1 in 5 Canty Uni jobs cut

Written By: - Date published: 9:07 am, September 2nd, 2011 - 11 comments
Categories: education, exports, Steven Joyce - Tags: , ,

The Tertiary Education Union has revealed that 350 jobs are for the chop at Canterbury University – 18% of the workforce. The Uni, hardly reassuringly, says its 100 to 500.

The Nats blame the quake. That’s rubbish. Yes, student numbers are down 13% but, if the government’s scenarios are to be believed, the rebuild will soon be underway and student numbers will recover. If the government believes its own scenario, it should be keeping the Uni going as a strong force in the economy and the community. These kind of cuts will permanently gut the Uni, leaving it in no position to be part of the recovery.

The Uni’s internal document slams the government’s bullying approach and cost-cutting:

 “The implicit message from the Tertiary Education Commission and the minister – that if the institution is willing to lead the way with cuts that could easily run to hundreds of jobs – the State may invest in the university once more – is reprehensible.”

National: the anti-education government.

11 comments on “1 in 5 Canty Uni jobs cut”

  1. uke 1

    And apparently the University of Canterbury is one of our very best research institutions – only behind Auckland if I remember correctly.

  2. Shane Gallagher 2

    This is typical of this government. Most of those staff will be off overseas as soon as they can and it will be the best staff who will be leaving first. The entire country will lose out. I have been a member of the TEU since I started working here in NZ and I am gutted by this. What the NACTs fail to understand is that the university IS the staff. It is not the buildings or the infrastructure – it is the intelligence, skills and ability of its staff that makes a university.

    The govt. think that people are interchangeable units of production like a factory robot and that they can treat people this way.

  3. Peter Rabbit 3

    The sad fact is that regardless of what the government does the student numbers are unlikely to return to a normal level for quite some time. This week alone the Canterbury region has suffered 3 +4 aftershocks and we are only a few days out 2 days away from the first anniversary of the September Earthquake.

    • McFlock 3.1

      According to the post, student numbers are down 13%, not 20%. Secondly, student (especially undergraduate) education is only a small factor in what a university does (yep, including Canterbury – or even Lincoln 🙂 ) – the real money is in research and investment funds. 
       
      I’m not saying that a reorientation is always a bad thing, just that a little investment by the govt now would speed the general recovery by keeping a major employer funnelling revenue into the area.

  4. Ed 4

    Most of those students will have been instead going to another New Zealand university – which other universities are being funded to pick up the majority of the cost-cutting at Canterbury? Or does National/ACT want the students to all go overseas?

    Private companies affected by the earthquake have moved staff to other centres for either short term placements until operations in Christchurch are restored, or long term positions where a permanent move of business operations has taken place. Does National think it knows better than the “market”?

  5. Most people in canterbury have been losing their jobs because of the quake, It would of been more suprising if people didnt lose their jobs at canterbury university.

    • Colonial Viper 5.1

      It would be even more surprising for the Government to stem the slow death of Christchurch.

  6. Peter 6

    If this happens it is typical of the National government. Perpetuate a downward spiral by laying people off and then talk-up an economic recovery. Withdraw support from the Uni and you might as well withdraw support from Canterbury and Christchurch. Next it’ll be school teachers and nurses etc. Canterbury recovery, really! They need to change the rules to suit abnormal conditions.

  7. One of the Masses 7

    Students are transients (i.e. they are not yet fixed by job or mortgage) – they will go to a University that fits their choice of papers &/or perhaps lifestyle – i.e. Choosing Engineering you have a choice of only either Auckland or Canterbury & many students pre-quake actively chose NOT to go to Auckland, as Canterbury offered a better student “experience.”
    Now the demand/competition to get in to Auckland Engineering will be extreme, as why would any non-Christchurch student want to go to Christchurch? And if the students don’t go to Christchurch, how can the University afford to keep staff when there is less demand for their services?
    And on a personal level, if you are a top of the line lecture/academic offered a place at another University – why would you actively choose to stay in Christchurch? 

  8. fatty 8

    I’m there at the moment…My lecturers this year (and in the past) have been amazing…under so much strain and poor leadership they have always done everything possible for me as a student.

    The issue is Rod Carr, he got it wrong post quake and forgot about the current students.
    We are already understaffed as far as lecturers go, there have been mergers within the arts department which have already squeezed things.

    I’m not sure if I’d bother going back next year….may take a year off…one thing is for sure I will not listen to another word Rod Carr says.

    Uni numbers at Canterbury will surely shoot up next year or the year after since there are a lot of people out of work in Chch (not everyone in Chch wants to, or can swing a hammer).
    There will be one reason why the numbers of students may not go up, that comes back to the struggles faced by the current students. Rod Carr’s leadership left us frustrated and not in a position to recommend study to any possible future students.

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