Video of David Cunliffe’s speech to the 2013 Labour Conference

Written By: - Date published: 10:16 am, November 3rd, 2013 - 22 comments
Categories: david cunliffe, labour - Tags:

 

Enjoy …

22 comments on “Video of David Cunliffe’s speech to the 2013 Labour Conference”

  1. Craig Glen Eden 1

    A very good speech touching on many different policy areas. This morning on Q and A Hooten tryed again and again to put the boot in to Cunliffe insinuating that the speech was low on policy, quite simply Hootens clearly lying again.

    Labour under Cunliffe is definately on the rise and Labours opponents only have liars and lies to fight back with. Should be an interesting election finally Labour has a leader who can articulate labours policy and values. To that pig hunters son, good on ya mate.

  2. Pete 2

    Excellent delivery too. Very relaxed, very assured and very confident.

  3. Ms X 3

    Goodness, why did we wait so long?

  4. newsense 4

    Well I’m obviously not in CHCH so shouldn’t have a right to comment like the 75% increasers, but I would like to see some artists and broadcasters influence the party a bit more.

    I think the last Labour Government had a bit of style and class, and even Tony Blair had cool Brittania, even if he wasn’t always worth a damn.

    The top 5 are very economicky, and health/police/defencey, which is good and shows a serious commitment to deal with problem areas. Maybe this is where Jacinda or someone needs to step up a lot, or perhaps parachute some people in.

    There needs to be an arts and broadcasting policy that doesn’t just tag along with the glory of our All Blacks, but a coordinated policy for having public festivals, performances, feteing writers, designers and making a public consciousness and discussion that is available for all. I think that the Auckland Festival is not very much a festival as accessible as it could be or that some of the festivals/musics in the parks etc etc could be better and more could be done to create art events that can bring more of the public together in beauty, in conversation and in celebration.

    Starting online, but engaging with our architecture, our history, our controversies and our differing communities.

    This is a potential weakness for David and Labour- that he is too focused on being a credible economic manager to rival National that he doesn’t show his ability to lead us culturally and be entrusted with being at the front of the next twist in our tale. I think his speech was a good start- the family, the outdoors, the railways, fishing, tramping- but unfortunately these are not things that speak to everyone- especially in our cities, things like gardening and backyards, with all the associated activities cricket, throwing a ball around, bbqs, drinks on the deck, growing your own veges or fruit trees are simply alien to a lot of city kids these days. This is why I’m afraid of the new city plan that can’t factor in things like transport etc etc.

    I’d love to see someone in Labour emerge with a real gift for storytelling and making our broadcasting and not just our parliament representative of who we are. Someone who can not just speak the policy speak but really inspire when they front up to bfm or twitter or whereever it is cool to have an public presence these days. Maybe that will be David as he grows into the role, or maybe there is someone else on the front bench who really has to decide that that is them.

    Where are our next Jacksons, Cohens,Waititis, Sarkies, Kings and how can we help them to feel comfortable to stand up, stand out and speak out?

    How do we intend to get our different communities and cultures to engage with one another? Will there be a buy New Zealand initiative? Will we have policies about learning other cultures languages at an early age?

    I suppose what I should really do is either put up the money and go to CHCH or head up to my LEC, but I still haven’t been convinced of Labour’s ability to avoid scuppering itself and doing National’s work for itself.

    David Cunliffe will betray the left at some point, but he won’t do it lightly. The reason he got elected leader is that this isn’t his reflex action.

    • dancerwaitakere 4.1

      Actually I am a young New Zealander who is studying a Bachelor of Fine Arts in San Francisco with the Lines Ballet.

      I am incredibly proud to have been supported by David Cunliffe throughout the process of applying to American universities, and subsequently gaining admission and looking at how to make the best choice in my education, so that I would be well equipped to gain the knowledge needed to be a leader in the arts.

      David is well connected to an understanding of the importance of the arts, and I applaud him for not using the neo-liberal language of ‘creative industries’ etc to describe the arts. It is important that we recognise that we must have arts for the sake of arts. That the wealth that it can bring to a community is far greater than any profit incentive. I believe this is what David was talking about in his speech when he talked fondly of NZ artists helping us come to realise who we are in the world.

      • newsense 4.1.1

        yeh he’s cool- I just can’t see him talking opera or hanging out with bfm breakfast hosts or their 2014 equivalents yet…though he does seem to get on well with Bomber (hint MSM sign him up! He’ll do a better John Stewart than Paul Henry…)

        I just think on two counts- he hasn’t got the equivalent of ‘Auntie Helen’ yet- the acceptance of good bloke-hood from the public and their confidence to lead us culturally as well as economically- even from those who don’t support him politically.

        The second is the affection with which the broadcasting and arts had or seemed to have for the last Labour administration whose leader took the arts as her personal porftfolio has not yet been mirrored by the work of the spokespeople who hold arts, culture and broadcasting. IIRC broadcasting was number 3 or 4 in the last Labour government too. We have seen figures politically close to National Prime Ministers in key leadership roles in the broadcasting bureaucracy.

        Conversely, the pitch for the regions that he has taken probably is better helped by this than by cosying up to Auckland artists the way Helen Clark did. In that regard it is probably handy. I think though that Key definitely is welcome everywhere and projects a relaxed and reasonableness, even if the policies and words don’t match this. It’s an area where Cunliffe trying to be serious and a safe pair of hands with policy and the economy may be a bit vulnerable and needs his front bench team to be convincing or at least in my opinion the left coalition can step up from what they have shown so far. But there is plenty of time.

      • Tat Loo (CV) 4.1.2

        Hey 🙂

        btw David talked to a young dancer in training on Saturday, who explained to him very clearly how unnecessarily difficult studying was, thanks to various government decisions. Yes, DC really gets it.

  5. TheContrarian 5

    Urgh. I can’t stand Cunliffe and this does nothing to make me like him anymore. That said however I’m not one to vote on how I feel about someone personally but on what the party policy offers and at this stage I have no idea where my vote will go so I look forward to be swayed. This speech has given me a lot of food for thought.

    • Paul 5.1

      What policies will persuade you contrarian?

      • TheContrarian 5.1.1

        *Softening drug laws and leaning towards a health/harm based policy instead of criminal issue
        *Focus on rehabilition of criminals rather than punishment (for minor crimes)
        *More focus on R&D and high tech industries
        *Education needs to aim at producing more scientists and techies as opposed to pumping out lawyers and bankers
        *CGT (though I thought 15% was too high) but tax credits on venture capital to help spur on NZ industries
        *A national discussion on neoliberal economics
        *Small tax increases on the rich
        *A national discussion regarding the five eyes arrangement
        *A focus on personal liberties
        *repealing the laws regarding police spying laws (which I was very much against when National introduced it)
        *etc etc

        I’m left leaning at heart but am more moderate than many. Labour might say they will do all these things but I want to see the policy and how it works rather than the soundbites. Labour saying they’ll do the above is different from showing how they will do it.

        Like I said, my vote is up for grabs and I also vote strategically so I’ll be waiting until I hear from all the parties next year before deciding.

        • David H 5.1.1.1

          Most of those were touched upon in the speech, except the first 2 and extra one, but he did sayLab/Gre government. So it stands to reason if you are building new houses, you would want to put in the latest technology rather than have it ‘tacked’ on at a later date. Also being in partnership with the Greens the subject of eco friendly houses will pop up at regular intervals I should think. If not Tat reads these, so he may know into who to ask questions?

        • David H 5.1.1.2

          Most of those were touched upon in the speech, except the first 2 and extra one, but he did sayLab/Gre government. So it stands to reason if you are building new houses, you would want to put in the latest technology rather than have it ‘tacked’ on at a later date. Also being in partnership with the Greens the subject of eco friendly houses will pop up at regular intervals I should think. If not Tat reads these, so he may know into who to ask questions?

        • felix 5.1.1.3

          Commie.

        • Rogue Trooper 5.1.1.4

          Comrade Contrarian 😀

      • TheContrarian 5.1.2

        one more:

        *Look at the feasibility of requiring new homes to be built with a section of solar paneling. Not heaps – even small enough to merely run the water heater. If feasible then a program to roll it out on older homes.

        • gobsmacked 5.1.2.1

          There’s a lot to like in Contrarian’s list, and if it were up to me then Labour would indeed have a stronger “moral/liberal” message, not being defensive as they usually are, but taking on the conservative/authoritarian Right, in their own language – an emphasis on core principles, on real freedom, on “right and wrong” rather than “what works”, which usually doesn’t work, it just jerks knees (e.g. corrections policy, incarceration etc).

          But … in a full 3 year cycle there can be time to change the conversation. To reflect, to open up before closing down. To get people thinking. Sadly, Labour (i.e. caucus) opted not to do that, so 20 months were wasted while we couldn’t really work out what they were saying.

          So Cunliffe doesn’t really have time now to use the “bully pulpit”, to lead a national dialogue. He got the job when the party is gearing up for an election, and much of the policy work – some of it good – has already been done.

          It’s a shame, because I think at heart he is an “ideas” man, but New Zealanders aren’t fond of ideas, so they need time to think about them. Cunliffe wasn’t given that time.

          (and right on cue, proving my point both 6pm TV news bulletins lead with … sex scandal vs sex scandal. We are now a no-information environment).

          • Anne 5.1.2.1.1

            and right on cue, proving my point both 6pm TV news bulletins lead with … sex scandal vs sex scandal. We are now a no-information environment

            Yep, and I won’t be watching “Sunday” on principle. I don’t care how ‘nice’ she might sound, the woman is loving the attention. She claimed to be very sorry that she caused so much upset to Len Brown’s family by speaking out about the affair, then she sets out to make things worse for them.

            As for Contrarian: I can’t quarrel with anything on that list. Don’t pass judgement on Cunliffe yet Contrarian. I know many people mistake his political ambition and enthusiasm for arrogance but my observation is: he’s no more arrogant than the rest of us. When you meet him in person he actually comes across as being a little shy. I have never heard him talk down to anyone and those who know him best – his New Lynn members and supporters – cannot speak highly enough of him.

            • TheContrarian 5.1.2.1.1.1

              I’ll be voting on policy not personality so my dislike of him won’t have much, if any, bearing on whether I vote labour or not.

          • newsense 5.1.2.1.2

            Well having been taken under the wing of Hamish Price her story comes out during the Labour Party conference. While he didn’t want to shaft Len Brown, it’s a nice bonus for either or any faction of the WanaTories.

  6. David 6

    Very good speech and he is far and away better than anything the party has put up since Helen left. I think he may have erred with wanting to house people in the red zone, I live on its outskirts and it’s pretty damn grim and not somewhere kiwis should be housed but if he could magic up 10000 houses that would be a much better result.
    I hate the kiwi assure idea, the two worst outfits to deal with and the biggest hold up of the rebuild is EQC and Southern Response which are state owned and managed (from personal experience). What worries me even more as a taxpayer in the quake zone it is absolutely nuts to take on that liability and we are better off leaving it to people who can understand risk, if another one hits and the re insurance runs out it will be the taxpayers who not only has to fund the social obligations but will have to bail out the commercial ones too. When you have been hit like we have the last thing you need is more obligations when it is far better to grab a cheque from the nomes of Zurich.
    I say hold your nose and ignore the profits that go offshore, when the shit hits the fan it’s nice to know the fat cats in Switzerland stand behind their obligations! and they have done when they can get past EQC.

    • Tat Loo (CV) 6.1

      So losing money overseas is better? Surely sorting out the problems with EQC and its leadership is the answer, not bleeding cash overseas?

      I say hold your nose and ignore the profits that go offshore, when the shit hits the fan it’s nice to know the fat cats in Switzerland stand behind their obligations!

      You have to be fucking kidding.

  7. captain hook 7

    David Cunliffe stood up and was counted as a person that new zealanders can trust and who will deliver the policies that are needed to sail this ship in difficult waters.
    Bravo David Cunliffe.

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