web analytics

Aquifer recharge

Written By: - Date published: 8:00 am, October 31st, 2017 - 44 comments
Categories: disaster, Environment, farming, water - Tags: , , ,

This Guest Post is by John Hodgson, a long time angler, and active member of the NZ Salmon Anglers Association. 

___________________________________________________________

The fol­low­ing is a sim­ple demon­stra­tion to help peo­ple un­der­stand “Na­tures pro­cesses” for wa­ter re­newal of the Can­ter­bury Plains. Put wa­ter in the sink to near the top. Then us­ing a veg­etable drain­ing colan­der im­merse in the wa­ter and watch how quickly the in­com­ing wa­ter fills the colan­der. Next, lift up and ob­serve how fast the wa­ter drains. What you are see­ing is how na­ture’s plumb­ing sys­tem works in re­gards to aquafier wa­ter recharge.

This is the sys­tem of the Can­ter­bury plains and has worked sat­is­fac­to­rily for man and beast etc., and has had suf­fi­cient un­der­ground reserves of wa­ter along the foot hills of the Alps to main­tain a flow for the Aquafiers for sev­eral years when rain­fall and snow is at a low ebb. The po­si­tion now is that there are hun­dreds of deep bore wells, that have over 10 or more years drained the nat­u­ral reserves of wa­ter so the sink is empty. The con­se­quence of this is go­ing to be a mas­sive disas­ter.

The first be­ing no drink­able non-treated wa­ter and each year be­com­ing worse. It is false in­for­ma­tion that the rivers are dry be­cause of low rain­fall. The cause is ex­ces­sive draw off of the nat­u­ral wa­ter reserves by the dairy cow in­dus­try. (Ir­ri­ga­tion for agri­cul­ture is not a prob­lem, it is sea­sonal.)

Of the many opin­ions ex­pressed just lately about our wa­ter and no mat­ter how cor­rect and gen­uine they are, no change to the cur­rent sit­u­a­tion is pos­si­ble un­til the deep well own­ers are re­quired to lift their pumps three me­tres per year un­til equi­lib­rium is reached. It has taken less than ten years to get to this very se­ri­ous state of af­fairs and will take at least fif­teen years to start re­cov­er­ing.

The laugh­able side of the sit­u­a­tion is that the present Na­tional Gov­ern­ment col­lapsed the En­vi­ron­men­tal Coun­cil. They put in Com­mis­sion­ers to al­lo­cate wa­ter fairly, and have failed in their re­spon­si­bil­ity. We are now back to the ear­lier Coun­cil’s dis­cus­sion that the wa­ter takes are all over al­lo­cated. The sad side is that many farm­ers to­wards the coast­line who at­tended the many zone com­mit­tee meet­ings are go­ing to be dis­ad­van­taged to have enough wa­ter to run their farms and they will be fight­ing the up­land wa­ter tak­ers.

The se­ri­ous side is that as the mean wa­ter ta­ble drops, the over­load of pol­lu­tants from dairy­ing will con­tam­i­nate pro­gres­sively the wa­ter sup­ply for many com­mu­ni­ties un­til it reaches Christchurch proper. The Christchurch City Coun­cil has knowl­edge of this, and since the earth­quake era has been re­plac­ing dam­aged bores, but they are go­ing much deeper so the pol­lu­tion fac­tor will not show as early as with the shal­lower wells. The wa­ter bot­tling com­pa­nies need to be aware that the present pu­rity of sup­ply is in jeop­ardy.

In all of 70 years of be­ing able to vote in a gen­eral elec­tion I don’t re­call such a bad sit­u­a­tion as that which we have at the present time. Even the 1951 strike ac­tion and the Hol­land Gov­ern­ment re­sponse was tame com­pared to the present time. We are now deal­ing with the sur­vival of Can­ter­bury.

The cause of this se­ri­ous sit­u­a­tion is sim­ply the present Gov­ern­ment*, the Over­seas In­vest­ment Of­fice and the Banks that urged farm­ers to go into a very large debt re­pay­ment sys­tem with the prom­ise of an abun­dant wa­ter sup­ply. The Gov­ern­ment used in­ad­e­quate wa­ter sci­ence to start with and is fail­ing to recog­nise that many farm­ing units are go­ing to fail be­cause of debt re­pay­ment. It will be the Gov­ern­ment’s re­spon­si­bil­ity to ac­cept the debt of failed farms and pay the money­len­ders. It is also ironic the Gov­ern­ment is giv­ing mil­lions of dol­lars to­wards the re­build of Christchurch city, but ig­nores the on­com­ing disas­ter that has al­ready started by the de­struc­tion of our once fa­mous arte­sian wa­ters.

Update:

What Needs To Be Done Immediately.

1. No deepening of any bore wells without authority. This covers many shallow wells of less than 70 metres.

2. Instructions to the deep bore well’s owners to start lifting their pumps.

3. Extensive and accurate assessments of recording factors, and public recognition of the bore well holders of consents that they are doing what is required.

4. A statement from the Christchurch Council and the District Councils of how they will supply potable water for use by the public when the water becomes contaminated.

5. Will the councils confiscate the Canterbury Water scheme to supply what is needed?

6. What is the emergency profile for the Canterbury Health Board?

7. Fire fighting is able to use any water, (polluted or otherwise) as long as it is water.

8. So that people will be able to come to terms with the diminishing water flows, a cross section map showing bore depth relative to mean sea level starting from the foothills to the sea. The public are entitled to know because it is their water resource as well as private enterprise.”

this post was written before the change of government in October 2017.

44 comments on “Aquifer recharge ”

  1. Antoine 1

    Well spoken

  2. Robert Guyton 2

    In Southland, aquifers and rivers are interconnected and water moves to and fro, backwards and forwards from one to the other, unseen. It’s worth picturing that when thinking about “green stream” events and other visible degradation in the surface waters.

    • ianmac 2.1

      Robert, Little is known about the shift between rivers in mid-Canterbury but the movement is critical for Canterbury water viability for town and irrigation. It is a vital area which should be researched.

  3. Ad 3

    “The sad side is that many farm­ers to­wards the coast­line who at­tended the many zone com­mit­tee meet­ings are go­ing to be dis­ad­van­taged to have enough wa­ter to run their farms and they will be fight­ing the up­land wa­ter tak­ers.”

    I’m not sure why this is sad. Farmers need to have this debate with each other – and that includes with Federated Farmers Canterbury. Farmers also need to determine whether the entire cycle of water in Canterbury is failing them enough to act.

    But I have a question:
    I have heard that the 2017 winter and spring in central and northern Canterbury has recharged the whole water system.

    Do you see that this is the case?

    • tracey 3.1

      I was wondering if it is sad cos the farmers closer to coast genuinely engaged in the process while others just went through lobbyists to get water for their dairy? Or sad cos the coastal farmers are not dairying but will get burdened with dairy excesses?

      • weka 3.1.1

        Also sad is that Ecan and the govt manage the commons so that farmers end up fighting each other over water.

  4. Gristle 4

    In North Otago/South Canterbury there is a substantial amount of water flowing underground. Holes that are dug for power poles (and the like) are regularly going down 2 or 3 meters into the alluvial gravels on the plains. Nowadays you will often see a green tide mark at the top of water table, and before you see it, you can smell it. The older/experienced hands say that this did not occur 15 years ago.

    You know how the ground filters out some of the shit and some of the chemicals. Well, maybe this is were it is occurring and being overloaded.

    • weka 4.1

      Yikes.

      Makes sense though. If you look at somewhere like Waimate, it’s basically all old wetland and river/creek systems.

      We are idiots in the extreme.

  5. garibaldi 5

    No excuses, the science has been there for a long time. It’s just another example of greed by pig headed capitalists ie Federated Farmers. They don’t even milk their poorly placed herds, they need slaves from the Philippines to do that because they have ruined the once great sharemilking ladder with their greed for intensive dairying/large herds. You would have to be nuts to try and get into farm ownership from scratch now. Why would young NZers bother, unless Daddy owns a farm?

    • Johan 5.1

      How many of our dairy farmers make an adequate living to sustain themselves and their family?

    • greywarshark 5.2

      That sharemilking system was of great benefit. But I will never forget the hard working bloke running sharemilking with his wife who said that the owner just kept piling stock onto the farm till it was at capacity and he didn’t have room or feed for the herd they were building and trying to develop. He died, and she said that the way the owner developed the farm was the reason, she said that he was working night and day to make it work. It was some decades ago, I thought how sad, the real farmers we wanted on the land in this country are being ousted by all sorts people like the Crafurs and so on. Getting every big lots, and then not even farming themselves, getting managers and imported labour in.

  6. ianmac 6

    Thanks for posting the above Weka. I have been off-line since Friday and John Hodgson has added to the above in the NZ Salmon Anglers Association. As an 87 year old John is very concerned about water in Canterbury.

    “What Needs To Be Done Immediately.
    1. No deepening of any bore wells without authority. This covers many shallow wells of less than 70 metres.
    2. Instructions to the deep bore well’s owners to start lifting their pumps.
    3. Extensive and accurate assessments of recording factors and public recognition of the bore well holders of consents that they are doing what is required.
    4. A statement from the Christchurch Council and the District Councils of how they will supply potable water for use by the public when the water becomes contaminated.
    5. Will the councils confiscate the Canterbury Water scheme to supply what is needed.
    6. What is the emergency profile for the Canterbury Health Board.
    7. Fire fighting is able to use any water, (polluted or otherwise) as long as it is water.
    8. So that people will be able to come to terms with the diminishing water flows, a cross section map showing bore depth relative to mean sea level starting from the foothills to the sea. The public are entitled to know because it is their water resource as well as private enterprise.”

  7. Mad Plumber 7

    The other issue is Ecans approach to Backflow prevention of bores. At one stage they were letting the use of a non testable device known as a Chemcheck valve which Irrigation NZ was promoting (they are cheaper).
    We do a lot of testing of on farm bores for house supplies and common thread in all the results is the high nitrate levels and it is quite surprising that coliforms (shit) does not occur more frequently.
    The installation of the filtration units are not cheap and the moans over the cost are amusing. We do not say well you shit in your own back yard———

    • ianmac 7.1

      John Hodgson reckons that of the deep bores “the deep well own­ers are re­quired to lift their pumps three me­tres per year un­til equi­lib­rium is reached.”
      What do you think Mad Plumber?

      • Mad Plumber 7.1.1

        I am just a simple plumber and to comment about that is out of my depth.But I have been lead to believe that when irrigation first started that in measuring the amount of water used ECAN relied on the rated capacity of the pumps and it was not until they made meters compulsory that they found how wrong they were.
        We were working on a new dairy shed on the plains and the effluent pond was dug out and left for a week or so before the liner was installed. Then there was a rain storm in the hills and a day later water started to leak in to the pond.

  8. Exkiwiforces 8

    Yikes, sounds like a few chickens are slowly coming home to roost.

    I can remember from my 1st year as a farm cadet at CHCH Polytech back 91, when our tutor Hamish talked about chemical leaching on the Canterbury Plains and especially on the outer suburbs of Christchurch when Applefields was going dambusters with it orchards at the time and possible long term affects of chemical leaching on the shallow aquaifers around CHCH.

    On a field trip around the plains looking and understanding the various soils and hydrology of the Canterbury Plains we had a member from DSIR who was then based out of the Lincoln University explaining why most of the then Canterbury Plains was mixed cropping with sheep and cattle as it due to the poor soils, the harsh winters/ summers and the water issues. It was one of the reasons dairy farms, horticulture areas were around the the outer suburbs of the main centres or the foot hills/ port hills. A question was asked if dairy were to take off and the answer was if it wasn’t managed a careful managed in a sustaining/ regulatory way with the proper check and balances. The long term effects will be huge to the water and soils, but short to medium effects of dairying well depend on the various catchments and soils as some areas will be more notable than in some areas as previous mention on soil and water.

    The out laying areas and region centres of the plains will see possible signs of leaching before CHCH will, but once it reaches CHCH it would have reached its Point of No Return (PNR) again what be the ongoing cost for water treatment for potable water? The other elephant in the room is what damage/ ongoing damage to aquaifers had after the earthquakes in the Canterbury region and bearing in mind the we haven’t had the Alpine faultline rupture before white settlement began and a unknown question there of the possible effects.

    As I’ve said before the dairy farming in NZ has become one great big Ponzi scheme and its bubble will burst with lasting effects from the big end of town to the small end of town!

    • ianmac 8.1

      A bit scary Exkiwiforces that as far back as 91 so much was known of the risks and yet the policy of denser farming at all costs went ahead anyway with the connivance of a political ECan. Wasn’t it Smith who justified the dismantling of an elected ECan by claiming that the elected body was making the “wrong” decisions? And yet the elected ECan had been working steadily and carefully to avoid over allocation.

      • Exkiwiforces 8.1.1

        I can remember Hamish and two other gentlemen saying that chemical leaching was only a theory to about the 70’s or it may have been a wee bit earlier. It was only when they started research into Agriculture and Horticulture practices on the Canterbury Plains after the big droughts of the late 70’s in looking at recharging the aquifers that they found Agriculture and Horticulture chemical traces in some of the wells which started to get the Agriculture and Horticulture researchers thinking not only in water allocation, but also the long term effects of chemical leaching be it man made or by animals/ Agriculture and Horticulture current practises.

        I think Nick Smith who sack the ECAN councillor’s , Ruth Richardson, Jenny Shipley and others who pushing for dairy farms on the plains at the time need to be questioned.

        My dad is good mates with the Deans family and Rob Cope- Williams along with a few other farmers who are still doing mix cropping still can’t their head around Dairy Farming on the Plains.

        Also Dad was saying they now Dairy Farming in the McKenzie Basin and in the Manatoto basin in Central Otago and my response was WTBF are they doing that? Weather there is the most extreme anywhere in the country be it summertime or winter from my army days with 1st Recce SQN NZ Scots RNZAC and its just plain nuts where they are now dairy farming.

        And I’ll keep saying is again this till the cow’s come home, dairy farming in NZ has become one great big Ponzi scheme and its bubble will burst with lasting effects from the big end of town to the small end of town!

        • Sam aka clump 8.1.1.1

          It’s actually really difficult for Fuana to evolve to a point of sustaining complex life because of a particular type of rock called dunnite. Dunnite makes up most of the Cantabury plains and the reason why water just disappears.

          • Exkiwiforces 8.1.1.1.1

            I’ve never heard of “Dunnite rock” as i’m at work, I don’t have access to GNS books to confirm “Dunnite rock” makes up the Canterbury plains as most of the Canterbury plains is made up of Greyweck and rocks/ sediment aka erosion from the Southern Alps (if it wasn’t for the rate of erosion of the Southern Alps the Alps would higher than the Himalayas. Unless you are talking the Mt Dunn ore belt which is behind Nelson which has it origins in Southland.

              • Exkiwiforces

                Cheers for DTB, Heard of Dunite from exploring as a kid with my late grandfather in the Nelson region many moons ago, but the Canterbury Plains are mainly up the Greywacke rock and rocks/ sediment aka erosion from the Southern Alps.

                • Sam aka clump

                  It’s traditional for Geo’s who discover an ore body to name it after themselves.

                  • Exkiwiforces

                    It was the spelling that got all twisted like the bowl of the century by a young Shane Warne to Mike Gatting and poor old Mike is still confuse as to what happen that day.

                    I may still have a piece of Dunite from Mt Dunn at my Mum and Dad’s with a heap of rocks from the Hill and other places from NZ like a chunk of Coal from the old family Coal Mine at Blackball.

          • Exkiwiforces 8.1.1.1.2

            The Canterbury Plains were during Otira Glaciation through erosion of the Southern Alps and it foothill. Pg7

            The Canterbury Plains are made up to a kilometre of Quaternary alluvial sediments blanket sedimentary and volcanic rocks. As we all know the Christchurch is built on former river channels with a shallow water table with underlying silts. Pg197.

            New Zealand’s major groundwater resources are held in flood plain aquifers on the eastern side of the main mountain ranges aka the Canterbury Plains. Groundwater is the major source (82%) of water for agriculture and is also important in some urban areas such as CHCH. About 3 billion cubic meters of freshwater falls on NZ as rainfall or snow each yr, but quickly flows to the coast. Therefore, potential to capture more of this water, once the Hydrology of each aquifer system is better understood. pg301

            The central Canterbury Plains is a 2000sq km area that lies between the Waimakariri and Rakaia rivers, which both flow 50km from the foothills of the Alps to the coast. This section goes on about leaching in the aquifers worth reading pg 322 to 325

            All references quoted are from the book “A Continent on the Move, New Zealand Geoscience Revealed, 2nd Edition” wonderful tool for amateur rock kicker or someone into Natural history like me. Also these books are useful for a detail understanding in your area.

            http://shop.gns.cri.nz/mqm15/
            http://shop.gns.cri.nz/mqm16/
            http://shop.gns.cri.nz/mqm13/
            http://shop.gns.cri.nz/mqm19/

        • ianmac 8.1.1.2

          Exkiwiforces you might remember the Snowy River Irrigation Disaster. The chemicals, often natural salts, drained back across the soils and again and again back into the river system. The end result was that the chemical loading of the irrigation poisoned the land.
          So the “…saying that chemical leaching was only a theory to about the 70’s,” was a very important warning which has gone unheeded by farmers who should know better. Mind you, owners of dairy farms are no longer the local cocky making good but commercial business operators after capital gain and quick returns regardless of the effects on the land.

          • Exkiwiforces 8.1.1.2.1

            The Snowy River Development was a Hydro power scheme not a Irrigation scheme. The Murray/ Darling basin was turned in a massive Irrigation scheme with the states over allocation water which in turn over the decades turn land in virtual salt pans and again growing such crops as rice and cotton which use a lot of water to grown in a semi desert environment.

            They are only now getting on top of the environment issues now for the Murray/ Darling basin. But it hasn’t help with the locks, barges that stop the floods that flush the river systems out and the states over allocation water.
            My dad comes from Broken Hill and the stories he talks about the water restriction’s at the Hill during the droughts, also the time spent at the Menindee lakes and later down Mildura way after he left the mines to work on the land for a while.

            I think they always knew about the leaching but couldn’t confirm the theory until the droughts in the late 70’s. But Canterbury was always known for mix- cropping until the great Dairy Ponzi Scheme of late which has now causing/ speeding up the environment problems such as nitrate, e-coili etc leaching into the Canterbury aquifers and the over allocation water.

  9. Philg 9

    Dairy farming on the Canterbury plains is an ecological crime. Those responsible should be prosecuted. Until that happens, very little will change.

    • ianmac 9.1

      Of course Philg no one would be held to account. Government policy, Smith, ECan? No way unless the incoming Government can at least put the breaks on.
      John says that the Rakaia River has an Act that when water level drops below a certain point, irrigation must stop. But when they keep taking water after the minimum there is no way to enforce the Act. And some “clever” irrigators found that they could dam the streams just below the meter to give a false inflated depth. Penalty? None.

    • Dairy farming on the Canterbury plains is an ecological crime.

      That could be said of many places where we have farms across the country. Probably worth putting in place serious regulations about it. Get the universities to study the land and recommend what farming should be allowed there or even if farming should be allowed.

      • Exkiwiforces 9.2.1

        The Canterbury Plains are well known for its mix cropping and world known for it Bailey and wheats yields. It was last year or the yr before that a mix cropping farmer smash the world record the highest yield for Bailey and that’s before we even start talking sheep or cattle weights or fine wool.

        Anyone Dairy farming on the Plains apart from domestic use have rocks in their head and as ianmac has said after a quick buck and bugger the environment.

      • greywarshark 9.2.2

        But that’s a command economy isn’t it. The richies and would-bes want to do what they can make money from. It only takes a hint that a law might be brought in and deadheads start holding signs about communism. Farm areas are known to be slow to pick up new ideas, they call it conservative when being polite. If the backward farmers think that serious laws interfering with their next clearance and drainage and fast profit scheme are to be introduced and then enforced, inspected, prosecuted and perhaps jail at the end, there will be Massey’s troopers again and possibly shooting.

        Perhaps there should be National Standards for farmers. And refresher courses every few years so they can keep up with the latest and work out the most profitable ways of farming in a sustainable manner. And they should be klicensed. The courses will be tax deductible if all attended and a diploma achieved with a 75% level to that.

        • Draco T Bastard 9.2.2.1

          But that’s a command economy isn’t it.

          That’s what some would say but it’s becoming increasingly clear that we can’t leave it to ignorant schmucks to do as they like, where they like as it has too much negative affect on everyone else.

  10. ianmac 10

    No one knows the process of water movement underground across from the Waimakariri to the Rakaia. The irrigators should find out because shifting water tables plus dairy effluent are a serious threat to Canterbury and to Christchurch water supply.
    There must be research done about the movement. It is criminal to go ahead in ignorance.

  11. Paul Campbell 11

    So National took away Cantabrian’s right to vote for members of ECAN, they returned some of that under pressure in 2016 – is Labour going to replace the 6 National appointed members on the board? perhaps with elected ones?

    (same question for the SDHB which has only got worse since National dismissed its elected board)

    • ianmac 11.1

      The new Government cannot do everything at once but the whole question of allocation and purity is a high priority. Once the water becomes contaminated by decades of mess filtering down, it will take decades to recover.
      I think aquafiers get replenished by surface percolation while deeper down is under the hard pan is the artesian mountain water. Artesian water used to bubble up above ground level decades ago. An artesian pipe could harness the water pressure to power a ram which pumped about a third of the water up to household holding tanks.
      Now the pressure has gone and artesian water is much much deeper and lower.

    • JC 11.2

      Re ECAN, Yes.

  12. Venezia 12

    This piece needs to shared widely. Especially in the face of the current intense PR media bombing from the dairy lobby we are subjected to.

    • ianmac 12.1

      We would be so pleased if it did go far and wide.

      • Exkiwiforces 12.1.1

        If my memory serves me right a lot of freshwater angling clubs incl the fishing section of the old now defunct Riccarton Working Men’s Club, along the Fish and Game, and some of the Greenie (sorry can’t the groups names) outfits were lobbying ECAN councillor’s before ECAN got the sack through MS Media etc. Come to think about now I think must have quite an effective campaign up to that point. The Greens lady who was on the ECAN broad at the time, might worth try to see what she remembers before they got the sack?

        I was follow a lot of the ECAN sacking stuff and I was pointing a few people to where information was or could be find.

        • ianmac 12.1.1.1

          Back then ECan was sorting out priorities for water access rights. There were legal blocks to some of the decision making rules and ECan sought permission from the Government to enlarge those rules. They were denied.
          One of the first things the Government Commissioners got was access to those needed rules. But then they over-allocated the water rights with the end result of far too much water being taken with disaster on the way. With the rights being given for decades ahead, how can the allocations be modified?

          • Exkiwiforces 12.1.1.1.1

            Probably take al leaf out of book here IRT returning environmental flows back into the Murray/ Darling basin when the federal pollies dragged the states out of the Stone Age IRT allocation of water entitlements. There is going to pain somewhere along the line and really needs to start now before genie gets of the bottle as it’s going to bloody hard to stuff her in the bottle!

            Has there any talk of blue babies being born yet within the CHD? Because that’s a sign of high levels nitrates within water supply.

            My last visit to coes ford left me with a sad feeling, as I use catch eels, flounder further down at the huts and 2-3 lb Brown trout between the huts and coes ford with a cold beer at the world famous rabbit arms hotel in springston afterwards

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Minister of Defence departs for Middle East
    Minister of Defence Peeni Henare has today departed for the Middle East where he will visit New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) personnel deployed within the region, including in Operation Gallant Phoenix in Jordan and the Multinational Force and Observers mission on the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The Minister will also undertake ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Government funds work to clean up six contaminated sites
    The Government has announced funding to clean up six contaminated sites to reduce the risk to public health and protect the environment.    “These six projects will help protect the public from health risks associated with hazardous materials, so New Zealanders can live in a cleaner, safer environment.” Environment Minister David Parker ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • Government partners with industry to reduce agricultural emissions
    New Zealand’s effort to reduce agricultural emissions has taken a step forward with the signing of a memorandum of understanding by Government with agribusiness leaders, in a joint venture as part of the new Centre for Climate Action on Agricultural Emissions, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced. The Ministry for Primary Industries signed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    23 hours ago
  • Vosa Vakaviti sustains generations of Fijians
    The enduring strength and sustainability of Vosa Vakaviti is being celebrated by the Fijian community in Aotearoa New Zealand during Macawa ni Vosa Vakaviti – Fijian Language Week, which gets underway today. “This year’s theme, ‘Me vakabulabulataki, vakamareqeti, ka vakaqaqacotaki na vosa Vakaviti’, which translates as ‘Nurture, Preserve and Sustain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New Zealand condemns Russia’s annexation attempts
    New Zealand condemns unequivocally Russia’s attempts to illegally annex Russia-occupied regions of Ukraine, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says. “We do not recognise these illegal attempts to change Ukraine’s borders or territorial sovereignty,” Jacinda Ardern said. “Russia’s sham referenda in Luhansk, Donetsk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia are illegitimate, and have no legal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government provides confidence to those seeking an adventure
    With our borders opened and tourists returning, those seeking out adventurous activities can do so more safely due to the steps we’ve taken to improve the health and safety regulatory regime for adventure activities, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood has announced.  “We are seeing international visitor numbers begin ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • More single-use plastics banned from tomorrow
    Single-use plastic cotton buds, drink stirrers and most plastic meat trays are among single use plastics banned from sale or manufacture from tomorrow. “This is the first group of the most problematic plastic products to be banned in a progressive phase out over the next three years,” Environment Minister David ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech to NZDF Command and Staff College
    It’s a pleasure to join you today – and I extend a particular welcome to Marty Donoghue (a member of the Public Advisory Committee on Disarmament and Arms Control) and Athena Li-Watts (interning with me this week) who are also joining me today. On the face of it, some ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Milestone of half a million mental health sessions delivered
    The Government’s flagship primary mental health and addiction programme Access and Choice has hit the milestone of delivering more than 500,000 sessions to New Zealanders needing mental health support. Health Minister Andrew Little made the announcement at ADL – Thrive Pae Ora in Cromwell which provides mental wellbeing support services ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government continues to future-proof arts, culture and heritage sector
    The Government has announced further support for the recovery and resilience of the arts, culture and heritage sector as part of its COVID Recovery Programme’s Innovation Fund. “We’re continuing to secure the recovery of our arts, culture and heritage in Aotearoa New Zealand by supporting transformational initiatives across the motu,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government steps up kauri protection
    The Government is delivering on an election commitment to protect kauri in our northern forests through the new National Pest Management Plan (NPMP) for the forest giant and the allocation of $32 million of funding to back the coordinated effort, Biosecurity Minister Damien O'Connor and Associate Environment Minister (Biodiversity) ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Russia’s Ukraine referenda a sham
    Aotearoa New Zealand does not recognise the results of the sham referenda in Russia-occupied regions of Ukraine, Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta says.  “These so-called referenda were not free or fair, and they very clearly were not held in accordance with democratic principles,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “Instead, they were hastily organised ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Govt invests in New Zealand’s wine future
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has officially opened New Zealand Wine Centre–Te Pokapū Wāina o Aotearoa in Blenheim today, saying that investments like these give us cause for optimism for the future. Funding of $3.79 million for the Marlborough Research Centre to build a national wine centre was announced in 2020, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Appointment of Judges of the Court Martial Appeal Court
    Attorney-General David Parker today announced the appointment of Colonel Craig Ruane, Commander Robyn Loversidge, and James Wilding KC as Judges of the Court Martial Appeal Court. The Court Martial Appeal Court is a senior court of record established under the Court Martial Appeals Act 1953. It is summoned by the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government strengthens measures to combat migrant worker exploitation
    Offence and penalty regime significantly strengthened New infringement offences for non-compliance Public register of individuals and businesses that are found guilty of migrant exploitation New community-led pilot to educate migrants workers and employers of employment rights Implemented reporting tools successfully brings exploitation out of the shadows Take-up of protective visa ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Livestock exports by sea to cease
    The passing of a Bill today to end the export of livestock by sea will protect New Zealand’s reputation for world-leading animal welfare standards, Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor said. “The Animal Welfare Amendment Bill future-proofs our economic security amid increasing consumer scrutiny across the board on production practices," Damien ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Extra measures to increase census turnout in 2023
    3500 census workers on the ground, twice as many as last census More forms to be delivered – 44% compared to 3% in 2018 Prioritisation of Māori and other groups and regions with lower response rates in 2018 Major work to ensure the delivery of a successful census in 2023 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Shining the light on screen workers
    Improved working conditions for workers in the screen industry is now a reality with the Screen Industry Workers Bill passing its third reading today, announced Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood. “It’s fantastic to see the Screen Industry Workers Bill progress through Parliament. The new Act will strengthen protections ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Mental health resources for young people and schools launched
    Associate Minister of Education (School Operations) Jan Tinetti and Associate Minister of Education (Māori Education) Kelvin Davis have today launched two new resources to support wellbeing, and the teaching and learning of mental health education in schools and kura. “Students who are happy and healthy learn better. These resources ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Progress continues on future-proofing Auckland’s transport infrastructure
    Transport Minister Michael Wood has welcomed the latest progress on Auckland’s two most transformational transport projects in a generation – Auckland Light Rail and the Additional Waitematā Harbour Connections. Auckland Light Rail and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency have named preferred bidders to move each project to their next phase, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government supports local innovation in homelessness prevention
    Ten successful applicants in round two of the Local Innovation and Partnership Fund (LIPF) Close to $6 million allocated as part of the Homelessness Action Plan (HAP) Māori, Pasefika and rangatahi a strong focus Round three opening later this year with up to $6.8 million available. Government is stepping up ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • More medicines for New Zealanders, thanks to Govt’s Budget boost
    Health Minister Andrew Little is welcoming news that two more important medicines are set to be funded, thanks to the Government’s big boost to the country’s medicines budget. “Since coming into Government in 2017, the Labour Government has increased Pharmac’s funding by 43 per cent, including a $71 million boost ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government delivers ACC change to support 28,000 parents
    The Maternal Birth Injury and Other Matters Bill passes Third Reading – the first amendment to ACC legislation of its kind From 1 October 2022, new ACC cover to benefit approximately 28,000 birthing parents Additional maternal birth injuries added alongside new review provision to ensure cover remains comprehensive Greater clarity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Further cuts for East Coast tarakihi limits to rebuild numbers faster
    Commercial catch limits for East Coast tarakihi will be reduced further to help the stock rebuild faster. “Tarakihi is a popular fish, and this has led to declining levels over time. Many adjustments have been made and the stock is recovering. I have decided on further commercial catch reductions of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Ambassador to Colombia announced
    Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of diplomat Nicci Stilwell as the next Ambassador to Colombia. “Aotearoa New Zealand’s relationship with Colombia is fast growing with strong links across education, climate change and indigenous co-operation,” Nanaia Mahuta said.  “Trade is a key part of our relationship with Colombia, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • 3000 more RSE workers to ease workforce pressures
    The Government continues to respond to global workforce shortages by announcing the largest increase in over a decade to the Recognised Seasonal Employer Scheme (RSE), providing 3000 additional places, Immigration Minister Michael Wood and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor have announced. The new RSE cap will allow access to 19,000 workers ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Sanctions on more of the Russian political elite
    Further sanctions are being imposed on members of President Putin’s inner circle and other representatives of the Russian political elite, as part of the Governments ongoing response to the war in Ukraine, says Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta. “Ukraine has been clear that the most important action we can take to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Principal Youth Court Judge appointed
    Judge Ida Malosi, District Court Judge of Wellington, has been appointed as the new Principal Youth Court Judge, Attorney-General David Parker announced today. Born and raised in Southland, Judge Malosi graduated from Victoria University of Wellington and spent her legal career in South Auckland.  She was a founding partner of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Visitor arrivals highest since pandemic began
    Overseas visitor arrivals exceeded 100,000 in July, for the first time since the borders closed in March 2020 Strong ski season lifts arrivals to Queenstown to at least 90% of the same period in 2019 Australia holiday recovery has continued to trend upwards New Zealand’s tourism recovery is on its ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Language provides hope for Tuvalu
    Climate change continues to present a major risk for the island nation of Tuvalu, which means sustaining te gana Tuvalu, both on home soil and in New Zealand Aotearoa, has never been more important, Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio said. The Tuvalu Auckland Community Trust and wider Tuvalu ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Minister Sio to attend Asian Development Bank meeting in Manila
    Associate Foreign Affairs Minister Aupito William Sio travels to the Philippines this weekend to represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) Board of Governors in Manila. “The ADB Annual Meeting provides an opportunity to engage with other ADB member countries, including those ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • United Nations General Assembly National Statement
    E ngā Mana, e ngā Reo, Rau Rangatira mā kua huihui mai nei i tēnei Whare Nui o te Ao Ngā mihi maioha ki a koutou katoa, mai i tōku Whenua o Aotearoa Tuia ki runga, Tuia ki raro, ka Rongo to pō ka rongo te ao Nō reira, tēnā ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New strategy unifies all-of-Government approach to help Pacific languages thrive
    A united approach across all-of-Government underpins the new Pacific Language Strategy, announced by the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio at Parliament today. “The cornerstone of our Pacific cultures, identities and place in Aotearoa, New Zealand are our Pacific languages. They are at the heart of our wellbeing,” Aupito ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Upgrades for sporting facilities ahead of FIFA Women’s World Cup
    Communities across the country will benefit from newly upgraded sporting facilities as a result of New Zealand co-hosting the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023. The Government is investing around $19 million to support upgrades at 30 of the 32 potential sporting facilities earmarked for the tournament, including pitch, lighting and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Partnership supports climate action in Latin America and Caribbean
    Aotearoa New Zealand is extending the reach of its support for climate action to a new agriculture initiative with partners in Latin America and the Caribbean. Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced a NZ$10 million contribution to build resilience, enhance food security and address the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Landmark agreement for Māori fisheries celebrates 30th year
    The 30th anniversary of the Fisheries Deed of Settlement is a time to celebrate a truly historic partnership that has helped transform communities, says Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries Rino Tirikatene. “The agreement between the Crown and Māori righted past wrongs, delivered on the Crown’s treaty ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government backs initiatives to cut environmental impact of plastic waste
    The Government has today announced funding for projects that will cut plastic waste and reduce its impact on the environment. “Today I am announcing the first four investments to be made from the $50 million Plastics Innovation Fund, which was set last year and implemented a 2020 election promise,” Environment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Call for expressions of interest in appointment to the High Court Bench
    Attorney-General David Parker today called for nominations and expressions of interest in appointment to the High Court Bench.  This is a process conducted at least every three years and ensures the Attorney-General has up to date information from which to make High Court appointments.  “It is important that when appointments ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Depositor compensation scheme protects Kiwis’ money
    New Zealanders will have up to $100,000 of their deposits in any eligible institution guaranteed in the event that institution fails, under legislation introduced in Parliament today. The Deposit Takers Bill is the third piece of legislation in a comprehensive review of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand Act and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New fund to help more Pacific aiga into their own homes
    The Government has launched a new housing fund that will help more Pacific aiga achieve the dream of home ownership. “The Pacific Building Affordable Homes Fund will help organisations, private developers, Māori/iwi, and NGOs build affordable housing for Pacific families and establish better pathways to home ownership within Pacific communities. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago