web analytics

A tsunami of wing clipped kiwi?

Written By: - Date published: 9:52 am, November 9th, 2020 - 45 comments
Categories: Economy, exports, immigration, International - Tags:

Liam Dann @ NZ Herald is reporting (paywalled) “Historic wave of returning Kiwis has just begun – new expat survey“. The press release from KEA is here. The results of the survey are here. I’d just comment that this survey is effectively self-selected and more about intention than plans.

But the rush back home has definitely been happening and appears to mainly be constrained at present by the limits on quarantine facilities. Liam Dann also did a piece over the weekend “What went wrong? Why is the economy doing so well?” that looked at some of the immediate implications.

Why are things going so well for the New Zealand economy?

Latest unemployment numbers came in at 5.3 per cent last week – a figure that for most of the past few decades would have been considered pretty good.

It isn’t good, of course.

The pandemic and the closure of New Zealand’s borders made about 37,000 more people unemployed in the September quarter.

And that doesn’t include those who have lost work but don’t qualify as officially unemployed for a variety of statistical reasons.

But relatively speaking, 5.3 per cent unemployment is not bad, either.

In April, for example, Treasury forecast that unemployment would hit 9.8 per cent in the September quarter.

In the early 1990s it was close to 11 per cent.

If we were able to send this week’s data back to our panicked selves of seven month ago – we would breath a sigh of relief.

The forecasts of bank economists have also proved overly pessimistic.

NZ Herald: “What went wrong? Why is the economy doing so well?

As he points out, there is a point of view that keeps looking at the data and persisting in saying that it isn’t going to last. That it is all being propped up by the money flowing out of government debt. And yes – there is some truth that happened – especially during the lock downs. But the wage and business subsidies are either stopped or winding down.

Sure, we’re going to keep hearing that from the likes of David Seymour. Richard Harmon @ Politik in “The debate we didn’t have” (paywalled). But I have sparrows from winter who appear to have similar memories than David Seymour @ ACT – short-term and related to feeding. My partner was feeding some young sparrows when it got cold and they still pop in hopefully months after we stopped. Seymour is still repeating the same motions and words he did early this year and clearly hasn’t engaged his brain yet.

Kiwibank Chief Economist, Jarrod Kerr said the unemployment figure highlighted the damage from the lockdown.

“The spike is essentially payback for a counterintuitive fall in the number unemployed – and the unemployment rate –in the June quarter,” he said.

He pointed out that to be counted as unemployed someone has to be actively seeking work and for many, that was not possible during the lockdown.

“An inability of those unemployed to seek paid employment during lockdown masked the true damage,” he said.  

“We got lucky on Covid-19,” said Seymour.

Politik : “The debate we didn’t have

Seymour then proceeds to compare it with the much smaller increase in absolute employment in one quarter that happened in the GFC – ignoring that the GFC was unfurling for over than eighteen months in NZ before it had its full effect. Comparing a one-off event an increase in unemployed after the release of a wage subsidy is a comparison between a rising flood and a tsunami.

But also in case he hadn’t noticed, the sugar rush part of the fiscal stimulus has been pretty well finished for a while now. It currently requires that businesses are able to demonstrate that they had something like a drop of 40% from the same months last year.

Larger businesses have been regularly paying back subsidies received because they no longer met the requirements when they took them for. This is the only sensible and rational approach when you have the IRD eventually going to have a look at businesses wholesale using a massive computer system to compare time data not only of the business, but also their employees.

But we are approaching a crunch point for this view.

The wage subsidies are finished and we are about to feel the absence of international tourists more acutely as we reach the traditional peak of the season.

But if anything, the risk of that narrative proving incorrect appears weighted to the upside.

In other words, the bigger risk is that things keep going better than expected.

Perhaps our economy was just more robust than we thought.

NZ Herald: “What went wrong? Why is the economy doing so well?

Exports have been doing well. Most of our major target markets haven’t been overly affected by the pandemic. The virus is out of control in the North and South Americas and Europe. As Liam Dann says “Overall something like 75 per cent of our exports by value are now to the Asia Pacific.”. If you look at any trade page you’ll see something like this (I highlighted the Americas and European destinations).

Top export destinations of commodities from New Zealand in 2019:

  • China with a share of 27% (11 billion US$)
  • Australia with a share of 14.5% (5.74 billion US$)
  • USA with a share of 9.4% (3.71 billion US$)
  • Japan with a share of 5.84% (2.31 billion US$)
  • Korea with a share of 2.81% (1.11 billion US$)
  • United Kingdom with a share of 2.47% (980 million US$)
  • Hong Kong with a share of 2.12% (838 million US$)
  • Other Asia, nes with a share of 1.95% (773 million US$)
  • Singapore with a share of 1.87% (741 million US$)
  • Malaysia with a share of 1.77% (703 million US$)

We haven’t got full data yet, but even the badly afflicted destinations appear to have been not doing too badly for our exports. Wines in particular appear to be valued during lock downs.

The other three main sources of income for NZ are flight related.

  • Overseas tourism is obviously munted – but it appears to be partially offset by our tourists not going offshore and having to move within NZ. Making kiwi flightless again also appears to be good for balance of trade. Our exports of cash have diminished markedly without overseas flights. The full effects of this won’t really show until about now. But there has been 6 months for these seasonal businesses to adjust.
  • Students not arriving will continue to plague the education sector. Hopefully they’re flexible enough to adjust to that, because they have at least another year of that. Probably more as I can’t see that trade reviving very fast. Parents tend to be somewhat risk adverse about children.
  • Immigration – we’ve had a major fall in migrants. But not really.

It looks like this year we’ve had something like 50,000 kiwis or permanent residents returned – keeping our immigration industries like real estate agents busy. Plus stacked immigration or refugees who’d like to get some place that isn’t quite as traumatic as they’ve been observing.

According to KEA’s survey there are upwards to half a million kiwis who think that they may be heading our way. Now I suspect that is over the top. But there are a lot of people I know who are planning or thinking on returning. I wouldn’t discount it. And we can’t refuse them – just make them go through quarantine.

I’m just not sure where we’ve going to stack them. Especially here in Auckland where most of them say they want to go. Fortunately most will have urban skills and be able to feed into our burgeoning urban exports.

45 comments on “A tsunami of wing clipped kiwi? ”

  1. Janet 1

    Yes the cuckoos are planning to come home it seems.

    more from the same pay-walled article

    "More than 50,000 Kiwis have already returned home this year as the pandemic has ravaged the world.

    But as many as 500,000 could be on their way in the next few years.

    A survey of 15,000 expats by KEA (Kiwi Expats Association) found that 49 per cent were planning to come home.

    About half of them said they would be returning in the next two years."

    They cannot expect full free healthcare, superannuation and welfare generally. Any entitlement will need to be on a pro-rata bases -time worked in NZ / time worked off-shore.

    • alwyn 1.1

      You say that "They cannot expect full free healthcare …..".

      That may be your opinion but I certainly don't think it is the opinion of ex-pat Kiwis, or at least I know it isn't the view of a number of Kiwis I know who live in Australia. There sole reason for planning to come home is that they do expect to get welfare benefits here which they don't get in Oz.

      Mind you they don't expect to stay here if things pick up in Australia. They will be gone from here as they seem to think of New Zealand as simply being a safe haven, and a generous benefactor, in a storm.

      That is only anecdotal of course. It tends however to be the view of the children of my friends where the children are currently in Australia. There are quite a large number of them looking at the prospect of a (perhaps temporary) return.

      Since there doesn't seem to be any indication that our Government has any intention of cutting back benefits, or Superannuation entitlements, here I would think that their belief in what they are entitled to will prove to be true.

      • Tricledrown 1.1.1

        Alwynger if you have been out of the country for more than 10years you have no access to any benefit except an emergency Benefit which is much lower than standard benefits and has to be paid back. There are other stand down periods as well.

        Facts instead of tormenting divisiveness but as unusual you always have divide New Zealanders with your ignorant Trumpish rhetoric.

    • Tricledrown 1.2

      Janet there are standown periods for New Zealanders returning home depending how long they have been out of the country.

      Seeding division is a Trumpish uneducated simplistic and nasty.

      Many of these people are bringing lots of Money ,are highly educated motivated people we have been wanting in our economy for a very long time.

      So they will be paying higher taxes and contributing more to the economy than you I bet.Do you pay enough taxes to cover your govt services.

      These returnees will have skills and experience that you only get by going overseas and working in much bigger economies.

      • woodart 1.2.1

        yes, many, if not most returning kiwis will bring skills and $$$ that will benefit the country.

      • Janet 1.2.2

        “So they will be paying higher taxes and contributing more to the economy than you I bet.Do you pay enough taxes to cover your govt services.

        No, I do not pay enough taxes now to cover the superannuation I get now ! BUT I am still running a small farm and am working fulltime on it and over all my working years – not all self -employed but , all in NZ , I will have relatively paid much more tax to the NZ government than many returning will have when they retire.

        I had a friend return to NZ who had worked half his working life in NZ and the other half elsewhere in the world. He was over 70 when he returned home. He was stood down, I think it was 5 yrs , before he could receive any superannuation. In his case it would have definitely been better for him if he could have received half- superannuation from the year he returned home. Pro-rata . I think there are things that need to be addressed to make everything fair.

  2. SPC 2

    The lack of students, tourists and migrant workers means more jobs for locals.

    And we will hear a lot of businesses complaining about that – locals not skilled (less mention of having to pay less skilled locals more to do the work).

    And the numbers of Kiwis coming in is rationed by managed isolation, and some of them are just relocating because they can work on-line and enjoy society freedom and others – in front-line education and health, who can walk into "safe" jobs.

    The tentative plans of those overseas, will for most, come to nothing (as they will still be in the queue when this is over – by effective treatment if not vaccine).

    I do not see any population increase inflow – because the numbers coming in from Oz (loss of jobs) is restricted, and yet those of use who want better pay and cheaper housing can still go to Oz.

  3. RedLogix 3

    This is a theme I've returned to often. Some 25% of all people born in NZ now live elsewhere, often chasing opportunity that simply didn't exist here.

    The unexamined risk was that a global event like COVID could precipitate a mass return. The big impact being obviously to an already stressed housing market.

    Yet many will also return with capital and valuable experience that we can embrace wholeheartedly if we can set aside our often parochial instincts.

    • Janet 3.1

      Yes I welcome them home too, they are us , and they will replace the so called "need" for continuing immigration , but "More than half of respondents had been away for more than 10 years." They will be coming to an age when they will need more healthcare and then superannuation and they have not been paying forward for this.

  4. Muttonbird 4

    They should be made to build new and pay for their own required infrastructure. Existing residential property should be off limits to these fair-weather Kiwis.

    • SPC 4.1

      For mine, its those borrowing money to buy investment property who should be restricted to newbuilds. How this can be done is the problem/question? Maybe a mortgage surcharge on loans to investors when they buy existing homes.

      • Patricia Bremner 4.1.1

        In other countries the deposit controls investors. Up to 50% cash deposit for investment properties with strong tax rules for the first 5 years.(not borrowed money) and low deposit for home owners who must live in the property as their principal address for 3 years.

        Many Kiwis coming back will have been in unsecured work, which has since disappeared.

        They are looking at the employment, but housing keeping warm and food costs will be a shock for those returning from Australia particularly.

        Many will though bring portable business and wealth. So over all people seeing this as a desirable place to live is beneficial.

        Keeping the virus under control is critical to this so the continued control through the voucher system is sensible. The promoting of "sad cases" will continue, and perhaps we need a facility kept for medical emergency critical or some of those situations which can not be planned for. jmo.

        • SPC 4.1.1.1

          I would have the deposit controls like that, but the RB Governor is independent and his brief is merely to keep banks safe and manage inflation – not equity, or any sort of housing policy as such.

  5. Sanctuary 5

    There is huge potential culture clash that could occur here – a huge influx of highly self-regarding expats who may exude an attitude of doing us all an enormous favour by gracing us with their return running head long into a locals who might regard them as fair weather kiwis will make for interesting times.

    • AB 5.1

      I fully expect to be condescended to by at least some of these unimaginably brilliant returnees. I’ll get used to it.

  6. Pat 6

    Unemployment is a lagging indicator and the assumptions about returning expats are exactly that, assumptions….many are returning temporarily and not all are cashed up and able to purchase property.

    The local economy is still being supported by wage subsidies (only recently ended), enhanced unemployment payments (due to end), mortgage holidays (end in March) and the export markets can be expected to decline as our offshore markets also feel the impact of shrinking economic activity.

    The impacts do not happen instantly and the longer the recession lasts the greater the cascade effect

    • Tricledrown 6.1

      Pat bordering on xenophobia for years we have been complaining about the brain drain and how do we attract these highly educated people back to NZ.

      Now we are getting these people back some people are trying to make divisive cheap nasty political shots.

      • Pat 6.1.1

        Are you suggesting that my comment is expressing xenophobia and is some sort of cheap shot?

        • Tricledrown 6.1.1.1

          Yes claiming our economy is going to be much worse is completely unfounded most economic indicators show there are many areas of facing major shortages in Labour Bank economists and David Seymour have claimed double digit unemployment are going to hit NZ.

          They have been proven Wrong.

          This type of hysteria is feeding into the narrative that returning kiwis are taking NZ jobs.

          Facts please .

          Exports are going up in most areas because we are Covid free,especially as meat processing plants many of the countries we export to have shut because of Covid.Primary exports are well up on previous years so let's have some balance in the argument.

          • Pat 6.1.1.1.1

            What part of 'lagging indicator' do you not understand?….the major economic impacts of the GFC did not present until 2-3 years after the event…it takes time for businesses to fail, it takes time for mortgages to fall into arrears, it takes time to retrain and develop new employment opportunities.

            Do you expect the government is willing or able to sustain the pre covid level of activity for 3 years?….they themselves say they cannot.

            As to exports our covid free status has little to do with whether our major markets can buy what we can offer, indeed their own covid ravaged economies will increasingly struggle with unemployment and reduced GDP (recession)….not to mention the increased cost of transport from the most transport isolated part of the world.

            And am still not sure where the xenophobia enters into the discussion

            • Tricledrown 6.1.1.1.1.1

              Pat National were in power after 2008 their policies lead to a worse scenario then tax cuts for the well off tax increases for the poor .

              Minor stimulation packages that created a few jobs in roading.

              The Canterbury earthquakes were the turning point that got the economy of its knees effectively an accidental stimulation package of $80 odd billion $66 billion from insurance payouts the National govt got re elelected on the back of the economic stimulus it created.

              Labour this time around has pumped $200 billion in stimulus so far over 4 years .free apprenticeships as well

              So I don't expect the downturn to be as bad as the neigh sayers.

              Also Grant Robertson has said he will do more if necessary.

              [Please stick to one e-mail address, thanks]

              • Tricledrown

                Sorry also the $25 dollar benefit increase .

                Nationals GFC response was to blame the poor and drug use by beneficiaries which was eventually proven a total lie as around only 1% use compared to 10% among workers Todd Barclay ironically caught out in Bill Englishs (the DP and finance minister who demonized the unemployed)old electorate.

  7. Adrian 7

    After 2 years in Britain young Kiwis are sent packing anyway so the natural return rate is 50% give or take the few who can get residency.

    I'm surprised the 20% "Want To Come Home "rate is so low even with Covid.

    I think the survey is bullshit.

  8. I bought a can of Ukrainian beer the other day (it wasn't very nice!) – why the f*** do we need beer from obscure parts of Europe or anywhere? Choice???

    Our exports will see us through the pandemic because we are a food producer, but perhaps we need some sort of import licensing policy (like in the 1960s) so that places like the Warehouse and others cannot bring in a lot of useless crap.

    • greywarshark 8.1

      I bought some little pottles of tiramisu? made in ITALY out of the supermarket chiller the other day. Quite nice, but totally inefficient except from the 'logic' and logistics of the free market. They are largely dairy goods, and can be made well by NZs. They had got to the clearance of the sell-before items, so gave them a whirl at a reduction. I prefer to buy it made at the local Italian pizzeria and wine place which I like to frequent, which has small desserts and baked goods.

    • Phil 8.2

      Most 'foreign' beer sold in NZ is brewed locally under license and tastes nothing like the true-equivalent. What was the brand?

      • Sorry, thrown the can out but as I recall, Oblomon or similar. It did say 'imported' on the can.

      • tc 8.2.2

        Totally Phil, they stamped out the parallel importing of genuine Stella/Becks etc years back as chains like 'The Mill' would trumpet them being same price but imported.

        Independent (part of Asahi now) brews many aside from the 2 lion made beers mentioned above they're all consistently inferior.

        All good as kiwi craft beer is fantastic and nibbling ever so slightly into the main brands.

    • Tricledrown 8.3

      Don't buy foreign beer and then complain if we want to export then we need to import if we shut down imports other countries will do the same.

  9. Ad 9

    This government is spending tens of billions of debt and tax funding on infrastructure projects that make marginal improvements, but don't alter the economy at all.

    Even if we are able to sustain the same economy as before, that's not a good thing.

    • Overseas tourism indeed tourism itself is a low-wage, low-productivity, low-input, low-innovation economic sector. Propped us up for a decade.
    • Tertiary education as we practice it here is a low-wage, low-productivity, high bulk input, low-innovation economic sector.
    • Dairy and meat and forestry and fishing are predominantly low-wage, low-productivity, high bulk input sectors
    • Then there's the other mainstays of our economy, finance and insurance and property. The wages and salaries are better, but they are industries based principally on paying rent of one kind or other
    • And finally there's government infrastructure expenditure of tens of billions in debt and taxes. This is a low-return, low-productivity, low innovation sector. And as above in property, most of the money is tied up in rent in the form of maintenance.

    I’m really glad that the world continues to drink our wine, and elated that we are nowhere near 9% unemployed so far. But how much more of our money do central city landlords need in implied subsidy of their wealth?

    The above pretty much sums up our main private sector employment. Rod Oram and the Productivity Commission have been saying similar things for a while. But I haven’t seen fresh thinking out of MBIE or others on this whole picture for a while.

    The effort from government and private sector that's missing is the one where we start to focus on business sectors with low bulk and mass, high innovation requiring high brain input, low use of mass cheap labour, and high salaries. And doesn't need us to meet us in person.

    There's no useful plan yet other than advanced make-work programmes, and sectoral packages that continue to prop up what is simply not advancing our interests.

    It's great to have more Kiwi come home, but they need the focus and framework from central government and business that is more substantial than that outlined by Ardern so far.

    • Yes Ad, we still suffer under the neolib mantra – low wages, bulk products so the rich can get richer, houses as commodities rather than a basic right, cheap imported labour and so on.

      Labour have the mandate to change all that, but will they, that is the question. I'm not holding my breath.

    • RedLogix 9.2

      focus on business sectors with low bulk and mass, high innovation requiring high brain input, low use of mass cheap labour, and high salaries.

      Often the precise kind of thing us 'entitled' ex-pats have been exposed to.

      When I went to Australia in 2013 I thought I knew what I was doing, seven years later I can only say that I was wrong. Yet the really silly part is that if I came back to NZ right now there would be no work for me, over qualified and too old.

      As for transforming our economy; I’d put my bet on radically improving our agricultural and horticultural sector. It’s what we’re good at.

      • Ad 9.2.1

        When do you start winding back Red?

        Most people who work in and out of countries have some idea of what their little cottage on the hill will look like, and when.

      • Draco T Bastard 9.2.2

        As for transforming our economy; I’d put my bet on radically improving our agricultural and horticultural sector. It’s what we’re good at.

        Its what we like to think we're good at but the reality is that there's no such thing as radically improving our agricultural and horticultural sector. Neither is an 'industry' that can be radically altered. Improvements are in the slim to none basket which is why the farmers keep complaining about the rules necessary to protect our waterways and other aspects of our environment.

  10. Craig H 10

    Tourism is a high portion of our GDP, but I think it helped that more than half was domestic tourism anyway, as stated we have had a lot of our own international tourists become domestic tourists (my wife and I did 2 weeks around Northland after our planned USA trip was a Covid casualty, was fantastic), and a lot of workers in the high volume international tourist market (e.g. Queenstown) were migrants, so when they lost their jobs, the impact on our labour market statistics was nil.

    • woodart 10.1

      yes, tourism very much a double edged sword, when it comes to employment, and $$$$ in or out of NZ. add to that, environmental costs( poo in waterways, and jet fuel burnt). would like to see some data re education industry and cheap foreign labour. suspect their is a high crossover.

      • Craig H 10.1.1

        Hard to say – I surmise that international education has less migrant employment because a lot of it is via NZ institutions (schools, universities and polytechs) with NZ teachers and educators. Obviously there are also private training establishments (PTEs in the industry lingo), but they still employ some NZ staff.

        • CrimsonGhost 10.1.1.1

          Nah man. student Loan scheme was National Neo-liberal bullshit in the first place. Was the general population asked via referendum if a good idea? No! Time for Universal Student Allowance or GMI or UBI. Time to write down debt/steadily work towards abolition of SLS. I like NZF idea (but expanded) of writing off 5%-10% for every year debtor working in NZ for benefit of NZ society & paying taxes. Charge an arm and a leg to overseas NZ debtors, but give a carrot of 10% off if they commit to returning and working for/in NZ for 5 years. Institute a matching system like Kiwisaver. every dollar paid down, Gov wipes .50c. SLS is a dead albatross around our younger peoples necks. The fact it's so actually pushed a lot of people to go offshore/stay offshore to avoid those concrete boots. A perverse incentive/hopefully unintended consequence of the stupid policy …along with making it harder for young to save for homes/get mortgages.

      • Poission 10.1.2

        Education is an interesting problem,fees (direct transfer are around 1.1 b) the rest of the assumption for the gdp makeup is living cost expenditure food, accomodation etc( some of which is driven by domestic work) which is transferable to a nz resident.

  11. Daily Lurker 11

    Be great to have them back once any overdue student loans are paid. Genuine hardship cases excepted.

    • Draco T Bastard 11.1

      The only thing that should be done with student loans is that they get written off.

    • CrimsonGhost 11.2

      Nah man. student Loan scheme was National Neo-liberal bullshit in the first place. Was the general population asked via referendum if a good idea? No! Time for Universal Student Allowance or GMI or UBI. Time to write down debt/steadily work towards abolition of SLS. I like NZF idea (but expanded) of writing off 5%-10% for every year debtor working in NZ for benefit of NZ society & paying taxes. Charge an arm and a leg to overseas NZ debtors, but give a carrot of 10% off if they commit to returning and working for/in NZ for 5 years. Institute a matching system like Kiwisaver. every dollar paid down, Gov wipes .50c. SLS is a dead albatross around our younger peoples necks. The fact it's so actually pushed a lot of people to go offshore/stay offshore to avoid those concrete boots. A perverse incentive/hopefully unintended consequence of the stupid policy …along with making it harder for young to save for homes/get mortgages.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Building back better
    It’s a three-week recess in Parliament – so, no bills are going through the House and no select committees are meeting. But the hard work of our ministers continues, and many of our MPs are back in their electorates, taking the opportunity to meet with local communities and businesses about ...
    2 days ago
  • Greens call for a Warrant of Fitness for rental homes
    The Green Party is launching a petition today calling on the Government’s Healthy Homes Standards to be backed up with a proper Warrant of Fitness (WoF) for rental homes. ...
    6 days ago
  • Securing our recovery: By the numbers
    Our plan to secure New Zealand’s recovery from COVID-19 is working, with the past three months seeing the second-highest number of people moved off a main benefit into work since records began. ...
    1 week ago
  • More Kiwis in work through recovery plan
    The latest statistics show the Government’s focus on jobs is working. The net number of people on a main benefit dropped by around 11,190 people during the past three months, with around 31,240 people moving off a benefit into work. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Green Party appoints new Chief of Staff
    The Green Party has appointed a new Parliamentary Chief of Staff, Robin Campbell. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • We’re turning 105!
    It’s our birthday! Today, 105 years ago, the New Zealand Labour Party was founded. And we haven’t stopped moving since: fighting for workers’ rights, expanding protections to boost equality, and upholding democratic socialist ideals. We’re now the oldest political party in New Zealand and, as we celebrate our 105 years, ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Principles for guiding the Emissions Reduction Plan Speech
    Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa. ...
    3 weeks ago

  • New station a platform for AirportLink to take off
    Every Aucklander with access to the rail network will now have a quick and convenient trip to the airport, Transport Minister Michael Wood and Auckland Mayor Phil Goff said during the official opening of the new Puhinui Interchange today. The new interchange links the rail platform with a new bus ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • 10 days sick leave for employees delivered
    Legislation doubling employees’ minimum sick leave entitlement to 10 days comes into effect today, bringing benefits to both businesses and employees, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced today. “Our Government is delivering on a key manifesto commitment to help Kiwis and workplaces stay healthy,” Michael Wood said. “COVID-19 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Prime Minister congratulates Fiame Naomi Mata’afa on Election Win
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern tonight congratulated Prime Minister-elect Fiame Naomi Mata’afa on her victory in the Samoa’s general election. “New Zealand has a special relationship with Samoa, anchored in the Treaty of Friendship. We look forward to working with Samoa’s new government in the spirit of partnership that characterises this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Quarantine Free Travel with Australia suspended
    Quarantine Free Travel from all Australian states and territories to New Zealand is being suspended as the Covid situation there worsens, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. From 11.59pm today Australians will no longer be able to enter New Zealand quarantine-free. This will be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Growing conservation efforts in Gisborne
    A big injection of Jobs for Nature funding will create much-needed jobs and financial security for families in TeTairāwhiti, and has exciting prospects for conservation in the region, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “The projects target local communities most affected by the economic consequences of COVID 19 and are designed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Flood recovery given further assistance
    The Government is contributing a further $1 million to help the flood battered Buller community, Acting Emergency Management Minister Kris Faafoi announced today. “Buller is a small community which has found itself suddenly facing significant and ongoing welfare costs. While many emergency welfare costs are reimbursed by Government, this money ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Funding for five projects to reduce food waste
    The Government is funding five projects to help address the growing problem of food waste, Environment Minister David Parker announced today. “New Zealand households throw away nearly 300,000 tonnes of food every year, half of which could still be eaten. By supporting these initiatives, we’re taking steps to reduce this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Temporary Accommodation Service activated for West Coast flooding event
    The Temporary Accommodation Service (TAS) has been activated today - meaning residents on the West Coast of the South Island and in the Marlborough region hit by flooding over the weekend can now access help finding temporary accommodation, announced Associate Minister of Housing (Public Housing) Poto Williams in Westport today. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Pause to Quarantine Free Travel from South Australia to New Zealand
    Quarantine Free Travel from South Australia to New Zealand will be paused from 11.59am (NZT) tonight, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins has announced. However, people currently in the state who ordinarily live in New Zealand will be able to return on “managed return” flights starting with the next available flight, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Zealand condemns malicious cyber activity by Chinese state-sponsored actors
    New Zealand has established links between Chinese state-sponsored actors known as Advanced Persistent Threat 40 (APT40) and malicious cyber activity in New Zealand. “The GCSB has worked through a robust technical attribution process in relation to this activity. New Zealand is today joining other countries in strongly condemning this malicious ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Remarks to Diplomatic Corps
    It is a pleasure to be with you all this evening. Some of you may have been surprised when you received an invitation from the Minister of Disarmament and Arms Control, and I would forgive you if you were. New Zealand is unique in having established a Ministerial portfolio ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Early Pfizer shipment boosts vaccine schedule
    The largest shipment of the Pfizer vaccine to date has arrived into New Zealand two days ahead of schedule, and doses are already being delivered to vaccination centres around the country, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. “The shipment of more than 370,000 doses reached New Zealand yesterday, following a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Backing for Bay of Islands predator free effort
    The Government is throwing its support behind an ambitious project to restore native biodiversity and build long-term conservation careers, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. Predator Free Bay of Islands aims to eradicate predators from the three main peninsulas in the region, and significantly reduce their impact throughout the wider 80,000-plus ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government commits $600,000 to flood recovery
    The Government is contributing $600,000 to help residents affected by the weekend’s violent weather with recovery efforts. Acting Minister for Emergency Management Kris Faafoi and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor have been in the Buller district this afternoon to assess flood damage and support the local response effort. They have announced ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government assisting local responses to heavy rainfall and high wind
    Acting Minister of Emergency Management Kris Faafoi says Central Government is monitoring the severe weather across the country, and is ready to provide further support to those affected if necessary. “My thoughts are with everyone who has been affected by this latest event, particularly communities on the West Coast and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • PM Ardern chairs APEC Leaders’ meeting on COVID-19
    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has chaired a meeting of Leaders representing the 21 APEC economies overnight. “For the first time in APEC’s history Leaders have come together for an extraordinary meeting focused exclusively on COVID-19, and how our region can navigate out of the worst health and economic ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Health Minister welcomes progress on nurses’ pay
    The New Zealand Nurses Organisation’s decision to take the Government’s improved pay offer to members and to lift strike notices is a positive move towards settling district health board nurses’ pay claims, Health Minister Andrew Little said. “It’s encouraging that the discussions between NZNO and DHBs over the nurses’ employment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Boost for Pacific regional business
    Pacific businesses will get a much-needed financial boost as they recover from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic thanks to the new Pacific Aotearoa Regional Enterprise Fund, said Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio.  The new $2 million fund will co-invest in Pacific business projects and initiatives to create ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • PM Ardern call with President Biden
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern spoke with US President Biden this morning, ahead of the APEC Informal Leaders’ Retreat on COVID-19. “President Biden and I discussed the forthcoming APEC leaders meeting and the critical importance of working together as a region to navigate out of the COVID-19 pandemic”, Jacinda Ardern said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Renewed partnership creates jobs for New Zealand youth
    The Government has signed a new memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Mayors Taskforce for Jobs, strengthening the partnership to get more young people into work.  The Mayors Taskforce for Jobs (MTFJ) is a nationwide network of all Mayors in New Zealand, who are committed to making sure all young ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • South Island areas prioritised in tourism fund
    Five South Island areas are prioritised in the latest round of decisions from a tourism fund that is supporting infrastructure projects from Cape Reinga to Stewart Island and the Chathams. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has announced details of 57 nationwide projects to receive support from the Tourism Infrastructure Fund (TIF). ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New code sets clear expectations for learner safety and wellbeing in tertiary education
    A new code of practice for the pastoral care of domestic tertiary and international students will be in place from January next year, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today The code, which makes clear that creating an environment that supports learning and wellbeing is a shared responsibility between tertiary providers, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First TAB New Zealand Board appointments announced
    The members of the first TAB NZ Board come with experience in racing and sport administration, business and governance, the betting industry, broadcasting and gambling harm minimisation. “This Board will progress from the excellent work done by the interim board, put in place in August 2020,” Grant Robertson said. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Northland Maori Pathways initiative introduced
    The Government has today launched Māori Pathways at Northland Region Corrections Facility, a ground-breaking series of initiatives designed in partnership with Māori to reduce re-offending and improve outcomes for whānau. A key part of the Hōkai Rangi strategy, Māori Pathways looks to achieve long-term change and involves a number of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Extended Essential Skills visas being rolled out
    Two year Essential Skills visa to provide certainty to at least 18,000 visa holders Streamlined application process to benefit at least 57,000 visa holders The Government is increasing the duration of some Essential Skills visas and streamlining the application process to provide more certainty to employers and visa holders while ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pause to Quarantine Free Travel from Victoria to New Zealand
    Quarantine Free Travel from Victoria to New Zealand will be paused from 1.59am (NZT) Friday, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins has announced. The decision follows updated public health advice from New Zealand officials and a growing number of cases and locations of interest. The pause will run for at least ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Hydrogen arrangement signed with Singapore
    The signing of an Arrangement of Cooperation on low-carbon hydrogen with Singapore heralds the start of greater collaboration between it and New Zealand as both countries transition towards low carbon economies, says Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods. The cooperation arrangement between New Zealand’s Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Hydrogen agreement signed with Singapore
    The signing of a Memorandum of Cooperation on low-carbon hydrogen with Singapore signals the start of greater collaboration between the two countries as they transition towards low carbon economies, says Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods. The cooperation agreement between New Zealand’s Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to LGNZ Conference
    Kia ora koutou katoa and thank-you for the invitation to speak to you all today. I would like to acknowledge Local Government New Zealand President Stuart Crosby, and Chief Executive, Susan Freeman-Greene, Te Maruata Chair, Bonita Bigham, and our host, Mayor John Leggett. I also acknowledge all the elected members ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government to provide support for water reforms, jobs and growth
    The Government today announced a $2.5 billion package to support local government transition through the reforms to New Zealand’s drinking water, wastewater and stormwater services. The package will also stimulate local economies while creating jobs and unlocking infrastructure for housing. “New Zealand’s water systems are facing a significant crisis and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government Initiatives Contribute to Fall in Benefit Numbers
    Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni has welcomed the release of the June quarter Benefit Statistics which show a continuing fall in the number of people receiving a Main Benefit. “This Government’s plan to increase work focused support for Jobseekers is paying off,” Carmel Sepuloni said. “All up Benefit numbers ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Tourism support package continues rollout
    Mental wellbeing support is being rolled out to five South Island communities most affected by the absence of international tourists. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash today announced details of how tourism operators and communities can access the help announced in May as part of the government’s $200 million Tourism Communities: Support, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • NZ-PNG Sign Statement of Partnership
    New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister James Marape signed the first ever New Zealand - Papua New Guinea Statement of Partnership today. “This new Statement of Partnership reflects the importance we place on the close economic, cultural and people-to-people links our two countries have ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Further advice being sought on new cases in Victoria
    Further advice is being sought from public health officials following seven new positive cases of COVID-19 in Victoria today, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. “There are also a growing number of locations of interest that are of concern, including a sports stadium on Saturday and several pubs,” Chris Hipkins ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Christchurch Learning Community Hubs supporting ethnic families
    As part of the Government’s ongoing commitment to working with the victims and those affected by the March 15 terror attacks, today Associate Minister of Education Hon Jan Tinetti released the report ‘Voices from the Ōtautahi’ on the Christchurch Learning Community Hubs. “It’s so important we continue to support the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Hundreds more hands funded to work for nature
    Supporting biodiversity protection through community-led projects and on private property will create at least 500 more jobs under the Mahi mō te Taiao/Jobs for Nature programme, Minister of Conservation Kiritapu Allan announced today. “The work we are funding includes everything from pest control and restoration planting to plant propagation, skill ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Saliva testing expansion for frontline border workers
    All frontline border workers who are required to be regularly tested for COVID-19 will soon be able to choose regular saliva testing as a full replacement for nasopharyngeal testing, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins has announced. Saliva testing will be expanded as an option for all those on a regular ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government consults on freshwater farm plan
    The Government is inviting farmers and growers to provide their practical ideas to help develop high-quality and workable freshwater farm plans, in line with its freshwater goals said Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor and Environment Minister David Parker. The ministers today released the consultation documents for freshwater farm plans and stock exclusion low slope maps. Comment is being sought on a new, more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Increased support for midwives
    New measures to help bolster the midwifery workforce as they care for the next generation of New Zealanders, have been announced today by Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall. “New Zealand’s midwives are committed to the wellbeing of women and whānau, but they’re facing significant challenges. The DHB midwifery ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Prime Minister's Speech to NZIIA Annual Conference
    Ladies and gentlemen, distinguished guests, ata mārie, tēnā koutou katoa. It’s a great pleasure to attend an event on such an important topic as New Zealand’s future in the Indo-Pacific region. Thank you to the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs for bringing this hui together. I am encouraged to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago