web analytics

Wellington quakes

Written By: - Date published: 5:27 pm, July 21st, 2013 - 123 comments
Categories: Environment - Tags: ,

Venue for discussing the quakes that have hit Wellington and other centers in middle NZ.

No news on the major stations yet, but lots of traffic on #eqnz

OK – RNZ now has occasional updates, and 3News will be covering it at 6pm.

Take care all.

123 comments on “Wellington quakes ”

  1. Well here in Golden Bay it was a real rattler – the house jittered and creaked on it’s piles (old farmhouse) and even the cat took off.

    • Arfamo 1.1

      Rellies in Taranaki were diving under doorways and tables too they tell me.

      • Jimmie 1.1.1

        We are just south of Te Awamutu and definitely felt it – this far away it was like a smooth rolling shimmer that lasted around 15 seconds.

  2. Arfamo 2

    Jesus – just had a 6.5 quake in Northern Suburbs of Welly. Welly’s been wobbling all weekend but that one was a real monster. Won’t be surprised to see quite a few damage reports. Loud rumbling. House was visibly moving back and forth West to East. Still getting aftershocks. I blame the government.

    • Colonial Viper 2.1

      Where did you get the 6.5 reading from?

      • Arfamo 2.1.1

        Geonet. They had it up instantly as 5.09 pm, mag 6.8 (automated), then up to 6.9, now it’s at 6.5. I believe they average multiple readings or something. Loads of aftershocks showing up too although I’ve only felt a couple of those.

        • Colonial Viper 2.1.1.1

          cheers. I notice Stuff has it as a 6.8 still.

        • Tim 2.1.1.2

          Mmmm! Maybe Gerry B has yet another opportunity to inflict his scorched earth policy a la ChCh.
          Interesting from where I am, the whole harbour echoed with the rumble and the view suddenly began to blurr momentarily.
          Probably Gerry will want to knock it all down to ground level, and start again – just as he did immediately following ChCh – that is UNTIL he realised the folly (oops – too late)

    • lprent 2.2

      http://www.geonet.org.nz/

      Geonet has it at 4.8/4.9. They are just pretty shallow.

      On the good news side, if you don’t get the big one down the major slip faults in the next month, then the probability of getting it over the next few decades is diminished. It is pretty clear that the quakes are triggering other ones and relieving stress throughout that region.

      Of course if I was in Wellington, I’d be checking the emergency supplies are up to date.

      • Colonial Viper 2.2.1

        If you look at geonet the one at 5:09:30 is the one you want: 6.5. I didn’t look far down enough originally.

      • Arfamo 2.2.2

        The epicentres look pretty close to the plate boundary. If we get any mag 7.5+s we’ve maybe got a tsunami risk.

        Edit: maybe that’s not the plate boundary – will have a look on some other maps. They are gaining in intensity from Friday’s. This morning’s one was bigger than Friday’s and more noticeable. Probably shallower. But this 6.5 one you couldn’t possibly fail to notice.

        • Colonial Viper 2.2.2.1

          Tsunami…if the quake was in teh Cook Strait, Wellington would have 4-5 minutes warning, tops.

          • Arfamo 2.2.2.1.1

            Yeah it’s close to the plate boundary all right – bottom end of the Hikurangi trench is not far away from the epicentres. They’re mostly South-east of Cook Strait off Seddon/Blenheim area but some of the smaller ones have been in Cook Strait I think. Geonet doesn’t have them all listed under their “All” category. Older ones drop off the list.

          • lprent 2.2.2.1.2

            http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/animations/2

            The faults in this area are strike-slip faults. I don’t know of any block faults that could get vertical movement across enough area to displace a significant volume of water nor are there any deep canyons in the cook strait to cause large debris slides.

            Large tsunami’s are highly unlikely. Tsunami’s are caused by large vertical earth movements, not by earth shaking or sliding.

            • Arfamo 2.2.2.1.2.1

              Large tsunami’s are highly likely.

              I take it you meant highly unlikely…good to know. Hope you’re right. There are warning signs and tsunami maps along the Red Rocks seal colony beach walk and I think in Island Bay too, with warnings about how little time there will be to get to higher ground. The hikurangi trench could produce a megathrust I think.

              • lprent

                Ah yes. Corrected my typo.

                Any major trench area usually indicates a risk for tsunami’s from both of the main reasons. They usually indicate a subduction zone with a plate going under another plate. There can be various forms of reverse faulting on either plate with the consequent major displacement of water. And the slopes in a subduction zone can be on very high angle, have a vast height (some of them make the Himalayas look small) and with unstable seafloor sediments mixed in with lots of water and salts – perfect for the worlds largest and most widespread landslides.

                Can’t say for sure (since I have never used my degree – earth sciences is more of a interest than the profession), but the Hikurangi trench doesn’t look like a good candidate to me for big tsunamis.

                The seafloor is subducting under the aussie plate that the NI is on. That means that most of the water displacements inside the trench will tend to be either reflected away by the steeper overlapping plate face – thereby dissipating energy. So the main risk would be from reverse faulting on the aussie plate especially if it were moving over the other place.

                But the Hikurangi trench is on the twist point between the two plates. The northern end of it fades into the Kermandec trench, which subducts the other way. at a different angle. It has been speculated that twisted knot in the subductions if teh only real reason for the NZ land mass being as large as it is. From memory, it is pretty jammed on the landward side of the Hikurangi trench. I’d be more worried about the Kermadec trench.

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hikurangi_Trench

                • Arfamo

                  From memory, it is pretty jammed on the landward side of the Hikurangi trench. I’d be more worried about the Kermadec trench.

                  Maybe you would be, but I live here and this makes me concerned about the Hikurangi Trench. All very well to say the energy release will focus out into the Pacific but sea floor upthrust produces circular tsunami ripples – the sea humps up & back down and roars of rippling outward in all directions:

                  http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Earthquakes/Earthquakes-at-a-Plate-Boundary/Stuck-Plate-Boundary

                  • Arfamo

                    correction: roars off, rippling outward in all directions.

                    Quakes seem to be tailing off now though, so hope we dodged a bullet.

                  • lprent

                    If I was in that area, I’d be far more worried about the block faulting on the land mass.

                    The point I was trying to make was about the effect of the water depths on the dispersion of energy. Virtually all of the earth moving action will be inside the trench and the tsunamis generated will tend to reflect energy from the cliff like western wall of the trench (the western side is the upper plate in this subduction zone) back to the east, and north/south rather than towards the west.

                    Up towards Gisborne where the subduction zone (and therefore the trench) operates in the opposite way looks to me to be at a damn sight higher risk of tsunamis.

                    Of course I live in Auckland as I’m sure someone would have been happy to point out. But paradoxically and despite the number of basaltic cones around (basaltic volcanoes give a lot of warning), it is one of the safer areas of NZ to live in if you are looking at geological risks. Crossing the street is another matter.

                    • Arfamo

                      Tongariro didn’t. Still, I expect a new one popping up would be a different story. I grew up in the shadow of Taranaki, and love it for its stunning beauty, but don’t trust it.

                      I understand what you mean about the subduction upthrust cliff facing outward. GNS also seem to be wary about a tsunami if there’s a large quake on one of the Strait faults, so I’m assuming there must be some upthrust, tilting or slumping evident, or a landslide remnant on the sea floor.

                    • Arfamo

                      …nor are there any deep canyons in the cook strait to cause large debris slides.

                      Looks like there are: http://www.infonews.co.nz/news.cfm?id=63490

          • fambo 2.2.2.1.3

            One day there will be a tsunami that destroys houses somewhere in New Zealand. After that, every house that has been and is presently being built close to the coast in New Zealand will be uninsurable and therefore lose all value. At the moment all the heat is going on old buildings while ugly and expensive new homes are being built right up to the beach in places like the Kapiti Coast.

            • Arfamo 2.2.2.1.3.1

              Yep. They’ve tsunami-proofed the newer subdivisions with a bit of landforming and expect a smaller size on that coast if there is one. But if there’s a quake and the area slumps they’re in big trouble.

  3. TheContrarian 3

    Yeah, that was big shake alright. This has been going all weekend. Have removed the valuables from the shelves

  4. lprent 4

    http://www.geonet.org.nz/quakes/quakesmap

    Zoom in on the Cook strait – looks like this for recent quakes

    Be nice to see a time series mapped.

    Triggering stress slip faults further north (or south) is the issue for humans. At present it is just relieving stress in the cook strait.

  5. karol 5

    tuff is reporting fire service phone going off:

    A fire service spokeswoman said the phone had been ringing off the hook, with power lines down, people trapped in lifts and multiple sprinkler activations in city buildings.

    “We’ve had reports of damage to some buildings down town. We’ve got power lines that are coming down.”

    Every fire truck had been sent to jobs, she said: “We’ve got all of Wellington out now. And we’ve got jobs waiting to be addressed. We are prioritising jobs.”

  6. johnm 6

    I’ve lived in Wellington since 1979 and this one 6.5 is the biggest. Was at an outside door and the house and ground rocked as if in a heavy sea. The wheelbarrow outside had some water in it still from the storm and it was slopping around West to East. My friend rushed outside and I followed her though we’ve been told standing under a door jamb is best. I hope this isn’t building to an even bigger one life’s hard enough without this happening. Hopefully everything will calm down over weeks with I think inevitable aftershocks. Disturbing is that the last one was up by Levin (Correct me If I’m wrong). That means Wellington has been straddled in the middle. If we get the big one in Wellington there’ll be hell to pay? :-(. Hope not. I’ll have to see to securing the water tank to not bounce off! This has been a tough Winter with storm damage and now earthquakes. 🙁 Except amazing warm temps thanks to Climate Change Still don’t have to fire up the woodburner as much as I did some 5+ years ago.

    • lprent 6.1

      That one at 5:47:32 (south north of Ward) looks like it was on a different fault

      • bad12 6.1.1

        Yeah that is the danger for wellington surrounded by various faults, most of these quakes tho shallow and quite large are 40 odd K South,

        Should a big enough one cause the Tinakori fault to let go i would imagine we will be losing a fair few buildings of size…

        • lprent 6.1.1.1

          Beehive pleeze

          I want to find out if the engineers know what they were talking about..

          • bad12 6.1.1.1.1

            LOLZ, yeah i have the odd laugh when i am downtown thinking about the ‘Hive’ sitting on it’s ball-bearings and what size shake would cause it to bounce off down Lambton Quay…

  7. Rhinocrates 7

    Biggest I’ve known living in Wellington since 1985. Luckily for me, a couple of toppled paperweights and a stack of paperbacks ended up in my laundry basket, but no worse. Hearing about power outages in Karori though.

  8. bad12 8

    Another small one just then, i am out east of the City and all of them have been felt more mildly out here…

  9. Felt the Quake where I live near Raglan, Waikato. Whole house was shaking like it was floating on a shoal on the ocean for the longest time! Strength about a 3.5!

  10. infused 11

    That was scary. I knew some more were coming… I think there will be another big one too. Too much movement on the plate edges.

  11. karol 12

    Stuff now saying:

    Parts of the Beehive and Parliament have suffered damage.

    So, which parts?

  12. bad12 13

    Another smaller than the last one, just a bump and a rattle of the window…

  13. Poission 14

    There seems to be absence of quality reporting,or information probably as it is Sunday.

    WCC information is sparse and non existent as there is a data center relocation.An inability to have resilient information following CHCH is untenable

    http://wellington.govt.nz/

  14. bad12 15

    Oooh felt that one, two distinct jolts felt as if someone had dropped something very heavy just outside the house….

  15. Outofbed 16

    Dick Seddon Rolling in his grave?

  16. Tim 19

    I’ve just done an inspection.
    The Liar Liar Pants on Fire Billboard appears to have come out of all this unscathed.

    Even from a distance, that Bridges ‘do Oi Give a Shit? – Oi’m in with the IN crowd’ visage is still staring at me under bright lights.

  17. Dan1 20

    It was a goodie! Rocked and rolled something great. We decided after Friday’s effort to get our supplies up to date. We had sent our water container to our son after the first of the Christchurch quakes, so figured we better replace that. And we filled up the spare gas container for the BBQ.
    The message from David’s Christchurch experience of 12,000 quakes was to make sure the car was full of gas. Many people were handicapped severely by not being able to fill up with petrol stations out, and were unable to get out of town or across town to rellies.
    So we filled the car as well.
    And so at 5.05 we were all prepared. Our enjoyment of a recorded Wallender programme was majorly interrupted. But nothing came loose!
    Having experienced a few in Christchurch, the thing that bugs me is you never know whether it is going to build to real big one. This was big enough!

    PS I think I preferred the old Geonet layout.

  18. Poission 21

    WCC the council emergency call centre had been shut down due to council buildings being unsafe.

    there needs to a complete cull of the entire elected council for gross incompetence.

    • Colonial Viper 21.1

      Emergency call centre shut down due to being in an unsafe building. On a normal day, that would be funny.

      • Poission 21.1.1

        There is substantive structural damage in the CBD,there will be a significant economic cost if the first chch quake provides guidelines (both in occurred damage and perceived risk) such as red and yellow stickered buildings in the cbd.

      • weka 21.1.2

        “On a normal day, that would be funny.”

        We should laugh (darkly) while we still can.

  19. Rosetinted 22

    Radionz played a historical clip tonight. 100 year old lady recalling, when she was a toddler, the 1855 Wellington earthquake which was 8.2. That was the one that raised the fore shore that the road to Petone and Hutt is on now.

    • Rosie 22.1

      RT, the historical recordings they play on RNZ are wonderful, and a good anchor, in light of how we see society. It would have been wild and strange for Maori and colonial Pakeha to be living in the ‘New Zealand Company’ town of Wellington in 1855, during and after that quake.

  20. It was a biggie, reminded me of the chch june 2011 ones. Seems like its going to be
    a bumpy nice, lets just hope its safe.

  21. Poission 24

    5 hours after the shake we are yet to hear from a gvt minister can someone email the radio stations in Bali, Hawaii, etc to get them to pick up their phones.

    • Rob 24.1

      Yes , I thought the glorious Wgtn mayor might have something to say (often difficult to kepp her quiet), but it looks like she ran for the hills and is still travelling.

  22. Arfamo 25

    We’re still getting frequent, noticeable aftershocks – most still epicentred in Cook Strait off Seddon by looks of it. (Hope they’re aftershocks and not foreshocks.) Have just been walking around the house straightening pictures. Probably not worth the effort at the moment.

  23. Rosie 26

    Earlier post on Open Mike:

    21 July 2013 at 5:54 pm

    “Yeah Risildo, that was a biggie, bigger than Friday’s and this morning’s one. It’s starting to get a bit much. I had just got a glass of wine to celebrate the planting of a hedge and my husband (a civil defence volunteer in training, so will have lots to discuss at this weeks class) was in the bath, recovering his sore muscles. Had a mini tsunami in the bath, windows rattling, crockery rattling, glassware tinkling, rumble rumble rumble, wine sloshing around in my glass as I found a safe place to stand. (Clearly I couldn’t put it down otherwise it would fall over!) …………

    Hope all living in Marlborough and lower north island doing ok and not dealing with too much damage”.

    Prior to that comment we received a call from friends in CHCH who were checking on us.. Our friend’s 6 year old son came on the line and asked “are you ok? Has it stopped? Is there any damage? Will you be ok now?”. Quite humbling that a 6 year old earthquake veteran asked such practical questions. Once he was reassured that everything was ok (for us at least but not in town where there is a lot of damage) and I got off the phone I felt like a bit of an idiot for thinking, on our departure from living for many years in Auckland, to return to Wellington, “violent wind and earthquakes, I am coming back home to your madness and I can’t wait”
    It seems like a bit of a romantic thought now.

  24. Adrian 27

    Acording to an explanation about new research findings I read about a few years ago, the area where the quakes are happening is a bit like the lid of a box whwn you fold the four sides in on themselves to lock them in. They found a new fault that was at 90* to the North /South Wairau and Waiarapa ones effectivly “locking” the area up. It seems like the quake boffins have been waiting for this lot for a while. It may be the best thing to happen sooner rather than later. There have been lots of less than 4 quakes in this area for years, by the way.

    • lprent 27.1

      It seems like the quake boffins have been waiting for this lot for a while. It may be the best thing to happen sooner rather than later.

      Yeah, I’m a trifle disappointed. I’ve been waiting to see if the Beehive could survive a major quake in that region for a *long time*. In fact ever since I found out in the early 80’s that they’d carefully placed it directly over one of the major strike faults. With all of the stress relief that will happen over the next few months as these quakes cascade through the system, I figure that it massively lowers the probability of having a really large quake in the coming decades. So either we get one in the next few months or I put it in the carton of lost dreams like spending a season in Antarctica or seeing real AI in my lifetime.

      • King Kong 27.1.1

        Had you been hoping that Christchurch got hit as well, to see how it stood up to a major quake? Must of been quite exciting for you when the reports of people being crushed by masonry started coming through.

        • lprent 27.1.1.1

          That one was a bit of a surprise because it had been pretty inert earthquake wise since the 1880’s ones further north. No-one had any really good idea of the frequency of earthquakes there, if only because there hadn’t been enough earthquakes in the last 40-50 years (since there have been adequate local measurements) to generate the required pulses to locate the unknown faults.

          The building standards in ChCh even up to the latter parts of last century were known to be somewhat lax compared to much of NZ because it was thought the main risk was from the fault s in the Alps. It wasn’t until the Kobe earthquake in 1995 that engineers realised exactly how dangerous lax assumptions about fault lines below and close to a city could be. Hell even a monkey like yourself is probably vaguely aware of it these days after ChCh.

          Wellington/Blenheim on the other hand have been quite active because of the number of major faults that go through there. Consequently there has been a concerted effort over the last 70 years to ensure that buildings are up to a higher standard. However there hasn’t been a large quake close enough to the city to find out how effective the earthquake protection has been – especially the retro-fitting of older buildings undertaken since the 80’s. I was peripherally involved in a study on the preparedness of the Wellington region for a earthquake in the early 80’s. Hence my interest….

          I really can’t help it that you were more interested in smearing your excreta at the time than in the effects of earthquakes. But I really wish that you’d given up on *your* obsession. There are toilets even for mythical monkeys and you really don’t have to continue to smear crap…. BTW: Have you read King Kong novelisation?

  25. Mary 28

    Should really be called the Marlborough quakes, not Wellington quakes. Were way closer to Seddon and Blenheim and have been hit far harder, too. MSM’s doing the same thing. Why is that?

    • Arfamo 28.1

      Just that it’s a bigger city, with more old and non-compliant high rise buildings and infrastructure to get damaged Mary. And it’s the capital. TV news has shown Seddon residents, we know they’re getting even stronger shakes than we are. Not sure about Blenheim but I imagine they’re getting rocked worse than us as well. Haven’t seen anything about Nelson yet.

      • Mary 28.1.1

        Anyone would think it was all about Wellington. Inside of any houses in Wellington “trashed”?

        http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/mp/18091023/sleepless-night-as-aftershocks-continue/

        • Arfamo 28.1.1.1

          A few friends have had minor breakages, things came off shelves. The lateral oscillation went on for long enough to cause things to topple and shift out of alignment & that seems to include some building walls, brick fences etc. It might seem to be all about Wellington, because there’ll be more to damage, but it’ll probably be recorded seismologically/geologically as the Seddon or Cook Strait earthquake sequence I reckon. Much like Christchurch’s seems to be referred to as the Darfield quake.

          The 4+ pointer around 3.15 am woke me up but luckily was short duration. (Actually a minor tremor a couple of minutes before probably woke me. Bedroom’s upstairs where shaking’s stronger. I was wide awake for the bigger one.) Still plenty of smaller quakes happening. My kitchen fridge is the best quake detector – the cooling panel on the back rattles even if the tremor’s light and there’s no perceptible roaring.

  26. Sanctuary 29

    According to Audrey Young, the Treasury overlooks the building the press gallery are housed in –

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10901284

    Was it wrong of me, just for a fleeting to moment, to smile as I imagined the unelectable crushing the unreadable?

    • bad12 29.1

      Lolz, the monolithic Treasury building along with the Reserve Bank across the road will probably take a 10 pointer on the rickety scale directly underneath befor they suffer any significant damage,

      The tower block tucked in behind the Reserve Bank built in the midst of the Neo-Liberal revolution tho is a different story entirely…

      • bad12 29.1.1

        Listening to National radio just now and Wellington City Council are saying Bolton Street is still closed,

        i have to wonder how the tower block i mention in the comment above,(and the underground carpark next door), managed during the 6.5 and if there is not some significant damage like ‘pancaking’,

        Lolz if so, better go hit up the designers as in my opinion both the tower block and underground car park were designed to do just that…

    • karol 29.2

      Hillarious. nd some of Audrey Young’s lines funny in ways she didn’t anticipate:

      I was waiting for Patrick Gower to send us the latest political poll results to see if Labour’s “man-ban” debacle had had any impact.

      The Press Gallery sits alongside the Beehive and all I can say is, thank God for Stalinist architecture.

      It’s a long, skinny, two-storeyed building, unattractive, solid concrete, with small impractical windows. No chance of it toppling over. The Treasury could topple on to us but it is built like the proverbial brick s*** house.
      […]
      The most scary thing about our offices is the prospect of the floors opening up and dropping us into the parliamentary swimming pool below.
      […]
      The box marked Winston Peters and Owen Glenn came flying off the shelf in the Herald office, along with David McGee’s Parliamentary Practice in New Zealand and many other files.

      […]
      Paddy Gower emailed the poll results out under embargo at 5.30pm but I decided to follow the sirens up Molesworth and into Aitken St.

      The gods have spoken – Gower’s manipulations sidelined.

  27. yeshe 30

    Kiwibank computer(s) must have been badly shaken .. a auto payment due out overnight remains in my account (still visible online) but calls to Customer Services explain there has been ‘an incident’ and no calls will be answered.

    Stay safe down there.

    • Colonial Viper 30.1

      Do they process payments on a Sun night? I’m with ANZ and I think they only process on weekday nights.

  28. bad12 31

    For some reason when i got up this morning i got the ‘Feeling’ that last nights 6.5 was ‘it’ as far as big ones here go,

    Not being an expert my guess is that the Seddon ‘flurry’ of quakes was a follow on from the Christchurch quakes where those quakes have transferred all the ‘stress’ on that particular fault north-wards to Seddon which has now ‘slipped’ and relieved it’s stress,

    The question then is where the next stress will occur if the movement at Seddon is transferred elsewhere onto the fault line…

    • King Kong 31.1

      Looking forward to the headline on stuff, “unqualified, internet nut job declares quakes over”

      • bad12 31.1.1

        Must be pretty grim in the empty cavern of your mind where everything is whittled down to simple Derrs, Darrs and Aaahs, and required reading is the tri-annual National Party manifesto,

        i could almost feel sorry for your sad unimaginative intellect except for the fact that is that such a denseness of awareness is mostly self inflicted…

        • Rosetinted 31.1.1.1

          No bad12 KingKong probably is on John Key’s diary list, where the Great One passes on his pearls of wisdom, his winsome words from the dynamic duo, and his complacent confidence that the reader will agree with him and all that is being accomplished in the country by ACT which of course includes breaking it in half, like our hearts.

      • Te Reo Putake 31.1.2

        KK, such a headline has already been kinda done to death, albeit for earthquake and weather crank Ken Ring.

    • bad12 31.2

      Lolz i take it all back, a bit of a bump and then a shake…

  29. Veutoviper 34

    Well folks, there is nothing to worry about – John Key says its all OK.

    “KEY: HAVE CONFIDENCE IN WELLINGTON’S BUILDINGS

    New Zealand’s high building standards should give Wellingtonians confidence as aftershocks continue to roll, said Prime Minister John Key.

    He said he could understand the feeling of helplessness and the “fear factor” that came with the quakes, but Wellington’s buildings would hold up “very well.”

    Somehow, I just do not have confidence in much/anything that Key says. And I for one have not/am not enjoying the shakes which are still continuing. Watching the Geonet site doesn’t help!

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/8946666/Wellington-streets-deserted-after-quake

    This is the wrong place for this, but the article also states the following:

    “Key had cancelled some planned engagements today as a result of the earthquakes.

    The Labour Party’s caucus meeting in Napier was also cancelled because a number of MPs were stuck in Auckland due to the fog which had disrupted flights, while others wanted to be in Wellington because of the quakes. “

    I wonder whether the cancelled engagements include the meeting of the Intelligence and Security Committee planned for this afternoon?

    And re the cancellation of the LP caucus meeting, Shearer made no mention of this an hour or so ago when he was interviewed on Radio NZ and stated that his leadership would not be discussed at the meeting….

  30. vto 35

    I feel for all of you up there getting shaken to bits.

    I think it’s unnerving us down here in Christchurch too given its proximity and similarity. I think it’s probably unnerving the entire country, including the insurers too I wonder.

    • Veutoviper 35.1

      Thanks, vto. I am usually a very strong person – but my biggest phobia is earthquakes.

      I now have a much better understanding etc of what you people down there in Christchurch have experienced for so long – and my hat goes off to you all. We have only had a couple of days of it up here – and I am a nervous wreck!

      • vto 35.1.1

        I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. Well, depending I guess……

        Handy hints;

        fuel up the car
        fuel for the heating
        water for cleaning
        don’t run outside and get killed by bits falling off your building
        don’t stand under old buildings
        concrete fences, they are never built properly and fall over
        what is up will come down
        keep good hiking shoes
        old telephones still work without power
        lime for the longdrop
        beer and tipple

        things are probably very uncertain in Wellington and Marlborough. What’s everyone doing in Wellington? The CBD empty? People staying at home nervously? Last thing we need ……..

        • Rosie 35.1.1.1

          Thanks for the tips vto. I remember one thing that folks said after the CHCH quakes was always keep the petrol tank full in your car, as you’ve suggested above. Since then, I’ve always done that. Never know when you may have to make an escape, if you can that is and the roads aren’t all busted..

          Don’t what it’s like in town apart from whats on stuffed, as well as reports on RNZ.

          http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/photos/8945747/Central-NZ-hit-by-earthquake

          Looks like some one got real angry with Steven Joyce and trashed his office.

        • weka 35.1.1.2

          Learn about composting toilets before you need one. They’re a better option than digging a hole in the ground, and can be set up relatively easily during an emergency. Important esp where there is liquefaction, and can be used for weeks not just days. Here’s the work that came out of the Chch quakes (and I see they’ve been talking to Wellington too).

          http://www.composttoilets.co.nz/

          • Martin 35.1.1.2.1

            and plenty of good stuff four the garden and a coast without fecal pollution.
            Maybe we need to change the building code?

            • weka 35.1.1.2.1.1

              Don’t need to. As long as you still have a flushing toilet, there is nothing illegal about a composting one.

  31. Rosetinted 36

    For those interested in knowing more about the seismic status around Cook Strait and Seddon. For one thing they have happened before.
    http://info.geonet.org.nz/display/quake/2013/07/21/Preliminary+science+from+the+Seddon+sequences
    Most recently, in 2005 a series of four earthquakes greater than 5.0 occurred about 10 to 15 km to the south-west of the current swarm; these earthquakes caused no damage.

    largest earthquake (as at 9 pm on Sunday 21 July) being of magnitude 6.5, which generated shaking of up to 21% g (or about 1/5 of the force due to gravity) at Ward, and 16% g (or about 1/6 of the force due to gravity) at Picton…. (Note Ward is 15 minutes away from Seddon. Christchurch biggie peak ground acceleration was 10 times bigger ie 220%.)
    http://info.geonet.org.nz/display/quake/M+6.3,+Christchurch,+22+February+2011

    I wondered how Picton was affected, It was a little less than the area around Seddon and Ward which includes Clifford Bay, the scene of one of NACTs expensive ‘Think Big’ likely misspending fiascos. (Undermining the thriving and enterprising community at Picton, duplicating infrastructure at a huge expense, using borrowed money and opening up what are largely NZ owned investments to the drain of overseas profit.)

    Sounds like a bad place to pour more money into. And there are the possibilities of tsunamis as well as earthquakes affecting the expensive infrastructure and development of a Clifford Bay port area.

    Earthquakes less than magnitude 7.0 do not usually generate a tsunami; however, it is possible for undersea landslides triggered by earthquake shaking to produce a tsunami. The impact of these types of tsunami is usually confined to the coastline close to the earthquake epicentre, and would reach the coast within 10 to 20 minutes following the earthquake.

    One reason why NACTs and their big farmer lobby could want faster and shorter trips between the islands, is so they can carry animal haulage vehicles with in excess of 1000 sheep sometimes from far south destinations to mid North Is. and vice versa.

    That was a big feature in the spread of foot and mouth in Britain. Of course we never learn. It has an horrific effect on farmers there and their economy and animal genetic strains, as the economic bulldozer wiped out herds and pockets of rare animals and special breeds. Our economy couldn’t recover from this. Just mentioning ramifications – no sheepish pun intended.)

  32. Roflcopter 37

    Was in Wellington this morning. All I could think of was this song….

    The Specials : Ghost Town – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WhhSBgd3KI

  33. fambo 38

    Alternative check list for surviving an earthuake (happily) aka “Let’s have an Earthquake Party”

    * Wind up gramaphone and plenty of 78RPM records and/or a musical instrument

    * Appropriate intoxicants

    * A good book

    * Good company

    * A set of binoculars to look at the night sky

    * A shovel and toilet paper

  34. Emelsee 39

    where is Key? Is anyone else surprised that we have had so many disasters since Key and his cronies got into government? time to vote out Key

  35. vto 40

    The similarities with Christchurch continue …… just heard an engineer (I imagine) from I think the Council on radionz saying confidently that things have been checked to a certain level and precautions are in place.

    Down here that was said after each and every one. People in the CTV building post-September commented on whether it had been weakened, was it safe, it began to shake at a passing bus, it had been checked by engineers.

    I certainly don’t mean to put the fear of god into anyone but this was a reality. Don’t put all your trust in authoritative assessment – trust your instinct as much. Near to us an unprotected and unassessed thingy got further damaged enough to kill after the third one in June ’11. It had never been assessed as dangerous. We always walked around it.

    From what I see of downtown Blenheim and Wellington there needs to be some pretty comprehensive assessment before letting people back. Equals empty CBD for a time.

  36. Molly Polly 41

    I am angry.

    Someone close to me was forced to work in Wellington’s CBD today against the directive of the Civil Defence and the Mayor of Wellington. This person was due to start work at 11am but the other worker, who was the key holder, had to open the shop at 9am. This person couldn’t get into the CBD by public transport to do this.

    However, this person managed to get into the city by mid afternoon. Both workers were told that if the shop didn’t open both of them would have to take annual leave.

    So here we have two young people on minimum wage forced to open a retail shop in the middle of the CBD at 3.00pm for 2 hours! This is after a severe earthquake when the advice from all and sundry was not to go into the CBD. Inspections of buildings needed to take place (and the shop is part of a high rise complex, including a car park) and to keep the public away as a safety precaution.

    The CBD is a ghost town today so there are little, if no people, shopping.

    I guess that if you were desperate for a pair of shoes, or an ouffit for a special occasion…this is the very day you would go shopping to get these vital items. Straight after an earthquake and continuing after shocks – and in defiance of the Civil Defence!

    Shame on this business owner for putting the company’s profits before anything else. Shame on this business owner for putting these two young people at risk. And shame on this business owner for forcing these two young people to work for 2 hours, or else.

    Other major companies such as Farmers and Kirks were closed, as were the majority of small retailers.

    And by the way – zilch purchases were made.

    • Bill 41.1

      You’ll probably find that Farmers, Kirks and whoever else will count today against an employee’s annual leave. Personally, I think it’s bullshit and that employees should receive a day’s pay while retaining their full leave entitlements, but hey….

    • Arfamo 41.2

      What’s the name of the shop?

  37. Lloyd 42

    Helen didn’t organise any earthquakes like these!

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Apartments give new life to former Trade Training hostel
    A building that once shaped the Māori trade training industry will now revitalise the local community of Ōtautahi and provide much needed housing for whānau Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today. The old Māori Trade Training hostel, Te Koti Te Rato, at Rehua Marae in Christchurch has been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Major step to pay parity for early learning teachers
    Certificated teachers on the lowest pay in early education and care services will take another leap towards pay parity with their equivalents in kindergartens, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said in a pre-Budget announcement today. “Pay parity for education and care teachers is a manifesto commitment for Labour and is reflected ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • New Zealand Wind Energy Conference
    Tēnā koutou katoa Tēnā koutou i runga i te kaupapa o te Rā No reira, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tatou katoa  Thank you Grenville for the introduction and thanks to the organisers, the New Zealand Wind Energy Association, for inviting me to speak this morning. I’m delighted that you ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    16 hours ago
  • Speech to New Zealand Drug Foundation 2021 Parliamentary Drug Policy Symposium
    Speech to Through the Maze: On the road to health New Zealand Drug Foundation 2021 Parliamentary Drug Policy Symposium Mōrena koutou katoa, Tēnei te mihi ki a koutou, Kua tae mai nei me ngā kete matauranga hauora, E whai hononga ai tatau katoa, Ka nui te mihi! Thank you for the opportunity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Govt to deliver lower card fees to business
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister David Clark has today announced the Government’s next steps to reduce merchant service fees, that banks charge businesses when customers use a credit or debit card to pay, which is estimated to save New Zealand businesses approximately $74 million each year. “Pre COVID, EFTPOS has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Government support boosts Arts and Culture sector
    Government support for the cultural sector to help it recover from the impact of COVID-19 has resulted in more cultural sector jobs predicted through to 2026, and the sector performing better than forecast. The latest forecast by economic consultancy ‘Infometrics’ reflects the impact of Government investment in keeping people in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Govt takes further action against gang crime
    The Government will make it illegal for high risk people to own firearms by introducing Firearms Prohibition Orders (FPOs) that will strengthen action already taken to combat the influence of gangs and organised crime to help keep New Zealanders and their families safe, Police Minister Poto Williams and Justice Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Thousands of MIQ spaces allocated to secure economic recovery
    Five hundred spaces per fortnight will be allocated in managed isolation facilities over the next 10 months, many for skilled and critical workers to support our economic recovery, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor say. “The Trans-Tasman bubble has freed up more rooms, allowing us to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand Sign Language Week a chance to recognise national taonga
    This week (10 – 16 May 2021) is New Zealand Sign Language Week (NZSL), a nationwide celebration of NZSL as an official language of New Zealand. “We’re recognised as a world leader for our commitment to maintaining and furthering the use of our sign language,” says Minister for Disability Issues ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Economic resilience provides more options in Budget 2021
    Securing the recovery and investing in the wellbeing of New Zealanders is the focus of Budget 2021, Grant Robertson told his audience at a pre-budget speech in Auckland this morning. "The economy has proven resilient in response to COVID-19, due to people having confidence in the Government’s health response to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Pre-Budget speech to BNZ-Deloitte Auckland Breakfast Event
    Thank you for the invitation to speak to you today, and to share with you some of the Government’s thinking leading into this year’s budget. This will be my fourth time delivering the annual Budget for the Government, though the events of the past year have thrown out that calculation. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Rotuman Language week affirms language as the key to Pacific wellbeing
    The first Pacific Language Week this year  makes it clear that  language is the key to the wellbeing for all Pacific people said Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. “This round of language  weeks begin with Rotuman. As I have always  said language is one of the pillars of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Budget delivers improved cervical and breast cancer screening
    Budget 2021 funds a more effective cervical screening test to help reduce cervical cancer rates A new breast screening system that can proactively identify and enrol eligible women to reach 271,000 more people who aren’t currently in the programme. Budget 2021 delivers a better cervical screening test and a major ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • NZ-France to co-chair Christchurch Call Leaders’ Summit
    New Zealand and France will jointly convene the Christchurch Call Community for a leaders’ summit, to take stock of progress and develop a new shared priority work plan. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and President Emmanuel Macron will co-chair the leaders’ meeting on the 2nd anniversary of the Call, on 14 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New South Wales travel pause to be lifted tomorrow
    COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says the current travel pause with New South Wales will lift tomorrow – subject to no further significant developments in NSW. “New Zealand health officials met today to conduct a further assessment of the public health risk from the recently identified COVID-19 community cases in Sydney. It has been determined that the risk to public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • March 15 Collective Impact Board appointed
    The voices of those affected by the March 15 mosque attacks will be heard more effectively with the establishment of a new collective impact board, Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment Priyanca Radhakrishnan announced today. Seven members of the Christchurch Muslim community have been appointed to the newly established Board, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • More young Kiwis supported with mental health and addiction services
    Nearly quarter of a million more young New Zealanders will have access to mental health and addiction support in their communities as the Government’s youth mental health programme gathers pace. New contracts to expand youth-specific services across the Northland, Waitematā and Auckland District Health Board areas have been confirmed, providing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New hospital facilities mean fewer trips to Auckland for Northlanders
    Northlanders will no longer automatically have to go to Auckland for lifesaving heart procedures like angiograms, angioplasty and the insertion of pacemakers, thanks to new operating theatres and a cardiac catheter laboratory opened at Whangārei Hospital by Health Minister Andrew Little today. The two projects – along with a new ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Fair Pay Agreements to improve pay and conditions for essential workers
    The Government is delivering on its pre-election commitment to implement Fair Pay Agreements which will improve wages and conditions, as well as help support our economic recovery, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced today. Fair Pay Agreements will set minimum standards for all employees and employers in an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Establishment of the new Māori Health Authority takes first big step
    Sir Mason Durie will lead a Steering Group to provide advice to the Transition Unit on governance arrangements and initial appointments to an interim board to oversee the establishment of the Māori Health Authority. This Group will ensure that Māori shape a vital element of our future health system, Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Cycle trails move up a gear in Central
    Work on new and upgraded cycle trails in Queenstown, Arrowtown and Central Otago is moving up a gear as two significant projects pass further milestones today. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has announced new funding for the Queenstown Trails Project, and will also formally open the Lake Dunstan Trail at Bannockburn ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government gives households extra help to reduce their power bills
    Nine community energy education initiatives to help struggling New Zealanders with their power bills are being given government funding through the new Support for Energy Education in Communities (SEEC) Programme.   “Last year we committed nearly $8 million over four years to establish the SEEC Programme. This funding will help ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Picton ferry terminal upgrade consent fast-tracked
    The planned upgrade of the Waitohi Picton Ferry terminal has been approved under the fast-track consenting process.  Environment Minister David Parker today welcomed the decision by the expert consenting panel to approve the Waitohi Picton Ferry Precinct Redevelopment Project.    The project will provide a significant upgrade to the ferry facilities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Quarantine Free Travel with New South Wales paused
    COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins has announced his intention to pause Quarantine Free Travel from New South Wales to New Zealand while the source of infection of the two cases announced in Sydney in the last two days is investigated.  Whole genome sequencing has linked the case yesterday to a recent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Covid-19 immigration powers to be extended
    The passing of a bill to extend temporary COVID-19 immigration powers means continued flexibility to support migrants, manage the border, and help industries facing labour shortages, Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi said. “Over the past year, we’ve made rapid decisions to extend visas, vary visa conditions and waive some application requirements ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • “Supporting a Trade-Led Economic Recovery”
    Trade Policy Road Show SpeechManukau, Auckland   Kia ora koutou – nau mai, haere mai ki Manukau, ki Tāmaki.   Good morning everyone, and thank you for this opportunity to discuss with you current global challenges, opportunities and the Government’s strategy in support of a trade-led recovery from the economic ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Building consent numbers at an all-time high
    A record 41,028 new homes have been consented in the year ended March 2021 March 2021 consent numbers the highest since the 1940s Record number of new homes consented in Auckland The number of new homes consented is at an all-time high, showing a strong and increasing pipeline of demand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Whānau-centred support for parents and tamariki
    Up to 60 whānau in Counties Manukau will be supported through the first three years of their parenthood by a new whānau-centred model of care, said Associate Health Minister, Hon Aupito William Sio. “Providing this support to young parents is something we have to get right. It’s a priority both ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • NZ backs moves to improve global access to COVID vaccines
    New Zealand welcomes and strongly supports the announcement made by the United States Trade Representative to work for a waiver of IP protections on COVID-19 vaccines at the WTO, Trade Minister Damien O’Connor said. “New Zealand supports equitable access to COVID vaccines for all. No one is safe from the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Tourism communities: support, recovery and re-set plan
    TIHEI MAURI ORA Tuia te whakapono Tuia te tumanako Tuia te aroha Tuia te hunga ora Ki te hunga ora Tihei Mauri ora Ka nui te mihi ki a koutou Tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa. Thank you, Hilary and thank you, Chris, and everyone at TIA for this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Support, recovery and re-set plan for tourism communities
    Five South Island tourist communities targeted for specialist support Pressure on Māori tourism operators and Conservation facilities recognised Domestic and international-facing tourism agencies put on more secure footing Long-term plan to re-set tourism with a focus on sustainability, industry standards and regional economic diversification A plan to ensure the immediate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Speech on NZ Rail Plan
    Check against delivery E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karanga maha o te wa, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa. Ki ngā mana whenua o Taranaki Whānui anō nei aku mihi ki a koutou. Nōku te hōnore kia haere mai ki te whakanuia tēnei huihuinga whakahirahira. Nō ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government hits massive milestone in Violence Prevention & Elimination
    Minister for Family and Sexual Violence Marama Davidson announced a major milestone at a hui in South Auckland today, with the launch of the national engagement process on the prevention and elimination of family and sexual violence. “There is no room for violence in our lives – there is no ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Fee waiver extended for conservation tourism businesses
    Tourism businesses operating on public conservation land will have another six months of fees waived to help them adjust to the downturn in international visitors in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Acting Minister of Conservation Dr Ayesha Verrall has announced. "We acknowledge it has been a difficult year for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • ‘Lua Wave’ to future-proof Pasifika Festivals in Aotearoa
    Pasifika festival organisers will receive additional support to adapt to the COVID-19 environment thanks to the Government’s newly launched ‘Lua Wave’ component of the Pasifika Festivals Initiative, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “This initiative has not only been to support festival organisers to recover from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Crown accounts show confidence in Govt economic plan
    The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect the resilience of the economy and confidence in the Government’s economic recovery plan. The Crown accounts for the nine months to the end of March 2021 show both OBEGAL and the operating balance remain better than forecast in the Half Year Economic and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Energy Trusts of NZ Autumn Conference
    It’s a pleasure to be here today. Thank you Karen [Sherry] for the introduction and thanks to the Energy Trusts Executive for inviting me to speak at tonight’s event. It is an exciting time to come to speak to trustees of distribution companies. For many decades the electricity industry was ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New partnership to grow Māori success in STEM
    A new partnership with the Pūhoro STEM Academy will support thousands more rangatahi Māori to participate and succeed in the fields of science, technology, and innovation, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. Since 2016, Pūhoro has worked with Māori students to build their capability and create pathways to employment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Rail builds platform for economic recovery
    Transport Minister Michael Wood and State-Owned Enterprises Minister Dr David Clark today released the Government’s long term vision for a sustainable rail network that supports our economic recovery. New Zealand Rail Plan lays out how the Government is building a resilient, reliable and safe network, as well as the indicative ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • NZ and UK agree to lift the pace of free trade talks
    New Zealand and the United Kingdom have agreed to rapidly lift the tempo of talks, as the two countries enter a new phase in free trade negotiations, Trade and Export Growth Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. “UK Secretary of State for International Trade, Liz Truss, and I spoke today about ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago