web analytics

Collective bargaining? Yeah right …

Written By: - Date published: 10:30 am, October 26th, 2014 - 11 comments
Categories: employment, law, national, same old national, Unions, workers' rights - Tags:

This is a continuation of my first article about work flexibility and rest and meal breaks. To recap in the earlier piece, it was established that employers will no longer be legally obliged to provide prescribed rest and meal breaks and a reasonable test was introduced in terms of allowing the employer to decide when such breaks can be taken both in timing and duration.

It was also established that the proposals in the Employment Relations Amendment Bill  will modify the Employment Relations Act (ERA) so that it will no longer have the ability to impose penalties on employers who have been found to breach their duty of good faith (in not allowing employees who are entitled to take some form of rest and meal break). Any recourse for the imposition of penalties would likely only be heard in a higher court (such as the employment court).

On the brighter side of things, the provisions that allow for the employee to request for more flexibility in terms of hours of work to suit their lifestyles and for employers to give such requests proper consideration appears to be a step in the right direction.

I would now like to highlight some changes in Collective Bargaining and try and workout what these new provisions could mean for Unions and the workers they represent.

Collective bargaining

The commentary section of the bill which relate to Collective Bargaining states:

Duty to conclude – Clauses 7 to 9 would remove the current provisions to the effect that the duty of good faith requires parties bargaining for a collective agreement to conclude the agreement unless there is genuine reason, based on reasonable grounds, not to. Parties would still be required to deal with each other in good faith, but the change aims to avoid protracted fruitless bargaining that is costly for both sides. The bill would protect against stalemate if the bargaining parties hit an impasse on one issue, as a declaration could be sought from the Employment Relations Authority as to whether bargaining had concluded. To address the possibility that an employer might walk away from bargaining on principle, we recommend amending clause 9 by inserting new section 33(2) to provide that an employer is not complying with the duty of good faith if they refuse to conclude a collective agreement simply because they object in principle to collective bargaining or collective agreements.

Opting out of bargaining – Clause 11 would allow an employer to opt out of bargaining for a multi-employer collective agreement. We recommend an amendment to make it clear that the ability to opt out of bargaining would also apply to bargaining initiated for the purpose of obtaining an employer’s agreement to become party to an already-concluded collective agreement (as provided for in section 56A of the Act). We consider that an employer should have the same opt-out option in this situation as they would if they had been identified as an intended party to the initial bargaining for the collective agreement.

Determination that bargaining has concluded – Clause 12, inserting new section 50K, would allow a party bargaining for a collective agreement to apply to the Employment Relations Authority for a determination as to whether bargaining had concluded. The Authority would be required to consider whether the parties had tried mediation or facilitation to resolve their differences and, in certain circumstances, the Authority would be required to direct that mediation or facilitation be used.

We recommend some amendments to this clause to make it clear how it would align with existing sections of the Act. The Authority can direct parties to facilitation on the grounds set out in existing section 50C(1), unless certain countervailing factors are relevant. The factors specified in proposed new section 50K(2)(c) are the same as those in existing section 159(1)(b) of the Act.

We recommend amending clause 12, new section 50K(3)(a), to make clear the intention that the Authority must (rather than “may”) make a declaration if it finds that bargaining has concluded.

I will now attempt to compare the relevant provisions in the Bill which will supersede the Act and discuss what this could mean for union members.

Good faith – Clauses 7 to 9 of the Bill replaces Section 31 to 33 of the Act

The current provision (s31) stresses the need for “good faith” in any collective bargaining and the need for orderly collective bargaining.

The term “good faith” is integral in setting the tone for any negotiations and is defined (s4) as “… parties to an employment relationship … (a) must deal with each other in good faith … (b) not do anything to mislead or deceive each other or likely to …”.

It stresses that the duty of good faith is “wider in scope than implied mutual obligations of trust and confidence …”. Terms such as “constructive, responsive and communicative relationships” are emphasised in this provision. “Good faith” also applies to any form of bargaining and variation of a collective or individual agreement. This is fairly encompassing and there is an expectation that an employer takes into account the employee’s collective employment interests when changes occur in an employer’s business (eg contracting out work, sell or transfer all or part of the business); making redundancy decisions, providing a union representative access to a work place and the employer to not induce an employee to refrain from being a party to a collective agreement, etc.

There is an expectation that collective agreements need to be concluded (s33) unless there are genuine reasons and reasonable grounds on why it cannot be concluded. s32(ca) states, “even though the union and employer have come to a standstill or reached a deadlock about a matter, they must continue to bargain …  about any other matters on which they have not reached agreement …”

The new provisions repeal the previous s31 and s32 and significantly modifies s33. The duty of good faith (s4) still applies generally but the requirement for parties to conclude a collective agreement has been done away with provided that there are genuine reasons for doing so.

Note that the implied test of reasonableness in the previous paragraph above has been stealthily dropped in this modification. Are the terms “genuine reason” and “reasonable grounds” the one and the same? I’m sure there are lawyers out there who will point out that the two can be mutually exclusive.

Opting out. Clause 11 of the Bill replaces s45 of the Act

The current provision (s45) gives the unions the ability after endorsement from its membership to initiate bargaining with 2 or more employers for a single collective agreement. This type of collective agreement is called a multi-employer collective agreement.

The new provision (cl 11) gives the employers the ability to opt out of such multi-employer collective agreements. They can literally walk away without good reason for not agreeing to be part of such multi-employer collective agreements.

There are unions in the public service (PSA), banking sector (Finsec) and fast food sectors (Service and Food Workers Union, Unite) to name a few, that have many members who work across a wide spectrum of businesses and employers. Most of these unions will have multi-employer collective agreements so that improved conditions fought for its membership can benefit all members.

The removal of the need for employers to engage in such collective agreements basically sets different groupings of the union membership against each other as some employers may ratify agreements that are more favourable to certain groupings of the union membership than others. It would appear that this is a veiled attempt to impose the divide and conquer rule practised by many in the dark arts of management and will likely have the effect of destroying multi-employer collective agreements.

Concluding the collective bargaining process even though it’s not been concluded – new clause 12 of the Bill

A new provision (cl 12) has been inserted that gives the Employment Relations Authority (ERA) to determine that collective bargaining has concluded even if it has not. Talk about an oxymoron!

In saying that, there is a test that needs to be met before the ERA can determine bargaining has been concluded even when in reality it has not. The test is benchmarked against the mediation (s159) and facilitation (s50B to 50I) provisions and the process is overseen by the ERA. Regardless of the outcome as to whether collective bargaining has been deemed to be concluded or not, there is a cooling off period of no less than 60 days before any party can re-initiate the bargaining process.

The drafters say the introduction of this provision is to encourage parties who are in a stalemate to hurry along in terms of finding solutions to ratifying the agreement or risk starting from scratch again. It is not clear what the unintended consequences could be if the ERA were to conclude collective bargaining processes “prematurely”.

This may very well leave employees who are union members exposed to inferior terms and conditions. Does this really incentivise all parties concerned to go back to the drawing board and renegotiate in good faith for best outcomes? Or is it just another way of dragging the chain but placing the onus on the ERA to be the party responsible for prolonging the pain? Or is this an exercise in gauging the union membership’s appetite and endurance for another round of protracted negotiations?

Continuity of employment in the event of a proposed restructure : Clauses 28 to 36 of the Bill amends subpart 1 of Part 6A of the Act

The current provisions require employers who are proposing to restructure the work place to ensure specified classes of employees have the option to elect to transfer to the new employer on the same terms and conditions or have the right to bargain for redundancy entitlements if made redundant by the new employer. These specified classes of employees include but are not limited to employees who work in cleaning services, food catering, care-taking, laundry, orderly services for Education, Health, Local Government sectors, etc. In short, the current law attempts to protect vulnerable workers in sectors where restructuring can be common place.

The new provisions introduces a category called exempt employers who are small to medium sized businesses (19 or fewer employees) from the aforementioned requirement (option to transfer to new employer, etc). This exemption applies for any sale between small to medium sized businesses as these businesses would all be classed as exempt employers.

It would appear that some measure of protection for the most vulnerable workers has been left intact but and this is a big “But” only if the business is transferred or sold to a large business/corporation. What this means is that these protections are pretty much useless if businesses get sold or transferred within the small to medium sector. Anecdotally, it would appear that a significant number of employees in these sectors are employed by small to medium sized businesses. So, in actual fact, the reality of this change is likely to result in a significant abrogation of the vulnerable worker’s rights to have some semblance of continued employment when such a “restructure transaction” occurs.

Conclusion

The slow and steady chipping away of collectivism and solidarity – the power base of unionism is further eroded by these provisions. It is not quite the last nail in the coffin for the union movement yet but the scales have certainly been tilted in favour of employers yet again which is the modus operandi for the current administration – no surprises really. For some on the right, the changes made in favour of employers to the detriment of employees are not nearly far reaching enough and there needs to be more – much more. Already, the stark reality for most employees is to take on more responsibility with no corresponding recognition in remuneration and/or conditions in pursuit of that old chestnut, “efficiency and productivity gains”.

Most employees are expected to commit to working in excess of what their contract specifies – Heck, most contracts even have provisions written in them that provides a catch all with obligations to undertake duties above and beyond the call of duty. The overarching narrative would appear to strengthen the hand of the employer with these raft of changes which is likely to cast a long and foreboding shadow to employees writ large – especially the marginalised and vulnerable work force.

On Labour day, I think it is important to acknowledge and reflect on the many protections we enjoy and take for granted as workers. And by workers, I also mean the managerial class which quite often reflects the embodiment of false consciousness. The old adage, “We’re all in this together” applies to you lot too.

The protections that we enjoy can be severely eroded or lost when practices become entrenched. It becomes significantly harder for subsequent left leaning governments to turn the tide and reinstate the protections and rights employees used to have once these practices become entrenched.

It pays to be mindful that changes to legislation by this cascading effect can lead to an acceptance of a new regime that will have deleterious consequences for our rights to challenge unsavoury practices imposed by employers.

It is my hope that the opposition parties and especially the media scrutinise these reforms and ask the hard questions and not settle for smoke screen replies. I cannot stress enough, in our era of obfuscation and spin doctoring to hold the policy makers to account, otherwise we will continually relinquish our rights and eventually find ourselves being serfs in a dystopian like Aotearoa.

JAmooches

11 comments on “Collective bargaining? Yeah right … ”

  1. karol 1

    Thanks very much for his important analysis. This part of the conclusion is the really important bit for people to attend to:

    The slow and steady chipping away of collectivism and solidarity – the power base of unionism is further eroded by these provisions. It is not quite the last nail in the coffin for the union movement yet but the scales have certainly been tilted in favour of employers yet again which is the modus operandi for the current administration – no surprises really.

    And its why as many people as possible need to get behind the campaign against this latest erosion of workers’ rights.

  2. Foreign Waka 2

    A change in the Employment law will erode the income of workers. Given that they pay the majority of taxes, it will lead to ministers not able to be paid in the current structure but bought by big business. So in that sense NZ is not a Democracy anymore. The political impact of the ever decreasing means of making a living, leading to premature death and chronic illness will impact on the social structure and most likely to internal unrest within the country. If this political landscape does not change it will be mayhem in 20 years time. Mr Key, this will be your legacy and it is not something to be proud of.

    • Skinny 3.1

      Little gets it about ‘Work’ none of the other leadership contenders really do. The way we work means everything. The rate things are happening with the likes of casualization and now zero hours, workers will be tendering for a couple of hours work a day.

      I am quite critical of the CTU who in my opinion have been weak since it’s concept. Far too PC. Kelly should be talking up on the likes of the Nation and National radio things such as ” Who can blame workers for mass industrial action over the current attacks, the Tories in the UK just got a taste of a mass walk out of workers, they simply took the view that they weren’t prepared to take it without a fight, so workers here may think it’s time to hit the bricks here”. Of course Unions and her as head of the CTU can’t be calling the shots, however nothing stopping the workers. It’s not like the Bosses are going sack the workforce if they all stick together.

      • KJT 3.1.1

        Do you blame them as anyone calling for strike action is likely to end up with large fines, if not imprisoned, as withdrawing your labour is effectively illegal in New Zealand..

  3. Tracey 4

    enshrining low income and low skilled workers as peasants, by stealth… its why a third terms was SO important… and why the LP decision to have kelvin davis at any cost and not accomodate greens and talk alternatives with greens is SO costly

  4. Tracey 5

    rodney hide writing selective history to advance his anti union stance in the herald today…

    like many his reading comprhension is at best lacking and at worst selective.

    parnell demanded an 8 hour day for himself due to lack of carpenters but he then represented this stance for those who arrived later. hide leaves this out. parnell told employers arriving that 8 hours was the custom and those ignoring it would be dunked in the harbour.

    “… … Other employers tried to impose longer hours, but Parnell enlisted the support of other workmen and informed those arriving on incoming ships of the local custom. In October 1840 a meeting of Wellington workmen apparently resolved to work eight hours a day, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. – anyone offending would be ducked into the harbour.”

    hide claims labour day is wrongly celebrated as a union victory when he claims it was merely market forces and not unions

    but for hides version of history to work he had to omit the following

    “.. By 1890 the eight-hour working day had become standard for tradesmen and labourers, but many other employees still worked much longer hours. The Labour Day parades that began that October were part of a union campaign to force the government to restrict working hours by law rather than custom. The Labour Day Act 1899 established a statutory holiday, which is today celebrated on the fourth Monday in October…. ”

    http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/people/samuel-parnell

    the truth wont matter… hide achieved his anti rant propaganda with flawed history

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Canterbury school students get hands-on with food and fibre careers
    Secondary school students in Canterbury will have the breadth of food and fibre careers showcased to them thanks to a new initiative launched today, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor said. Secondary School Employer Partnerships (SSEP) Canterbury is a collaboration between the Ministry for Primary Industries and SmartNZ, a charitable trust that connects ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Tuvalu language revival and COVID-19
    Te Vaiaso o te Gana Tuvalu 2021 - Tuvalu Language Week moves online due to the uncertainty around COVID-19 said the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio.  “However it is a timely reminder of the power of embracing both traditional and new ways of doing things. It has been ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Strengthened reporting will improve abortion and sterilisation services
    Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall has announced new data and reporting regulations which will help improve abortion and sterilisation services in New Zealand, by painting a clearer picture of the need in our communities. “The Government is committed to ensuring everyone who needs to access abortion services can, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • United Nations General Assembly: 76th General Debate Statement
    E ngā Mana, e ngā Reo, Rau Rangatira mā o tēnei Whare Nui o te Ao Prestigious people, Speakers of note, Chiefs one and all of this General Assembly Ngā mihi mahana ki o koutou katoa, mai i toku Whenua o Aotearoa Warm greetings to you all from my home ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • APEC 2021 Women and the Economy Forum prioritises women’s economic empowerment
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today chaired the virtual APEC 2021 Women and the Economy Forum, which is working to address outstanding issues for women and girls across the region as it recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic. The forum brought together Ministers and representatives from 21 economies to discuss gender ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Upper Hauraki to move to Alert Level 2
    Upper Hauraki will move to Alert Level 2 from 11:59pm tomorrow, 25 September, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. After positive cases were detected in the Upper Hauraki area on Sunday, extra Alert Level restrictions were put in place to immediately prevent any wider transmission of the virus.  “We’ve ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Report into Aotearoa New Zealand’s export controls system released
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today welcomed the findings of an independent review into Aotearoa New Zealand’s export controls system, which regulates the export of goods to foreign militaries, police forces or paramilitaries. Produced by David Smol, a former Chief Executive of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New District Court Judge appointed
    Attorney-General David Parker has announced the appointment of Brett Crowley of Wellington as a District Court Judge.  He is currently the Wellington Public Defender and started his career as a staff solicitor working in a range of litigation including criminal defence work. He went to the bar in 1999 specialising ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Mental health stocktake shows strong progress
    The first report of the Government’s Implementation Unit has found strong progress has been made since the Mental Health and Addictions Package was announced in 2019. “The report notes most initiatives funded in the Budget 2019 package are on track to deliver what is expected by 2023/24,” Grant Robertson said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Working together to grow the West Coast
    A project that has been crucial in allowing businesses to continue during the tourism downturn is among a number of initiatives to receive a boost from the Government’s Jobs For Nature programme, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. Sustaining South Westland is an extension of an initiative set up last year ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Next steps to improve safety in wake of Whakaari White Island tragedy
    The Government is moving to improve safety in light of the Whakaari White Island tragedy and has released proposals to reinforce safety standards in registered adventure activities. The package of proposals includes: Strengthening requirements for how operators, landowners and the regulator manage natural hazard risks Improving how risks are monitored, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand donates more COVID-19 vaccines to COVAX and the Pacific
    Foreign Affairs Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta and Associate Health Minister Aupito William Sio announced today that New Zealand is donating additional Pfizer vaccines to the Pacific and AstraZeneca vaccines to the COVAX Facility, to support equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines. “New Zealand is donating 708,000 doses of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech to the Property Council of New Zealand
    Kia ora koutou katoa   Is it a pleasure to be able to speak with you today, and to be able to answer some questions you may have. I would like to acknowledge the organisers of this event, the Property Council. The theme of this year’s conference is City Shapers. Together ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Additional MIQ for Christchurch
    An additional hotel will be added to our network of managed isolation and quarantine facilities, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “I have approved and Cabinet is in the final stages of signing off The Quality Hotel Elms in Christchurch as a new managed isolation facility,” Chris Hipkins said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • NZ COVID-19 response earns another major digital investment
    Minister for the Digital Economy and Communications Dr David Clark welcomes Amazon’s Web Services’ (AWS) decision to establish a Cloud Region on New Zealand shores, further boosting New Zealand’s growing digital sector, and providing a vote of confidence in the direction of New Zealand’s economic recovery. “Amazon is the second ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Zealand invests in cutting edge cancer R&D
    Scaling up the manufacture of CAR T-cell cancer therapy for clinical trials Advancing New Zealand’s biomedical manufacturing capability Supporting future international scientific collaborations Transforming cancer care with targeted, affordable solutions Research, Science and Innovation Minister Hon Dr Megan Woods has announced that the fight against COVID-19 will not stop the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Expert group appointed to lead New Zealand’s future health system
    An outstanding group of people with extensive and wide-ranging governance and health experience have been appointed to lead the Māori Health Authority and Health New Zealand, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “This Government is building a truly national health system to provide consistent, high-quality health services right across the country. This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Funding to help clean up contaminated sites
    The Government is supporting the clean-up of contaminated sites in Northland, Dunedin and Southland to reduce risk to people’s health and protect the environment. Environment Minister David Parker said the funding announced today, through the Contaminated Sites Remediation Fund, will help us turn previously hazardous sites into safe, usable public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Predator Free apprenticeships open up new job opportunities
    The expansion of a predator free apprenticeship programme is an opportunity for more people to kick-start a conservation career, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “The Predator Free Apprenticeship Programme is focused on increasing the number of skilled predator control operators in New Zealand through a two-year training programme. “The Trust ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Further NCEA support confirmed for Auckland students
    The number of Learning Recognition Credits for senior secondary school students will be increased for Auckland students, Education Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. This recognises the extended time these students will spend in Alert Levels 3 and 4. “It means students in Auckland will have a fair opportunity to attain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Long-term pathway next step to better mental wellbeing for New Zealanders
    The Government is taking a new approach to support people who experience mental distress, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “Kia Manawanui Aotearoa – Long-term pathway to mental wellbeing (Kia Manawanui) is the first 10-year plan of its kind that targets the cause of mental distress and also sets out how ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Keeping our Police safe to keep our communities safe
    The Government is committed to keeping our frontline police officers safe, so they in turn can keep New Zealanders safe – with one of the largest investments in frontline safety announced by Police Minister Poto Williams at the Police College today.   The $45 million investment includes $15.496 million in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Clean Vehicles Bill passes first checkpoint
    The Land Transport (Clean Vehicles) Amendment Bill will help New Zealand drive down transport emissions by cleaning up the light vehicle fleet, Transport Minister Michael Wood says. The Bill passed its first reading today and will establish the legislative framework for key parts of the Government’s Clean Car Package, including ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Funding boost supports ongoing Māori COVID-19 response
    The Government is responding to the need by whānau Māori and Māori Health providers to support their ongoing work responding to COVID-19 and to continue increasing rates of Māori vaccination, Associate Minister for Health (Māori Health), Peeni Henare and Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson announced today.   This increased ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Significant increase to COVID-19 penalties
    Penalties for breaches of COVID-19 orders are set to significantly increase from early November 2021 to better reflect the seriousness of any behaviour that threatens New Zealand’s response to the virus, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Throughout this Delta outbreak we’ve seen the overwhelming majority of people doing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Counter-Terrorism Legislation Bill returns to Parliament
    The Counter-Terrorism Legislation Bill has returned to Parliament for its second reading in an important step towards giving enforcement agencies greater power to protect New Zealanders from terrorist activity. “The Bill addresses longstanding gaps in our counter terrorism legislation that seek to protect New Zealanders and make us safer,” Justice ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Joint Statement: New Zealand and Australian Trade Ministers
    Hon Damien O'Connor MP, New Zealand Minister for Trade and Export Growth, and Hon Dan Tehan MP, Australian Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment, met virtually on Monday 20 September to advance trans-Tasman cooperation under the Australia-New Zealand Closer Economic Relations Trade Agreement (CER). CER is one of the most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Prime Minister’s Post Cabinet Press Conference/COVID-19 Update opening statement
    ***Please check against delivery***   E te tī, e te tā, nau mai rā [To all, I bid you welcome]   As you will have seen earlier, today there are 22 new community cases to report; three of which are in Whakatiwai in the Hauraki area, and the remainder in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Major milestones for Māori COVID-19 vaccine rollout as new campaign launches
    Whānau Ora and Associate Health (Māori Health) Minister Peeni Henare acknowledges two major milestones in the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccination programme for Māori. “I am very pleased to announce more than 50 percent of eligible Māori have received their first dose and 25 per cent are now fully vaccinated,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government funding to fight infectious diseases
    $36 million for research into Covid-19 and other infectious diseases The investment will improve our readiness for future pandemics Research will focus on prevention, control, and management of infectious diseases The Government’s investing in a new Infectious Diseases Research Platform to boost Aotearoa New Zealand’s Covid-19 response and preparedness for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Quarantine-free travel with Australia to remain suspended for a further 8 weeks
    Suspension to be reviewed again mid to late November Decision brought forward to enable access from Australia to first tranche of around 3000 rooms in MIQ Air New Zealand working at pace to put on more flights from Australia from October    The suspension of quarantine-free travel (QFT) with Australia has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Extra support for Ethnic Communities to share vaccination information
    Extra support is being made available to Ethnic Communities to help them share COVID-19 vaccination information within their communities, Minister for Diversity, Inclusion and Ethnic Communities Priyanca Radhakrishnan said. “We know we need to get every eligible person in New Zealand vaccinated. A fund being launched today will allow for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • School holidays remain unchanged for Auckland region
    School holidays in Auckland will continue to be held at the same time as the rest of the country, starting from Saturday, 2 October, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “I’ve carefully considered advice on the implications of shifting the dates and concluded that on balance, maintaining the status quo ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government continues crackdown on gangs and organised crime
    Operation Tauwhiro extended until March 2022 Since it was launched in February, Operation Tauwhiro has resulted in:   987 firearms seized $4.99 million in cash seized 865 people charged with a firearms-related offence Gangs and organised crime groups will continue to be relentlessly targeted with the extension of Police’s successful ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to Body Positive 'HIV Treatments Update Seminar 2021'
    E ngā mana E ngā reo E ngā iwi Tēnā koutou katoa Ka huri ki ngā mana whenua o te rohe nei. Tēnā koutou. He mihi hoki ki a tatou kua tau mai nei I raro I te kaupapa o te rā. Nō reira tēnā koutou katoa Acknowledgements It’s a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Power bill changes bring fairness to charges
    A key recommendation of an independent panel to make electricity charges fairer across all households will be put in place, the Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods has announced. “Phasing out the regulations on ‘low-use’ electricity plans will create a fairer playing field for all New Zealanders and encourage a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZ economy’s strong momentum will support rebound from Delta outbreak; COVID fund replenished
    The economy showed strong momentum in the period leading up to the recent Delta COVID-19 outbreak, which bodes well for a solid economic rebound, Grant Robertson said. GDP rose 2.8 percent in the June quarter, following on from a 1.4 percent increase in the previous March quarter. This was a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Projects create benefits into the future
    Making a well-known lake swimmable and helping to halt the decline of the endangered hoiho/yellow-eyed penguins are among a suite of new projects being supported by the Government’s Jobs for Nature programme across the southern South Island, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “It’s no secret that many of our most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Opening statement for Whāriki Indigenous Small Business Roundtable
      Kei ngā tōpito e wha o te āo e rere ana te mihi maioha ki a koutou nō tawhiti, nō tata mai e tāpiri ana ki tēnei taumata kōrero mo te ao hokohoko arā mā ngā pākihi mo ngā iwi taketake Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa – Pai Mārire.  ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New members appointed to Kāpuia
    The Government is adding four additional members to Kāpuia, the Ministerial Advisory Group on the Government’s Response to the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the terrorist attack on Christchurch mosques. “I’m looking forward to having Pamela MacNeill, Huia Bramley, Melani Anae and Katherine Dedo  join Kāpuia and contribute to this group’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago