web analytics

Safe from prying 5Eyes

Written By: - Date published: 10:22 pm, December 8th, 2018 - 62 comments
Categories: australian politics, China, Free Trade, infrastructure, interweb, tech industry, telecommunications, us politics, winston peters - Tags:

I like my Huawei phone. Apparently the US National Security Agency can’t break its encryption. That’s presumably the “security” issue why Spark is being blocked from using Huawei here, and why Meng Wanzhou is held hostage in Canada at the behest of  US neocons.

Ironic isn’t it. But also very dangerous. As Chinese technology races ahead, the US is desperate to support its companies like Cisco, whose technology everyone can break. Trade war can easily become hot war, as happened in the Pacific last century.

Winston Peters went to the to the US last week hoping to meet, Bolton, Pompeo and Pence. I doubt if he will be able to charm them the way he charmed Condoleeza Rice. What will be interesting will be if he is still insisting that no decisions have been made and we are following our independent processes to evaluate Huawei’s “risk” to Spark’s networks.

Even more ironic Papua New Guinea is standing out against Australian pressure to block them.  The Five Eyes might block Huawei, but the rest of the world will be rushing to their door. Watch this space.

 

 

62 comments on “Safe from prying 5Eyes”

  1. xanthe3 1

    Absolutly This is not because huawei gear is a security risk but because it is not. Thats a big problem for the US.

    • joe90 1.1

      This is not because huawei gear is a security risk but because it is not.

      And you know this, how?

  2. joe90 2

    Who wrote the linked article?

  3. McFlock 3

    Pretty big “presumably” there.

    It could be more to do with longstanding issues around transparency, intellectual property, and who else it chooses to do business with and does R&D for.

    It probably doesn’t matter a damn to most private citizens, but if you’re building network infrastructure of any importance you need to be reasonably sure nobody has put in a back door, or even a nice little switch to brick the entire thing at their convenience, without putting it in the EULA.

    • Adrian Thornton 3.1

      Well I guess if that is true, you could call that “chickens coming home to roost”our industries in the West think that they can just exploit the labour of other countries forever and not at some point have to pay the piper, well that’s not how it works, there are no free lunches.

      • McFlock 3.1.1

        Pretty much – that’s one reason the US is big on domestic producers for essential equipment. But they’re big enough to have leaders in every facet of the tech development chain (when it doesn’t just become a rort).

        Countries without tens of millions of people in them need to place trust in overseas organisations for some step of the chain.

  4. Ad 4

    Why does the left always do handsprings to defend China?

    • Doogs 4.1

      I am left Ad, and I have no sympathy for China and the way it operates in the world. China is a self-professed ‘world leader’, in that it intends to be top dog in every aspect of world interaction – politics, sport, commerce, technology and I suspect in other areas such as the arts in all its forms. This is why there is a push through soft power channels to infiltrate into other countries’ political and commercial structures. I also read recently about how all manufacturing entities in China are required, if asked, to do espionage for the communist party. This push for what can only be seen as world domination is something we all need to be aware of and push back against where we can.

      In saying this, I am aware that other powers, the US in particular, have similar aspirations. They go about it differently. However, I see the Chinese process as being quite invidious and all-consuming, and the most dangerous one.

      • Ad 4.1.1

        Good to hear sense talking.

      • Adrian Thornton 4.1.2

        Try telling that to the civilian population in Yemen.

      • KJT 4.1.3

        Given the destruction, US inspired corporate Neo-liberalism has done to the lives of the majority of New Zealanders, I don’t think there is much to choose between them.

        Huawei want to sell to the West, so i think they have pretty strong motivations not to be caught spying.

        Back-doors for Government agencies, are already compulsory for US suppliers.

        The creeping advances in repression, surveillance, and privacy breaches from the NZ Government, currently worry me far more than the Chinese.

        • RedLogix 4.1.3.1

          You miss the timescale. The US Empire has been around since the end of WW2, while the Chinese one has yet to really flex it’s muscle.

          If you think there is little to chose between them, I suspect you haven’t travelled much in SE Asia lately where resentment over Chinese soft power is already rife.

          The US hegemony certainly had it’s shady side, but it’s fundamental premise was always quite different to Xi Xinping’s overt totalitarian ambitions.

          • Mark 4.1.3.1.1

            What is this ‘fundamental premise’ of what you rightly label US hegemony – care to explain?

            BTW: The South East Asian nations and China will soon come to an agreed code of conduct concerning the South China Sea. The issue is for Asians to sort out among themselves. The US is just there to make trouble:

            “Everything’s been excellent between China and the rest of Asean, except for the fact that there’s friction between Western nations and China,” President Rodrigo Duterte
            https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/duterte-says-china-already-in-possession-of-south-china-sea-tells-us-to-end-military

            • RedLogix 4.1.3.1.1.1

              I talk with real people on the ground. I’ve discussed here a wide range of ideas and opinions for many years.

              You on the other hand only ever turn up whenever this one topic arises uncritically parroting CCCP lines.

              One of us looks and behaves like a paid shill.

              • Aaron

                Have you talked to some real people on the ground in Yemen? They might have a bit to say about the “shady” side of the US. Or you could ask the people of Iraq, or Palestine, or Vietnam or most countries in South America…

                I think it’s pointless trying to decide who is the worst (although the answer is easy) when we should just be strategising for how to weave a path between these two lumbering giants.

            • SPC 4.1.3.1.1.2

              I’ll raise you … Malathir on the threat posed to ASEAN by China … I will presume you are aware of this but find it too inconvenient to mention.

              ASEAN has two unwelcome options, appease China or be dependent on American protection.

              Believing that ASEAN will succumb is a dangerous presumtion, for it implies any other outcome is unthinkable/unacceptable – not part of China’s plans for dominance of the region.

          • KJT 4.1.3.1.2

            China hasn’t napalmed a few million Asians, to my knowledge!

            “Uppity” Asians with their culture of win-win, long term mutual benefit, in business relationships, rather than the US, “winner takes all” appears a better option for the future, than the USA’s failing imperial descent into totalitarianism, as they struggle to retain the economic power they have given away.

            With a great many Chinese, the hope is that their Government becomes more democratic and peaceful.
            The same as our hopes, for our Government.

      • Mark 4.1.4

        Yes – the Chinese – ‘invidious’ and ‘all-consuming’ and ‘dangerous’ – because they aspire to be the best!

        Uppity coloured folk eh?

        Western record in the Pacific: driving people off their home islands to test nuclear weapons, ‘blackbirding’ , indentured labour (Fiji and Hawaii), happily allowing a third of Samoans to die from influenza, terrorism (Rainbow Warrior)…

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackbirding

        Yet the Chinese are the ‘most dangerous one’ because they offer to sell us some excellent high-tech gear?

        • RedLogix 4.1.4.1

          Resorting to the racist card is pathetically weak. You’ve absolutely no idea about who I am, who I associate with, and why I have such clear views about the current Chinese regime.

          Hint, it has hilariously nothing to do with uppity or coloured.

    • xanthe 4.2

      why are shills transparent?

    • RedLogix 4.3

      Because some of us never saw an authoritarian tyrrany we didn’t have a sneaking admiration for?

      Or maybe just the idea of being President for Life appeals?

      • Mark 4.3.1

        Hauling a previously backward nation of a billion out of the muck hole they were put in by Western imperialism, and in an historical blink of an eye, does deserve admiration.

        • RedLogix 4.3.1.1

          Essentially by cheating; by coating tailing on the liberal worlds economic success, without becoming democratic or liberal yourselves.

          Without Western markets to sell to China would remain as poor and brutal as it was under Mai’s Great Leap Backward.

          China is a massive parasite that openly plans to dominate.

          • Mark 4.3.1.1.1

            Ahh….there you go….the old yellow peril, Yeah….the West’s ‘economic success’ came through being ‘democratic and liberal’. What planet are you from?

            Why the heck do you think the US has a 1000 military bases around the world (vs China’s one)? To spread ‘democratic or liberal’ values?

            Coloured people becoming rich are parasites…..its just natural that white people continue to enjoy a wildly inordinate share of the world’s resources, right?

            • greywarshark 4.3.1.1.1.1

              Actually sounds like a symbiotic relationship and that negates the argument talking place here.

          • Adrian Thornton 4.3.1.1.2

            “China is a massive parasite that openly plans to dominate.”

            WTF are you talking about?, we (the west) actively pursued cheap slave labour all the way to China with the sole purpose of driving down wages in the west, and making more money for share holders and CEO’s, why do you think there has been stagnant wage growth in the west since the early nineties? …coat tailing off the back of slave Labour that has made the 1% rich while most others who feels rich are probably living in the fantasy world of a housing bubble.

            ‘Rising employment overshadowed by unprecedented wage stagnation ‘
            “More worryingly, wage stagnation affects low-paid workers much more than those at the top: real labour incomes of the top 1% of earners have increased much faster than those of median full-time workers in recent years, reinforcing a long-standing trend.”
            http://www.oecd.org/employment/rising-employment-overshadowed-by-unprecedented-wage-stagnation.htm

            The underpants you are sitting in right now were probably made by some 14 yo girl factory worker earning some sort of shit wage and working in shit conditions in China..how does that figure into your Red logic?
            Not long ago those same underpants would have been made here in NZ by NZ workers on a pretty good wage and pretty good conditions…better blame the Chinese for that too.
            …..ever wondered why Swanndri’s never got cheaper once they shut down NZ production and manufactured with labour at 1/10th cheaper in China?

            “Manufacturing valued added as a percentage of GDP in New Zealand has fallen significantly in the past 30 years, sitting at 27% in 1982, compared to 11.9% in 2012
            Had New Zealand had maintained manufacturing activity closer to 30% of GDP, much like Germany managed over the same period, average incomes would now be substantially higher. Employment has increased in some sectors with lower earnings, such as tourism.”
            http://www.johnwalley.co.nz/271-thirty_years_of_manufacturing_.aspx

            “cheating; by coating tailing on the liberal worlds economic success”..holy shit! any success the Chinese might have had has been paid in blood,sweat and tears of it’s exploited workers, and for what.. so we could have cheap flat screen TV’s, cell phones to negate those lower wages.
            ‘The grim truth of Chinese factories producing the west’s Christmas toys’
            https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/dec/04/the-grim-truth-of-chinese-factories-producing-the-wests-christmas-toys

            • SPC 4.3.1.1.2.1

              Sure, the Western corporate was looking for both the cheap labour supply and the large consumer market – capitalism searching for profit growth under global market policy settings.

              And the idea that while we take resources from tyrannies, China is a parasite off trade with us, because they are not a democracy, was a silly argument.

            • RedLogix 4.3.1.1.2.2

              Those underpants used to be made in NZ factories, paying local people local wages, and run to NZ labour standards and environmental regulations. Their currency has been consistently undervalued, they’ve actively stolen vast amounts of IP from the West… and you call this success.

              Exactly who do you think controls these things in China?

              • Mark

                “Their currency has been consistently undervalued”

                Oh…ffs ….their currency has been ‘undervalued’ because they are or were a poor developing nation. And recently that argument has lost currency for a number of years now (no pun intended)
                https://www.ft.com/content/11e96e1e-03a7-11e5-b55e-00144feabdc0

                The fact is the West plundered vast amounts of wealth from the East (both India and China) – read up on the Opium wars.

                What motivated the so called ‘Age of Discovery’ ….it was the West wanting trade and trade routes to the East.

                NZ was part of the imperialist West, became rich through being the privileged protected farmers of the Anglo Saxon West, while Chinese, Indian, African peasants bore the brunt of Anglo Saxon imperialism.

                Hopefully that era is drawing to a close, but of course not without a last possible desperate attempt by the West to maintain its privileged position throughout the world.

                RedLogix – you still have not provided an answer:

                What are those 1000 military bases of the US doing round the world – promoting ‘freedom’ and ‘liberal democratic’ values?

                • RedLogix

                  I’ve consistently argued here for years that the age of nation state empires is over.

                  All your paid for lines amount to is for a Chinese imperium to rise and replace the ones that preceded it. It’s an unthinking repitition of a dullards history.

                  • Mark

                    The world’s real parasite:

                    “A child born in the United States will create thirteen times as much ecological damage over the course of his or her lifetime than a child born in Brazil,”

                    https://www.thestreet.com/personal-finance/the-countries-that-use-the-most-resources-per-person-14699472

                    What do you want RedLogix – coloured people to carry on living on rubbish tips while the rich world lives it up indefefinitely?

                    The most important thing for countries like China is DEVELOPMENT, at almost any cost. Without DEVELOPMENT you have absolutely nothing.

                    You need DEVELOPMENT so you can have a powerful military, a powerful economy and people to enjoy the things that people in the West take for granted and think is their birthright.

                    For the short term at least, so-called Western notions of ‘human rights’ should take a back seat.

                    • RedLogix

                      What do you want RedLogix – coloured people to carry on living on rubbish tips while the rich world lives it up indefefinitely?

                      That’s a resentful and bigotted view of history Mark. The West was not always wealthy; it was our scientific revolution, our industrialisation and crucially our legal and democratic reforms that entrenched principles such as equality before the law, innocence until proven guilty, freedom of religions, open speech, the value of private property rights, workers right to unionise, and crucially the right to hold our leaders accountable via elections … were all reforms that were hard won.

                      But even as late as 1890 most people in the West were still very poor; most lived on the equivalent a few dollars a day. It was not until after WW2 that the average person in the West rose out of absolute poverty. Hell my own father lived the first five years of his life in a miserable tent in the middle of what is now a very plush Auckland suburb.

                      You seem to have an exceedingly narrow view of Western history; while it’s absolutely true that in the past 500 years or so you can count some 15-20 ’empires’ or dominant hegemonies, you can point to many dark episodes in our history (as you can the East’s as well) … at the same time there is a positive story, one where legal, political and economic rights have been established and over time their scope expanded to include wider and wider populations.

                      An informed view shows that in just the past several decades much of the world is quite rapidly moving out of absolute poverty, out of utter deprivation and towards something resembling a middle class. And yes China has been part of this story too, having wealthy Western markets to sell it’s goods to has been enormously advantageous to you.

                      But the expectation was that in becoming part of this liberal world order China would reform it’s own political systems and take a legitimate, substantial part of this system. Instead it has taken an increasingly totalitarian, authoritarian anti-liberal path.

                      Instead of the internet being a pathway to the world, you built a wall. Instead of building on the rule of law and adopting global norms you’ve turned opacity and commercial untrustworthiness to an art form. Instead of elections you’ve appointed a “President for Life”. Instead of respecting religious rights you’ve created mass labour camps in Uighuyr regions. Instead of protecting wildlife, your medieval superstitions are wiping out rhinoceros, elephant and other species. Instead of dealing with an insane tyranny in North Korea you’re doing your best to imitate it with mass surveillance systems and a deeply intrusive ‘social credit’ system designed to overtly manipulate and control your populations according to the CCCP’s whims and fancies. Need I mention the repugnant trade in body parts; the persecution of minorities and the endless stories of corrupt trade practises. And openly dreams of dominating the world as it once imagined it did.

                      All these are mistakes the West too has done in it’s past; we too know failure, humiliation and catastrophe. But to varying degrees we’ve learnt the lessons and stepped back. While China’s CCCP, convinced of it’s historic superiority and global destiny charges headlong into all of these errors simultaneously.

          • Mark 4.3.1.1.3

            Mao?

            He saved more lives than perhaps any other political figure in human history:

            China’s growth in life expectancy at birth from 35–40 years in 1949 to 65.5 years in 1980 is among the most rapid sustained increases in documented global history

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4331212/

            Suck it up. And you can see from the chart that even during the Great Leap Forward, infant mortality was still lower than it was in 1950, just a year after the communist victory. The Great Leap Forward was a relative setback, but your small mind probably finds it difficult to grasp that basic concept.

            “Without Western markets to sell to China would remain as poor and brutal “

            The Wanhsien Incident: British gunboats shelled innocent Chinese civilians killing about 3000 in 1926. The British Consul thus described this incident: “Its a wonderful show on the part of the navy, but we can never forgive these bloody Chinks…’ Also the Shanghai English language press hailed the killing of innocent Chinese claiming they had been “put in their place.” Of course this is just one minor incident in the overall catalogue of imperialist crimes committed against China during the Century of Humiliation.

            Of course under the principle of extraterritoriality the British and other Westerners could kill Chinese with impunity in China — shoot them down like dogs, with absolute legal impunity.

            Winston Churchill had particular racist contempt for the Chinese urging at one point in the 1920 the “systematic bombing of the Chinese army as well as the use of poison gas.”

            In fact it could be argued that British imperialism was far worse than Japanese imperialism – the British created about 50 million opium addicts, in order to reverse an unfavourable balance of trade.

            So you should read up on a bit of history before characterising the China as a massive parasite. That’s an obviously racist statement, deny it all you want.

            • RedLogix 4.3.1.1.3.1

              Possibly from where you are the internet is censored so you cannot access the real history of Mao Zedong. He was history’s greatest Mass Murderer, and he boasted about it. Conservatively he set about murdering an estimated 65 million people in his repeated efforts to forcibly turn China into a socialist utopia.

              That’s worse than Hitler or even Stalin. Maybe these links will be accessible to you; or maybe you’re just too scared to read them. There are literally hundreds of similar sources, these are just a handful of random ones:

              https://fee.org/articles/who-was-the-biggest-mass-murderer-in-history/

              https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/news/maos-great-leap-forward-killed-45-million-in-four-years-2081630.html

              https://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/09/opinion/a-bleak-anniversary-mao-the-mass-murderer.html

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_killings_under_communist_regimes

              Assuming you haven’t read any of these though, your claim Mao ‘saved more lives than anyone in history’ is again blinkered by resentment and ignorance. The increases in life expectancy you mention were simply following exactly the same trends that had already happened elsewhere in the Western world after we invented public sanitation, clean water supplies and understood how to control disease and prevent mass epidemics. Mao can take zero credit for any of this; all he did was impose one massive setback after another on China for decades.

              It was only after he died, and China decided to copy aspects of the Western economic model that the country became prosperous and modern. And that was achieved ONLY because you were given access to massively wealthy Western markets to export to. China’s own domestic markets, even today are still too weak to have ever supported such growth. In that strict economic sense yes China has become an enormous parasite, bloated on it’s exports to the West, but remaining a politically anti-ethical to us.

              All history is an endless catalog of atrocities; including several thousand years of Chinese imperial warfare:

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_China_before_1911

              Of course British Imperialism in China was nothing anyone would defend; but typical of the era; and in the broader scale of history it’s relatively small beer. This doesn’t excuse it, but it places into a context quite unremarkable for the period. It’s what Empires do, they expand at the expense of any other group they can dominate, militarily, economically or by uncontrolled migration. It’s precisely the same ambition your glorious President for Life Xi Xinping has openly outlined … albeit with softened edges to avoid overt alarm at this early stage.

              Still I’m sure none of this will detract from your uncritical loyalty to China; although not quite the same could be said for the millions of wealthy Chinese (the ones who have options) who’ve left the country as soon as they could, and purchased homes, businesses and properties just as fast as they could get their capital out of China and into nasty, racist, thieving imperial places like Sydney, Melbourne, Vancouver and Auckland.

    • xanthe 5.1

      Thanks for the link Pat !
      The US has for some time been engaged in a war on encryption.The 5 eyes and our GCSB are just one arm of this (pointless) struggle.

      The only way to build a system that cannot be remotely “bricked” (by whoever, take your pick) is to go open source . If the GCSB had any intention of actually protecting our security it would be mandating open source systems

      • KJT 5.1.1

        Open Source is “brick” proof?

        • xanthe3 5.1.1.1

          No open source is not “brick proof” only orders of magnitude less so than propriatory gear. But the point is that there cannot be hidden backdoors in open source gear because its open and contuniously peer reviewed. Every human artiface will propably have some exploit somewhere in this case our interests are best served by avoiding gear with deliberate clandistine exploits inbuilt and having a transparant process to identify and mitigate the unintentional ones…. in tech terms open source best meets these interests

          • KJT 5.1.1.1.1

            Which makes it even more vulnerable to “hacking”, as anyone can obtain the source code.

            • xanthe3 5.1.1.1.1.1

              What you are promoting here is the idea of security through obfustication. It simply does not work. Why do you think the web mostly runs on some flavour of linux?

              • RedLogix

                Xanthe is 100% correct in terms of software vulnerability; unfortunately open source software does little to address attack vectors at the firmware or even silicon level.

  5. SPC 6

    The Huawei exec is being held for using a controlled company to get around sanctions on Iran.

    And yes 5 Eyes is as much spying on communications of the citizens of our nations (thus the encryption issue) as it is spying on the rest of the world (as we are part of the imperial US security order), but the fact remains 5G is linked into intelligent devices and involves a higher level of intrusion into system security than anything before it – so having a Chinese government obedient organisation’s tech involved in the roll out is a whole new level of risk.

    It’s borderline farcical for anyone with concerns about America’s operations to have little concern for those of China. The corporations of each are in bed with their governments and obey their imperial masters.

    PS You can still use a Huawei phone on 5G after this begins.

    • Pat 6.1

      It would be interesting to see the results of a poll/referendum with the question…who would you prefer having exclusive access to your personal communications/browsing history ?

      a) the NSA or
      b) the CCP

      Sorry no option c) neither of the above.

  6. barry 7

    Given that Australia has just legislated against encryption, they will only be using gear that has a NSA-sanctioned back door.

  7. One Two 8

    Risk to human health, animals, insects and the environment…

    Where is the discussion in NZ going to come from about the damaging multiplier effects…

    The infrastructure heavy requirements and pollution generated from yet another layer of unecessary technology and the effects of it…

    Note: In the UK Gateshead council recently lost a gag attempt in local court…

    Huawei is a distraction…

  8. Mark 9

    “It took a thousand years for the world’s economic centre of gravity to shift from Asia to Europe.”

    It will take only a few decades for it to shift back, says a report from the McKinsey Global Institute.

    A thousand years ago, the economic centre of the world was in central Asia, just north of India and west of China, reflecting the high levels of wealth enjoyed in the Middle and Far East at that time, says the report, Urban world: Cities and the rise of the consuming class. At that time, Asia accounted for two-thirds of the world’s wealth.”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/07/05/world-economic-center-of-gravity_n_1651730.html

    Why do you think all those Europeans went round the world in those creaky old boats – the so-called ‘Age of Discovery’ was all about the West wanting to get its hands on the wealth of the East.

    And unfortunately, because of the military weakness of the East and superior technology of the West (in the past couple of centuries), the East was pauperized by the West (opium wars and all that).

    New Zealand was England’s farm, and directly benefitted from this plunder of the East (and Africa). That is why in the late 1960’s we were the 6th wealthiest per capita nation on earth. It was ill-gotten gains.

    Now the developing world is rising. With the waning power of the Western imperialists, Westerners cannot automatically assume a good standard of living simply because they are Westerners. They have to compete with the yellow, brown, and black masses of the world on an increasingly equal footing.

    And RedLogix can cry in his beer all he wants, but that ain’t gonna change things – I’m sure he feels absolutely sick about it. Boo.Hoo.Hoo.

    • SPC 9.1

      We had the high level of wealth per capita because

      1. we had a lower population.
      2. agriculture was a higher proportion of the GDP of economies back then and we were and are very competitive in pastoral farming.

      This had little to do with the past of our then major market the UK.

      Our ill gotten gains, was Maori land.

  9. Mark 10

    New Zealand became rich through being the privileged farmers of the white Anglo-Saxon imperialist West – we were not treated like Indian or Kenyan or indeed Chinese peasants (China only freed itself from Western domination in 1949)

    New Zealand was a fully signed up member of Western imperialism and benefitted from that enormously.New Zealand’s wealth entirely due to what was effectively subsidies and protectionism, through favours granted by mother England. However in 1973 the UK joined the EEC. We lost privileged access to the UK market, and hence had to look for markets elsewhere.

    And that is when our current accounts deficit plunged. Rogernomics came more than a decade after that.
    https://www.rbnz.govt.nz/research-and-publications/speeches/2002/speech2002-01-25

    The free trade deals are part of New Zealand’s need to forge new markets, to make its way in the world by itself, and not as parasite on the rest of the world through being attached to a former imperialist power.

    New Zealand was part of Western imperialism and fought Western imperialism’s wars. In that way NZ became rich.

    • SPC 10.1

      Utter tosh.

      • One Two 10.1.1

        Why is it, tosh?

        What Mark has been saying is far more ‘informed’ than those who are replying to him…

        Like your one word ‘rebuttle’…and bewildereds two word ‘sentence’..

        • SPC 10.1.1.1

          Why – the only reason we were rich in the 1950’s/1960’s per capita was because

          1. small population
          2. most efficient pastoral farm in the world (temperate/grass)
          3. agriculture was larger share of the economy back then

          (while our major market was then the UK, we would have been as wealthy with access to the global market at the time under WTO rules).

          Mark ignored my earlier comment and it is once again not informed it is devoid of relevant argument.

          It deserved the repost on grounds of the lack of substance to his point and then simply restating it rather than respond to the criticism is intellectual cowardice.

    • Bewildred 10.2

      Loon alert

    • Bewildred 10.3

      Loon alert

  10. gsays 11

    What am I missing?

    What Mark has outlined seems reasonable.

    Is this one of these ideological things that I missed the memo for.

    As an aside/confession/observation, a lot of the impetus for the lack of concern over the rise of China, comes from a distancing from the actions of the USA over the last century, especially since Hiroshima and Ngasaki.

  11. Richard 12

    “New Zealand was part of Western imperialism and fought Western imperialism’s wars. In that way NZ became rich.”

    Which doesn’t quite explain how we’ve stayed rich since we lost preferential access to the UK and never really had it to the US.

    As for Huawei being more secure than Cisco (love to hear a credible voice in the tech community back that up), tell that to the African Union.

  12. boggis the cat 13

    Huawei is the leader in 5G technology. This is just about keeping the Chinese tech sector from overtaking the Western corporations — and that has already happened in any case.

    The spooks can always tunnel in to systems at other vulnerable points, and any ‘suspicious activity’ flagged by metadata analysis can get a court warrant and legal surveillance. US technology is known to be open to the NSA and partners, so it would be surprising if China didn’t want similar access built in to domestic technology — however, that is only suspected at present.

    Trying to prevent the rise of China is a fool’s errand. Western governments have plenty of fools to spare.

  13. Mark 14

    With Xi Jinping China is going down exactly the right path. He does not want to betray his people down by ‘reforming’ in the way the West wants him to reform.

    The Chinese have learned the lesson of the Soviet Union. In Russia, Gorbachev, who was feted by the West, is now widely reviled as the traitor that he was, whereas Stalin, who is demonized in the West, is consistently rated as the greatest person in history:
    https://www.voanews.com/a/russians-josef-stalin-greatest-figure-history-poll/3916559.html

    All this abuse about ‘totalitarianism’, etc is just a load of bollocks. The Chinese leadership is responsive to the needs of the vast majority of Chinese people, and that’s all they should care about. The bleating of Westerners who want to bring the country to its knees should be treated with the utter contempt it deserves.

    Liberalization means death, literally:
    Millions of excess deaths in immediate post-Soviet Russia:
    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2009/1/18/685673/-

    Indian ‘democracy’ vs Chinese ‘authoritarianism’, life expectancy:

    From the article “Today, China’s life expectancy for both sexes is remarkably close to the average life expectancy of Europe – just some 2 years lower. …. Compared to China, India’s life expectancy for both sexes has increased much slower. Today, it is more than 8 years below the level of China and more than 14 years below the level of the United States of America….These numbers demonstrate the remarkable development success of China, whose government has focused on bringing basic health care to most (rural) regions and social groups. “
    http://www.china-profile.com/data/fig_WPP2008_L0_1.htm

  14. Mike23 15

    Doesn’t anybody worry about the ‘security’ of US conglomerates like Microsoft, Google etc etc spying for THEM??

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Jenny Marcroft MP to represent New Zealand First in Auckland Central
    New Zealand First is pleased to announce Jenny Marcroft as the party’s election 2020 candidate for the Auckland Central electorate. Jenny spent years working in Auckland Central, having spent a vast proportion of her broadcasting career there. She says she, "knows the place and knows the people." Ms Marcroft says ...
    4 hours ago
  • Creating jobs and cleaning up our rivers
    New Zealanders deserve healthy rivers and lakes that are safe to swim in - but they have been getting worse for decades. That's why, with our latest announcement, we're investing in projects that will help clean up our rivers and lakes and restore them to health, within a generation. ...
    1 day ago
  • Jacinda Ardern: 2020 Labour Congress Speech
    Jacinda Ardern's speech to the 2020 Labour Party Congress. ...
    1 day ago
  • Kelvin Davis: 2020 Labour Congress Speech
    Kelvin Davis' speech to the 2020 Labour Party Congress. ...
    1 day ago
  • Week That Was: Another week of major progress
    This week we moved into the second half of 2020 - and our Government delivered another week of big changes and major progress for New Zealanders. Read below for a wrap of the key things moments from the week - from extending paid parental leave, to making major investments in ...
    3 days ago
  • Green Party opposes RMA fast-track bill that cut corners on environmental safeguards and public cons...
    The Green Party has opposed the COVID-19 Recovery Fast-track Consenting Bill which shortcuts normal consenting processes under the Resource Management Act (RMA), reduces public participation and narrows environmental considerations. ...
    4 days ago
  • Site of new freight hub revealed
    Hon Shane Jones, Minister of Regional Economic Development A regional freight hub for the lower North Island will be built just northeast of Palmerston North, Regional Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. The Government is investing $40 million through the Provincial Growth Fund to designate and buy land and design ...
    4 days ago
  • Greens call for Guaranteed Minimum Income to alleviate skyrocketing debt with MSD
    Green Party Co-leader Marama Davidson is calling for the introduction of a Guaranteed Minimum Income to lift hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty and prevent more families entering into further debt with the Ministry of Social Development.  ...
    4 days ago
  • Winston Peters: Facts matter when taxpayer money is on the line
    There has been renewed focus on New Zealand First acting as a handbrake on the Government after our decision to not support Auckland light rail. We are a handbrake for bad ideas, that is true, but our track record since 2017 has seen New Zealand First constructively also serve as an ...
    4 days ago
  • Bill raising minimum residency requirement for NZ Super passes first reading
    Mark Patterson MP, New Zealand First List MP New Zealand First’s Fair Residency for Superannuation Bill passed its First Reading in Parliament today. The Bill makes a significant change to NZ Super by raising the minimum residency requirement from 10 to 20 years, after age 20. “Currently, a migrant of ...
    4 days ago
  • Harsher penalties for assaults on first responders one step closer
    Darroch Ball MP, Spokesperson for Law and Order A New Zealand First member’s bill in the name of Darroch Ball introducing a six-month minimum prison sentence for assaults on first responders has passed its second reading in Parliament. The new offence of "injuring a first responder or corrections officer with ...
    5 days ago
  • Criminal Cases Review Commission delivers Coalition promise
    Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Deputy Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand First welcomes the launch of the new Criminal Cases Review Commission, gifted with the name from Waikato-Tainui - Te Kāhui Tātari Ture, announced in Hamilton today by Justice Minister Andrew Little. “New Zealand First has long believed in and ...
    5 days ago
  • Greens welcome huge new investment in sustainable projects
    The Green Party is celebrating over $800m in new funding for green projects, which will get people into jobs while solving New Zealand’s long-term challenges. ...
    5 days ago
  • New Zealand First demands answers from Meridian Energy
    Mark Patterson MP, Spokesperson for Primary Industries New Zealand First is appalled that Meridian seems to have been unnecessarily spilling water from its dams to drive up its profits."While New Zealanders have been coming together in some of our darkest hours, we don’t expect power gentailers to waste water and ...
    6 days ago
  • Getting New Zealand moving again: June 2020
    We wrapped up the first half of 2020 with a busy month, taking additional steps to support New Zealanders as we continue with our economic recovery. We rolled out targeted packages to support key industries like tourism and construction, helped create jobs in the environmental and agriculture sectors, and set ...
    6 days ago
  • Māori union leader appointed to Infrastructure Commission board
    Hon Shane Jones, Minister for Infrastructure Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has welcomed the appointment of Maurice Davis and his deep infrastructure and construction experience to the board of the Infrastructure Commission. Mr Davis (Ngāti Maniapoto), is the seventh and final appointment to the board led by former Reserve Bank Governor ...
    6 days ago
  • Click-bait journalism at its worst
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand’s click bait journalism is taking a turn for the worse, with yet another example of sensationalist, wilful-misrepresentation of the facts. “New Zealand First has worked constructively with its Coalition partner on hundreds of pieces of legislation and policy, and ...
    6 days ago
  • Green Party proposes transformational Poverty Action Plan
    The Green Party is today unveiling its Poverty Action Plan, which includes a Guaranteed Minimum Income to ensure people have enough to live with dignity.     ...
    1 week ago
  • PGF accelerates Rotorua projects
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development The Rotorua Museum redevelopment and Whakarewarewa and Tokorangi Forest projects will be accelerated thanks to a $2.09 million Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) boost, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher ...
    1 week ago
  • Week That Was: Getting people into jobs
    This week, we rolled out the next steps of our recovery plan, with new infrastructure investment, extra support for tourism operators, and a new programme to get Kiwis into agriculture careers. The global economic consequences of COVID-19 will continue to be a challenge, but we have a detailed plan to ...
    1 week ago
  • Coalition commitment establishing Mental Health Commission delivered
    Jenny Marcroft MP, Spokesperson for Health New Zealand First welcomes the passage of the Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill through its final reading in Parliament today fulfilling a coalition agreement commitment. “This is an important step in saving the lives of New Zealanders and delivers a key coalition commitment ...
    1 week ago
  • Whakatāne gets a $2.5m ‘turbo boost’
    Whakatāne has been given a $2.5 million boost to speed up previously funded projects and create more than 450 jobs in the next decade. Of those, the equivalent of 160 full-time jobs could be delivered in the next six weeks. Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters is in town to make ...
    1 week ago
  • $2.5m PGF funding to speed up economic recovery in Whakatāne
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is investing $2.5 million to accelerate three infrastructure projects in Whakatāne, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. “This package is about ...
    1 week ago
  • Shane Jones calls out those holding drought-stricken Auckland ‘to ransom’ over water
    Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones is throwing his weight behind a bid by the Auckland Council to fast-track the more than doubling of the city's water allowance from the Waikato River. And he's coming out strongly against anyone who plans on getting in the way of this campaign. "It is my ...
    1 week ago
  • Another Green win as climate change considerations inserted into the RMA
    The Green Party is thrilled to see changes to the Resource Management Act (RMA) that mean consents for large projects can be declined if they will have significant climate change implications that are inconsistent with the Zero Carbon Act and Aotearoa New Zealand’s Paris Agreement obligations.  ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Navy vessel Aotearoa to arrive in New Zealand
    Hon Ron Mark, Minister of Defence The Royal New Zealand Navy’s new ship, Aotearoa, set sail for New Zealand on 10 June from the Republic of Korea, and is due to arrive in Auckland tomorrow, announced Minister of Defence Ron Mark. “Aotearoa is the Royal New Zealand Navy’s new fleet ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Racing Industry Bill passes third reading
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister for Racing Racing Minister Winston Peters has today welcomed the Racing Industry Bill passing its third reading, creating the legislative framework for revitalising the racing industry while limiting the need for future government intervention. “For too long our domestic racing industry has ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Green Party seek amendment to ensure all prisoners can vote
    The Green Party has today put forward an amendment to the Electoral (Registration of Sentenced Prisoners) Amendment Bill to ensure all people in prisons can vote in general elections. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Green Party welcomes new approach to delivering light rail
    The Green Party welcomes the decision to not proceed with Public Public Investment (PPI) delivery of Auckland’s light rail project and to instead run the process through the public service. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First welcomes PGF investment in Wairarapa Water
    Hon Ron Mark, New Zealand First List MP based in the Wairarapa New Zealand First List MP Hon Ron Mark welcomes the announcement of Provincial Growth Funding investment of $1.4 million to help secure the Wairarapa’s water supply. The funding boost will allow the Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC), and ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First MP Mark Patterson selected as candidate for Taieri
    New Zealand First list MP Mark Patterson has been selected to represent the party in the newly formed Taieri electorate at the upcoming election. Mr Patterson, his wife Jude and two daughters farm sheep and beef at Lawrence and Waitahuna. He previously stood in the Clutha-Southland electorate however boundary changes ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ground-breaking on NZ Post depot
    Hon Shane Jones, Associate Minister for State Owned Enterprises A new ‘super depot’ to be built for NZ Post in Wellington will create around 350 jobs during construction, Associate Minister for State Owned Enterprises Shane Jones says. Shane Jones today attended a ground-breaking and blessing ceremony for the parcel-processing depot ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Week That Was: Putting our economic plan into action
    Our strong economic management prior to COVID-19 - with surpluses, low debt and near-record-low unemployment - put us in a good position to weather the impact of the virus and start to rebuild our economy much earlier than many other countries. Now we're putting our plan to recover and rebuild ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Fleeing drivers hit new record-high yet again
    Darroch Ball MP, New Zealand First Spokesperson for Law and Order Recently released Police fleeing driver statistics have shown yet another increase in incidents with another record-high in the latest quarter. “This new quarterly record-high is the latest in a string of record-high numbers since 2014.  The data shows incidents ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Fletcher Tabuteau selected as candidate for Rotorua
    New Zealand First MP Fletcher Tabuteau is pleased to be confirmed today as the party’s candidate for the Rotorua electorate. Speaking at the Rotorua AGM for New Zealand First, Mr Tabuteau said this is an election that is incredibly important for the people of Rotorua. “The founding principles of New ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Greens call for Government office to address Rainbow issues following Human Rights Commission report
    The Human Rights Commission’s PRISM report on the issues impacting people based on their sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) provides an excellent programme of work for future governments to follow, say the Greens. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Winston Peters continues push for trans-Tasman travel as military take control of operations
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters said the trans-Tasman bubble had not been jeopardised after a border botch-up resulted in New Zealand having two active cases of COVID-19. On Friday, Mr Peters told RNZ's Morning Report he had heard from Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison that borders for trans-Tasman travel would open by ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Winston Peters on the Government’s Covid-19 border blunder
    Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters said today he was pleased the army was now running the quarantine and isolation process - up until now it has been the Ministry of Health. Peters told Newstalk ZB's Mike Hosking that the army knew how to introduce and follow protocols and instil discipline. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First’s Ron Mark confirms bid for the Wairarapa seat
    Hon Ron Mark, New Zealand First List MP based in the Wairarapa New Zealand First MP and Minister for Defence and Veteran’s Affairs Ron Mark has confirmed his bid for the Wairarapa seat.“The Coalition Government has done a lot of good work throughout the Wairarapa, but many constituents have told ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First welcomes second tranche of candidates
    New Zealand First is pleased to release the names of its next tranche of candidates for the 2020 election. We’re proud to announce these hardworking New Zealanders that have put their hand up to fight for a commonsense and resilient future.Jamie Arbuckle – Kaikoura Mark Arneil – Christchurch Central Jackie ...
    3 weeks ago

  • Keeping ACC levies steady until 2022
    The Government is maintaining current levy rates for the next 2 years, as part of a set of changes to help ease the financial pressures of COVID-19 providing certainty for businesses and New Zealanders, ACC Minister Iain Lees-Galloway says. “New Zealanders and businesses are facing unprecedented financial pressures as a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Extended loan scheme keeps business afloat
    Small businesses are getting greater certainty about access to finance with an extension to the interest-free cashflow loan scheme to the end of the year. The Small Business Cashflow Loan Scheme has already been extended once, to 24 July. Revenue and Small Business Minister Stuart Nash says it will be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New investment creates over 2000 jobs to clean up waterways
    A package of 23 projects across the country will clean up waterways and deliver over 2000 jobs Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Environment Minister David Parker announced today. The $162 million dollar package will see 22 water clean-up projects put forward by local councils receiving $62 million and the Kaipara ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Speech to Labour Party Congress 2020
    Tena koutou katoa  Nga tangata whenua o tenei rohe o Pōneke, tena koutou Nau mai, haere mai ki te hui a tau mo te roopu reipa Ko tatou!  Ko to tatou mana!  Ko to tatou kaupapa kei te kokiri whakamua  Tena koutou, tena koutou, tena tatou katoa   Welcome. I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • PGF top-up for QE Health in Rotorua
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is investing $1.5 million to ensure QE Health in Rotorua can proceed with its world class health service and save 75 existing jobs, Under Secretary for Regional Economic Development, Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. The PGF funding announced today is in addition to the $8 million ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Building a more sustainable construction sector
    A new programme, which sets a firm course for the Building and Construction sector to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, has been announced by the Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa. “A significant amount of New Zealand’s carbon emissions come from the building and construction sector.  If we’re serious ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • PGF funds tourism boost in Northland
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing more than $7.5 million in Northland ventures to combat the economic impact of the COVID-19 virus, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investment is going to the Northern Adventure Experience and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Four new projects announced as part of the biggest ever national school rebuild programme
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Education Minister Chris Hipkins today announced significant funding for Auckland’s Northcote College as part of the first wave of a new nationwide school redevelopment programme to upgrade schools over the next 10 years. The $48.5 million project brings the total investment in Northcote College to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • COVID-19: Support to improve student attendance and wellbeing
    The Government has opened an urgent response fund to support schools and early learning services to get children and young people back on track after the Covid-19 lockdown. “While we are seeing improvements in attendance under Alert Level 1 Ministry of Education data shows that attendance rates in our schools ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Fast-track consenting law boosts jobs and economic recovery
    The law to boost the economic recovery from the impact of COVID-19 by speeding up resource consenting on selected projects has passed its second and third readings in the House today. “Accelerating nationwide projects and activities by government, iwi and the private sector will help deliver faster economic recovery and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Whanganui Port gets PGF boost
    Five port-related projects in Whanganui will receive a $26.75 million Provincial Growth Fund investment to support local economic recovery and create new opportunities for growth, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “This is a significant investment that will support the redevelopment of the Whanganui Port, a project governed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • More support for Sarjeant Gallery
    Whanganui’s Sarjeant Gallery will receive an investment of up to $12 million administered by the Provincial Growth Fund to support its redevelopment, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. The project is included in a $3 billion infrastructure pipeline announced by Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Shane Jones yesterday. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Funding for training and upskilling
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing nearly $2.5 million into three Te Ara Mahi programmes to support Manawatū-Whanganui jobseekers and employees to quickly train and upskill, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “Up to 154 local people will be supported into employment within the first year by these ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Statement from the Minister of Health Dr David Clark
      This morning I have formally tendered my resignation as Minister of Health, which was accepted by the Prime Minister. Serving as Minister of Health has been an absolute privilege – particularly through these extraordinary last few months. It’s no secret that Health is a challenging portfolio. I have given ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Scholarship placements for agricultural emissions scientists doubles
    Scholarships for 57 early-career agricultural emissions scientists from 20 developing countries is another example of New Zealand’s international leadership in primary sector sustainability, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Mr O’Connor, announcing the scholarships today, says hundreds of applications were received for this fourth round of the CLIFF-GRADS programme (Climate, Food ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Funding for Foxton regeneration
    A project to help rejuvenate the Horowhenua town of Foxton will receive a Provincial Growth Fund investment of $3.86 million, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “This funding for the Foxton Regeneration project will be used to make the well-known holiday town even more attractive for visitors and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Plan to improve protection of moa bones
    Moa bones and other sub-fossil remains of extinct species are set to have improved protection with proposals to prevent the trade in extinct species announced the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage today. “We have lost too many of our native species, but these lost species, such as moa, remain an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Free lunches served up to thousands of school children in the South Island
    The Government’s free and healthy school lunches programme moves south for the first time creating jobs for around 30 people in Otago and Southland. “Eighteen schools with 3000 students are joining the programme – 11 have already begun serving lunches, and seven are preparing to start during Term 3. This is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Screen Sector recovery package protects jobs, boosts investment
    Thousands of Kiwi jobs and investment in New Zealand productions will be protected through a screen sector support package announced today by Associate Minister for Arts Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni, Minister for Economic Development Phil Twyford and Minister for Broadcasting Kris Faafoi. The package also includes investment in broadcasting ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New fund to help save local events and jobs
    The Government has established a new $10 million fund for the domestic events sector to help save jobs and protect incomes as it recovers from the impacts of COVID-19, Minister of Economic Development Phil Twyford announced today. This funding from Budget 2020 follows talks with the event sector designed to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Bill to improve fuel market competition
    The Government has taken another step in its commitment to making sure New Zealanders get a fairer deal at the petrol pump with the introduction of legislation to improve competition in the retail fuel market, says Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods. “The fuel market study that this Government ordered ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Zealand joins global facility for pre-purchase of COVID-19 Vaccine
    New Zealand has joined a global initiative that aims to enable all countries to access a safe and effective Covid-19 vaccine, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters announced today. The COVAX Facility was recently launched by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. The Alliance includes the World Health Organization, UNICEF, the World Bank ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Right to legal representation in Family Court restored today
    From today new legislation takes effect to both restore the right to legal representation at the start of a Care of Children (CoCA) dispute in the Family Court, and allow parties to those proceedings to access legal aid where eligible. During a visit to the Family Court in Auckland today, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Transitioning to a fully-qualified home-based ECE workforce
    Home-based early childhood education (ECE) subsidised by the government will transition to a fully qualified workforce by 2025 to ensure better and more consistent quality, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. “Quality early learning helps provide children with a strong foundation for their future,” Chris Hipkins said. From 1 January ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Criminal Cases Review Commission gets to work
    The new Criminal Cases Review Commission | Te Kāhui Tātari Ture (CCRC) has started work and can now independently investigate claimed miscarriages of justice. “Even though we have appeal rights and safeguards against unsafe convictions, from time to time our justice system does get things wrong. The design of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Speech by the Minister of Defence to the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs
    E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karangatanga maha, tēnā koutou Ki a koutou Te Āti Awa, Taranaki Whānui, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, ngā mana whenua o te rohe nei, tēnā koutou Ko Te Whare Wānanga o Aotearoa ki ngā take o te Ao (NZIIA), Ko te Rōpū Tohu Tono ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Six months with baby and $20 more a week for new parents
    The Government’s increase to paid parental leave kicks in today with another 4 weeks taking New Zealand up to a full 6 months (26 weeks, up from 22 weeks) leave for new parents, and the maximum weekly payment will increase by $20pw, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Iain Lees-Galloway says. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Infrastructure investment to create jobs, kick-start COVID rebuild
    A new package of infrastructure investments will help kick-start the post-COVID rebuild by creating more than 20,000 jobs and unlocking more than $5 billion of projects up and down New Zealand. Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones today outlined how the $3 billion infrastructure fund in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Statement on passage of national security law for Hong Kong
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters today expressed the New Zealand Government’s deep disappointment at the passage by China’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee of a national security law for Hong Kong. “New Zealand has consistently emphasised its serious concern about the imposition of this legislation on Hong Kong without inclusive ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • July 1 marks progress for workers, families
    More jobs and more family time with newborns are the centrepiece of a suite of Government initiatives coming into effect today. July 1 is a milestone day for the Government as a host of key policies take effect, demonstrating the critical areas where progress has been made. “The Coalition Government ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Auckland water consent referred to Board of Inquiry
    Environment Minister David Parker has today “called in” Auckland’s application to the Waikato Regional Council to take an extra 200 million litres of water a day from the lower reaches of the Waikato River for Auckland drinking water and other municipal uses.  The call-in means the application has been referred ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand to host virtual APEC in 2021
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters and Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker announced today that New Zealand’s hosting of APEC in 2021 will go ahead using virtual digital platforms. Mr Peters said the global disruption caused by COVID-19, including resultant border restrictions, had been the major factor in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Matakana Link Road construction kicks off and drives jobs
    The start of construction on a new link road between Matakana Road and State Highway 1 will create jobs and support the significant population growth expected in the Warkworth area, Transport Minister Phil Twyford and Mayor Phil Goff announced today. Transport Minister Phil Twyford said construction of the Matakana Link ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • PPE supplies secured as COVID-19 response focuses on border
    The Government is prioritising its latest investment in PPE for frontline health workers, including staff at managed isolation and quarantine facilities, Health Minister David Clark says. “With no community transmission of COVID-19 our response now has a firm focus on keeping our border safe and secure. “We must ensure that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • PGF funding for Parihaka settlement
    The Parihaka Papakāinga Trust in Taranaki will receive up to $14 million for a new visitor centre and other improvements at the historic settlement that will boost the local economy and provide much-needed jobs, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little have ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Protections for workers in triangular employment
    Protections for workers who are employees of one employer but working under the direction of another business or organisation have come into force, closing a gap in legislation that  made the personal grievance process inaccessible for some workers, says Workplace Relations Minister Iain Lees-Galloway. “This Government is working hard to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government strengthens managed isolation system
    A range of improvements are already underway to address issues identified in the rapid review of the Managed Isolation and Quarantine system released today, Housing Minister Megan Woods said. The review was commissioned just over a week ago to identify and understand current and emerging risks to ensure the end-to-end ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Whakatāne to go predator free with Government backing Ngāti Awa led efforts
    The important brown kiwi habitat around Whakatāne will receive added protection through an Iwi-led predator free project announced by Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage and Under Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau. “The Government is investing nearly $5 million into Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Awa’s environmental projects with $2.5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Growing Goodwood: Expanding wood waste recycling plant in Bay of Plenty, Waikato
    An extra 4,000 tonnes of offcuts and scraps of untreated wood per year will soon be able to be recycled into useful products such as horticultural and garden mulch, playground safety surfacing and animal bedding as a result of a $660,000 investment from the Waste Minimisation Fund, Associate Environment Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Scott Watson’s convictions to be referred to Court of Appeal
    The Governor-General has referred Scott Watson’s convictions for murder back to the Court of Appeal, Justice Minister Andrew Little announced today. Mr Watson was convicted in 1999 of the murders of Ben Smart and Olivia Hope. His appeal to the Court of Appeal in 2000 was unsuccessful, as was his ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago