacs, being ...
    5 days ago
  • This is bullshit
    On March 13, three plainclothes police officers kicked in Breonna Taylor's door under a no-knock warrant targeting another person. When a person inside reasonably assumed they were home invaders and (this being America) started shooting, they shot up the place and everyone around them - killing Taylor. Today, one of ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    5 days ago
  • Arctic sea ice is being increasingly melted from below by warming Atlantic water
    Tom Rippeth, Bangor University Arctic sea ice today (white) is covering a much smaller area than in 1980-2010 (orange line). National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, CC BY-SA Each September, scientists like me look out for the point when the Arctic’s meagre summer fizzles out and ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    5 days ago
  • The long-term health burden of COVID-19: further justification for NZ’s elimination strategy
    Prof John D. Potter* This blog briefly surveys the emerging scientific evidence on the longer-term burden of symptoms and disease in survivors of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many of these symptoms point to damage in the brain and heart. These long-term harms add to the wide range of other reasons for ...
    SciBlogsBy Public Health Expert
    5 days ago
  • Going High, Going Low: An Assessment Of The First Leaders’ Debate.
    Uncrushed: Jacinda Ardern knew exactly what was expected of her in the first Leaders' Debate. Labour’s dominant position, three weeks out from the general election, is constructed out of the admiration and gratitude of hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders who, more often than not, vote National.  Nothing she said ...
    5 days ago
  • The smokefree policies of political parties: Do they care about people who smoke?
    George Thomson*, Nick Wilson, Janet Hoek, Andrew Waa, Richard Edwards In this time of Covid-19, helping people who smoke to quit their addiction has an even greater importance. Smokers are more vulnerable to many harmful health effects, including severe effects from the virus. Policies that support people who smoke to ...
    SciBlogsBy Public Health Expert
    5 days ago
  • The Fog Of Economic Policy Is Starting To Clear…
    Bryan Bruce, https://www.facebook.com/www.redsky.tv, 19 September 2020 National’s economic policy of temporary tax cuts yesterday proved, if proof be needed, that they are unapologetic neoliberals. While their claim that with more money in their pockets people will spend more might sound attractive, the reality is that tax cuts always benefit the ...
    Closing the GapBy Tracey Sharp
    5 days ago
  • Skeptical Science New Research for Week #38, 2020
    Highlighted article: Carbon pricing and planetary boundaries  Engström et al take what might be called a systems approach to evaluating carbon pricing, taking into a account various economic sectors affected by and affecting paying for emissions. The conclusions are overall a rare pleasant surprise— a feature predicated on cooperation.  Abstract: ...
    6 days ago
  • Humans ignite almost every wildfire that threatens homes
    Nathan Mietkiewicz, National Ecological Observatory Network and Jennifer Balch, University of Colorado Boulder CC BY-ND Summer and fall are wildfire season across the western U.S. In recent years, wildfires have destroyed thousands of homes, forced hundreds of thousands of people to evacuate and exposed tens of millions to harmful ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    6 days ago
  • Climate Change: China steps up
    China has increased its climate change ambition, and set a target to be carbon-neutral by 2060: China will reach carbon neutrality before 2060 and ensure its greenhouse gas emissions peak in the next decade, Xi Jinping has told the UN general assembly. “China will scale up its intended nationally ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • Humans have dealt with plenty of climate variability
    Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz How much climate variability have humans dealt with since we ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    6 days ago
  • Indigenous perspectives on unrestricted access to genomic data
    By Genomics Aotearoa researcher Maui Hudson, University of Waikato It is vital that genomics research respects genomic data and genetic heritage from indigenous communities. Genomics research is a rapidly growing field of study, and there is a strong push to make the huge amount of data being produced open ...
    SciBlogsBy Genomics Aotearoa
    6 days ago
  • Terrible luck: lockdowns on learning and youth job prospects
    What is bad luck? Bad luck is spilling spaghetti sauce down your shirt right before an important meeting. When the person in front of you gets the last seat on the bus, that’s bad luck. Bad luck is when it’s sunny outside, so you leave the house without a coat, ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    6 days ago
  • Ian Powell: Does private healthcare threaten public healthcare in New Zealand?
    Is the private health system impacting negatively on the public health system? Health commentator Ian Powell evaluates a recent NZ Herald article by Natalie Akoorie (“Public v private healthcare: Moonlighting, skimming, duplication – should NZ do better”), and looks at how the dual system works, and concludes that the answer ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    6 days ago
  • A rabbit-hole election debate: So do you want more avocado orchards?
    We live in strange and unusual times. It’s been a century since we’ve endured a global pandemic like this, more than half a century since we’ve had economic woes like this. So maybe we got an opening election debate for the times - because that was a strange and unusual ...
    PunditBy Tim Watkin
    6 days ago
  • LIVE: Jacinda Ardern vs. Judith Collins, First Debate
    Tonight, The Civilian will be live-blogging the first of too many debates between Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and National Party leader Judith Collins, and also the last fifteen minutes of the news. Be sure to tune in from 6:45pm for regular updates, which can be accessed by refreshing this page ...
    The CivilianBy admin
    7 days ago
  • Hundreds of Aucklanders arrested after illegal mass gathering on Harbour Bridge
    An enormous drive-in party, shown here, was held this morning on Auckland’s Harbour Bridge, where police were forced to intervene. Hundreds of Aucklanders were arrested this morning on public health grounds, after an apparent illegal mass gathering on the city’s Harbour Bridge. Police say hundreds of Aucklanders gathered in their ...
    The CivilianBy admin
    7 days ago
  • The Looming Fight.
    Social Distancing Be Damned - It's Jacinda! Shortly after ascending to Labour’s leadership, Jacinda described herself as a “pragmatic idealist”. It was an inspired oxymoron – packing into just two words the essence of the social-democrat’s dilemma. It was good to know that she knew what lay ahead of her. ...
    7 days ago
  • Climate Change: Moving faster
    Back in 2017, the UK announced that it would ban the sale of new fossil fuel vehicles by 2040. Its a basic climate change measure, aimed at reducing emissions by shifting the vehicle fleet to cleaner technologies. Now, in the wake of the pandemic, they're planning to bring it forward ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    7 days ago
  • The Australian courts have had enough of refugee detention
    For the past decade, Australia has had a racist, anti-refugee policy. Those claiming refugee status are imprisoned without trial and left to rot in the hope they would "voluntarily" return to be tortured and murdered. When the courts have granted them visas, the government has immediately revoked them on racial ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    7 days ago
  • Friction and the Anti-lock Braking System
    Yesterday afternoon I had to call on my car’s anti-lock braking system (ABS). For reasons best known to its driver, a car pulled out of a side road right in front of me while I was driving home after work, and I needed to stop in a hurry. I rather ...
    SciBlogsBy Marcus Wilson
    7 days ago
  • The Inside Word: New Zealand Quarantine
    There are a fair few misconceptions about conditions within New Zealand’s Quarantine Hotels. Madeline Grant’s misplaced accusations being one prominent example, though she is not alone. Today, I thought I’d share the inside word, so to speak. A friend of mine has recently returned to New Zealand from overseas, and ...
    7 days ago
  • Hard News: ASA: Let’s not talk about this
    Last week, major newspapers carried a full-page ad as part of the campaign for a "No" vote to the referendum question about supporting the Cannabis Legalisation and Control Bill. The ad was authorised by the SAM NZ Coalition, which takes its name from a controversial American anti-cannabis group and includes ...
    7 days ago
  • This is not kind
    New Zealand has a serious homelessness problem, due to skyrocketing rents and a lack of state houses. One of the ways we stick a band-aid on it is to put people up in motels. Previously, they were charged full commercial rates, saddled with odious debt due to the government's failure ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    7 days ago
  • Wokies are the establishment
    by Ani O’Brien In the absence of a better word with which to refer to the rabid activists who claim progressivism while demanding adherence to an increasingly prescriptive set of political beliefs, I call them “woke”. With its roots in Black American slang, the term originally denoted a person or ...
    RedlineBy Daphna
    1 week ago
  • How to strengthen the post-isolation Covid rules
    Over the weekend, the Ministry of Health reported a case of Covid-19 in Auckland that is not related to the current Auckland cluster. Before we start to panic, here’s how I think the case happened and how we can strengthen our current border controls. The new Covid-19 case is someone ...
    SciBlogsBy Siouxsie Wiles
    1 week ago
  • Neuralink and You: A Human-AI Symbiosis
    Becky Casale Elon Musk reckons his Neuralink brain implant is much more than a medical device–that one day it will drive a symbiosis between humans and artificial intelligence. “Good morning! I’m Dr Benedict Egg and I’ll be supervising your Neuralink insertion today. Do you have any questions?” “Yes, Doc. ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    1 week ago
  • Liam Hehir: Our obsession with American politics
    Many New Zealanders take a strong interest in US politics, with the death of Supreme Court Judge Ruth Bader Ginsberg being the latest example. Liam Hehir wonders if it very wise for New Zealanders to get so worked about it.   Many politically engaged New Zealanders are now furiously ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    1 week ago
  • COVID: Back to Level 1
    After stamping the Coronavirus out via strict lockdown between March and May, New Zealand went through a good three months without any community cases. Then a local outbreak in Auckland rather buggered things up last month. Auckland’s been in level 3 and level 2.5 for the past six weeks. ...
    1 week ago
  • Climate Change: Climate injustice
    Who's causing our skyrocketing emissions? As with most of our other problems, It's the rich: The wealthiest 1% of the world’s population were responsible for the emission of more than twice as much carbon dioxide as the poorer half of the world from 1990 to 2015, according to new ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Good riddance
    The border closure and resulting lack of foreign slave-workers is driving the fishing industry out of business: One fishing company is effectively out of business while others are bracing for large financial hits as the deepwater New Zealand industry, unable to get skilled foreign workers into the country, have ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • 2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #38
    Story of the Week... Toon of the Week... Coming Soon on SkS... Climate Feedback Claim Review... SkS Week in Review... Poster of the Week... Story of the Week... The tipping points at the heart of the climate crisis Many parts of the Earth’s climate system have been destabilised by ...
    1 week ago
  • Anyone for Collins?
    In the absence of national public opinion polls, we have had to make do in recent weeks with other guides to voter intentions. Those guides, such as the Auckland Central poll, the incidence of google enquiries and the responses to Vote Compass questions, have suggested, not unexpectedly, that Labour is ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    1 week ago
  • Crusher’s fiscal malfunction
    Crusher Collins - National Party leaderWe all know that the National Party is desperate to gain some traction during this election campaign and have been throwing pretty much everything at the Labour Party in order to try and undermine Jacinda Ardern and what the Coalition Government has achieved. But unfortunately ...
    1 week ago
  • Much of the commentariat’s reporting of the most recent GDP figure was misleading and unhelpful. The prize for the stupidest remark about the GDP figure for second quarter 2020 (2020Q2) released on Thursday (17 Sept) goes to Judith Collins, whose response to Grant Robertson’s comments indicated she did not ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    1 week ago
  • Love and Hate as Complementary Revolutionary Acts
    by Gearóid Ó Loingsigh goloing@gmail.com (19/09/2020) Che Guevara said that a true revolutionary is motivated by love i.e. love of the oppressed, the poor, the children dying from preventable illnesses. This phrase of his is true but has been used by reformists and their more hippy wing have taken advantage ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    1 week ago
  • 2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #38
    A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, Sep 13, 2020 through Sat, Sep 19, 2020 Editor's Choice Get to Net-Zero by Mid-Century? Even Some Global Oil and Gas Giants Think it Can Be Done A report by a ...
    1 week ago
  • Tax cuts for all!!! (except you, you, and you)
    With the National Party this week announcing a new policy of tax cuts to spice up the election campagin. MyThinks went along to the launch and afterwards we spoke to the party’s finance spokesperson Paul “Golden Touch” Goldsmith. MT: Thanks for speaking to us Mr Goldsmith. PG: No. Thank you. ...
    My ThinksBy boonman
    1 week ago
  • Great Waves Washing Over New Zealand
    Always to islanders danger Is what comes over the seas ‘Landfall in Unknown Seas’ (Allen Curnow)Six economic issues external to New Zealand, which will greatly impact upon us. 1.         The Diminishing Global Dominance of the US. Since 1941 America has dominated the world economically and politically. Probably it could ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand has role to play in resolving crisis on ‘geopolitical fault line’, Helen Clark says
    By Geoffrey Miller New Zealand should continue to champion human rights in Belarus amidst an ongoing crackdown on protests by the country’s regime, former Prime Minister Helen Clark says. Protests in the country often referred to as ‘Europe’s last dictatorship’ erupted after the country’s disputed presidential elections on August 9 ...
    Democracy ProjectBy Geoffrey Miller
    2 weeks ago
  • Euthanasia referendum: How to cut through the emotions
    Jacqui Maguire, registered clinical psychologist This podcast episode highlights how difficult it is to have effective conversations about euthanasia due to how polarised people’s views are. I’m a clinical psychologist, with a passion for science communication. In early 2020 I founded the podcast Mind Brew, with an aim to make psychological ...
    SciBlogsBy Guest Author
    2 weeks ago
  • Why we need cameras on boats
    In case anyone needed further convincing, there's another example today of why we need cameras on fishing boats: reported seabird bycatch doubled during a camera trial: Commercial fishers operating off Auckland's coast around vulnerable seabirds are twice as likely to report accidentally capturing them when cameras are on ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 weeks ago
  • Graham Adams: The religious right’s campaign to spike the euthanasia referendum
    In the leadup to the euthanasia referendum, an array of conservative Christian political organisations is running an expensive campaign to sow doubt about the safety of assisted dying. Graham Adams argues that these religious forces know that Christian arguments aren’t convincing the public, but that it is in the public ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    2 weeks ago
  • Opportunistic looting
    The National Party has spent the last six months acting horrified at the cost of supporting people through the pandemic and banging on about how the debt must be repaid. So what was their economic policy released today? Massive tax-cuts for the rich, of course! National has walked back ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 weeks ago
  • Uncomfortable Choices.
    Dangerous Times: This will be the choice confronting those coming of age in the 2020s. Embrace Neoliberalism’s belief in racial and sexual equality; adopt its secular and scientific world view; and cultivate the technocratic, multicultural, global outlook required of those who keep the machinery of hyper-capitalism humming. Or, throw your ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Tony Burton: Covid and benefit payments
    It would be a great time to reform the benefit system, according to former Deputy Chief Economic Advisor at the Treasury, Tony Burton. He argues the complexity of benefit system means that it’s failing to achieve its difficult three core objectives, which form an “iron triangle”.   New Zealand’s benefit ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    2 weeks ago
  • Talking tax: How to win support for taxing wealth
    Tax Justice UK, September 2020 Serious tax reform is on the political agenda for the first time in decades due to the coronavirus crisis. As this debate hots up it is important to understand what people think about public spending, wealth and tax. Tax Justice UK, along with Survation and ...
    Closing the GapBy Tracey Sharp
    2 weeks ago
  • Getting Tough.
    Not Mucking Around: With upwards of 800 dead from the virus’s resurgence in the Australian state of Victoria, leniency is not on Premier Daniel Andrews’ agenda. The Victorian Police are cracking down hard on the protesters the Australian press has labelled "Covidiots".IMAGES OF POLICE, some in riot gear, others on ...
    2 weeks ago

  • Job numbers up in August
    New data from Stats NZ today shows a rise of more than 9,000 filled jobs from July – driven mostly by the education and training sector, Grant Robertson says. Filled jobs were up 9,147 to 2.2 million in August 2020 compared with July – with 7,409 of those in education ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • Māori development receives funding
    Māori development projects across the country will receive a total of $18.8 million from the Provincial Growth Fund that will create infrastructure and permanent jobs, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “These projects will support economic development in Northland, Bay of Plenty, Tairawhiti, Manawatū-Whanganui, Waikato and Southland to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • Hand-up for owners of earthquake-prone units
    From today, owner-occupiers of unit and apartments living in earthquake-prone buildings can apply for financial support to fix their homes, Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa says. The Residential Earthquake-Prone Building Financial Assistance Scheme will help unit owners facing financial hardship over earthquake strengthening costs. “We understand how complicated ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • PGF backing successful Māori enterprise
    Whanganui will benefit from a Provincial Growth Fund investment in a local food-processing company which will help the company increase production and create jobs, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones says. Kii Tahi Ltd, which is owned by South Taranaki iwi Ngaa Rauru Kiitahi, will receive a Provincial Growth Fund ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Hokitika Landmark earmarked for $22m restoration
    Seddon House in Hokitika, once a hub for government on the West Coast, has been earmarked for government use once again. “Today we’re announcing a $22 million investment from the Government’s $3 billion infrastructure fund for shovel ready projects for the purchase and restoration of Seddon House in the heart of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Town halls and war memorials in PGF renovation programme
    Town halls, war memorials and other community landmarks across the country will be renovated thanks to grants totalling just under $12.4 million from the Provincial Growth Fund. Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones says more than 1000 jobs are expected to be created during the renovation programme. “Town halls, other ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs makes two diplomatic appointments
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has announced two new diplomatic appointments: •         Michael Appleton as New Zealand’s first resident High Commissioner to Sri Lanka. •        Tredene Dobson as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Viet Nam.  Sri Lanka “New Zealand is opening a post in Colombo in 2021 because we are ready ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • NZ’s most prestigious conservation award – Loder Cup presented to Graeme Atkins
    The Minister of Conservation Minister, Eugenie Sage, today presented Aotearoa New Zealand’s most prestigious conservation award, the Loder Cup, to the 2020 winner Graeme Atkins while in Gisborne/Tūranga-nui-a-Kiwa. “Graeme Atkins of Ngāti Porou is a Department of Conservation ranger whose contribution to conservation goes well above and beyond his employment,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Early help for whānau who need extra support
    The Government is investing in a new, whānau-centred early intervention prototype designed to strengthen families and improve the safety and wellbeing of children. The new programme, Ngā Tini Whetū, is a collaboration between Oranga Tamariki, Te Puni Kōkiri, ACC and the Whānau Ora Commissioning Agency (WOCA) and was announced today ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Parliament to install solar and cut carbon
    Parliament is leading by example by taking action to cut its carbon footprint by installing solar and improving energy efficiency, the Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw said today. The Minister confirmed that Parliamentary Services will receive support through the Clean-Powered Public Service Fund to install solar PV and LED ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Tuvalu Language Week theme promotes community resilience in the face of COVID-19
    The Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio says the 2020 Tuvalu Language Week theme of “Fakatili Te Kiloga Fou” which means “Navigating the changing environment” is a call on all Pacific peoples to be strong and resilient in the face of COVID-19. “This theme is a reminder to us ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • International sport back up and running in New Zealand
    The Government is welcoming today’s announcement that the West Indies and Pakistan cricket teams will tour New Zealand this summer.  “A lot of hard work has been undertaken by sports officials including New Zealand Cricket, Netball New Zealand and government officials to ensure that international sport can return safely to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • 1BT funds for Northland forest taonga
    Northland’s indigenous tree canopy is set to grow for the benefit of mana whenua and the wider community thanks to nearly $2 million in One Billion Trees funding, Forestry Minister Shane Jones announced today. Te Komanga Marae Trust has received more than $1.54 million to restore and enhance the native ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Better health care for West Coasters as Te Nikau Hospital officially opened
    The Government has delivered a new hospital for Greymouth and is starting work on a much needed new health centre in Westport, ensuring local communities will benefit from better access to high quality integrated health services. Today, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Associate Health Minister Peeni Henare officially open Te ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government backing local with PGF loan
    A West Coast distillery will benefit from a Provincial Growth Fund investment that will enable it to expand its operations and create jobs in the town of Reefton, Rural Communities Minister Damien O’Connor and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. The Reefton Distilling Co will receive a $928,000 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Primary sector exports and jobs up again
    Primary sector exports and jobs are up again, demonstrating the sector’s underlying strength amid the COVID-19 global pandemic and US-China trade war, and supporting New Zealand’s economic recovery. Stats NZ today reported New Zealand’s merchandise exports in August were up 8.6% on a year ago, driven by an increase in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Clean energy future for more schools
    Schools across Aotearoa New Zealand will be supported by the Government to upgrade to run on clean energy, the Minister for Climate Change James Shaw announced today. The Minister has allocated $50 million from the Clean Powered Public Service Fund to replace, or convert, coal boilers in schools with clean ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Building business strength with digital tools
    New training and tools for digital commerce will give small businesses, especially in the tourism sector, the support they need to adapt and innovate in a COVID world. Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis and Small Business Minister Stuart Nash have announced details of how $20 million digital capability funding set aside ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New pest lures to protect nature
    The Department of Conservation (DOC) is investing $1.4 million to develop new predator lures that would be game-changers for trapping and surveillance towards a predator-free Aotearoa, the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage, announced in Christchurch today. The proposal is to develop long-life lures attractive to a range of predators—rats, mustelids ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Support for innovative Pacific education responses to COVID-19 needs
    Supporting new and creative Pacific education practices as part of our COVID-19 response and recovery is the focus of a new $28.5 million Pacific Education Innovation Fund announced today by Associate Minister of Education Jenny Salesa.  “There is already an incredible amount of innovative and creative work going on in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Eligibility expanded for COVID-19 leave support
    The expanded scheme will cover: People who have COVID-19 like symptoms and meet the Ministry of Health’s criteria, and need to self-isolate while awaiting the results of a COVID-19 test. People who are directed to self-isolate by a Medical Officer of Health or their delegate or on advice of their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Seasonal work visa available to more people
    The Government is putting in place a range of immigration policy changes to help fill labour shortages in key industries while ensuring New Zealanders, who have lost jobs due to COVID-19, have the chance to find new employment. “Two key sectors we are moving to help are horticulture and wine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • More border exceptions for critical roles
    The Government has established class exceptions for border entry for a limited number of veterinarians, deep sea fishing crew, as well as agricultural and horticultural machinery operators. “Tight border restrictions remain the backbone of the Government’s border strategy to protect New Zealand against COVID-19 and ensure New Zealand citizens and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Crown will not appeal Dodds v Southern Response decision
    The Crown will not appeal the Court of Appeal decision in the Dodds v Southern Response case, Grant Robertson announced today. “Southern Response will be paying the damages awarded by the Court to Mr and Mrs Dodds shortly. The Crown was already meeting their legal costs for this appeal. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Crucial PGF investments for Northland
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing nearly $30 million in a diverse range of projects that will create immediate and long-term jobs and lift economic and social outcomes for Northland and its people. Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones made the announcement today in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • $27million investment in global vaccine facility
    The Coalition Government has committed to invest $27 million in COVID-19 vaccine development through the global COVAX Facility, Foreign Minister Winston Peters announced today. “The COVAX Facility is a key part of our COVID-19 Vaccine Strategy to obtain safe and effective vaccines. It allows us to invest in a high-quality, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government backing Māori landowners
    The Government will provide up to $1.69 million through the One Billion Trees programme to Māori landowners to make their whenua more productive through the planting of forests, both native and exotic, and improve economic and environmental outcomes, Forestry Minister Shane Jones has announced. “Around 1.5 million ha of land ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New tools to make nature more accessible
    People planning to head outdoors now have a resource that lets them know how accessible an area is for people with varying levels of mobility, Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage announced today. The Halberg Foundation, Sensibel, and the Department of Conservation (DOC) have launched Accessibel, a new tool which helps ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • PGF makes Māori history more accessible
    One of the most significant battle sites of the 1860s Land Wars will receive $2.96 million from the Provincial Growth Fund to improve the site and help tell the New Zealand story to visitors, Māori Development Minister Nanaia Mahuta and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. Nanaia Mahuta ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Making it official: The journey of te reo Māori | Kia whakapūmautia: Ngā piki me ngā heke o te r...
    The journey towards recognising Māori as an official language and taonga has been captured as a web series and launched today during Te Wiki o te Reo Māori, announced Associate Arts, Culture and Heritage Minister Carmel Sepuloni. “Te reo Māori is a living language, and understanding its significance, and pathways to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
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  • Better-than-forecast GDP reflects decision to protect New Zealand
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