Open mike 30/04/2013

Written By: - Date published: 6:00 am, April 30th, 2013 - 75 comments
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Step right up to the mike…

75 comments on “Open mike 30/04/2013 ”

  1. Jenny 1

    A very good post on the Green Party website by Meteiria Turei condemning the government for pimping out our beautiful coastal environment to the highest bidder.

    http://www.greens.org.nz/press-releases/govt-exposing-auckland-dangers-deep-sea-drilling

    But doesn’t the Labour Party as well as the National Party in Government currently also support deep sea oil drilling and exploration?

    Could this be the deal breaker for a Labour/Green coalition government?

  2. Jenny 2

    The Green Party is condemning the Government for announcing the tender process today for new permits to conduct exploratory deep sea drilling in New Zealand waters off the west coast of the North Island and the east coast of the South Island. Much of the area is in deep water.

    “The Government is putting the economic interests of the oil companies over the environmental values of the people of New Zealand,”

    “The Government’s argument of an economic boon are rubbish. There is little evidence that there would be many jobs from these deep sea rigs and they put at risk the local economies if there is a spill.

    “With deep sea drilling the Government is pursuing a failed economic agenda that runs totally counter to our real economic advantages and opportunities.”

    Metiria Turei

    To have any meaning words need to be backed up with actions.

    The Green Party if they choose, could stop deep sea oil drilling now.

    A united opposition stand in parliament against deep sea oil exploration and drilling would have the effect of killing off the oil company investors enthusiasm to take up the current government’s offer.

    This is the time for the Green Party to put in a serious real world effort to win the Labour Party over to oppose deep sea oil drilling.

    To back up her words Meteiria Turei needs to take immediate action in the house, with a Green Party private member’s bill calling for a moratorium on all deep sea oil and gas drilling. And seriously lobby the Labour Party to back it.

    This needs to be dealt with now. Not in the closed, heated, hot house environment of rushed coalition talks held behind closed doors following an election.

    If the Green Party Bill is drawn from the ballot and the Labour Party refuse to support it and instead choose to stand with the Nats, instead of their future coalition partner, then the respective parties will know where they all stand, and will be able to make their future coalition decisions based on that.

    Likewise the voting public will know where to place an informed vote, instead of being kept in the dark and crossing their fingers as they vote, hoping that it works out.

    If on the other hand……

    The Labour Party do agree to back the Green Party private members bill to turn it into an opposition members bill to banish deep sea oil drilling from our economic zone then this as well as driving investors off, would set the strong foundations for a principled coalition that will stand the test of time.

    Mark my words

    For the Green Party to ignore this major policy difference between the two major opposition parties at this time and place and leave it for later, will be a major tactical error that will see Turiana’s good words being turned into empty rhetoric in the name of pragmatism and under the pressure of “real politik”, to be left on the cutting room floor, during future coalition talks, to the disappointment of Green Party members and supporters.

    Nobody can say it hasn’t happened before.

    • prism 2.1

      Trouble about the jobs burble. They are temporary construction stuff and when done they are gone and the new ones arising are fewer and may not be available to locals, but the often tenuous economy of the surrounding towns has changed and life is more difficult, houses dearer etc and still not many jobs.

  3. So Auckland Council wants to consult with Aucklanders about our transport future. There is a significant funding hole if all important projects are proceeded with.

    There needs to be a debate about how these projects are funded and it is proper to put the evidence in front of the people and ask them for their view.

    So what does the Government do? It effectively sabotages the consultation on day one by ruling out most of the possible funding mechanisms.

    Why can’t it wait for the evidence to be properly analysed and for the people to speak? What is it afraid of?

    • freedom 3.1

      What is it afraid of? My guess would be, reality

    • David H 3.2

      Sometimes I am so glad I live in Levin, No traffic Jams, (No Car) cheap rents, can get everywhere by bike. Yep no jobs I know, also no 2 hour stress fest morning and night either.

      • freedom 3.2.1

        and we have Te Takere !

        but yeah, the dearth of employment opportunities is a growing concern

        • David H 3.2.1.1

          But it’s also way safer to bring up my 2 year old, very few cars. But I do know one thing my Blood pressure has gone down since I left the Capital, and it’s rat race. But my littley does keep it bouncing now he can climb.

        • David H 3.2.1.2

          It’s a damn site better than what was offered before and all under the same roof. and it will be good when it’s all finished. Oh well I seem to work when Labour is in power, and am on the dole when the Nats get in, and fuck up the economy again.

      • ianmac 3.2.2

        Yes David H. We too in Marlborough have all those that you have (but so far we have only roundabouts- no traffic lights where you have 2 sets.) I am bemused that so many people choose to live in big cities! They seem to have so much against making their lives enjoyable. I don’t get it.

        • karol 3.2.2.1

          Some of us were born in cities, and have our roots there. It’s also where the jobs are. There are also many other exciting benefits to living in cities, if they were organised for the benefit of all, and not dominated by the wealthiest of the propertied classes.

          • David H 3.2.2.1.1

            I know Carol being born and bred London style. Now that’s a city. I used to go on the train from Deptford to new Cross and then

            • karol 3.2.2.1.1.1

              Hah! Worked and studied in that area back in the 80s and early 90s – cycled many times between Newcross, Walthamstow and Stockwell – sometimes doing a whole round trip to those areas on the same day, and into the evening. Cycling seemed relatively safe back then too.

          • David H 3.2.2.1.2

            I know being London born and bred. Now there’s a city full of history, I used to go to all the Museums (Not fussed on the stately homes) Growing up in South east London in the 60’s was fun working down the Markets at Deptford. I think we got out at the right time 1969.

          • The Pink Postman 3.2.2.1.3

            Well Karol I was born in Sydenham in a hovel owned bybthe Duke of Westminster ,
            We were hard up,but happy Then along came Hitler who seemed to have grudge for me bombing us out three times . 3 new places in 6 years finished up in a flat above The shops in Lordship Lane in Dulwich , Then served my apprenticeship in Newmarket . later on moved to Epsom and courted my wife who lived in the East End by biking from Epsom 3 or 4 nights a week . Married and lived in the country ever since ,60m years inFeb.
            Used to stop for pie at a pie stall in New Cross on the way back .

            • Anne 3.2.2.1.3.1

              Were you born within the sound of Bow Bells Pink Postman? My father was… although his family shifted soon afterwards. He loved telling Kiwis he was a Cockney even though he had no Cockney accent. As a child I never tired of listening to the stories and songs of old London. Seen the Julie Andrews film ‘Mary Poppins’ half a dozen times.

            • karol 3.2.2.1.3.2

              Damn, you’ve seen some changes, TPP. Epsom to the East End is a long commute by bike.

              I remember hearing some of the Blitz stories when I lived in London. 60 years married! Congratulations – a full, productive and interesting life so far.

            • halfcrown 3.2.2.1.3.3

              Hi Pink Postman Like to hear others tales about where they come from. You mentioned New Cross I used to go to New Cross as that was where Millwall had there football ground. Great childhood days prior to the Thatcher shit with a lot of care by the so called “lower” classes. I remember as a kid the grown ups putting their hands on the wall of the exit stairs forming a tunnel so all us kids could get out safely. just like today eh. I think it would do good for some of these right wing prats to live in that type of community, it might teach them that there is more to life than screwing everybody for a dollar.

            • David H 3.2.2.1.3.4

              And the Winkle stall, with the Jellied eels, and Pie and Mushy Peas. Ahhh theMemories
              My stepfather ran the Centurian public house in Deptford, A 3 story edifice Well to a 11 year old it was, with lots of rooms to play in, and the roof to sit, and get soaked in the Thunderstorms.

        • David H 3.2.2.2

          But I have found that Roundabouts can be more hazardous to your health, than Traffic lights, especially when on a bike.

          • prism 3.2.2.2.1

            David H
            Your remark about roundabouts triggered a thought I’ve had for a while. Courtesy on the roads – could be a great facilitator for better conditions and less accidents.

            And one thing would be that at roundabouts a driver should slow a little say 10km or change down, which gives time for other traffic to enter or pass safely. The extra seconds provided by just a more deliberate approach to a roundabout, give way etc. would allow other traffic to go. Instead people often maintain a 50 kmh speed up to and through, and hardly seem aware of others around them. Get them up in a high 4WD and they’re like royalty in a world of their own.

            • karol 3.2.2.2.1.1

              In my experience the practices of (mainly Auckland) drivers are puzzling. When there are road works, with signs showing the stretch of road has a 30 or 40 kph speed limit, I seem to be one of the few drivers that actually slow down. And I usually feel pressured by other drivers to go faster.

              Usually there are clear reasons why there is a temporarily low speed limit – workers working near to the stream of traffic, uneven road surface, narrowed road with little space for diverging in case of a collision, etc.

              Ditto for people slowing down when approaching a pedestrian crossing. Some drivers seem to have no respect for anyone else, just an attitude of getting to their destination as fast as possible. Why the constant need for so much haste?

              “More haste, less speed”.

              • felix

                I thought I was the only one who actually slows down to 30.

                Pisses me right off seeing people ignore those signs. I don’t mind that they aren’t concerned for their own safety, but they could give a thought to the people working within feet of their hurtling block of steel.

              • halfcrown

                Kasrol

                Unfortunately that is the world today. Get out of my fucking way, you are stopping me from making or getting a another dollar.

                [lprent: I think that I can help. Would you like to not be able to comment here? That would give you the time.

                You really are a dickshit – do something that is more than stupid trolling. Or leave one way or another. ]

                • halfcrown

                  Karol

                  My apologies for spelling your name wrong. My arthritis does not get my fingers on the right keys at times, and I find this site a shit to edit.
                  Regards

                • prism

                  I think halfcrown was echoing a current zeitgeist which he doesn’t agree with – being sarc/satirical.

              • prism

                karol
                Is the behaviour we mostly display as drivers an indication of national character? Some people are unwilling to limit or control themselves for their, and others, safety.
                That can be applied to more situations than that of driving too.

                Drivers seem to be very self-centred – who lifts a hand for a thank-you gesture to a car that makes way for you when not legally obliged, who gives a couple of short toots to a large vehicle that moves over to let you past etc. I usually do, but don’t notice many others though it used to be common in my younger days. (I’m probably thinking prior to 1984 when we were sprayed and saturated with the propaganda of – ‘There is no such thing as society.’)

            • David H 3.2.2.2.1.2

              “a driver should slow a little say 10km” It’s not Rocket Science is it? And when I drove I always slowed down because of the danger.

      • Te Reo Putake 3.2.3

        CHH may be looking for temps, if its any help. It’s not the busy season yet, but they do have a regular turnover in the casual pool. Reasonably well paid, unionised site. They use the temp pool to assess whether to hire workers as permanents, so it might be a foot in the door for you or other family members who are looking for a long term job.

        And if you can ever get a start at Graphic Press, you’ve won the job lottery! One of the most amazing worksites I’ve ever been in, with a genuine commitment to profit sharing and total respect for their workers. Lovely place.

        Levana … not so much!

      • aerobubble 3.2.4

        30G is just stingy, the rent seeker in our elites just can’t seem to understand, their greed is a corruption of our economic health, and we’d all be richer should they remove the private tax shackles evident in all areas of our economy. In order for them to get rich, they need to leverage their existing capital to multipliers of what is sensible, and to maintain their solvency they need mum and dad nz to pay the interest on the debt. Its wrong, its extortion, its bad economics.
        Broadband will open up small town NZ with huge opportunities to have the lifestyle and the means to sustain it. Well it would if the rent seekers weren’t so stingy with 30G a month.

    • karol 3.3

      Thanks, micky. I have been thinking of doing another Auckland post, particularly on how the NZ herald is blatantly opposed to the Auckland Unitary Plan. Just too many things happening right now.

      But the Auckland Transport Blog has done some very good posts on the NZ Herald’s blatant bias against the AUP and the City Central Rail Loop – so many NZH articles opposed to the AUP that it is looking like a concerted campaign.

      • mickysavage 3.3.1

        It is interesting Karol that out west the Unitary Plan is not raising anything like the sort of opposition that central and north Auckland is showing.

        I believe it is because locally we have been talking about intensification around Henderson and New Lynn and in a smaller way around Glen Eden for the past decade as well as at the same time trying to preserve the Waitakere Ranges by holding the MUL in place. The area is already developing the way that the rest of the city will hopefully.

        The alternative of uncontrolled urban sprawl is too awful to comprehend. You just have to think about the problems associated with uncontrolled sprawl with a lack of community infrastructure to realise how stupid this is.

        We should have learned about this from suburbs such as Kelston, Otara, Managere, Flat Bush, Birkdale etc where they basically plonked a whole lot of houses in with no cultural centre. These areas are full of good people but they are handicapped because they are just a collection of roads and houses and have not social centre.

        Surely we should have learned from the experience.

    • muzza 3.4

      Why does there need to be a debate – Just issue the funds required, at close to zero %, for the key transport programmes to go ahead, get it done!

      This continued nonsense of *manufactured scarcity*, and having to raise steal the funds, by borrowing and/or picking the pokets of Aucklanders, even further!

      Only debate needs to be , which projects to get moving first!

    • muzza 3.5

      MS – which funding options has it ruled out?

    • Elizabeth Bourchier 3.6

      The Wellington mandarin’s and the Agri lobby block do not want Auckland to have an dffective tax raising power. And they collectively manipulate Smith et al.

      Why stop Auckland have an effective tax base and control over its destiny?

      It looks like it will be controlled by leftish people for the foreseeable future.
      It is not controlled by big business.
      It owes no allegiances to the primary industries sector.

  4. freedom 4

    A handy resource for battling the privatisation of Education in New Zealand, and other issues of course http://saveourschoolsnz.wordpress.com/do-something/

  5. AsleepWhileWalking 5

    Pissed off the Parekura isn’t given as much attention on the front page of Stuff as the Jamie’s World child.

      • tc 5.1.1

        Yup, scot free for Hotchin/Watson etc not even any corporate breach charges on care of duty issues against boys club members like Muir. Wish I could’ve laid odds at the TAB on it, a shoe in.

        This is one reason why we can’t attract foreign investment, no effective policing of the cowboys club. The SFO is a F’n joke just the way neo lib’s like it while they PPP up more incarceration capacity for the masses.

        However foreign investors will line up for the family silverware such as MRP etc.

  6. karol 6

    TV3 Reid poll – wrong & poorly constructed question.

    The questions in the poll said: “The Government Communications Securities Bureau the GCSB is responsible for defending New Zealand against an increasing number of cyber attacks, but it’s been caught up in controversy, including potentially illegal spying on 88 people including New Zealand citizens and residents. Can our GCSB spies be trusted to act in the best interests of New Zealanders?”

    There is a load of bias in the lead up to the question. And the question should really be about the spy boss and the role of the PM in providing oversight, not the spy-workers who are most likely following orders or set parameters for their activities.

  7. felix 7

    On Backbenches last week that horrible little turd Jamie Lee Ross once again repeated his favourite trite Thatcherism about how “the problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money to spend”.

    Apparently he’s too thick to notice that the slogan implies that the people who oppose socialism are the ones who want to spend other people’s money.

    Thatcher: evil and thick. Jamie: just thick.

    • vto 7.1

      “the problem with capitalism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money to steal”

    • muzza 7.2

      Repeating such pure cliché, is the sign of a very ill-informed individual, who was *selected* for his ability to bend over, and to repeat the messages he has been brainwashed into believing!

      As felix points out, very thick, but a supporter of evil none the less!

  8. prism 8

    Listening to the news this a.m. First Hanover – after lengthy examination there isn’t enough evidence to hang a criminal case on. Shouldn’t tricksters and negligent and deliberately ignorant businesspeople have a lifetime ban or near, on running any business that involves providing finance! They could open a garage and repair cars, or buy a property and farm, but keep them away from being directors or owners of any other company where they can carpet the floor with NZ’s venture capital and retirement savings.

    And second. The politicians have been treated like businesses, limited liability entities. If they couldn’t just step out of the spotlight and into some well-paid job and vanish from sight, leaving their detritus behind them for the people, they might think twice. If John Key and his band of degenerates think they are going to open us up to deep water disasters and ruin our livelihoods for at least a generation, and get off scot-free they are mistaken. The passion that goes into opposing abortion by the febrile fervent, may be a small example of what will come.

  9. johnm 9

    ‘Climate Collision Course: CO2 Levels About to Hit 400 PPM
    In a first in human history, “it looks like the world is going to blow through the 400-ppm level without losing a beat.” ‘

    http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/04/29-2

    ‘Now we know that the Earth has shown a remarkable ability to regulate its temperature within a range conducive to Life, and that several natural carbon cycles have served as temperature regulators. When humans extract carbon from geologic reservoirs hundreds of millions of years old, dumping it into the surface reservoirs (especially the air), we are attacking the Earth’s metabolism.

    There’s no known means of getting rid of the excess carbon we’ve already disgorged. The only secure way to sequester carbon is to leave it in the ground. Fossil fuel extraction must stop.’

    ‘The truth is, we are in terrible, terrible times on every front. Judge that however you wish, call me whatever, but we are in terrible times and they are going to get a lot worse. Climate change is not for the faint of heart, that is for sure. There is a growing number of credible people who are convinced, based on science, that we have very few years left on the planet. Maybe fewer than 10, and certainly no more than 35.

    Global warming alone is sufficient to cause extinction of all life, and it is far worse than most people know because all our information is so filtered and politicized. We have triggered between 8 and 12 feedback loops that contribute to increased warming, depending on which expert you pay attention to. Living beings are dying, forests, the oceans, hundreds of species per day are going extinct, plants are dying, rivers are dying, aquifers are depleted, and the dying is going to get a lot bigger before it gets smaller. The things that are causing the dying, including the CO2, are increasing every year. Every year we put however much percentage again over last year’s amount of CO2 into the atmosphere. If we could stop right now, which is not possible, the earth would continue to warm because of the melting glaciers, ice caps and permafrost that have been triggered. The role in climate stability that the ice caps and ice sheets play is critical to understanding what is occurring and what will occur. ‘

  10. johnm 10

    The book—titled The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills, written by David Stuckler, an Oxford University political economist, and Sanjay Basu, an epidemiologist at Stanford University—uses historical case studies from around the globe and throughout history to show “how government policy becomes a matter of life and death” during deep or prolonged financial crises.

    ‘Discovering that the cure to the financial crisis of 2008 was in some ways worse than the affliction, Stucklet and Basu argue that countries “turned their recessions into veritable epidemics” by championing austerity measures that ultimately “ruined or extinguished” thousands of lives in series of “misguided” attempts to balance budgets, appease financial markets, and bow to the economic elite.’

    ‘New Research: Economic Austerity in US and Europe ‘Is Killing People’
    HIV/AIDS, malaria outbreaks, shortages of essential medicines, lost healthcare access, and an epidemic of drug abuse, depression and suicide.’

    http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/04/29-1

    ‘Citing examples from the historical and current record, Stuckler and Basu show that many countries have weathered financial and other crises by investing in public health and innovative social programs.

    “Ultimately what we show is that worsening health is not an inevitable consequence of economic recessions. It’s a political choice,” said Professor Basu.’

    A bankrupt and in huge debt to the US Socialist UK brought in the NHS and Unemployment benefits.

  11. veutoviper 11

    And more on the appointment of Susan Devoy as Race Relations Commissioner.

    TVNZ sought more information on the appointment and ‘other applicants’ and – surprise, surprise – Devoy was not the only sports star considered for the role.

    http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/sports-stars-shortlisted-race-relations-top-job-5422082

    “Rugby legend Michael Jones and netballer Irene Van Dyk were both shortlisted for the position before it was given to Devoy earlier this year.

    The revelation has prompted fresh questions over what qualifications are needed for the job. …

    As I/S at NRT says

    Like Devoy, its hard to see how either of these people could possibly have been regarded as qualified for the role. Their sole qualification seems to be fame (and in Jones’ case, his strong links with the National Party).

    The Human Rights Commission is an important body and a vital watchdog in our society. It deserves better than National’s celebrity crony-appointments.

    http://norightturn.blogspot.com/2013/04/nationals-celebrity-cronyism.html

    • emergency mike 11.1

      What a joke. On us.

      File under: ‘Contempt For Democracy.’

    • prism 11.2

      I was remembering Paul Henry’s sensitive comment about our Governor General with an Indian name not being a real New Zealander. Well Irene Van Dyk was South African wasn’t she, certainly not born and bred in our fair land. But rugby players know how to handle pesky racist name callers etc.

      • Murray Olsen 11.2.1

        In Paul Henry’s world, white South Africans are real New Zealanders. Unless of course, they’re white South Africans who fought apartheid. I have no idea what van Dyk’s history is in that respect.

    • Populuxe1 11.3

      Michael Jones probably knows a bit more about race relations than many of the previous holders of the position – what with knowing the oppression first hand and such.

      • tc 11.3.1

        Yup and his religious beliefs caused him issues so he actually would’ve been OK IMO, but he’s too smart to sully his persona being Collins lapdog, Devoy on the other hand….

      • Colonial Viper 11.3.2

        As recent history shows, that’s a completely incidental consideration.

    • RJL 11.4

      Collins confuses “probably being good at running a race” with “being good at running Race Relations commission”?

      At least Jones seemed aware that he was not the right crony for this job.

  12. When is NZ Prime Minister John Key going to stand down John Banks as a Minister?

    The John Banks Private Prosecution has been referred to the Solicitor General with a request that the Crown take over the prosecution and appear for the Informant when Banks is summonsed to appear in the Auckland District Court sometime in May or early June 2013.

    http://www.dodgyjohnhasgone.com/uncategorized/john-banks-prosecution-referred-to-solicitor-general/

    Penny Bright
    ‘Anti-corruption / anti-privatisation campaigner’

    2013 Auckland Mayoral candidate

    • emergency mike 12.1

      “When is NZ Prime Minister John Key going to stand down John Banks as a Minister?”

      When the ref sends him off, not before.

      I’m looking forward to Banks’ day in court, the media scrums where he bleats on and on in his bully/shouty way about how he’s the victim as narcissists typically do. I’m looking forward to Banks doing the walk of shame out of court followed by yet another ‘I am standing tall’ speech. And I’m looking forward to John Key matter-of-factly announcing in the house that he is standing Banks down as a minister as if it’s just an other one of his ‘corrections’.

      Also the John Key press conference afterwards where he acts like it’s just some technical thing between Banks and ‘the courts’, like it’s nothing to do with him anyway, like he’d rather talk about ‘jobs’, and like ackshully, he’s not bovvered about it.

      • Alanz 12.1.1

        The government is trying to run the country on a knife-edge!

        • David H 12.1.1.1

          And the legs are slipping one slip too far and snjiick off they go.

      • North 12.1.2

        Such an accurate painting of the totality of Shonkey Python there EM.

        Bloody tragic isn’t it ? “That” is our Prime Minister.

        Word of warning. I wouldn’t hold my breath over Botox Banks. Shonkey’s spooned with that boy. Would take a very sharp knife !

    • veutoviper 12.2

      Thanks for the news and link, Penny.

      The link provides a further link to the Judge’s decision to allow the case to go forward.

      I had been meaning to read the decision in full and found it well worth reading in terms of how the Judge very fully dealt with the (weak IMO) arguments of Banks’ counsel seeking to have the case thrown out.

      Looking forward to the next round. Referral to the Solicitor General leaves the SG and Key etc in a real conundrum!

  13. veutoviper 13

    Another sign that the honeymoon is over? I don’t usually read Travel pieces as my travel days are essentially over, but was drawn to read this one in the Herald by the title – “Why the PM’s wandering eye does matter”.

    It’s none of our business if any old Minister of Tourism – or any old Prime Minister, for that matter – chooses to take his family holidays in Hawaii each year.

    But when John Key chose to pick up the tourism portfolio he was making a marque declaration about the industry’s importance to New Zealand. Like David Lange baggsying the education portfolio back in the 1980s, this sends a powerful message – look Rest Of The World, this stuff is so important to us that the Prime Minister runs the shop … er, when he’s not tanning himself on Waikiki, of course.

    When quizzed at last week’s Trenz tourism conference about taking his big holidays in Hawaii rather than in New Zealand, Key – who takes shorter breaks at his holiday home in Omaha – had a smart enough answer.

    “The reason I go is not because I don’t love New Zealand. The reason I go is because if I truly want to have a couple of weeks where it’s just me and the family – given the other 50 weeks it’s seven days a week 360-odd days a year – I can’t do that in New Zealand because you can’t switch off being Prime Minster.”

    Yep, a smart enough answer. A smarter one might have been to say, “You know what, funny you mention it, next summer we are staying in New Zealand.”

    Go on, John, there are plenty of places a millionaire can hole up for a week or two of privacy in Nelson or Coromandel.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=10880426

    Key’s reply also suggests that the Hawaii holidays are only two weeks a year???? Cannot be bothered checking but IIRC, their summer breaks there are definitely longer than two weeks.

    • Lanthanide 13.1

      Key probably works ~40 weeks a year. Hard work, sure, but it’s not 50.

    • freedom 13.2

      “Go on, John, there are plenty of places a millionaire can hole up for a week or two of privacy in Nelson or Coromandel”

      or closer to home even, there is a big place in his own electorate that seems perfect to hide away unknown and unseen, worked for that german billionaire, JK never even knew he was there

      • veutoviper 13.2.1

        LOL!

        Somehow I don’t think Key would be welcome there from reading KDC’s twitters.

  14. Tim 14

    In other STUFF news:
    SFO will not be prosecuting Hotchins or Golden Boy *juxtaposed* against the jailing of the ‘dirty filthy’ for drug offences.
    I was just thinking (and NOT that I’m an advocate for so called ‘dealers’): Which of the two has caused its victims greater long term damage – given that the Polis generally over-value drug hauls’ street value?
    Oh yea – Eric Watshis name!

  15. aerobubble 15

    Just a thought. Let’s imagine for a moment that 100,000 Americans all up and off to some right wing state in the US, there they stole each others phones, three times, and all got locked away for life. How long would the three strikes law last under the weight of that many inmates. The reason why the right wing exists is they know that Americans no longer want to standup and be counted to defend their constitution. geez, like there aren’t 100,000 people jobless in the US.

  16. freedom 16

    https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc1/397854_10151631553985429_867186158_n.jpg

    the message is out, guess we all were wrong. looks like NZ is fine

    funny how it does not mention 57 billion dollars of new debt and where oh where do they get the after tax wage increase of 22% since 2008. Aside from a couple of high-end ad guys I know of no-one whose pay jumped by a fifth.

    • Colonial Viper 16.1

      Looks like National’s low pay policies and teacher cuts are already biting them in the bum.

      and where oh where do they get the after tax wage increase of 22% since 2008.

      That’s English pulling his bullshit “after tax” wages figure, which after the tax cuts to the wealthy did leap ahead.

  17. karol 17

    Oh, please! the last thing Aucklanders need is Maurice Williamson being let loose on it. In such a case I will likely fast-forward my retirement out of Auckland. Enough is Enough!

  18. I just saw Gerry Brownlee on TV3 explaining why the Government ill not do anything for Auckland’s transport intentions. He ruled out everything except increased rates.

    Labour should focus on this. They need to designate someone, eg Phil Twyford as spokesperson for Auckland issues. This person should have no other obligations or roles. All they need to do is take care of Auckland issues, talk about Auckland issues and investigate Auckland issues. With a third of the country’s population in the area this person should, like Len Brown, just talk about Auckland.

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