The Standard line: crime

Written By: - Date published: 9:27 am, October 20th, 2008 - 39 comments
Categories: crime, The Standard line - Tags:

So, you’re talking with someone about politics and they say something really dumb and wrong and you know it’s wrong but you don’t have the arguments and facts at your fingertips to make a decisive point. That’s where our election series, The Standard line, comes in. The info you need in bite-size form. Today, crime:

Points:
– Crime is down. When Labour came to power, there were 1200 offences reported per 10,000 people, each year. Now there are 1000.
– There were 8,000 fewer crimes in total reported last year than 1999 and 25,000 more were solved.
– The crime figures we hear about are only reported crimes. The evidence is that reporting of crime is up because of public awareness campaigns and because cell-phones making reporting crimes immediately easier. We know two types of crimes that always have nearly 100% reporting – homicides and burglaries (you can’t claim insurance if you don’t report a burgulary to the Police). Homicides are down 10% per capita, burglaries are down 18%. 
– reported violent crime is up but the experts say this is due to higher reporting of family violence. The number of violent street crimes actually fell 1% last year. Reported violent offences were up 30%. Think about it: is it credible that violence within families actually went up that much in one year for no reason even while homicides and street violence went down? No.
-Family violence has long been under-reported and in the last year there has been a strong campaign to get people to report family violence – that is the explanation for the increase in reporting.
-The entire increase in violent crimes and sexual crimes since Labour came to power comes from higher reporting of family violence. 
-while every violent crime is bad, it is worth noting that there is less than 1 violent crime per 100 people a year.

39 comments on “The Standard line: crime ”

  1. KK 1

    “rpeorting crimes immdeiately” ??

    I still argue that Nanny Key with his bootcamps provide the answer.

  2. Anita 2

    The entire increase in violent crimes and sexual crimes since Labour came to power comes from higher reporting of family violence.

    Can you remind me where the evidence for that is? I struggle to believe it’s true for sexual crimes I’m sure I saw something which said the increase was due in part of increased reporting of date rape, again a reporting increase but not family violence.

  3. Ianmac 3

    Murder is a subset of Homicide. There are about 50-60 murders per year and have been for a very long time. (But ask your neighbour how many murders they think happen and they usually say 2-300! Media?)
    (Homicides include manslaughter, infanticide and I was sure suicide but can’t prove the latter. The rate in the1970’s was 120. The rate currently is around 80. But can’t find my sources.)

  4. MikeE 4

    “- Crime is down. When Labour came to power, there were 1200 offences reported per 10,000 people, each year. Now there are 1000.”

    Incorrect, reported crime is down. This could mean that crime is down, or it could mean that people simply aren’t reporting crime. Is this violent crime? property crime, or meaningless stuff like pot offenses?

    “- There were 8,000 fewer crimes in total reported last year than 1999 and 25,000 more were solved.”

    Again, is this less crime happening or being reported? Are they solving more violent crime? burglaries? or just locking up more people for smoking pot? When my car was broken into I was told not to bother reporting it. When I was assualted the cops did nothign about it untill it ended up on the blogs and pressure was put on MPs in Wellington.

    “- The crime figures we hear about are only reported crimes. The evidence is that reporting of crime is up because of public awareness campaigns and because cell-phones making rpeorting crimes immdeiately easier. We know two types of crimes that always have nearly 100% reporting – homicides and burglaries (you can’t claim insurance if you don’t report a burgulary to the Police). Homicides are down 10% per capita, burglaries are down 18%. ”

    People won’t bother reporting crimes if the excess is higher than what is stolen/damaged. We had stuff stolen from our place in Kingsland (100m from Clarks electorate office) and didn’t bother reporting it, as the excess on what was stolen (cell phone) was higher than the value. This is all to common – for businesses, a lot of shoplifting is never reported, this doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. Same goes with domestic violence.

    “- reported violent crime is up but the experts say this is due to higher reporting of family violence. The number of violent street crimes actually fell 1% last year. Reported violent offences were up 30%. Think about it: is it credible that violence within families actually went up that much in one year for no reason even while homicides and street violence went down? No.”

    So more people are reporting family violence, this is good, but are people reporting car thefts? Shoplifting? Vandalism etc?

    “-Family violence has long been under-reported and in the last year there has been a strong campaign to get people to report family violence – that is the explanation for the increase in reporting.”

    Again see above, there seems to be some hard core head in the sand behavior going on.

    You’re arguments seem to revolve around the idea that if the stats are good, its because of Labour’s policy and leadership, but it they are bad its not their faut (Annette King blaming it on the full moon, or Rogernomics!) – you can’t have it both ways. Myself, I just blame it on the individual criminals.

    What would I like to see:

    – Increased effort on solving violent and property crime
    – Goal of Justice and protecting individuals, not punishment, or revenge
    – Move away from policing victimless crimes, such as those caught with cannabis or BZP

    Unfortunately it seems like Labour are going the opposite way… The other parties are ofering alternatives that at least focus on the first and hopefully 2nd points, it would be nice if we had a major party take on the third point.

  5. While most of the points on this list are fairly true, you need citations, otherwise this just comes across as opinion – there are quite a few I’d like to see substantiated before I accept them. I know this takes ages, but if it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing properly.

    Not all burglaries are reported. Small property crimes are often unreported because the excess and no-claims bonus outweigh anything that might be gained through an insurance claim.

  6. anita. the stats table builder, you can look at scene for location of the crime, ‘dwelling’ is an approximation for family violence, apparently the police have better figures but i’ve not seen them.

    ianmac, correct murder is a subset of homicides. strangely, the homicide category in the stats includes attempted murder – so my figures are murders and manslaughters combined.

  7. Anita 7

    SP,

    No no, anything but the stats table builder… back in half an hour 🙂

  8. randal 8

    the argument shoudl be how much crime is there in new zealand relative to our size and the incidence of crime on other countries of the same type. otherwise this is just an exercise in futility for numbskulls to flap their gums over every three years.

  9. Anita 9

    SP,

    Ok, I restrained myself and didn’t get distracted by other cool stats 🙂

    Sexual crimes committed in a dwelling could include:
    * sexual assault within the context of family violence
    * date rape in ones own house or the person one was dating
    * sexual assault by a burglar or other intruder

    So I don’t think that is evidence that it’s increased reporting of family violence that’s raising sexual violence stats. It also doesn’t sound right to me, much of the effort to increase reporting about sexual violence has been about acquaintance rape (date rape and similar).

  10. Ianmac 10

    MikeE said:”Incorrect, reported crime is down. This could mean that crime is down, or it could mean that people simply aren’t reporting crime. Is this violent crime? property crime, or meaningless stuff like pot offenses?”
    Mike. If crime is not being reported how do you know that crime is worse? Would your point be valid this year? Well it must have been valid for decades, so we must be working from the same base. That is; the figures available, in order to make judgements.
    randal: The nearest available to compare countries is the rate per 10,000. Unfortunately the data gathered in other countries varies. I think that in USA a multiple murder is classed as one event. In NZ the number of each victim is counted as separate stat. (Even in NZ the way the Stats were collated has changed in the last decade.)

  11. randal 11

    ianmac…so whats the guts. is crime more prevalent in new zealand than elsewhere or are we just “average” to mediocre?

  12. Ianmac 12

    Where does NZ sit? It does suggest that we are more violent over a long term than other comparable countries . (IMO the insistence on the right to hit kids is a reflection of that. Over 80 countries in Europe have banned hitting kids. The most recent in Germany where a flat ban was enacted. No reaction. In NZ???)
    Because the effectiveness of crime prevention and detection vary from country to country it becomes hard to compare apples with peaches. I am proud of our Police Force.

  13. Felix 13

    Sorry for the off topic but I just saw this and had a chuckle.

    Back on topic:

    Crime is bad but nothing anyone says about it in election season is ever worth listening to.

    I say get on with your life and enjoy it and stop being so scared of everything.

  14. higherstandard 14

    Felix

    “Crime is bad but nothing anyone says about it in election season is ever worth listening to.”

    Yup pretty much

  15. vto 15

    agreed too. violent crime on the tv news could be eased up on though – sheesh, it’s impossible to watch the news with the kids now because it is loaded with violence and yuck. 2c

  16. randal 16

    well why dont yu write a letter to yor MP and to the televison staion instead of bleating about it in here. I really dont care what you do in the privacy of your own home

  17. vto 17

    you get out of the wrong side of bed today wandal?

  18. randal 18

    whats it to you scumbag?

  19. sean 19

    Ha ha ha – you’ve devoted a complete article to apologies for why things are actually better than everyone thinks they are.

    Keep the stuttering apologies coming lads – I always wondered what a Policy Analyst is – now I know.

  20. higherstandard 20

    Put Randal into the “do not engage with” box – he’s either one of the saddest little abuse generators in the blogosphere or a sociology student completing a thesis on the responses to mindless comments a lefty blog.

    Either way I suggest you leave to his own devices.

  21. vto 21

    well randal you have been on the warpath today that is what

  22. randal 22

    why dont you trolls address the question. You will do anything rather than adress the question. and the question is why is Johny Keys in New Zealand after working for three organisations that have bordered on the criminal and have brought the international banking system to a standstill and yet you support him. Trying to attack me for telling the world what sort of people you are is just doging the issue. Address the question.

  23. vto 23

    randal that’s not the question on this thread you egg. and for the record i have not attacked you, merely defended myself AGAIN.

    anyway, if you are so concerned about near-criminal behaviour in govt, how about the question of the standards of governance taken on by Clark’s govt as exhibited by keeping a proven perjurer on baubles. poor. so very poor.

    re your question about Key’s role in the meltdown – financial products were not the reason for this meltdown, merely one of many components.

  24. Akldnut 24

    vto – It may not be the question on this thread but its one that I’d like to know, and also while we’re at it why does he keep flipping on so many things that he says? or why he can’t answer a straight question with a straight answer. Ok I know it’s the way politions work but he has taken it way past the reasonable to the extreme, to the stage when even his own party dont know what he’s up to at times.

  25. randal 25

    vto its idiots like you who continue to support geeks like keys and minimise his actions that makes the new zealand situation much more dangerous. wake up or do you specailise in abetting financial malfeasance?

  26. Akldnut 26

    Notice how English has been glaringly out of sight since the Pita Sharples (Maori Party) flip.

  27. vto 27

    randal I think you misunderstand the situation and lack an understanding of the human nature. Which also explains why you can turn a complete blind eye to Peters and his perjury.

    Re Key – I don’t have the detailed knowledge of whether any criminal wrongdoing was undertaken in his role at various ‘banks’. Best ask Key. If there was wrongdoing then the price should be paid. But merely workng in such an area is not an immediate guilty judgment – ex`cept on talkback radio. Perhaps try your luck there.

    Anyway, for what its worth there are some fair questions raised about Key as akldnut outlines. But they aint enough to turn me around to Clark – while the left has many policy areas I agree with I will not be supporting her because I do not like her style of governance (supreme court imposition, retrospective legislation, EFA imposition, Peters and OG matters, etc). And I do not believe her policies are sufficient to lift NZ. She is a socialist and her policies are limited to achieving those ends only.

  28. randal 28

    vto I understand completey what you are doing. you are filling up this space with barely literate maunderings to confuse people and to cause them to go elsewhere. in other words you are just a troll. You are just like keys who uses long strings of words that have no coherence and mean nothing.

  29. vto 29

    randal you are starting to sound hollow. that the best you got?

  30. The Realist 30

    hhm, while I accept that reported crime is down, I still don’t believe crime itself is. I also don’t know whether there is 100% reporting of homicides and burglaries either. While homicides are probably pretty likely to be accurate, there is a large amount of burglaries that don’t get report as the household doesn’t have insurance, or its too low to worry about, or in a lot of cases its not worth the effort.

    Also a lot of minor crime has dropped in part due to lower employment, better social conditions but also better security (alarms, locks etc) while violent crime has gone the other way. And its not due to domestic violence.

    These days you are just as likey to get a hiding at the same time as your wallet gets nicked. It also not just the media beating it up.

    I can think recently of a number of crimes that were of a major nature in West Auckland recently that recieved next to no coverage in the press.

  31. randal 31

    zip ah dee doo dah, zip a dee day, my oh my its just a wonderful day. except for the whining right whingers who fill up this blog with their logorhea…blettchhhh!!!

  32. vto 32

    randal
    in a mangle

  33. The Realist
    “hhm, while I accept that reported crime is down, I still don’t believe crime itself is.”

    That’s because fear of crime correlates with media reporting of crime, not actual levels. Crime is so infrequent and your unable to be every where at once. Your only gauge of the level of crime very occasionally when yourself or someone around you is a victim of crime this is very sporadic how ever. One burglary and an assult amongst your friends last year and 4 such offenses this year does not mean crime has doubled, but you’d sure as hell think its out of control.

    The other place you find out about crime is the news where “if it bleeds it leads”. Media reporting of crime is heavily asymmetric. Sure as hell you’ll hear about it if there’s 3 murders in a month, but no way is it news when theres no murders for 3 months.

  34. The Realist 34

    killingnthenameof,

    no back to my original point, in that the media don’t report a lot of crime. Crime isn’t infrequent, or maybe it is where you live.

    I deal with a lot of people of all types of areas and socio economic classes and they all tell me that crime is up….

    As a rule I ignore the meida’s take on crime. It swings from one pole to the other. The big issue I see is that the people must impacted by crime and those most likely to vote Labour so it makes no sense to try and convince them of what they seem isn’t completely true.

  35. “no back to my original point, in that the media don’t report a lot of crime. Crime isn’t infrequent, or maybe it is where you live”

    Reported crime is going down, media coverage of reported crime is going up.

    I’m talking serious crime here (There’s a hell of a lot of blasphemy these days, and a lot of people around me download music and I’ve been known to keep the odd movie recorded off t.v. for longer than a week). Thousands of cars pass me each day, quite a few (Like hundreds of them) more of them are smaller cars these days, I can legitimately conclude that there’s more small cars on the road. How ever if i was lucky enough to see 2 Porsche’s in a day, I wouldn’t conclude that Porsche ownership is up.

    Crime is infrequent enough that individual anecdotal reports cannot give an accurate picture of what crime is doing. Especially in the current media environment.

    “I deal with a lot of people of all types of areas and socio economic classes and they all tell me that crime is up .”

    Again, peoples fear of crime, perception of crime levels (which someone around here pointed out are way worse, some times by a multiple of 2 or 3 on crimes that have very very little under reporting) correlates to the level of media reporting of crime.

    There is some academic merit to an argument that reported crime levels are not a good measure for real crime levels, how ever the people making that argument would say individual anecdotal reports of crime are even less reliable for estimating the real level.

    The point I’m trying to make is that an assault involving blood, guts, Maoris, gangs, weapons and a whole lot of media attention creates a much higher increase in peoples perception of levels of crime than a drunken punch up on a Friday night. The are each 1 assault, how ever the first one would get headline of a national paper claiming crime is out of control. where as the second woudl be lucky to rate a mention in the any paper at all.

  36. Hoolian 36

    This is total nonsense.

    First, at the very mention of “the Standard line”, people will associate it with this blog and instantly anything else said will lose credibility. Why do people always laugh when I say “But I saw it on the Standard?” anyway?

    Secondly, this is crap.

    Pierson feels some continuous urge to protect perpetrators of violent crime by making outlandish comments on how it’s dropping.

    Case in point:
    “while every violent crime is bad, it is worth noting that there is less than 1 violent crime per 100 people a year.”

    Phew, after nine years of Labour “getting tough on crime”, only 1 little old lady is being violently assaulted/murdered per 100, per year. Well, thank goodness for that. I’m grateful that other parties aren’t so laissez-faire about violent actions against innocent members of society.

    “The evidence is that reporting of crime is up because of public awareness campaigns and because cell-phones making reporting crimes immediately easier.”

    Where is this evidence? It’s an assumption (a HUGE assumption) that doesn’t add up. Whenever any “non-Labour” party/organisation release statistics about the rise in crime, Pierson argues that its actually just a rise in reporting, and then rejects any question that his own manufactured ‘statistics’ could be anything other than an honest reflection of New Zealand.

    Following “the Standard line” there is no decrease in crime, just a decline in reporting. People are no longer reporting crime and “the evidence is that reporting of crime is DOWN”. Sounds unlikely? Diddums. I’m just following the “the Standard line”.

    [lprent: If you are able to read, then I’d suggest looking at the links to the statistics and the reports from the police that are in the reports. Most of the material quoted comes straight from the police report. Most of the other organisations you’re talking about cherry pick the crime stats for things that they can point up as being a problem. That makes headlines.

    Good news doesn’t, so they don’t read all of the figures or the commentary by the police. Now you are doing the same thing – I guess that says everything about your reading abilities doesn’t it..]

  37. Ianmac 37

    Hoolian: With all your bluster all you do is abuse the messenger. Can you prove beyond reasonable doubt that violent crime is up? All you are doing is lamenting that violence exists. Yes agreed. But is it getting worse? Statistics are really the only thing you can argue about. Conjecture, political spin, anecdotes, media over- reporting is not evidence.
    How many murders are committed in NZ each year? Guess?
    How much better/worse than 5 or 10 or 20 years ago?

  38. Hoolian 38

    If you are able to read, then I’d suggest looking at the links to the statistics and the reports from the police that are in the reports. Most of the material quoted comes straight from the police report.

    Unless my eyes are failing me, I can’t see any reference to any police report nor do I see any links. Am I going blind or are you just wrong? Hmm, I’m leaning towards the latter.

    Most of the other organisations you’re talking about cherry pick the crime stats for things that they can point up as being a problem.

    Absolutely right. The Standard is a godsend and all other organisations (as numerous and politically diverse as they may be) are all wrong, wrong, wrong. It couldn’t be that the Standard has been caught cherry picking crime stats for things they can point up in pursuit of their own ideology.

    With all your bluster all you do is abuse the messenger. Can you prove beyond reasonable doubt that violent crime is up?

    Statistics are hard fact, but they can be bent and swung to support political ideology (as I suspect is happening right here). Besides, since when was reasonable doubt a perquisite on this site? More often than not, we revert to gossip and hearsay as hard fact. Reason is to be left at the door.

    Conjecture, political spin, anecdotes, media over- reporting is not evidence.

    Agreed. That was my point.

  39. Ben R 39

    “Crime is bad but nothing anyone says about it in election season is ever worth listening to.

    I say get on with your life and enjoy it and stop being so scared of everything.”

    Perhaps not, but you could say this about a lot of issues during the election that don’t directly affect you. Not so easy if you’re an Indian shopkeeper in South Auckland.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Major investment in teacher supply through Budget 24
    Over the next four years, Budget 24 will support the training and recruitment of 1,500 teachers into the workforce, Education Minister Erica Stanford announced today. “To raise achievement and develop a world leading education system we’re investing nearly $53 million over four years to attract, train and retain our valued ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Joint statement on the New Zealand – Cook Islands Joint Ministerial Forum – 2024
    1.  New Zealand Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Rt Hon Winston Peters; Minister of Health and Minister for Pacific Peoples Hon Dr Shane Reti; and Minister for Climate Change Hon Simon Watts hosted Cook Islands Minister of Foreign Affairs and Immigration Hon Tingika Elikana and Minister of Health Hon Vainetutai Rose Toki-Brown on 24 May ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Middle East, Africa deployments extended
    The Government has approved two-year extensions for four New Zealand Defence Force deployments to the Middle East and Africa, Defence Minister Judith Collins and Foreign Minister Winston Peters announced today. “These deployments are long-standing New Zealand commitments, which reflect our ongoing interest in promoting peace and stability, and making active ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Climate Change Commission Chair to retire
    The Climate Change Commission Chair, Dr Rod Carr, has confirmed his plans to retire at the end of his term later this year, Climate Change Minister Simon Watts says. “Prior to the election, Dr Carr advised me he would be retiring when his term concluded. Dr Rod Carr has led ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Inaugural Board of Integrity Sport & Recreation Commission announced
    Nine highly respected experts have been appointed to the inaugural board of the new Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission, Sport & Recreation Minister Chris Bishop says. “The Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission is a new independent Crown entity which was established under the Integrity Sport and Recreation Act last year, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • A balanced Foreign Affairs budget
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters confirmed today that Vote Foreign Affairs in Budget 2024 will balance two crucial priorities of the Coalition Government.    While Budget 2024 reflects the constrained fiscal environment, the Government also recognises the critical role MFAT plays in keeping New Zealanders safe and prosperous.    “Consistent with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New social housing places to support families into homes
    New social housing funding in Budget 2024 will ensure the Government can continue supporting more families into warm, dry homes from July 2025, Housing Ministers Chris Bishop and Tama Potaka say. “Earlier this week I was proud to announce that Budget 2024 allocates $140 million to fund 1,500 new social ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand’s minerals future
    Introduction Today, we are sharing a red-letter occasion. A Blackball event on hallowed ground. Today  we underscore the importance of our mineral estate. A reminder that our natural resource sector has much to offer.  Such a contribution will not come to pass without investment.  However, more than money is needed. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government sets out vision for minerals future
    Increasing national and regional prosperity, providing the minerals needed for new technology and the clean energy transition, and doubling the value of minerals exports are the bold aims of the Government’s vision for the minerals sector. Resources Minister Shane Jones today launched a draft strategy for the minerals sector in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government progresses Māori wards legislation
    The coalition Government’s legislation to restore the rights of communities to determine whether to introduce Māori wards has passed its first reading in Parliament, Local Government Minister Simeon Brown says. “Divisive changes introduced by the previous government denied local communities the ability to determine whether to establish Māori wards.” The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • First RMA amendment Bill introduced to Parliament
    The coalition Government has today introduced legislation to slash the tangle of red and green tape throttling some of New Zealand’s key sectors, including farming, mining and other primary industries. RMA Reform Minister Chris Bishop says the Government is committed to  unlocking development and investment while ensuring the environment is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government welcomes EPA decision
    The decision by Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) to approve the continued use of hydrogen cyanamide, known as Hi-Cane, has been welcomed by Environment Minister Penny Simmonds and Agriculture Minister Todd McClay.  “The EPA decision introduces appropriate environmental safeguards which will allow kiwifruit and other growers to use Hi-Cane responsibly,” Ms ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech to Employers and Manufacturers Association: Relief for today, hope for tomorrow
    Kia ora, Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou kātoa Tāmaki Herenga Waka, Tāmaki Herenga tangata Ngā mihi ki ngā mana whenua o tēnei rohe Ngāti Whātua ō Ōrākei me nga iwi kātoa kua tae mai. Mauriora. Greetings everyone. Thank you to the EMA for hosting this event. Let me acknowledge ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government invests in 1,500 more social homes
    The coalition Government is investing in social housing for New Zealanders who are most in need of a warm dry home, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. Budget 2024 will allocate $140 million in new funding for 1,500 new social housing places to be provided by Community Housing Providers (CHPs), not ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • $24 million boost for Gumboot Friday
    Thousands more young New Zealanders will have better access to mental health services as the Government delivers on its commitment to fund the Gumboot Friday initiative, says Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Mental Health Minister Matt Doocey.  “Budget 2024 will provide $24 million over four years to contract the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill passes first reading
    The Coalition Government’s Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill, which will improve tenancy laws and help increase the supply of rental properties, has passed its first reading in Parliament says Housing Minister Chris Bishop. “The Bill proposes much-needed changes to the Residential Tenancies Act 1986 that will remove barriers to increasing private ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Montecassino Commemorative Address, Cassino War Cemetery
    Standing here in Cassino War Cemetery, among the graves looking up at the beautiful Abbey of Montecassino, it is hard to imagine the utter devastation left behind by the battles which ended here in May 1944. Hundreds of thousands of shells and bombs of every description left nothing but piled ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • First Reading – Repeal of Section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act 1989
    I present a legislative statement on the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill Mr. Speaker, I move that the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill be now read a first time. I nominate the Social Services and Community Committee to consider the Bill. Thank you, Mr. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • First reading of 7AA’s repeal: progress for children
    The Bill to repeal Section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act has had its first reading in Parliament today. The Bill reaffirms the Coalition Government’s commitment to the care and safety of children in care, says Minister for Children Karen Chhour.  “When I became the Minister for Children, I made ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • China Business Summit 2024
    Kia ora koutou, good morning, and zao shang hao. Thank you Fran for the opportunity to speak at the 2024 China Business Summit – it’s great to be here today. I’d also like to acknowledge: Simon Bridges - CEO of the Auckland Chamber of Commerce. His Excellency Ambassador - Wang ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Assisted depatures from New Caledonia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has confirmed a New Zealand Government plane will head to New Caledonia in the next hour in the first in a series of proposed flights to begin bringing New Zealanders home.    “New Zealanders in New Caledonia have faced a challenging few days - and bringing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Assisted departures from New Caledonia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has confirmed a New Zealand Government plane will head to New Caledonia in the next hour in the first in a series of proposed flights to begin bringing New Zealanders home.  “New Zealanders in New Caledonia have faced a challenging few days - and bringing them ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government to rollout roadside drug testing
    The Coalition Government will introduce legislation this year that will enable roadside drug testing as part of our commitment to improve road safety and restore law and order, Transport Minister Simeon Brown says.  “Alcohol and drugs are the number one contributing factor in fatal road crashes in New Zealand. In ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Minister responds to review of Kāinga Ora
    The Government has announced a series of immediate actions in response to the independent review of Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. “Kāinga Ora is a large and important Crown entity, with assets of $45 billion and over $2.5 billion of expenditure each year. It ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Pseudoephedrine back on shelves
    Associate Health Minister David Seymour is pleased that Pseudoephedrine can now be purchased by the general public to protect them from winter illness, after the coalition government worked swiftly to change the law and oversaw a fast approval process by Medsafe. “Pharmacies are now putting the medicines back on their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand-China Business Summit
    Tēnā koutou katoa. Da jia hao.  Good morning everyone.   Prime Minister Luxon, your excellency, a great friend of New Zealand and my friend Ambassador Wang, Mayor of what he tells me is the best city in New Zealand, Wayne Brown, the highly respected Fran O’Sullivan, Champion of the Auckland business ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New measures to protect powerlines from trees
    Energy Minister Simeon Brown has announced that the Government will make it easier for lines firms to take action to remove vegetation from obstructing local powerlines. The change will ensure greater security of electricity supply in local communities, particularly during severe weather events.  “Trees or parts of trees falling on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani win top Māori dairy farming award
    Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani were the top winners at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy awards recognising the best in Māori dairy farming. Māori Development Minister Tama Potaka announced the winners and congratulated runners-up, Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, at an awards celebration also attended by Prime Minister Christopher Luxon and Finance Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • DJ Fred Again – Assurance report received
    "On the 27th of March, I sought assurances from the Chief Executive, Department of Internal Affairs, that the Department’s correct processes and policies had been followed in regards to a passport application which received media attention,” says Minister of Internal Affairs Brooke van Velden.  “I raised my concerns after being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • District Court Judges appointed
    Attorney-General Judith Collins has announced the appointment of three new District Court Judges, to replace Judges who have recently retired. Peter James Davey of Auckland has been appointed a District Court Judge with a jury jurisdiction to be based at Whangarei. Mr Davey initially started work as a law clerk/solicitor with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Unions should put learning ahead of ideology
    Associate Education Minister David Seymour is calling on the Post Primary Teachers’ Association (PPTA) to put ideology to the side and focus on students’ learning, in reaction to the union holding paid teacher meetings across New Zealand about charter schools.     “The PPTA is disrupting schools up and down the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Craig Stobo appointed as chair of FMA
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Andrew Bayly today announced the appointment of Craig Stobo as the new chair of the Financial Markets Authority (FMA). Mr Stobo takes over from Mark Todd, whose term expired at the end of April. Mr Stobo’s appointment is for a five-year term. “The FMA plays ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Budget 2024 invests in lifeguards and coastguard
    Surf Life Saving New Zealand and Coastguard New Zealand will continue to be able to keep people safe in, on, and around the water following a funding boost of $63.644 million over four years, Transport Minister Simeon Brown and Associate Transport Minister Matt Doocey say. “Heading to the beach for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand and Tuvalu reaffirm close relationship
    New Zealand and Tuvalu have reaffirmed their close relationship, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters says.  “New Zealand is committed to working with Tuvalu on a shared vision of resilience, prosperity and security, in close concert with Australia,” says Mr Peters, who last visited Tuvalu in 2019.  “It is my pleasure ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand calls for calm, constructive dialogue in New Caledonia
    New Zealand is gravely concerned about the situation in New Caledonia, Foreign Minister Winston Peters says.  “The escalating situation and violent protests in Nouméa are of serious concern across the Pacific Islands region,” Mr Peters says.  “The immediate priority must be for all sides to take steps to de-escalate the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand welcomes Samoa Head of State
    Prime Minister Christopher Luxon met today with Samoa’s O le Ao o le Malo, Afioga Tuimalealiifano Vaaletoa Sualauvi II, who is making a State Visit to New Zealand. “His Highness and I reflected on our two countries’ extensive community links, with Samoan–New Zealanders contributing to all areas of our national ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Island Direct eligible for SuperGold Card funding
    Transport Minister Simeon Brown has announced that he has approved Waiheke Island ferry operator Island Direct to be eligible for SuperGold Card funding, paving the way for a commercial agreement to bring the operator into the scheme. “Island Direct started operating in November 2023, offering an additional option for people ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Further sanctions against Russia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters today announced further sanctions on 28 individuals and 14 entities providing military and strategic support for Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.  “Russia is directly supported by its military-industrial complex in its illegal aggression against Ukraine, attacking its sovereignty and territorial integrity. New Zealand condemns all entities and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • One year on from Loafers Lodge
    A year on from the tragedy at Loafers Lodge, the Government is working hard to improve building fire safety, Building and Construction Minister Chris Penk says. “I want to share my sincere condolences with the families and friends of the victims on the anniversary of the tragic fire at Loafers ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Pre-Budget speech to Auckland Business Chamber
    Ka nui te mihi kia koutou. Kia ora and good afternoon, everyone. Thank you so much for having me here in the lead up to my Government’s first Budget. Before I get started can I acknowledge: Simon Bridges – Auckland Business Chamber CEO. Steve Jurkovich – Kiwibank CEO. Kids born ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago

Page generated in The Standard by Wordpress at 2024-05-26T05:32:46+00:00