web analytics

Chinese Capital in the Pacific

Written By: - Date published: 8:23 am, July 19th, 2022 - 26 comments
Categories: China, debt / deficit, Economy, International, Nanaia Mahuta, Pacific, uncategorized - Tags:

It would be tidy for New Zealand and Australian leaders to blame China’s debt within Sri Lanka for its collapse, so that they could scare Pacific Island nations back into the fold. It would be wrong.

A lot of good came out of the Pacific Island Forum and in particular the 2050 Blue Pacific strategy, and some big new diplomatic investments by the United States.

But in this interview with Jack Tame, the Minister of Foreign Affairs traverses a lot of ground, but from 9.20m discusses how mindful the government is about the collapse of Sri Lanka.

You’ll be aware that the way New Zealand funds is largely by grant funding. We would like to see the opportunity of development partners to look towards greater coordination of its efforts,” said Mahuta.

“I’d say there’s a level of indebtedness that sits across the whole of the Pacific to financial institutions, including the way in which China has funded into certain countries.”

The minister described it as a “key area of vulnerability that should be addressed, and we need to find different ways to work together on the challenges that sit within the Pacific.”

Sometimes, however, it’s better to see what’s on the ground causing civil unrest before reaching for blaming other countries. The Pacific Forum was Chaired by a person who had led coups in Fiji. Its own multiple coups were caused for the most part by native Fijian-origin military and paramilitary groups seeking to ensure Indo-Fijians didn’t achieve parliamentary rule.

In the Solomon Islands, troops and police from Fiji, Australia and New Zealand have been invited in several times over the past decade to restore order after inter-ethnic fighting broke out. It stems from a really poorly handled internal decision to switch recognition of Taiwan to that of China, which cut off critical Tainwanese aid to parts of the Solomon Islands. It’s complex but aid withdrawal was at its base. The US stepped in with massive replacement aid but the cack-handed damage was done.

Further back, in 2006 New Zealand and Australian troops were invited to secure Tonga’s main city and airport after massive riots. Tonga has a messy and multi-layered relationship between authoritarian monarchical rule, feudalistic restrictions of political rights, cultural patronage, massive inequality, and a very low wage economy. Their path to greater democracy was and is very, very hard.

In none of those examples did Chinese state loans cause civil unrest. Nor in any of them was New Zealand out of the picture.

And so to Sri Lanka. Certainly China financed a billion dollar port+airport at Hambantota, but then accepted a lease of the property in place  of much of the repayment. At 99 years it’s more like a equity-for-debt swap.

And of course it was in Rajpaksa’s constituency, ‘nuff said. But the lessons out of Sri Lanka that New Zealand can draw are simpler, and little to do with how China forms debt agreements within Pacific island states.

The first lesson is very very few small states will ever have the headroom to massively slash income taxes, as the Sri Lankan government did in 2020. VAT was halved from 15% to 8% and many other taxes minimised. Well, state got no money. Fiscal deficit soared to 11% of GDP. Those lenders that had hung in there for a long time like the IMF were just shown empty pockets. No party that promises massive tax giveaways can also promise that the state will stay stable.

The second lesson for New Zealand is that the fastest thing we can do to stop layabouts on the streets looking for trouble, is get them jobs here. Developed countries like us have that power. Talk a lot less about medium term hero projects for climate change and more about dollars and cents to get cash into small island villages. We will need the workers particularly in horticulture, until such time as we get much greater harvest mechanisation. We caused stress through shutting them out during COVID.

A big lesson for countries that are striving their way out of subsistence and poverty is that they will stop getting access to highly concessional loans from the IMF and World Bank – so that’s the point where very kind lenders or donors like New Zealand, Australia and China need a whole bunch less suspicion of each other and a lot more coordination of what they are actually funding. Surely the PIF can do an actual job of coordinating that rather than complaining.

Sri Lanka’s farmers also give New Zealand a much more direct lesson, namely: you can’t force organic farming on farmers and banning fertiliser imports. When Sri Lanka’s government tried that to decrease import costs, rice and tea harvests crashed 20%.  Dilmah Director Malik Fernando gives a sense of how Sri Lanka is continuing to rebalance tea production and tourism amongst the crisis:

Tourism continues without any untoward incident. Citizens have been protesting the government’s mishandling of the economy. Demonstrations have been peaceful, barring a few at the start where protesters were dispersed by the police. Sri Lankans from all walks of life came together peacefully and demanded that the government step down. The entire cabinet resigned. There is a strong sense of unity. Tourists have also joined the protests in some places. Although it may look worrying in the news, there’s no risk whatsoever to tourists.”

Now, granted he’s entitled to his advertorial spin, but he points to a very simple lesson for New Zealanders: the easiest thing you can do to build up a small island state is go there on holiday. Take your family and NZ$5-$10k and buy everyone some happiness. Stop scolding farmers about how to produce, and instead help them diversify their economy. After all it worked here.

None of the above examples of disruption had a Chinese debt trap as their cause. All of them have solutions that don’t necessarily require more loans or more grants for whatever reason. Our New Zealand government needs a whole bunch less political suspicion about sovereign loans, a whole bunch more focus on actual jobs that give Pacific Island families cash in hand, and actually an acceptance that – just as New Zealand did in the 1990s real estate market – Chinese money is a permanent part of our picture.

26 comments on “Chinese Capital in the Pacific ”

  1. Stuart Munro 1

    Well your opening thesis is pretty sound, that China's involvement in Sri Lanka, if not benign (and lets face it, foreign investment is never entirely benign), does not appear to have been a major factor in the debacle that saw there government flee the country to avoid the natural and evitable consequences of their gross irresponsibility.

    China's expansion of interests into the Pacific thus far is more of a threat to competing predatory financiers than to the security of the region. And as long as they proceed carefully, and do not take advantage of the moral flexibility of of small state politicians too often, that's really none of our business. Incremental change, as opposed to the breakneck folly of Roger Douglas and his accomplices, is normal, and, because it allows the time for political responses and reviews, it is invariably more legitimate. Xi has appointed himself president for life, but thirty years on a less bellicose leader may control China, and the internal issues that have always been the major focus of that state are likely to keep him or her busy enough without strange dreams of conquest.

    The fastest thing we can do to settle things down in Sri Lanka is of course to impose a 10% annual property value tax and ship them the money as development aid. Ridiculous? Yes of course – as ridiculous as flooding NZ with even more migrants while we're still struggling to assimilate the extra million people MBIE asininely let in over the last two decades. These unskilled workers will take 30-40 years to work their way through the belly of the beast and allow wages to reach a natural equilibrium – until that time NZ workers have trouble enough keeping roofs over their heads without subsidizing the more egregious failures of foreign politicians.

    Nor should we derive excessive generalizations about the adaptability of farmers or the prospects of environmental reform from what seems to be an unremarkable instance of elite incompetence. The fastest growing (in value) sector in food are those products that are organic or sustainably produced, ideally both. Typically in the realm of 30%. NZ farmers are poised to swoop on that fat profit potential as soon as they get the sclerified old brown Fed crew's boot off their necks.

    • psych nurse 1.1

      I was in Sri Lanka in 2019 soon after the bombings, we must of been about the only tourists there, the tourist industry was in utter despair. But the astounding thing was the eight lane highway from Negombo to Colombo, built by the Chinese using Chinese prison labour according to the Taxi driver. He said the locals only realized when no locals were employed and all the cats, dogs and lizards disappeared from the streets as the labourers were not fed. There was also a massive port being constructed in Colombo all on a form of buy now pay later. Its obvious now the debt has been recalled and the Chinese will extract their pound of flesh.

      • RedLogix 1.1.1

        built by the Chinese using Chinese prison labour according to the Taxi driver.

        Yes – I have seen something similar myself working in Panama. We had a group of about 100 Chinese laborers doing light mechanical worlk (installing insulation and the like) who we treated like something out of concentration camp movie. One morning I thought to take a video of it from a distance – and was very quickly shut down by one of their white hat guards. They knew damn well what they were doing was fucked up. Or North Koreans.

        I was told the workers were likely forced labour taken from some very poor region in the interior.

        • joe90 1.1.1.1

          My brother said much the same about routine air frame rebuilds in China. Hundreds of workers in crammed into deafeningly loud, sweltering and poorly ventilated fuselages being pushed along by stick-wielding overseers. Little wonder they have the record turn-around times so beloved by airlines.

        • Adrian Thornton 1.1.1.2

          Interesting to note that the industrial and manufacturing component of the post war Western Capitalist ‘democratic’ ideology you defend so vigorously on this forum has been enabled to grow over the past few decades almost exclusively through the exploitation of those very same workers…and many other exploited nationalities of course…as we all know, capitalism sees no colour in its endless search for profit….

          So correct me if I am wrong, but I don't seem to remember any problems with China and Chinese workers being issued from the West when they being outrageously exploited by all western countries including New Zealand for huge profit…but now that they are a perceived challenge to Western (mainly US) economic hegemony, we are expected to suddenly forget all that history from literally yesterday, and regard them as the biggest threat to our way of life today…FFS.

          The thing I find endlessly intriguing about the Liberal class is how crazily and outrageously racist they often are, yet they seem to genuinely not even notice it…sort funny and annoying at the same time.

          • RedLogix 1.1.1.2.1

            Fuckwit.

            It was of course Chinese owned and operated contractors who were charging these poor sods out at Western rates – and paying them sfa.

            The exploiters here are Chinese. Shove your racism …

          • Tiger Mountain 1.1.1.2.2

            I know it is pathetic Adrian –$80 branded T-shirts for sale in Auckland, made for cents in Bangladesh by exploited workers with horrifically toxic dye methods, latest iPhone “designed in California” made in China.

            US companies “ran away” for cheap labour long ago. That is why I am an internationalist–“Neither Washington, Moscow or Beijing”.

            Obviously Russian and Chinese workers have to get organised in numbers, but so do US workers–and look what happens when they try to at Amazon and Starbucks!

            • RedLogix 1.1.1.2.2.1

              latest iPhone “designed in California” made in China.

              Well take heart – skilled labour in China is now quite expensive. Even Apple who have repeatedly doubled down on their commitment to Chinese manufacturing are re-considering.

              The bell-weather on this is automation. Investment in both SE Asia and the US is exploding for two complementary reasons – many US based companies are re-shoring their manufacturing as fast as they can in order to regain control and certainty over their supply chains. In order to do this both US based and Asia based entities are investing hard in automation in order to contain soaring labour costs.

              The calculus many companies are now making is that even if Asia remains cheaper on a per unit basis – China now presents an unacceptable sovereign risk to the whole Asian region and reshoring is the best bet in the long run.

            • Adrian Thornton 1.1.1.2.2.2

              @Tiger Mountain +1
              "That is why I am an internationalist–“Neither Washington, Moscow or Beijing”

          • Adrian Thornton 1.1.1.2.3

            I might well be a fuckwit RL, but at least I am not a racist fuckwit.

            • Jenny how to get there 1.1.1.2.3.1

              But you are a genocide denier, and an open supporter of fascist style Russian backed dictators.

              Which would sort of contradict your statement that you are neither Moscow, Washington or Beijing.

              [Your comment adds nothing to the debate and only attacks another commenter without any substance even when that other commenter’s comments are infuriating you because of their tone, style and/or contents. This flaming has got to stop. Take a week off and next one will be doubled – Incognito]

              • Incognito

                Mod note

                • RedLogix

                  Nah. I'm fed up with AT's blatant lying as well.

                  • Incognito

                    Aren’t we all?

                    Still, anybody who just attacks the messenger without any (other) substance in their comment can expect to be moderated, at least, and possibly receive an educational ban. As a reader, commenter, and a moderator of this site I’m fed up with those personal slurs, pot shots, attacks, et cetera. No matter how tempting it is to lash out at an infuriatingly obnoxious commenter and no matter how much the other ‘asks for it’ and/or ‘deserves it’, and trust me, I’m also ‘tempted’ a lot …

                    Collectively, we can choose to lift the tone and quality of the comments here and I’d like to think we [can] do this without heavy-handed moderation. But patience is wearing thin with some, obviously, and the time of kind warnings, gentle nudges, and soft moderation is coming to an end.

  2. bwaghorn 2

    “”Sri Lanka’s farmers also give New Zealand a much more direct lesson, namely: you can’t force organic farming on farmers and banning fertiliser imports.””

    I hope the greens are paying attention, just on the off chance they have some real power next year.

    • barry 2.1

      The narrative is about the government of Sri Lanka wanting to to go green. In reality it was the government refusing to use foreign reserves to pay for chemicals. Going green is not just about stopping using chemicals and the Green party is not advocating for a cold-turkey on them.

      • bwaghorn 2.1.1

        Didn't suggest they where but ,I'm sure there's a couple of em that'd love to shut down modern farming forthwith, so just thought I'd preempt them 🤔

  3. Obtrectator 3

    "The first lesson is very very few small states will ever have the headroom to massively slash income taxes, as the Sri Lankan government did in 2020."

    Careful how you construct your sentences. I took that to begin with as implying Sri Lanka did have the said headroom. (It didn't, of course, as further reading made abundantly clear.)

  4. barry 4

    I am off to the Cooks next week to support their economy. I am not expecting that my tourist dollars will actually result in many jobs for the locals, and I expect that tourism will be having many negative effects on the environment and wealth distribution. I suspect that tourism is only a small part of the answer to the economic problems.

    There is a need for climate change resilience work. Tsunamis in Tonga and storms in the Cooks recently have demonstrated the vulnerability of the islands, and local labour can be used to maintain defences, build up water infrastructure etc.

    RSE labour and remittances from NZ-based family members allow people to buy imports.

    Spending a lot of NZ/AUS/US/Chinese money does have down sides as it causes inflation and imbalance. Imports drive out local enterprise. Prices rise and the people without foreign income suffer.

    I agree that Chinese loans are not the problem. The problem is the failure to establish sustainable industries (e.g. fishing) that can employ people and sustain a truly local economy which earns enough to support the whole population.

  5. Maurice 5

    We must remember that "Chinese Money" is in effect recycled US Money that went from the US to China in exchange for Chinese Manufactured products. That is why China has a huge US Dollar surplus which can be utilised for the Belt and Road expansion

    Very much a US own goal?

    • pat 5.1

      And most of that USD earned by China went straight back to the US.

      • Maurice 5.1.1

        A lot of it used to buy US land, commercial enterprises and other 'hard' assets

        2nd own goal?

        … and quite major investments here too

        From MAFT website: https://www.mfat.govt.nz/en/countries-and-regions/asia/china/

        Investment from China including Hong Kong into New Zealand reached NZ$10.6 billion in 2018. After Australia, China is New Zealand’s second largest source country for foreign direct investment, representing almost 10% of our total FDI stock. Chinese investment extends across a range of sectors including primary industries and forestry (30%), infrastructure and commercial development (20%), and manufacturing (15%). Chinese investors are the largest foreign investors in primary products exports, waste management, electrical whiteware, and tourism infrastructure. New Zealand’s limited overseas direct investment in China is mainly concentrated in the dairy sector.

        • pat 5.1.1.1

          China is the largest creditor to the US government with over 1 trillion of US Treasury Securities

Leave a Comment

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Infrastructure funding unlocks 8000 new homes
    Seven centres first to get Government housing infrastructure funding, enabling over 8,000 more new homes to be built New homes to be enabled in Rotorua, Ōmokoroa, Kaikōura, Ōtaki, Napier, Gisborne and New Plymouth 28 further projects undergoing due diligence and negotiations for allocation from $1 billion Infrastructure Acceleration Fund ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    48 mins ago
  • Big emitters will have to do more to cut emissions
    The biggest polluters will have to do more to help meet climate targets because of changes the Government is making to decade-old settings that have allocated far too many free climate pollution credits to New Zealand’s largest emitters, Climate Change Minister James Shaw announced today.  “Tackling climate change is a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 hour ago
  • Govt launches first nationwide tsunami evacuation map
    The Government has taken a further important step in improving Kiwis’ preparedness in the event of a tsunami with the launch of Aotearoa’s first nationwide tsunami evacuation map, says Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty. “All of New Zealand’s coastline is at risk of tsunami which means most of us ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • Speech to LGNZ conference
    Kia ora koutou katoa and thank you for the invitation to speak to you all today. I would like to acknowledge Local Government New Zealand President Stuart Crosby, and Chief Executive Susan Freeman-Greene, and our host, Mayor Grant Smith of Palmerston North City Council. I also acknowledge all elected members ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Poroporoaki: Ricky Houghton
    E mara a Riki, ko koe tērā i tu mai i mua ra, hei pou matakana mo mātou te hunga noho taone, arā ko Tamaki Makaurau. Nāu ano i mātua mai te haumarutanga o ta tātou whānau, hapori, hapū me ngā iwi, arā ko te mauria mai o ngā whare ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • New investor migrant visa will bring growth opportunities to Kiwi companies
    A new Active Investor Plus visa category is created to attract high-value investors. The new visa will replace the existing Investor 1 and Investor 2 visa categories. Eligibility criteria includes a minimum $5 million investment and encourages greater economic benefit to New Zealand companies by capping passive investment in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • Government steps up protections against foot-and-mouth disease
    Measures to further protect New Zealand’s economy from foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) continue as the Government focuses on strengthening biosecurity settings, Biosecurity and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor said today.  “Biosecurity New Zealand will this week begin using foot mats with disinfecting chemicals for arrivals from Indonesia to step onto in a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • Niuean Premier visits New Zealand
    Niuean Premier Hon. Dalton Tagelagi will visit Aotearoa New Zealand this week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. Premier Tagelagi will be officially welcomed to New Zealand on Thursday 21 July. During his visit to Wellington he will undertake a number of official engagements, including meetings with the Prime Minister, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • Speech to Electricity Networks Association
    Good morning. It’s great to be here again and speak with you. The past few months have been momentous for climate policy in New Zealand. As you know, the Government has now set New Zealand’s emissions budgets for the first three budget periods, and have released our ambitious package of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • More measures to build more affordable homes
    First home buyers and renters are set to benefit from measures getting underway to support more new affordable homes for people and their whānau, says Housing Minister, Dr Megan Woods. “Since we came into Government, we have been hitting the housing crisis we inherited with initiatives to get new housing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government provides Three Waters support for councils
    Every Council in New Zealand will receive at least $350,000 of additional funding to ensure they have the resourcing necessary to implement the Three Waters reforms, Associate Minister of Local Government Kieran McAnulty announced today. The Government has set aside a $44 million fund to assist Councils with the costs ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Porirua Mental Health and disability facility opened
    Health Minister Andrew Little has opened a new purpose-built mental health and intellectual disability facility in Porirua today, marking another milestone in the Government’s billion dollar investment in mental health services and facilities. Manawai, the National Individualised Service Unit (ISU), was built to support a small number of people with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Trucking toward lower emissions heavy transport
    The Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods is celebrating today’s launch of two firsts for energy decarbonisation in the transport sector in New Zealand; an electric milk tanker and a hydrogen truck, made possible with the help of Government funding. New Zealand’s (and possibly the world’s) first electric milk ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand’s 10th Youth Parliament event begins
    Young people from across Aotearoa New Zealand will take centre stage in the capital as Youth members of Parliament (MPs), Youth Press Gallery members, and the Youth Clerk at the two-day Youth Parliament event in Wellington. Youth Parliament is an opportunity for young people from across Aotearoa New Zealand to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • CPI figures highlight challenges amid volatile global environment
    The latest inflation figures reflects the volatile and uncertain global environment though New Zealand is well positioned to respond and help households and businesses through this difficult time. The Consumer Price Index released by Stats NZ today showed a 1.7 percent increase in prices over the June quarter, taking the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Govt provides more cost of living support
                                    Petrol excise duty cut by 25 cents a litre for more than five months until 31 January 2023 Road User Charges reduced by the equivalent until 31 January 2023 Half price public transport fares ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Local Government commissioners appointed
    Local Government Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of three commissioners to Mana Kāwanatanga ā Rohe | Local Government Commission. The appointed commissioners are: Brendan Duffy, Chair Bonita Bigham Sue Bidrose The Local Government Commission was initially established in 1947 to consider proposals for local government reorganisation. Over time, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Five lay members of the High Court appointed
    Attorney-General David Parker announced today the appointment of five lay members of the High Court under the Commerce Act 1986.  Lay members assist the Court in cases involving appeals from decisions of the Commerce Commission and in other matters under the Commerce Act, and play a key role in ensuring ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Fish Passage remediation in Tasman District to boost fish numbers and employment
    A joint Government and Tasman District Council project is investing to bring more freshwater fish to the Tasman region, protect local waterways and employ local people. Environment Minister David Parker said the five-year $2 million Tasman Fish Passage project will see more than 4,000 in-stream structures assessed, with around 1,500 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New measures to tackle COVID-19 and flu
    Expanded eligibility for antivirals Making COVID-19 medicines available in pharmacies to help ease pressure on GPs Significantly expanding access to free RATs and masks Schools provided with mask supplies and more support for ventilation and winter heating costs Second COVID-19 booster available to those over 50 Extra measures for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Empowering Pacific Aotearoa to achieve home ownership
    Pacific peoples in Aotearoa are now on the road to achieving their ultimate goal of home ownership, one year after the launch of the Pacific Financial Capability Development programme, said the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio. “We successfully secured funding of up to $41.315 million over four years ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More tools for Police to tackle gangs and intimidating behaviour
    New targeted warrant and additional search powers to find and seize weapons from gang members during a gang conflict Expanding the range of offences where police can seize and impound cars, motorbikes and other vehicles Up to five years prison for a new offence of discharging a gun with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Sustainable manufacturing businesses in Manawatū-Whanganui to receive Govt investment
    Two sustainable manufacturing businesses, Techlam in Levin and Plentyful in Rangitikeī, will receive investment from the Government’s Regional Strategic Partnership Fund (RSPF), Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash announced today. Techlam, a company that manufactures sustainable timber, will receive up to $1.75 million to procure and install machinery for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Drought assistance to Kiribati as drinking water supplies dry up
    Threats to the drinking water supplies of Kiribati from a prolonged drought are being targeted with a joint assistance package from Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia. Foreign Affairs Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today announced that New Zealand and Australia are investing a further NZ$1.1 million between them in a new desalination ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government support for equality and empowerment of Fijian women and girls
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta have announced New Zealand will make a significant contribution to support the implementation of the Fiji Gender Action Programme to advance women’s empowerment and social protection. “Gender equality and women’s empowerment is a priority for Aotearoa New Zealand, and for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Funds for Manuherekia project will help restore waterway’s health
    The Thompsons Creek projects, part of the wider Manuherekia catchment programme in Central Otago, have been granted Jobs for Nature funding to help improve water quality and restore freshwater habitats. It is expected to generate about eight full time equivalent roles across three years. “The Thompsons Creek projects are based ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Final section of the Waikato Expressway now open
    The Hamilton Section of the Waikato Expressway opens today, marking the final chapter of a 30 year roading project that will improve safety, reduce travel times, and boost economic growth, Transport Minister Michael Wood says. “It’s terrific to see the last 22-kilometre piece of the Expressway falling into place. “This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Final section of the Waikato Expressway complete
    The Hamilton Section of the Waikato Expressway will open this week, marking the final chapter of a 30 year roading project that will improve safety, reduce travel times, and boost economic growth, Transport Minister Michael Wood says. “It’s terrific to see the last 22-kilometre piece of the Expressway falling into ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Mountain bike festival gears up with new Govt funding
    An international mountain bike festival will receive Government funding to secure events in Rotorua and across the South Island, offering significant economic, social and cultural benefits to New Zealand, Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash announced today. Crankworx will receive up to $8.1 million from the Government’s Major Events ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Hundreds of Kiwis awarded scholarships to Asia and Latin America
    New Zealand’s connections with Asia and Latin America are set to grow with 30 groups, made up of 387 New Zealanders, awarded Prime Minister’s scholarships, Chris Hipkins said today. “New Zealand is reconnecting with the world, and for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic, New Zealanders will embark on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pacific crop resilience supported though climate aid
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta have announced the first investment from the recently boosted $1.3 billion climate aid fund, a contribution of $10 million to the conservation of Pacific crop seeds impacted by climate change. $10 million will be allocated to the Fiji based Centre ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government announces refreshed Commemorations Programme 2023-2027
    The programme of historical anniversaries to be acknowledged by the New Zealand Government over the next five years includes some of our nation’s most important events, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni said. “We’re continuing to lay the foundations for a better future by ensuring all New Zealanders ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First Peoples International Business Forum – “Looking back to move forward”
    Before I commence, as I did at the beginning of the day, I would once again like to acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land on which we meet, and pay my respects to the original occupants of these ancestral lands, and to the Elders past, present, emerging and yet ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Southland oat milk producer gets Govt boost
    Southland-based oat milk producer New Zealand Functional Foods is getting new Government backing, with a $6 million investment from the Regional Strategic Partnership Fund, Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash announced today. “We set up the Regional Strategic Partnership Fund (RSPF) to help build more productive, resilient, and sustainable ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Past impacts the future of te taetae ni Kiribati
    Kiribati is now in the grip of a disastrous drought while it deals with the impact of Climate Change. This makes Kiribati Language Week 2022 a special time to think about the future ,said the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio. The third of nine Pacific Language Weeks, Wikin ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Under-Secretary to attend the First Peoples International Business Forum in Melbourne
    Parliamentary Under-Secretary Rino Tirikatene will depart to Australia today to attend the First Peoples International Business Forum: Aotearoa New Zealand and Victoria, which runs from 11 to 12 July in Melbourne. The two-day event is being hosted by the Aboriginal Economic Development group (AED), Global Victoria, Dept Jobs, Precinct and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Hillside redevelopment takes major step forward
    A major redevelopment of Dunedin’s iconic Hillside Workshops is on track to have the facility up and running by early 2024, Minister for State Owned Enterprises, Dr David Clark said. The Government is investing $105 million in KiwiRail’s Hillside Workshops – helping restore the site to its former glory by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • PM statement on death of Shinzo Abe, former PM of Japan
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern tonight sent New Zealand’s condolences following the death of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who was shot at a rally today. “New Zealand sends our condolences to Japan at this time of profound grief and deep shock,” Jacinda Ardern said. “This act of violence against ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • PMs reaffirm renewed trans-Tasman relationship
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese met in Sydney this morning for their first annual Australia New Zealand Leaders Meeting. “It was great to meet with Prime Minister Albanese again further cementing the close renewed relationship between Australia and New Zealand,” Jacinda Ardern said. “It is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government appoints Remuneration Authority Chair
    The Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety Michael Wood has today announced the appointment of Geoffrey Summers as the Chair of the Remuneration Authority (the Authority) for a three-year term. The Authority is responsible for setting the rates of pay and allowances for Members of Parliament, the Judiciary and Local ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago