web analytics

Tax cuts for some

Written By: - Date published: 12:30 pm, March 29th, 2009 - 47 comments
Categories: Media, national/act government, tax - Tags:

The Weekend Herald’s front page proclaims ‘$2 billion more in the pocket“. The article goes on to say “the average worker will get $15.66 a week”. But who is this ‘average worker’?

The Herald has used the average wage, which is $47,500 a year, but that’s not what the typical employed person earns because the average is pulled up by a few people on high incomes.

If you want to know the typical worker’s income, you want to look at the median, which is $40,000. Remember too, not everyone has a job. Retired people, beneficiaries, students, they have to buy bread too. The median income for all adults including people not working is $28,000.

2.6 million Kiwis have incomes below $40,000. They get nothing from these tax cuts. Except for 400,000 who are working and not getting Working For Families. They get $10 a week.

Most of the 1.4-1.5 million people who will get a tax cut won’t get much, either. The bulk of the money will go to the 50,000 people with incomes over $150,000.

So $2 billion in the pocket, but whose pocket?

47 comments on “Tax cuts for some ”

  1. Stephen 1

    You should probably consider the several hundred thousand who’ve been getting WFF since 2005 in your calculations…

  2. Sean 2

    didn’t one of your writers the other day talk about ‘government by the rich, for the rich’? That’s what it looks like to me.

    Stephen, If you get working for families you don’t get this new independent earner benefit

  3. infused 3

    “Stephen, If you get working for families you don’t get this new independent earner benefit”

    And the problem is?

    • Tane 3.1

      The problem is low-middle income families are actually worse off under these tax changes than they were in Labour’s tax cuts that were repealed by National last year.

  4. BLiP 4

    The rich get richer and the poor get poorer. Thanks National.

  5. RedLogix 5

    If you want to know the typical worker’s income, you want to look at the median, which is $40,000. Remember too, not everyone has a job. Retired people, beneficiaries, students, they have to buy bread too. The median income for all adults including people not working is $28,000.

    I think you have mixed up the median household income, and the median wage/salary income. The median wage is actually around $28,000, while the median for all adults is around $24,000.

    Median Income Stats

    The vast majority of New Zealanders will see sod all out of these tax cuts, but the Herald is not about to point that out is it?

  6. George Darroch 6

    This is blatantly obvious to anyone with even the most basic knowledge of statistics. That apparently excludes anyone working at the Granny Herald.

    I know, I know, Danyl McLauchlan will say that it isn’t the job of the media to know basic statistics, that’s for the opposition.

    But being the kind person I am, I’ll illustrate the difference between the mean (what the Herald uses as ‘average’) and the median, and why the difference is important.

    Ten people are riding on a bus in Redmond, Washington. The mean income of those riders is $50,000 a year. The median income of those riders is also $50,000 a year.

    Joe Blow gets off the bus. Bill Gates gets on.
    The median income of those riders remains $50,000 a year. But the mean income is now somewhere in the neighborhood of $50 million or so.so.

    From here.

    Graeme Hart will get a tax cut. The large majority of New Zealanders will not.

    The Granny Herald article would give you the impression that the large majority of New Zealanders will. Either the Granny Herald employs stupid reporters and editors, or it employs reporters and editors who willfully mislead their readers.

  7. George Darroch 7

    Ditto for the chronically stupid or willfully misleading editors and journalists at TVNZ.

    Or, perhaps, when they say ‘most people’, it is because some people count as 3/5 human?

    Who in NZ gets extra or reduced personhood in order for these claims to be true? Does being poor destroy one’s soul?

  8. And wasn’t Key offering “everyone” $50 a week at one point? Oops!

  9. Stephen 9

    Stephen, If you get working for families you don’t get this new independent earner benefit

    My point was that they got their fairly substantial tax cuts/credits years ago.

  10. Stephen 10

    The problem is low-middle income families are actually worse off under these tax changes than they were in Labour’s tax cuts that were repealed by National last year.

    Going on what Goff has been saying this year (plus the odd columnist you would not expect to express such sentiments) there wouldn’t be any tax cuts for anybody this year if Labour got re-elected.

    George, great point about medians.

    • Macro 10.1

      Probably not! Maybe now is not the time to be giving out lollies to those who don’t need them. The wff was needed, and targeted towards those who needed assistance at that time (working people who are raising a family) – and such folk still need that extra assistance.
      These recent tax cuts – which were promulgated before the election (and we should not be surprised at their direction) are clearly targeted towards those on higher incomes who perhaps are not in need of extra lollies. I’m sure there will be heaps who say – I need every extra penny I’m getting. It’s theft that they take taxes from me in the first place etc. etc.
      However – now the govt is in the quandary that it has decided to continue to reduce taxes for those who can possibly afford to pay them most easily, while at the same time it is faced with an ever growing deficit caused by a worsening labour market and reduced incomes. The govt response to this crisis is to re-jiggle the funding of previously committed finance and call it a “stimulus package”. My guess is that most of the tax breaks will go to repaying mortgages more quickly.

  11. gomango 11

    I don’t understand the mean/median explanation. Why would Bill Gates be getting on a bus?

    • George Darroch 11.1

      Why is he on a bus? It’s a thought experiment.

      An arbitrary series of numbers:

      1,2,3,4,100

      The mean is three.
      The median is twenty two.

      If you line all the waged and salaried incomes in NZ up, and pick the middle one (median), you’ll get about $39,000. If you line all incomes up, the median is near $28,000.

      If you add all the incomes in NZ up, and divide them by the number of income earners (mean), you’ll get $47,500.

      The difference is caused by the fact that there is income disparity – the number of people on high and very high incomes is comparatively small, but their incomes are much higher than most of the population.

      If your intention is to give larger tax cuts to these people all well and good. Which ACT voters, for example would have no problem with. If you’re claiming that the medium income voters who voted for you will get tax cuts, when most of them in fact will not, then there’s a problem.

      You’d think that broken promises would make for good media fodder. Again, I ask whether the media simply can’t do simple maths or is deliberately misleading the public.

      • Hilary 11.1.1

        Excellent explanations and analysis thanks George. I wonder if anyone in the MSM will pick it up?

      • r0b 11.1.2

        1,2,3,4,100

        The mean is three.
        The median is twenty two.

        Other way round, mean is 22, median is 3. But the point that these are very different measures (for non normal data) is well made.

  12. Quoth the Raven 12

    The righties have been going on a lot about WfF lately. Under labour it was just more welfare. But now…

  13. Helena 13

    Perhaps the rich dont think that the poorer people dont need any more money because they dont work as hard as those with the power. Perhaps they dont deserve tax cuts at all.
    How then does that equate with corporate welfare where businesses have their hands out for subsidies for wages and export earnings, relief on interest rates and council rates, financial assistance with wages, less holiday pay etc etc etc.
    I actually wonder why they feel they are more deserving of tax cuts/relief/subsidies than the people who really need it.

  14. Pascal's bookie 14

    Why would Bill Gates be getting on a bus?

    cause he’s a fuckin hippie?

    Going on what Goff has been saying this year (plus the odd columnist you would not expect to express such sentiments) there wouldn’t be any tax cuts for anybody this year if Labour got re-elected.

    Coupla points. Firstly, if Labour had ben re-elected, Goff wouldn’t be labour leader. Secondly, he’s called national’s tax cuts to be cancelled, which are aimed at the higher incomes. It’s generally accepted that targeting tax cuts at the lower end provides more stimulus, as most of it gets spent rather than saved. Nobody knows what Cullen would’ve done.

    • Strathen 14.1

      I was lead to believe one of the biggest lessons from the Great Depression was that saving does stimulate the economy, as long as it’s put in the banks. Apparently this allows (forces?) banks to loan money as they can’t just pay money out in interest without earning on it. Thus stimulating the economy.

      Is it a question of priorities? What I mean, is it more essential in a global recession to look after the economy or the low income earners? This is based upon the premise that we can only look after one or the other and not both at the same time, which may be flawed.

      • BLiP 14.1.1

        Human beings comes before the economy – if people are suffering disproportionately as the result of decisions designed to assist the economy then the priotities of government are incorrect.

        That you should even ask this question disgusts me.

        • Strathen 14.1.1.1

          ‘That you should even ask this question disgusts me.’ Apologies for disgusting you. Perhaps I could make myself clearer so to remove the jumps in moral conclusions.

          My knowledge probably fails because I’m not aware of the numbers of people below the poverty line in NZ. (you may read self-centred, but I help a family on the DPB whilst being on average wage and am comfortable with my morals) To my knowledge we’re not at the levels of other countries, and I’m lead to believe that whilst there are some in poverty, the numbers aren’t so high so as to be labelled an epidemic. I know that no one should be below the poverty line in a perfect world, but a couple is better than all if the economy fails completely. Judging by your comment, I’m horribly wrong in this premise. I am not aware of ‘people suffering disproportionately’ and would invite some serious statistics that shows the government is contributing to this.

          In this situation, obviously we need to help. My understanding is we draw from the economy to pay for the assistance these people need. Does this mean we have a chicken-egg situation?

      • Pascal's bookie 14.1.2

        I’m unsure. Seems to me that if people are saving, then they are not in the market for borrowing, if you catch my drift…

        The problem arises when due to bad economic weather, people on aggregate start saving (or paying back debt) more than business wants to borrow. If business can’t see the profit in building new plant or what-have-you, and are in fact cutting back on production, then the banks aren’t going to have much luck in trying to loan them money.

        One argument against the ‘paradox of thrift’ being a problem is that, as you say, money ‘saved’ in a bank is actually money just being ‘spent’ in a more productive way than the saver could think of (through loans etc). Recent events re banking might dilute this idea somewhat… 😉

        • Strathen 14.1.2.1

          Good comments Pascal, it opens my thinking up a bit more.

          Using an example to aid my thinking regarding your second paragraph, can you expand on my following thoughts. Let’s say I’m someone who doesn’t believe in borrowing. I just build my assets, business, wealth etc. Whilst my personal returns and growth probably aren’t going to be as high as others in the long run, I’m never in debt. What effect, positive or negative, do I have on the economy?

          What would happen if everyone did this and borrowing and debt was eliminated from an economy? (completely hypothetical of course)

  15. Ianmac 15

    If you give tax cuts to middle and upper incomes, and leave working for families as is, and give no rise to that group, then it follows that although the WfF group is not being cut, the richer are moving ahead leaving the others behind, which is like a cut in income.
    I stall at the lights and the car beside me can quietly slip ahead with little effort! (Well I know what I mean!)

    • Macro 15.1

      Yes I know what you mean Ianmac – Ruth did it in her “mother of all budgets!” and what a mother that was! The take home pay differentials for those on higher incomes went thru the roof! I had a graph of the before and after effects from the Stats Dept once – but its probably lost in antiquity now. It was quite startling to see it so graphically. The same will be revealed in the future with this handout to the wealthy. They have done it before and the average, mean, – no i think in this case MODE voters have such short memories.

  16. Stephen 16

    Good point about not knowing what Cullen would’ve done, and Labour hadn’t scheduled any tax cuts for 2009 anyway. I do know that he probably wasn’t going to give the not-so-rich the chance for 2% Government/employer Kiwisaver though.

    It’s generally accepted that targeting tax cuts at the lower end provides more stimulus, as most of it gets spent rather than saved

    Is that “generally accepted” in the emprical sense, or just ‘common’ sense?

    • Ari 16.1

      Stephen- The empirical data and theoretical models sense. Ask an economist and they’ll tell you that targeting assistance at those with smaller incomes results in much better circulation for any realistic figure- whether we’re talking about tax cuts, programs like WFFs, or even benefit increases, and that both real-world data and market theory backs up the assertion.

      (Of course, they’ll also say you can only tax the rich so much before you poison productivity, but there’s a lot of disagreement as to exactly how much is “too much.”)

    • Pascal's bookie 16.2

      ,i>Is that “generally accepted’ in the emprical sense, or just ñ€˜common’ sense?

      Bit of both, care to dispute it?

      this gives some hints…

      http://www.econbrowser.com/archives/2008/10/pocketfull_of_m.html

  17. Stephen 17

    Ianmac, does the ‘rich’ being richer affect the less rich’s ability to buy goods and services? I should add that the ‘rich’ do need to be paid some attention re: tax, or they’d all just f*** off!

    • IrishBill 17.1

      Probably not in this case but if we weren’t in a recession then that $2bn would probably put the cpi up a bit. As it stands it will probably all go into the bank in one way or another and not help stimulate the economy at all.

      Just as well we’ve got that cycleway coming.

    • Macro 17.2

      does the ñ€˜rich’ being richer affect the less rich’s ability to buy goods and services?
      Yes they do actually. Especially if the goods and services are in short supply. Those who have – can afford them, and those who haven’t – can’t!

      In the 1950, 60s and 70’s the difference between who was rich and who wasn’t was far less marked than it is now, and those who had – didn’t all disappear out of the country. Its just an empty threat! There are far more important things in life than earning money!

  18. Watching National now is like a re-run of the Bush presidency in early 2001. Tax cuts for the wealthy conceived in a boom get implemented in a bust anyway. Record deficits replace surpluses. Regulatory bodies are gutted and neutered. Cronies are moved into place so reality won’t intrude on the agenda to loot the state through poorly supervised PPPs where the regulator is run by allies of the regulated. Early moves to privatise Corrections have red flags all over them.

    All underway so far…..Just like Bush did.

    What I find most fascinating is National are oblivious to the role these very policies played in bringing about the present financial mess and limiting the resources America had to respond.

    It’s as though they don’t understand very much about a whole lot. They have their flavour of market-driven / private business is best religion and never mind that it has just conclusively demonstrated on a global scale it can’t be trusted and may destroy wealth and opportunity on a massive scale if left to its own devices.

    I have yet to hear National speak in any conscious way about its policies and the context they now operate in.

    I make these observations as one who began to see the Crash as inevitable from March 2003. National never saw it coming.

  19. Watching National now is like a re-run of the Bush presidency in early 2001. Tax cuts for the wealthy conceived in a boom get implemented in a bust anyway. Record deficits replace surpluses. Regulatory bodies are gutted and neutered. Cronies are moved into place so reality won’t intrude on the agenda to loot the state through poorly supervised PPPs where the regulator is run by allies of the regulated. Early moves to privatise Corrections have red flags all over them.

    All underway so far…..Just like Bush did.

    What I find most fascinating is National are oblivious to the role these very policies played in bringing about the present financial mess and limiting the resources America had to respond.

    It’s as though they don’t understand very much about a whole lot. They have their flavour of market-driven / private business is best religion and never mind that it has just conclusively demonstrated on a global scale it can’t be trusted and may destroy wealth and opportunity on a massive scale if left to its own devices.

    I have yet to hear National speak in any conscious way about its policies and the context they now operate in.

    I make these observations as one who began to see the Crash as inevitable from March 2003. National never saw it coming.

  20. Ari 20

    If you’re going to get into medians, you should probably stop talking about “averages” and start talking about “means”, (and perhaps even arithmetic, geometric, and harmonic means) as the list of what counts as an average is rather long.

  21. Stephen 21

    Yes they do actually. Especially if the goods and services are in short supply. Those who have – can afford them, and those who haven’t – can’t!

    Probably should’ve been a bit more specific – I know gold is in short supply, but apart from that, is good/service in short supply that really matters at the moment?

  22. Stephen 22

    Watching National now is like a re-run of the Bush presidency in early 2001. Tax cuts for the wealthy conceived in a boom get implemented in a bust anyway.

    I agree that Bush was a total disaster financially, but if you’re going to make that parallel, does that mean you don’t think that National is going to cut spending?

    • BLiP 22.1

      No. National will increase spending. Only, the money will be going to the private sector.

  23. Strathen 23

    My interpretation is that by giving tax cuts to the upper end, allows a lot more money to be both spent and saved. Thus giving the economy more stimulus in sheer quantity than giving tax cuts to the lower end. The number provided earlier is that this will provide $2bn to be spent/saved. Does anyone know of the total $$ that tax cuts for the lower end would provide for the economy?

    IMO – Another point of view would be that the middle – upper end would be more likely to have debt that requires servicing and therefore targeted tax cuts for these people will allow them to service their loans and reduce the risk of further financial institutes from going out of business.

  24. Hilary 24

    Has anyone considered that as the recession hits both the median and mean income levels will drop. Which means that someone might be in the tax cut range on 1 April but could drop below it later in the year so will in effect have a tax increase.

    • BLiP 24.1

      First of all, its a depression, not a recession.

      Yes. Many thousands of New Zealand families will have to manage a loss of income and many will fall into the trap you mention. Depending on their circumstances, they may qualify for state assistance, assuming National hasn’t outlawed it.

      Also, considering the increase in ACC levies, the increase in petrol tax, and the increase in car rego – don’t you think National has already pocketed your tax cut, or perhaps you’re so rich you will still have some money left to spend on what you choose?

      • Hilary 24.1.1

        If that comment is addressed to me I can tell you I am one of those not getting a tax cut. But I don’t mind increases to ACC levies if we can still keep the scheme in public ownership, as it is a lot cheaper than any of my other insurances, and the payout potential much higher.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Project protects jobs and nature
    A Waitomo-based Jobs for Nature project will keep up to ten people employed in the village as the tourism sector recovers post Covid-19 Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “This $500,000 project will save ten local jobs by deploying workers from Discover Waitomo into nature-based jobs. They will be undertaking local ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • Minister Shaw speaks with U.S. Presidential Envoy John Kerry
    Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw spoke yesterday with President Biden’s Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry. “I was delighted to have the opportunity to speak with Mr. Kerry this morning about the urgency with which our governments must confront the climate emergency. I am grateful to him and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs makes three diplomatic appointments
    Foreign Affairs Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today announced three diplomatic appointments: Alana Hudson as Ambassador to Poland John Riley as Consul-General to Hong Kong Stephen Wong as Consul-General to Shanghai   Poland “New Zealand’s relationship with Poland is built on enduring personal, economic and historical connections. Poland is also an important ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Major redevelopment of Wainuiomata High School underway
    Work begins today at Wainuiomata High School to ensure buildings and teaching spaces are fit for purpose, Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. The Minister joined principal Janette Melrose and board chair Lynda Koia to kick off demolition for the project, which is worth close to $40 million, as the site ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • New expert group appointed to advise Government on Oranga Tamariki
    A skilled and experienced group of people have been named as the newly established Oranga Tamariki Ministerial Advisory Board by Children’s Minister Kelvin Davis today. The Board will provide independent advice and assurance to the Minister for Children across three key areas of Oranga Tamariki: relationships with families, whānau, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • COVID-19 vaccine slated for possible approval next week
    The green light for New Zealand’s first COVID-19 vaccine could be granted in just over a week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said today. “We’re making swift progress towards vaccinating New Zealanders against the virus, but we’re also absolutely committed to ensuring the vaccines are safe and effective,” Jacinda Ardern said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New ACC Board members announced.
    The Minister for ACC is pleased to announce the appointment of three new members to join the Board of ACC on 1 February 2021. “All three bring diverse skills and experience to provide strong governance oversight to lead the direction of ACC” said Hon Carmel Sepuloni. Bella Takiari-Brame from Hamilton ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Economic boost for Southland marae
    The Government is investing $9 million to upgrade a significant community facility in Invercargill, creating economic stimulus and jobs, Infrastructure Minister Grant Robertson and Te Tai Tonga MP Rino Tirikatene have announced.  The grant for Waihƍpai RĆ«naka Inc to make improvements to Murihiku Marae comes from the $3 billion set ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Celebrating the Entry Into Force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons
    [Opening comments, welcome and thank you to Auckland University etc] It is a great pleasure to be here this afternoon to celebrate such an historic occasion - the entry into force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. This is a moment many feared would never come, but ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Supporting disabled people to stay connected
    The Government is providing $3 million in one-off seed funding to help disabled people around New Zealand stay connected and access support in their communities, Minister for Disability Issues, Carmel Sepuloni announced today. The funding will allow disability service providers to develop digital and community-based solutions over the next two ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Voluntary saliva testing offered to quarantine workers from Monday
    Border workers in quarantine facilities will be offered voluntary daily COVID-19 saliva tests in addition to their regular weekly testing, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. This additional option will be rolled out at the Jet Park Quarantine facility in Auckland starting on Monday 25 January, and then to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Next steps in firearms buy-back
    The next steps in the Government’s ambitious firearms reform programme to include a three-month buy-back have been announced by Police Minister Poto Williams today.  “The last buy-back and amnesty was unprecedented for New Zealand and was successful in collecting 60,297 firearms, modifying a further 5,630 firearms, and collecting 299,837 prohibited ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Jobs for Nature projects target iconic ecosystems
    Upscaling work already underway to restore two iconic ecosystems will deliver jobs and a lasting legacy, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says.  “The Jobs for Nature programme provides $1.25 billion over four years to offer employment opportunities for people whose livelihoods have been impacted by the COVID-19 recession. “Two new projects ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New Public Housing Plan announced
    The Government has released its Public Housing Plan 2021-2024 which outlines the intention of where 8,000 additional public and transitional housing places announced in Budget 2020, will go. “The Government is committed to continuing its public house build programme at pace and scale. The extra 8,000 homes – 6000 public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Prime Minister congratulates President Joe Biden on his inauguration
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has congratulated President Joe Biden on his inauguration as the 46th President of the United States of America. “I look forward to building a close relationship with President Biden and working with him on issues that matter to both our countries,” Jacinda Ardern said. “New Zealand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding will create training and employment opportunities
    A major investment to tackle wilding pines in Mt Richmond will create jobs and help protect the area’s unique ecosystems, Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor says. The Mt Richmond Forest Park has unique ecosystems developed on mineral-rich geology, including taonga plant species found nowhere else in the country. “These special plant ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pre-departure testing extended to all passengers to New Zealand
    To further protect New Zealand from COVID-19, the Government is extending pre-departure testing to all passengers to New Zealand except from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “The change will come into force for all flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (NZT) on Monday ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Bay Cadets learn skills to protect environment
    Bay Conservation Cadets launched with first intake Supported with $3.5 million grant Part of $1.245b Jobs for Nature programme to accelerate recover from Covid Cadets will learn skills to protect and enhance environment Environment Minister David Parker today welcomed the first intake of cadets at the launch of the Bay ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Cook Islanders to resume travel to New Zealand
    The Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern and the Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Mark Brown have announced passengers from the Cook Islands can resume quarantine-free travel into New Zealand from 21 January, enabling access to essential services such as health. “Following confirmation of the Cook Islands’ COVID ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Supporting communities and landowners to grow employment opportunities
    Jobs for Nature funding is being made available to conservation groups and landowners to employ staff and contractors in a move aimed at boosting local biodiversity-focused projects, Conservation Minister Kiritapu Allan has announced. It is estimated some 400-plus jobs will be created with employment opportunities in ecology, restoration, trapping, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Border exception for some returning international tertiary students
    The Government has approved an exception class for 1000 international tertiary students, degree level and above, who began their study in New Zealand but were caught offshore when border restrictions began. The exception will allow students to return to New Zealand in stages from April 2021. “Our top priority continues ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Tiwai deal gives time for managed transition
    Today’s deal between Meridian and Rio Tinto for the Tiwai smelter to remain open another four years provides time for a managed transition for Southland. “The deal provides welcome certainty to the Southland community by protecting jobs and incomes as the region plans for the future. The Government is committed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New member for APEC Business Advisory Council
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has appointed Anna Curzon to the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC). The leader of each APEC economy appoints three private sector representatives to ABAC. ABAC provides advice to leaders annually on business priorities. “ABAC helps ensure that APEC’s work programme is informed by business community perspectives ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt’s careful economic management recognised
    The Government’s prudent fiscal management and strong policy programme in the face of the COVID-19 global pandemic have been acknowledged by the credit rating agency Fitch. Fitch has today affirmed New Zealand’s local currency rating at AA+ with a stable outlook and foreign currency rating at AA with a positive ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Additional actions to keep COVID-19 out of NZ
    The Government is putting in place a suite of additional actions to protect New Zealand from COVID-19, including new emerging variants, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Given the high rates of infection in many countries and evidence of the global spread of more transmissible variants, it’s clear that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • 19 projects will clean up and protect waterways
    $36 million of Government funding alongside councils and others for 19 projects Investment will clean up and protect waterways and create local jobs Boots on the ground expected in Q2 of 2021 Funding part of the Jobs for Nature policy package A package of 19 projects will help clean up ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • New Zealand Government acknowledges 175th anniversary of Battle of Ruapekapeka
    The commemoration of the 175th anniversary of the Battle of Ruapekapeka represents an opportunity for all New Zealanders to reflect on the role these conflicts have had in creating our modern nation, says Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Kiri Allan. “The Battle at Te Ruapekapeka Pā, which took ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago