Ironically, nothing ever goes right for Roger

Written By: - Date published: 5:35 pm, February 9th, 2009 - 60 comments
Categories: scoundrels - Tags:

Roger Douglas has his big debut speech tomorrow night in Orewa. He’s been working hard and sucking the (tax payer funded) parliamentary library resources dry to get it right. The speech, which promises to restart the neoliberal revolution, is embargoed until he delivers it to a breathless crowd tomorrow night. You can read it here. Turns out he’s got nothing but the same old discredited ideological dribbling. Even his “facts” are wrong. Nothing ever goes right for Roger.

60 comments on “Ironically, nothing ever goes right for Roger”

  1. Which particular facts are wrong?

  2. sweeetdisorder 2

    With out even reading the speech…..

    Firstly, Who broke the embargo? and why?

    Secondly, a Roger speaking on TV makes a much better story than a print version in scoop. This will play on all the TV news tomorrow night (assume Roger speaks before 6pm to allow the TV crews time to record and make comment)

    Thirdly, Scoop, Schmoop, only for poli geeks, not mainstream.

  3. the sprout 3

    hilarious.

    “This will play on all the TV news tomorrow night”

    ah… yeah… right mate. 25 year old speech, delivered by our most boring political speaker of all time, and broken a day before it’s delivered.

    can’t see tv news editors going near it with a barge poll.

    who’s the gimp paid to be his press sec?

  4. Felix 4

    Thirdly, Scoop, Schmoop, only for poli geeks, not mainstream.

    And Roger is for the “mainstream”? Yeah right.

  5. Kelsey 5

    Wow, reading this reminds me how disappointing Sir Rog isn’t in government. I agree with Dr. Brash – he’s our greatest living NZer. Finally, someone that actually wants to improve the conditions of everyone.

    Was IrishBill planning on actually indicating which facts were incorrect?

  6. Kerry 6

    Why isnt he sedated and locked up in an Old Peoples Home?? Cause thats where he should be…..rambling on to the other oldies who cant escape or who are skipping through a field of poppies in their heads.

  7. Felix 7

    reading this reminds me how disappointing Sir Rog isn’t in government.

    ????

    In what sense is he not?

  8. IrishBill 8

    BB, Facts like “Any increase that workers receive beyond productivity increases will merely exacerbate unemployment.”

    Productivity was (slightly) decreased in the last ten years compared to the ten before that. And yet unemployment shrunk in the 2000’s and grew in the 90’s. does that mean the real world is wrong or is Roger? Hint: it’s not the real world.

    “Labour increased the costs to hire and employ workers, and told us these policies were employee benefits. They were benefits for people in jobs, but hurdles for those out of work. They will now act as a major barrier to re-employment for those who lose their jobs.”

    Yes of course, Roger. That’s why we’ve had low unemployment throughout the ERA years. Even now, heading into a recession, the unemployment rate is much lower than it was for most of the 90’s (when we had Roger’s mates making it “cheaper” to employ workers).

    There are plenty more errors here but I can’t be bothered listing them. Maybe I’ll do a post on them tomorrow. After all, I’ve got nearly 23 hours before it hits the news.

  9. Mr Magoo 9

    I heard him on sunday radio. Him and fran osullivan teamed up to say that privatisation worked and that SOEs underperformed against their state sector counterparts. Fran lept in with saying that National should revoke their promise not to privatise because of “exeptional times”.

    Telecom was mentioned. Rodger simply said it was the government’s fault for changing the rules etc.

    It was pathetic. The only reason he is still here is a lame attempt at justifying his ridiculous and wrong headed point of view of the past.

  10. BLiP 10

    That speech is an almost direct lift from his 1980 masterpiece “There Has To Be A Better Way”.

    Douglas has not shifted his thinking in 30 years – despite reams and reams and reams of hard data that show he was wrong and we are still suffering as a result.

    Greatest Living New Zealander? Douglas should be strung up at No 1 The Terrace and his rotting corpse hanged in the foyer as a reminder to those trolls who inhabit that evil place of what becomes of those who seek to make the rich richer and poor poorer. Then there will be justice.

  11. Kelsey 11

    Felix – I mean not in cabinet. ACT is in government but he’s on the periphery.

    If his policies are failures – then please, name a single policy of his that has been repealed by 9 years of Labour. Just one.

    IrishBill: the three tier tax system, total deregulation of the dollar, privatisation of rail. There’s three to start with. Most of his policies were asset sales that couldn’t be reversed. Plenty of the policy he influenced (as a mentor of Richardson) in the 1990’s has been turned back.

  12. IrishBill 12

    SD, scoop broke the embargo. Probably done by a non-journo content loader by mistake. But it’s not their fault because nobody in their right mind sends scoop embargoed media releases. Here’s a tip for Roger’s intern media advisor: when you send embargoed copies, send them to your list of trusted journos not your main list. If you must send an embargoed copy to scoop then do so by contacting Alister or Kevin directly.

    I guess this show that we can’t expect a hasbeen dinosaur like Rog to be able to function in a modern political environment.

  13. BLiP 13

    Kelsey said:

    ” . . . If his policies are failures – then please, name a single policy of his that has been repealed by 9 years of Labour. Just one. . . . ”

    How about the sale of state assets that had to be repurchased by the government after the private sector bilked them?

  14. Felix 14

    Kelsey, of course he’s on the periphery. He’s barking fucking mad. But he is in government.

    Is the question about his policies directed to me? Why?

  15. vto 15

    Well from the part that I read it seemed to make sense. Which is perhaps why labour never really did it for me over the past nine years. So much of their policy action just seemed, well, pretty dumb really. Driven by ideology and arrogant politics rather than reality on the ground.

    He is easy to dismiss with abuse (old age, dinosaur, etc a-la kiwiblog style you hypocrites) but try prising those welded ideology blinkers off and think / observe objectively for a change.

    Last labour govt – biggest waste in NZ’s history.

  16. Dean 16

    “Greatest Living New Zealander? Douglas should be strung up at No 1 The Terrace and his rotting corpse hanged in the foyer as a reminder to those trolls who inhabit that evil place of what becomes of those who seek to make the rich richer and poor poorer. Then there will be justice.”

    Another quote to add to the pile when people on here pretend to be morally superior to the “kiwiblog right”.

  17. IrishBill 17

    vto, he makes at least a half a dozen statements that are tangibly, empirically wrong. That’s delusional. Plain and simple.

  18. Dean 18

    “vto, he makes at least a half a dozen statements that are tangibly, empirically wrong. That’s delusional. Plain and simple.”

    Need we quote Helen or Michael on tax cuts – which they later seemed to forget – to embarass you IB?

  19. TghtyRighty 19

    so funny to come here and watch hypocrisy at work as the left slay the character of only two of the sensible people to ever appear on that side of the spectrum. you all can’t stand it when someone has a crack at dear leader, but you ruthlessly mock and assassinate the character of Mr Douglas. This man bravely managed this country to the point that the fourth labour government could then lie around on easy street and suck the fat out. Roger Douglas did more good for this country than Helen, Michael, Mike, H2 and all the rest of them ever did, or could have dreamed of doing.

  20. IrishBill 20

    Dean, for a start I’m not embarrassed by the comments of politicians I have never voted for. Beyond that I don’t recall either of them making statements about New Zealand’s economy that were directly and materially refutable.

  21. vto 21

    IB I heard him on national radio in the w.e. too and he did sound a bit like Prebble I have to admit. Thing is – these old codgers do often make more sense than anyone else, but they just dither with spitting it out. Which doesn’t come across too well.

    And I pull back (a little) on my waste of time re labour – they weren’t quite that bad. The common sense of previous times needed a little restraint to prevent excessive actions. And to make people remember other parts of the community. Which has now happened so its back to sensible policies.

    out (to watch a luv story hee hee)

  22. Dean 22

    “Dean, for a start I’m not embarrassed by the comments of politicians I have never voted for. Beyond that I don’t recall either of them making statements about New Zealand’s economy that were directly and materially refutable.”

    You have absolutely got to be joking.

    Not about the not voting for them part, because I can believe that.

    Are you honestly saying you’ve never heard Helen or Michael talk about tax cuts being bad?

    Really?

  23. Fran O'Sullivan 23

    Get a grip – He sounded like Prebble – because he was Prebble. Not Roger.

  24. IrishBill 24

    vto, I’m the last one to cast stones regarding old codgerness, it’s Douglas’ absolute denial of reality not his age that I’m criticising. Have a good time at the flicks.

    Hey, Fran, welcome back. Are you going to cover Roger’s speech? Any sneak previews of your analysis? I’ve been liking your call for concrete action lately although I doubt it would be the action I’d like.

  25. Quoth the Raven 25

    vto – Roger’s record is one of inequality, of the rich getting richer and everyone else, middle – lower classes getting poorer. I/S sums it up here. Some of the points:

    New Zealand’s gini coefficient (a common statistical measure of income inequality) rose significantly between 1986 and 1996, indicating greater inequality. This happened no matter how you slice it, whether you look at individuals or households, market, gross or disposable income.

    But it’s worse than that, because the same trend is evident in people’s actual disposable incomes. Only the top three deciles of personal income earners earned more in real terms than they did in 1986. Everybody else got poorer, and in some cases remarkably so (Fig 4.7 – though I should note that this is market income and doesn’t take transfers into account. The actual interpretation of those low deciles halving their market income is more people driven onto benefits)

    Poverty has increased – in 1986, only 16% of families fell below the 1996 lower quintile benchmark. In 1996, it’s by definition 20%.

    That outcome of rogernomics was the bulk of people being relatively worse off whilst the rich made off like bandits. That was not only the outcome of those policies but the intention of those policies.

  26. IrishBill 26

    Dean, tax cuts were bad in 2005 and 2006 and most of 2007. You don’t cut taxes at the peak of a cycle where there is no productive capacity left and a massive skills shortage because they only increase inflation. There’s nowhere else for them to go.

  27. bobo 27

    I’m still looking forward to those awkward 1980s white board sessions Roger was so good at. The whole Private vs Public is as dated as the trickle down theory, does Roger have any predictions on when the US dollar will fall over? this time next year maybe?

  28. Dancer 28

    I wonder if John Ansell was assisting (given the “guts to do what’s right” line in the speech). Remember that it reflects his previous work

  29. Rex Widerstrom 29

    Not so sure this is just a snafu… otherwise what’s with all the truncated paras like:

    New Zealanders who opt in will be guaranteed that they will not receive less in the new system than they would ha

    Looks like a draft to me. Which suggests a leak.

    An interesting take on things, and I think it’s a little unfair to call it outdated… the solutions he’s offering could be applied to today’s problems (which is not to say they should) just as other economic theorems far older than his are being debated as potentially offering some answers.

    Plus, dismissing them as outdated or even debating them point by point distracts from what’s really wrong with them, at least IMHO. Because while I’m all for some things to which he refers (the truncated passage about individual superannuation accounts, for one), and disgaree equally as strongly with him in other parts (where he disses R&D tax credits, for instance) something else concerns me much more.

    Nowhere does Douglas talk about the need to share the burden for getting us out of this recession. In fact he takes the exactly the same attitude for which he criticises the EPMU and others – except in Roger’s view it’s the workers who should pay the entire cost of resuscitating the economy.

    To quote Steve Pierson quoting Fran O’Sullivan:

    …there is no suggestion that boards of directors presented with ‘restructuring plans’ should ensure management does its bit. No sign either of any proposal to ask shareholders to take reduced dividends to help secure the long-term viability of their enterprise and its employees.

    I’m not concerned from any ideological perspective but rather because I fear that if the burden isn’t shared amongst executives, shareholders and workers then many enterprises which could survive and recover will collapse, causing irreparable economic harm.

    I’d have hoped Douglas could have taken off the blinkers sufficiently to see what’s happening around him. Clearly not… unless the final speech is very different.

  30. ieuan 30

    To save people the trouble of reading the speech he basically says slash tax and move health and ACC costs on to individuals.

    Nice if you can afford it, stuffed if you can’t.

    And just to show that he doesn’t want to throw the low paid on the scrap heap he is proposing a guaranteed minimum income for families. This after criticising working for families.

    His policies are guaranteed to do one thing, make the rich richer and the poor poorer, nice guy, why does anyone listen to him?

  31. Bill 31

    “…..I fear that if the burden isn’t shared amongst executives, shareholders and workers then many enterprises which could survive and recover will collapse, causing irreparable economic harm.”

    And an indication of the possibility of that happening just might be the fact that the Labour government in Britain has given 500 billion pounds to the banks,

    40 million pounds to bail out charities http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2009/feb/09/charities-recession

    and is still trying to privatise Social Welfare http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2009/feb/08/labour-welfare-jobs-plan.

    Which all points to the obvious; that capital ( in cahoots with government) will protect profits at the expense of flushing everything and everyone else down the drain.

    Irreparable economic damage? Yes, But irreparable economic damage visited upon on our oh so important masters and their interests? Absolutely not! In fact, it’s unthinkable.

    It’s just us expendables that are expected cop it.

  32. Pascal's bookie 32

    ieuan,

    His policies are guaranteed to do one thing, make the rich richer and the poor poorer, nice guy, why does anyone listen to him?

    Roger sees that the problems we are having with the global economy have been caused by the fact that the richest people don’t have enough money.

    From the scoop version of the speech:

    A problem:

    1) Labour started in 1999 with one of the most simple tax systems in the world with a broad tax base. It destroyed this simplicity by introducing complex Working for Families tax credits, re-introducing failed subsidy programs like the Research and Development tax credits, and making the taxation department responsible for transfer programmes like KiwiSaver.

    The solution to which is : create and administer an entirely new tax system that will run in parallel with the existing system:

    Individuals should have the ability to opt in to the new system. Individuals who like high tax rates and monopoly-run health, welfare, education, and superannuation services can stick with the old system. But if you want to opt out of that failing system, then you should be able to have a lower tax burden in exchange for taking personal responsibility over your life.

    What we do with those inevitable ones of us that opt for the low tax option, but don’t get themselves enough insurance? Watch their kids starve I suppose, as an encouragement to the others!

  33. The Fox 33

    O’Sullivan’s collumns in the Herald are usually beyond parody. She’s still having a Mills and Boon style romance with Chicago School economics while conspicuously ignoring the fact whole morally bankrupt philosophy is totally shagged out after one cluster fuck orgy too many. Well they say love is blind eh?

  34. mattyroo 34

    Pretty bloody good speech by the great Roger Douglas, only thing he has missed, is a CGT. We need to create more liquidity in the economy and have that money invested in businesses. If some in the middle class get burnt, so what, they should’ve understood risk when they rushed into the housing bubble, although if they went to the same economics school as Clinton Smith, then one can understand why a lot of them are losing their shirts right now.

    Even you thick lefties cannot argue against this most simple of statements:

    “Any increase that workers receive beyond productivity increases will merely exacerbate unemployment.”

    IrishBill: it doesn’t need to be argued. The last ten years in real world NZ have proved it wrong. And you’re on warning for needlessly insulting the blog owners.

  35. Rex Widerstrom 35

    Bill:

    Which all points to the obvious; that capital ( in cahoots with government) will protect profits at the expense of flushing everything and everyone else down the drain.

    That seems to be the misguided approach of much of capital but by no means all. In Australia at least one union and one business realise that radical solutions are needed and have jointly approached the government to pay wages and training costs for workers on days the company is forced to halt production.

    That’s only feasible when you have a surplus the size of Australia’s of course (which Rudd seems determined to waste on handouts to consumers to buy plasma TVs) but at least it points to a willingness of (some) capital and (some) workers to strive for solutions outside the class war.

    It’s disappointing that (some of) our political leaders can’t set aside the traditional playbook and come to terms with the fact that if anyone loses too much, we could all end up losing everything. And that includes capital. Skills shortages constrain growth (and thus profits) during booms – assuming companies can even survive, considering masses of unemployed people can’t consume.

  36. vto 36

    I seriously struggle with the idea that health and education are too important to leave to the private sector. If that is so then how come two even more important aspects of life on earth are quite happily left to the private sector – the provision of food and shelter?

    Imagine if the govt was responsible for the provision of food and shelter. How much would a loaf of bread cost? How long would it take to get a house built? Ha ha, doesn’t even bear thinking about.

    So, apply the same logic to health and education… which I’m sure will not be possible … quelle horreur …

    (with a safety net for those who cannot look after themselves of course)

  37. ieuan 37

    VTO – Peoples requirements for food and shelter are predictable and the costs generally reasonable and manageable.

    The cost of health is totally the opposite, the vast majority need very little in health care but for some extremely expensive and necessary health care is needed. Really I wonder why anyone would debate that an all private system for health care is better for this country, just look at the mess that is health care in the US!

    As for education, this is the great leveler in society and access to a cheap, quality education system is one of the things that gives everyone a fair chance in life.

    As I said earlier Roger Douglas is all about making the rich richer and the poor poorer and that is something we definitely don’t need.

  38. Mr Magoo 38

    The Fox: here here!

    It is complete and utter drivel. That Sunday radio show was as delusional as it was embarassing. Just because you can parrot out a tired old dogma, it does not make you an expert.
    The failure of that mentality is playing out on a world wide scale. It originated in the richest country in world and thus the country that had the best chance by a long margin of making it work.
    It did not and even greenspan is saying it was all a big, hairy mistake.

    And after all this they STILL parrot out the same old trash. Saying how their ideas are different because of X and blah blah blah.
    Take the telecom example on the radio interview. They just finished saying how SOEs should all be sold off because they were “underperforming” compared to the private ones and when telecom is mentioned it is a case of “well that was different”. What about power? What about water? All different also I suppose?
    All this also ignores the job layoffs, money going overseas and al the other great things that HAVE COME from privatising such companies. Great for the Phillipines, not so great for NZ at the moment.

    Total. Crap.

    Then they go on to attack the cullen fund and how we should gut the country’s retirement fund for unexplained reasons. Because of course we want to have the social security mess that the US has right now?
    Oh wait…there will be no super of course.

    It is tired, it is wrong. In the end all one can assume is that this is just pandering to an out of touch audience who likes what is being said for purely self indulgent reasons.
    Gets votes, sells articles I guess. Some one has to fill the gap, right?

  39. lukas 39

    IB, how is it relevant to the discussion that the parliamentary library was used to prepare the speech? Are you saying that ACT MP’s should not be allowed to use it? Or maybe only MP’s from parties who you agree with can use it?

  40. Stephen 40

    And just to show that he doesn’t want to throw the low paid on the scrap heap he is proposing a guaranteed minimum income for families. This after criticising working for families.

    Er yeah, anyone in the know want to point out the difference between the two?

  41. Jum 41

    vto
    February 10, 2009 at 8:26 am

    That’s what I liked about our democracy under Clark. Enough individual responsibility and freedom for everyone without the Douglas’ and Richardson’s trying to turn it into the black hole of freemarket thinking, where the only people with freedom are the rich and the only people with responsibility are the powerless.

    Food and shelter left to the market… Didn’t you spot the wee comparison in the paper about the income for the grower and the strangely disparate huge income for the supermarkets? I’m not into communism which you are so obvious about hinting at which wasn’t what Labour is about, but if the Government did look after food the growers would get more than they are now and the supermarkets/shareholders/businessroundtable would get less which is what they deserve as parasites on the back of the growers/transporters.

  42. vto 42

    Jum and ieuan, big topic which I shouldn’t have started as I have no time today to continue it. I do think tho that Douglas et al ideas have great merit but lacked in their initial implementation leading to the known problems with parts of it. A case of devil in the detail etc. And now of course those ideas struggle for traction becuase of that poor, and probably excessive, implementation.

    Things work better when the people involved have responsibility. Transfer that responsibility to someone else and things fall apart.

  43. burt 43

    Jum

    I think you missed two words, I have inserted them in bold for you.

    That’s what I liked about our retrospectively validated democracy under Clark.

  44. BLiP 44

    Lukas said:

    ” . . . how is it relevant to the discussion that the parliamentary library was used to prepare the speech? Are you saying that ACT MP’s should not be allowed to use it? Or maybe only MP’s from parties who you agree with can use it? . . . ”

    Can’t you see the irony? What about the sheer hypocrisy? A politician spouting private enterprise, market-driven, individual responsibility yet sucking at the state’s tit to gather supporting data for the elimination of the state? The other point is that Douglas used his experience of the system to swamp the library with his demands before any other politician could have a go, thus ensuring his work was given priority while the actual government ministers had to sit and wait.

    Douglas clearly belongs in a home for the bewildered yet retains his reptilian cunning.

  45. @ work 45

    “burt:
    Jum
    I think you missed two words, I have inserted them in bold for you.
    That’s what I liked about our retrospectively validated democracy under Clark.”

    Sorry Burt, throw away mispreresentations get no traction here

  46. @ work 46

    Strange, it said my first post didn’t work.

  47. Stephen 47

    Can’t you see the irony? What about the sheer hypocrisy? A politician spouting private enterprise, market-driven, individual responsibility yet sucking at the state’s tit to gather supporting data for the elimination of the state?

    Considering the Guaranteed Minimum Family Income, and school choice (taxpayer funded) and the fact he still wants the state to have a role in health, it’s not total hypocrisy, I would’ve thought. Those are the main reason the Libertarianz consider him a socialist of sorts (yes i know they think everyone is, but still). He doesn’t advocate the MPs paying for their own research/transport/office electricity either, does he?

  48. PB.

    Interesting, thank you.

    Re “taking responsibility over their lives” we have a wonderful example of exactly that in macroeconomic terms for what global financiers today have termed the hedge fund of the North Atlantic..

    In terms if one of its forerunners, what we might term Douglas’s entrancing hedge fund of the South Pacific, there is genuine learning (from experience) and instruction at the link.

    Yet again.

    My point is simply that blind prejudice can only remain so. And that intending or even still committed followers retain a choice over “responsibility for their lives”.

  49. burt 49

    @work

    Sorry Burt, throw away mispreresentations get no traction here

    You are right, I’m the only one who picked up on Jum’s inaccurate association of Clark and democracy and challenged it reminding people that democracy is not democracy when parliament needs to pass laws under urgency to validate an election.

  50. Jum 50

    Dean
    February 9, 2009 at 8:21 pm said “Are you honestly saying you’ve never heard Helen or Michael talk about tax cuts being bad?”

    In 2000, Helen Clark said tax cuts were not appropriate in this time of underdevelopment and were the promises of visionless and ?bankrupt people.

    John Key changed the entire meaning of her words. He left out the ‘in this time of underdevelopment’ and added ‘a’ before ‘visionless’ to make it sound like she accused NZers of being visionless, etc.

    Then on 1 October 2008 English started ‘In 2000 Helen Clark was saying ‘tax cuts are the promises of a visionless and bankrupt people’. More misinformation from National; more lies to make Helen Clark look bad, just before an election.

    That doesn’t say much for the people who support National, who suck up this disgraceful lying propaganda.

  51. Jum 51

    Burt
    Passing laws under urgency to take away the working rights of people (90 day) is bad.

    Businesses not even having to give a reason for firing workers, even though they can still fire them regardless is pure authoritarianism.

    NAct is not about democracy, unless you call democracy the freedom of the powerful and wealthy with the workers just trying to survive, without the energy to fight for their personal democratic rights.

    Refer to my 11.51 post. Lying about Helen Clark’s comments is libelous. Nice people you support Burt.

  52. BLiP 52

    Stephen said:

    ” . . . Guaranteed Minimum Family Income, and school choice (taxpayer funded) and the fact he still wants the state to have a role in health, it’s not total hypocrisy, I would’ve thought . . . ”

    Well, fair enough, I suppose, kind of, yeah – still, ironic all the same.

    And, as we all know, the measures you mention are the lube and the policy the anal dildo; once the public gets used to the policy, those measures will evaporate into whatever universe would have a planet so daft as to adopt such idiocy.

  53. lprent 53

    vto: Things work better when the people involved have responsibility. Transfer that responsibility to someone else and things fall apart.

    You missed something out. When you transfer responsibility then you also have to transfer authority.

    For instance and just off the top of my head (and as a stir) on education. Give the students the authority to shoot bad providers. I’ve seen a number of people who have had bad experiences of coughing up large amounts of money to receive an inadequate private tertiary level education. Trying to get a redress on that without coughing up even more major amounts of money is not effective.

    I think that simply removing those unrequired layers of justice would fit with the general right philosophy. Just allow the students a clear shot at their teachers and educational institution owners. The would put both the responsibility and authority directly with the owners of their own education – the students.

    Of course there wouldn’t be many teachers or educational institutions (left)..

  54. Michael 54

    The productivity thing needs to be blown out of the water.

    If a worker digs a hole with a pick and shovel the worker has a lower productivity than if dug with a digger. The productivity looks like 1/2 a day as opposed to 1/2 an hour.

    It is not the worker who is less productive but the tools by which the under capitalised industry chooses to work with.

    It is the high invester returns that have crippled industry through taking profit out of the industry as investments in plant and training are diverting it to their holiday homes.

    A model of increased productivity requires further investment in the industry, not in extravagant excesses.

  55. Draco T Bastard 55

    His policies are guaranteed to do one thing, make the rich richer and the poor poorer, nice guy, why does anyone listen to him?

    Because the non-productive rich like having government backing.

    We need to create more liquidity in the economy and have that money invested in businesses.

    I agree – increasing wages is a bloody good idea. (In a free-market everyone is a business not just the rich)

    And that includes capital.

    We started losing capital the day we started selling our assets and businesses to foreign owners.

    I seriously struggle with the idea that health and education are too important to leave to the private sector. If that is so then how come two even more important aspects of life on earth are quite happily left to the private sector – the provision of food and shelter?

    Actually, that comes down to competition. Food can be easily transported to any market meaning that food will be supplied @ near cost (in theory). Build two schools next to each other to compete for the same pupils and you’ve just doubled your expenses without any increase in benefits. Same applies to hospitals which helps explain why the US health service is the most expensive in the world. Housing – well, you may not have noticed but the government does have its hand in providing housing because the market generally fails there as well.

  56. Jum 56

    I remember now; I think it was ‘visionless and morally bankrupt people’ meaning the National opposition who sought to give tax cuts to the rich at that time and at the expense of weakened infrastructure and support both financially and community-wise for the poor and vulnerable.

    Now Douglas is trying it on again.

    The speech is relevant again today with the failure of the Finance Coys.
    ‘(Unequal) Tax cuts are not appropriate in a time of underdevelopment (change to ‘unemployment’) and are the promises of visionless and morally bankrupt people’ (National – no change there!).

  57. burt 57

    Jum

    Burt
    Passing laws under urgency to take away the working rights of people (90 day) is bad.

    They did it too…. I need to remind my kids that “He/She did it too” is not an excuse for bad behaviour. I don’t expect it from intelligent adults. You on the other hand…. Yes Jum – National did it too… Whatever.

  58. Oh yes, Sir Roger is wrong because you on the left say so. I suspect you suffer from a form of “living so far away from the real world” syndrome. Funnily enough, other countries are embracing much of what you call this out of touch policy, and if I recall, Canada recently honoured Sir Roger for his ability and skill.

    I love it that you get on your high horse about the nasty behaviour on Kiwiblog, only to descend into ageist abuse of a guy almost the same age as Anderton. I am sure you speak to your grandparents the same way too right?

  59. Ag 59

    Funnily enough, other countries are embracing much of what you call this out of touch policy, and if I recall, Canada recently honoured Sir Roger for his ability and skill.

    Was that the Fraser Institute, or some other Canadian wackos? Or was it the widely detested Harper?

    It’s funny that Douglas would give this speech right at the point where neoliberalism has been completely discredited. At least he’ll die knowing he’s been a complete failure.

  60. Felix 60

    Clint – it’s not his age, it’s his zombieness and wretchedness that people make fun of. The man is a wretched zombie.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Hard News: Friday Music: The Return of Disasteradio
    I confess, it had escaped me that there had not been a Disasteradio album for seven years. It's not as if Luke Rowell had been idle: he's made a bunch of records as his alter-ego Eyeliner in that time. But ...
    2 hours ago
  • What to know what’s happening in Charlottesville?
    Do yourself a favour and watch this. ...
    2 hours ago
  • Kiwi petition ignored by National
    The National led government has perhaps been the most arrogant when it comes to conserving our natural resources in New Zealand. Through ignorance and greed, they've managed to damage our ecology beyond measure in their relatively short political history.Unfortunately the ...
    3 hours ago
  • Don’t You Dare, Jacinda Ardern! Don’t You Dare!
    Oi! Jacinda! No!  If Jacinda Ardern follows the advice of her advisers to scale back voter expectations and re-commit to the Labour/Green "Budget Responsibility Rules", then she will endanger everything she has achieved to date. “DON’T YOU DARE, Jacinda Ardern. ...
    3 hours ago
  • In the Name of God, Go!
    As storm clouds gathered over Europe in 1938, Neville Chamberlain, the British Prime Minister, went to Munich where he believed that he had obtained undertakings from Hitler to the effect that Germany would not launch further attacks on its neighbours.  ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    4 hours ago
  • 2017 Rail Station Boardings
    For the last few years now and since electrification of the network, ridership on Auckland’s rail network has surged, jumping from 10 million trips in the year to June-2013 to 19.6 million trips in June this year (and bound to ...
    5 hours ago
  • Mark Richardson plays dirty
    The dirty politics debacle should have signalled to the right that underhanded tactics don’t usually pay off. There are some exceptions to the rule, but generally speaking New Zealander’s don’t like nastiness getting in the way of a good debate ...
    5 hours ago
  • Beyond the Beehive: Kaikohe / Whangarei
    In the lead-up to the election, journalist Max Towle is on an epic road trip taking the political pulse of young New Zealanders. The Whangarei electorate has been a safe National seat. Is that about to change? Beyond the ...
    5 hours ago
  • We are beneficiaries: I was used to feeling like a beggar
    A group of artists are continuing the conversation Metiria Turei MP started – demanding a more compassionate social welfare system. They asked artists who have been on a benefit in NZ (DPB, sickness, invalids, jobseeker, whatever) to draw a picture ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    15 hours ago
  • Metiria Turei has started something
    .   . When Metiria Turei announced her resignation as co-leader of the Green Party, on the afternoon of 9 August, it could be said that the bullies had won. The reactionary media pack – led chiefly by so-called “journalists” ...
    Frankly SpeakingBy Frank Macskasy
    16 hours ago
  • National would tax water as well
    Politics is a strange beast… it requires people to attack others over what they believe, usually because they think it's the best course of action to promote their party. Often those beliefs are founded on a real desire to make ...
    19 hours ago
  • Change happens when we stand together
    Tertiary Update Election Edition Vol 1 No 1 Together we have stopped National’s attempt to change the law to funnel public money to private tertiary education. Over the past few months, nearly 5,000 people have joined our campaign to keep tertiary education ...
    19 hours ago
  • Your university, pay and the living wage
    Dr. Wayne Linklater, co-president of the Victoria University of Wellington (VUW) branch of the Tertiary Education Union, discusses how paying the Living Wage would help advance the values of public institutions like VUW.  Universities are the engine of progress. They train ...
    19 hours ago
  • Mental health needs are failed by competitive funding
    Nicole Wallace from the School of Social Sciences at the University of Auckland, shares a powerful story about studying for a tertiary degree with a mental health condition, highlighting why we need to support public tertiary education for better access to ...
    19 hours ago
  • Local public tertiary education is vital for Māori
    Steven Wharehinga, president of the Tertiary Education Union branch at the Universal College of Learning, explains what impact reforms introduced by National have had on the provision of regional tertiary education and what this means for Māori, Pasifika and low income families. ...
    19 hours ago
  • Our own memorial problem
    This week we've all been made aware of the problem of the USA commemorating the leaders of the racist, slave-owning Confederacy with public monuments. Meanwhile, there's a similar problem in New Zealand. Via Twitter, I was pointed at a map ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    19 hours ago
  • No protection for whistleblowers in NZ
    There's been some debate about the need for increased whistleblower protection in New Zealand. And today, we have a perfect example of why it is needed: because the Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki has just got the Employment Relations ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    21 hours ago
  • That rail plan
    The big political news this morning in Greater Auckland's proposal for Auckland-Hamilton-Tauranga commuter rail. It looks like a good idea. In the southern part of the North Island we already have (limited) commuter rail between Palmerston North, Masterton and Wellington, ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    24 hours ago
  • The Singles Life: The evolution of Shorecore
    Welcome to weekly series The Singles Life, where known experts Katie Parker and Hussein Moses peruse, ponder and pontificate on the latest and (maybe) greatest in New Zealand music. Photo: Florence Noble/Facebook It may have been nearly a decade ...
    24 hours ago
  • Just how bad is the Aussie NZ relationship?
    As the finger wagging continues both here and over the ditch about Australian MP Barnaby Joyce being outed as a New Zealand citizen (oh the horror!) it's probably work pointing out just how bad our political relationship with our closest ...
    1 day ago
  • Voter Motivators 2017: Water.
    Worth Protecting? The threat to the nation’s water is real and it demands action. What’s more, the Water Issue comes with a whole cast of ready-made villains: someone to take the blame. Farmers. WHO CAN FORGET that magic childhood moment when ...
    1 day ago
  • Are we all anti-fascist now?
    US neo-Nazis and fascists supporters march in Charoltsvill, USA. Image credit: Alejandro Alvarez/News2Share via Reuters Wouldn’t that be nice? What if the current almost universal condemnation of fascism by the main stream media and social media commenters were genuine.? That it represents an ...
    1 day ago
  • Beyond the Beehive: The Far North
    In the lead-up to the election, journalist Max Towle is on an epic road trip taking the political pulse of young New Zealanders. Drugs, jobs and housing are on the minds of people in the Far North.   Beyond ...
    1 day ago
  • Introducing Regional Rapid Rail
    Greater Auckland is proud to present our proposal for Regional Rapid Rail – an Upper North Island Passenger Network. This post gives you a brief summary of our staged proposal to introduce higher speed inter-city rail to the Upper North ...
    Transport BlogBy Harriet Gale
    1 day ago
  • Media Link: Second radio interview in the US travelogue series.
    There is some overlap between yesterday’s post and today’s radio interview, but there is also a a fair bit of other material as well: http://www.radiolive.co.nz/home/video/2017/08/trump–charlottesville-and-north-korea—the-latest-from-the-us.html ...
    KiwipoliticoBy Pablo
    1 day ago
  • Whatever happened to one law for all?
    by Susanne Kemp The Metiria Turei case certainly brought a lot of mean-spirited people with double standards out of the woodwork.  People who vigorously defended John Key’s electoral fraud and Bill English’s rorting of the public purse for the ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    2 days ago
  • Access: The Driverless Road Ahead
    For the past decade and a bit, I've been working as a computer technician and sales rep. During that time, I've seen the desktop and laptop computer go from being the main method people get on the Internet, to an ...
    2 days ago
  • Speaker: Low-quality language on immigration
    Orcon IRL’s election special took place Sunday evening, and it was a right time. Kiri Allan mesmerised crowds in te reo. Stephen Berry knocked Rock Enrol. Chloe Swarbrick spoke of a Green future. And I disrespected Russell’s authority and went ...
    2 days ago
  • Meanwhile, in Poland
    While we're all worrying about Nazis in America, we might also want to keep an eye on Poland:Polish police broke up a feminist rally and forcefully removed activists to clear the way for a march for far-right extremists. A live ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 days ago
  • Privacy, not “secrecy”
    Politik breathlessly reports that the New Zealand government kept information on Barnaby Joyce's kiwi citizenship "top secret":New Zealand Ministers and officials imposed a heavy security lid once they realised that they had information which could, in effect, topple the Australian ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 days ago
  • General Election Debate on Transport – Campaign for Better Transport
    The Campaign for Better Transport is holding an election debate with all the major parties this month in Auckland. The CBT is led by Cameron Pitches and over the years has led campaigns and advocated for many transport issues including: Airport ...
    Transport BlogBy Harriet Gale
    2 days ago
  • The Real Reason for Housing Unaffordability
    The news that the number of houses being sold is falling and that prices are rising more slowly has been greeted in some quarters with responses that are – sadly – all too predictable. The consensus is that these shifts ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    2 days ago
  • Renting in New Zealand (and what politicians are promising to change)
    As politicians talk up their housing policies ahead of the election, renters share stories of stress, illness and why the current system doesn’t work. Photo: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Jared Kelly / Flickr Cleaning the house of mould and ...
    2 days ago
  • National fails miserably on housing
    I don’t know about you, but I’m not very happy with all the homeless people wandering the streets and sleeping rough in the cold, some of whom are dying on park benches. But instead of blaming the victims, I think ...
    2 days ago
  • Check this out
    The Spinoff has a terrific tool that lets you see and compare the leading parties’ election policies. You can tick your favourites and then see which way you lean based on your policy choices. It is beautifully done. It almost ...
    2 days ago
  • Loading Docs: Asian Men Talk About Sex
    Eight Asian men bare all as they speak candidly about sex, love and dating.   Asian Men Talk About Sex has been released as part of Loading Docs - a launchpad for short New Zealand documentaries. DIRECTOR INTERVIEW: ...
    2 days ago
  • “Let’s Tax This?” – “Hell, Yeah!”
    "Hell, Yeah!" - Labour must not retreat before National’s “Let’s Tax This!” counter-attack. Not when a majority of New Zealanders are ready to rescue their ailing public services from further deterioration. When National hurls the “tax and spend” accusation at Labour ...
    2 days ago
  • Barnaby Joyce – Asshole of the Week
    It came as somewhat of a shock when the Australian government attacked the New Zealand Labour party and its leader Jacinda Arsdern yesterday, a personally attack over the fact that their Deputy Prime Minister, Barnaby Joyce, has dual citizenship and ...
    2 days ago
  • Letters from America, take three: a scab got picked.
    Donald Trump picked a scab during his campaign for the presidency and now the puss is draining out. It will be a while before the wound is cleansed. The puss is racism, xenophobia and bigotry. When I left the US ...
    KiwipoliticoBy Pablo
    2 days ago
  • Timing is everything for Ardern & Labour
    Timing is just so important in politics, as in so much of life. Plenty of able people don't have the luck – or planning – to be in the right place at the right time. But right now, timing may ...
    PunditBy Tim Watkin
    2 days ago
  • Pouring gasoline on the housing fire
    Yesterday, Prime Minister Bill English announced that he would encourage the Reserve Bank to remove the loan to value ratio (LVR) rules that it put in place to take the heat out of rising house prices. As reported in Newsroom: ...
    Transport BlogBy Peter Nunns
    2 days ago
  • Inferno VII: The circle of capitalists
    "Pape Satàn, pape Satàn aleppe!" If these words ever meant anything in any language, or were otherwise intelligible to the contemporaries of Dante Alighieri, that meaning is lost. What’s left to us is the beginning of a curse, or a ...
    Bat bean beamBy Giovanni Tiso
    2 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on why Labour isn’t responsible for Barnaby Joyce
    First published on Werewolf As a desperate Turnbull government tries to treat the Barnaby Joyce affair as a Pauline Hanson fever dream – blame it on the foreigners! We’re the victims of the dastardly New Zealand Labour Party! – our ...
    2 days ago
  • Media Release: TIME TO TURN UP THE PRESSURE ON CANDIDATES
    For Immediate Release Tuesday 15 August 2017 TIME TO TURN UP THE PRESSURE ON CANDIDATES Polls are showing that inequality is a top voter concern (Roy-Morgan and UMR Polls). The income equality group Closing the Gap is urging New Zealanders ...
    Closing the GapBy Marino Smith
    3 days ago
  • Ardern stands up for kiwis
    Today politics seems to be dominated by Australian ridiculousness, after the Australian government blamed Chris Hipkins (rather than hard-working Australian journalists) for exposing Barnaby Joyce as a New Zealand citizen, and Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop interfering in our election ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    3 days ago
  • Editors put the boot into National
    There is no question that a resurgent Labour party has closed the National party out of the media limelight. What else could Bill English do but pander to his ageist supporters by proposing boot camps and spot fines for the ...
    3 days ago
  • Civil Disobedience Against Big Irrigation
    Construction has started on huge irrigation schemes in Canterbury. When they start working, it’s going to be disastrous for our rivers - most of which are already struggling. More irrigation means more cows and that means more pollution.A few weeks ...
    3 days ago
  • Climate change: The Cullen fund divests
    Climate change is now undeniable, and if we are to survive it, the fossil fuel industry has to die. And now the Cullen Fund has recognised that fact, and started divesting its risk:The New Zealand Superannuation Fund has sold shares ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    3 days ago
  • Dirty farmers
    Surprise, surprise - Waikato's dairy farmers are failing to comply with their resource consents:The Waikato Regional Council says dairy farm effluent compliance rates are heading in the right direction despite less than one quarter of farms monitored last year deemed ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    3 days ago
  • National’s policy hardly Christian
    It’s often amazing to see the ill-conceived political arguments that make it to print in New Zealand sometimes. Perhaps one of the least canvassed areas of voting preference is that of religious beliefs, and where those beliefs coincide with a ...
    3 days ago
  • “As soon as reasonably practicable”
    The Official Information Act requires agencies to decide on requests "as soon as reasonably practicable, and in any case not later than 20 working days after the day on which the request is received". But over the decades that the ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    3 days ago
  • Wijkontsluitingsweg
    This is another post about my recent trip to the Netherlands. The Netherlands has a standard road classification system with ideally three types of roads: flow roads (motorways), distribution roads (arterials), and local roads (residential roads). This system does not ...
    Transport BlogBy Kent Lundberg
    3 days ago
  • Eyewitness report from Charlottesville by Redneck Revolt
    REPORTBACK: CHARLOTTESVILLE: August 13, 2017 by Redneck Revolt members The situation on the ground in Charlottesville, Virginia, is still developing and unstable, but a few of our Redneck Revolt members on the ground took some time to provide the ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    3 days ago
  • Treating young people differently
    The Labour party has hit the ground running with Jacinda Ardern. Not only has she shown immense capability as leader, the Labour party has clearly got its game on and returned to its core values, values that once made New ...
    3 days ago
  • Looking to the past to understand the Politics of Love
    We need to transcend us vs them struggles, writes Philip McKibbin.   Image: The Prophet Te Whiti Addressing a Meeting of Natives from The Graphic (1881) In 1881, the peaceful village of Parihaka was invaded. Fifteen-hundred men, led ...
    3 days ago
  • Power imbalances in local vs central government
    Local government in New Zealand is a creature of statute, so it’s subservient to powers bestowed upon it by central government. From the creation of its mandate and structure, to the reforms imposed through time, local councils are, and will ...
    Briefing PapersBy Christine Rose
    3 days ago
  • The Greens’ Campaign Reset: Normal Ideological Transmission Is Resumed.
    Who Loves Ya Baby? “I didn’t come to Parliament to act like other political parties. But this week that’s where we ended up. We have not been our best selves, and for that I am sorry.” But who are your best ...
    3 days ago
  • Victory on Victoria
    The Victoria St Linear Park has been saved from the clutches of Auckland Transport. You may recall that we’ve been concerned about ATs plans for the future of many of the streets in the city centre for some time. In ...
    3 days ago
  • MSM catches up on Unemployment stats rort
    .   . The mainstream media – or at least one clever journalist working for Mediaworks/Newshub – has finally caught up with a story broken by this blogger last year that unemployment data from Statistics NZ was no longer reliable; ...
    Frankly SpeakingBy Frank Macskasy
    4 days ago
  • When is Lying Justified?
    Among the sinners the drunk porter in Macbeth welcomes into hell is the ‘equivocator, that could swear in both the scales against either scale’. Equivocation is a theme of the play; Shakespeare is thought to have been influenced by the ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    4 days ago
  • Has National gone Full Metal Jacket?
    Is bootcamp the government's solution for hardened young criminals?   Photo: 123rf. National plans to solve the problem of serious youth offending by sending people to a remote, army-run boot camp for a year. But opponents of the ...
    4 days ago
  • Yale Climate Connections: America’s beacon of climate science awareness
    This is an unabashed endorsement of an important group. I have no affiliation with them or conflict of interest. They are great, period. The ability to convey complex climate science to a wide-ranging audience is a golden attribute, something very ...
    4 days ago
  • On Mike Hosking – Don’t Say I Never Warned You
        Hi, my name is Brian. Edwards to be precise. You may remember me. I used to be on television. Started in Christchurch on a magazine show called Town and Around. Went North to Wellington to audition for ...
    4 days ago
  • PM lied about Greenpeace spies
    The Todd Barclay affair, where the unelected Prime Minister claimed seven times that he couldn’t recall if Barclay had told him about the secret recording of a National party staffer, proved without a doubt that Bill English is dishonest!But if ...
    4 days ago
  • I watched Miss Universe NZ 2017 so you don’t have to
    Beauty queens, magic, dangly bits and nip slips - Miss Universe NZ had it all.   The top five Miss Universe NZ contestants (L-R): Shekinah Delos Santos, Sarah Hensby-Bennett, Harlem-Cruz Ihaia, Holly Waghorn and Brooke Houia. Screenshot: Miss ...
    4 days ago
  • NZ Post spied on the public
    Last night we learned that NZ Post had been spying on the public, using microphones on its delivery vehicles to record and listen to conversations between its employees and random members of the public without the consent of either party. ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    4 days ago
  • Aspirational fluff from Ardern 
    by Daphna Whitmore Although women got the vote in the late 19th century, now well in to the 21st century we still do not have pay equity. While overt discrimination against individual female employees is no longer legal or socially ...
    RedlineBy Admin
    4 days ago
  • National party dead in the water
    The last week in New Zealand politics has been extraordinary. But there’s one political party in particular that appears to be missing in action… the National party.The unelected PM Bill English has failed to gain any real traction in the ...
    4 days ago
  • Barnaby Joyce is a New Zealand citizen
    Over the last few weeks the Australian Parliament has been rocked by a succession of resignations and court referrals over various Senators falling foul of s44 of the Australian constitution, which bars dual-citizens from the legislature. Today, that clause appears ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    4 days ago
  • Dual Modes and Axle Loads
    Last year KiwiRail made the decision to replace the 16 current 30-year-old EF class electric freight trains currently in use on the North Island Main Trunk with the procurement of more DL Class Diesel Trains. These EF Class trains use ...
    Transport BlogBy Harriet Gale
    4 days ago
  • What’s Going On? with Lucy Zee: Beervana
    Eye-popping beer infusions and drinking games with the bros. Lucy Zee heads to New Zealand's biggest beer festival, Beervana.   Produced and presented by Lucy Zee, and filmed and edited by Eddy Fifield. Made with the support of NZ On ...
    4 days ago
  • National resorts to racism on water
    National knows it can't defeat the Labour-Green policy on water charging on fairness grounds, so they're now appealing to racism, with Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Minister Chris Finlayson scaremongering that making farmers pay their fair share will mean reopening historic ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    4 days ago
  • A Weak Man Trying to Look Strong
    Donald Trump would not be the first political leader to try to build his popularity, or divert attention from his troubles at home, by seeking a diversion – usually by means of a military adventure of some sort – overseas.  ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    4 days ago
  • Keeping tiny humans alive
    Science is helping more premature babies survive, but for parents it's still a journey marked by fear, pain and joy.   Inside of what looks like a giant Ziploc bag filled with water, the hoof of a tiny lamb ...
    4 days ago
  • The left shouldn’t fear Greg O’Connor
    When Greg O’Connor was a young Police officer he did a stint undercover and has lamented having to arrest gang members he viewed at the time as his mates. This is perhaps the main problem for the left, being that ...
    4 days ago

  • Government must apologise over rebuild debacle
    The Prime Minister owes the public of Otago and Southland an apology and then he must come up with an unredacted copy of the business case for the Dunedin hospital rebuild, says Labour’s Health spokesperson David Clark. "For too long the interests of ...
    2 hours ago
  • Government caves to multi-national tax avoiders in the shadows
    News that the Government has secretly caved in to the demands of multi-national tax avoiders come as no surprise, but will disappoint Kiwi taxpayers, says Labour’s spokesman for Revenue Michael Wood.   “It has been revealed that a United States ...
    18 hours ago
  • Cheaper to stay at The Langham than emergency housing motels
    Labour’s comprehensive plan to fix the housing crisis and ensure there’s enough state housing, means we won’t be paying through the nose for emergency accommodation like the current Government has to, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. “National has ...
    20 hours ago
  • Government must come clean on water
      News that the National Government is secretly working behind closed doors on its own water charging schemes shows their utter hypocrisy on this issue, says Labour’s water spokesperson David Parker.  “They have been carping on about Labour’s plan for ...
    24 hours ago
  • Government pays twice the price for emergency housing motels – with two more on the way
    Under Labour’s plan to build at least 1000 state houses each year, New Zealand wouldn’t be paying more than double the valuations for motels to house Kiwis needing emergency housing, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. “Under questioning today, ...
    2 days ago
  • HAM shows country needs Labour on housing
    The latest Housing Affordability Measure report shows affordability dramatically worsening for Auckland first home buyers, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 days ago
  • Canterbury kids get more support for mental health
    Children in Canterbury and Kaikoura will get dedicated mental health support to help them overcome the trauma of the earthquakes, says the Leader of the Opposition Jacinda Ardern. “We’ll fund an extra eighty mental health professionals for the next three ...
    2 days ago
  • Statement on Julie Bishop’s comments
    It is highly regrettable that the Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has chosen to make false claims about the New Zealand Labour Party. I have been utterly transparent about this situation. I stand by my statements this morning that I ...
    3 days ago
  • Labour stands with Pike families
    A Labour Government will stand with the families of Pike River and reaffirm its commitment to safe workplaces by ensuring there will be a Minister responsible for Pike River, says Leader of the Opposition Jacinda Ardern. “The Pike River disaster ...
    3 days ago
  • Yes to Sallies – Labour will build more state houses
    The Salvation Army’s latest report ‘Taking Stock’ shows why New Zealand needs a Labour-led Government committed to a massive house building programme, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “When the Sallies say the country needs 2000 extra state houses a ...
    3 days ago
  • New Zealanders deserve better than scaremongering over water
    New Zealanders need to hear from National about how they will fund the clean-up of our rivers and lakes for future generations. Instead, National has broadened its scare-mongering, says Labour’s Water spokesperson David Parker. ...
    4 days ago
  • School Leavers’ Toolkit to equip young people for adult life
    Labour will give school leavers the practical skills and knowledge they need for adult life with a new School Leavers’ Toolkit, says Leader of the Opposition Jacinda Ardern. “Our teachers and schools do a great job of teaching our children ...
    4 days ago
  • Pay equity to be a priority for Labour
      Labour will make sure that the country’s mental health workers are a priority when it comes to pay equity negotiations, says the Leader of the Opposition Jacinda Ardern.  “It is very important for me to right the wrong created ...
    6 days ago
  • Labour’s positive education plan
    Today’s announcement on learning support is more tinkering and proof that only a Labour Government will deliver the resources that schools and parents are crying out for, says Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins.  “We have a positive vision for a ...
    7 days ago
  • Pike footage raises questions over government’s actions
    The Government’s seeming determination to turn a blind eye to new questions about what happened at Pike River Mine is troubling, says Labour’s West Coast-Tasman MP Damien O’Connor. ...
    7 days ago
  • Solution to rent rises lies in building houses and stopping speculators
    The spread of rental increases from the big cities to the surrounding regions shows why we need to get on top of the housing shortage build homes our families can afford, and lock out the speculators, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson ...
    1 week ago
  • Clean rivers don’t cost $18 a cabbage
    National is falling into a bad pattern of promising the world and not saying how they will fund it, says Labour’s Water spokesperson David Parker. ...
    1 week ago
  • Time for honest answer on transport funding
    National needs to explain how they will fund the $6 billion funding gap in their 10-year Auckland transport plan, says Labour’s Auckland Issues spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    1 week ago
  • Time for true numbers on overseas speculators
    It’s time for the Government to give accurate figures on the number of houses being bought by overseas speculators, says Labour’s Land Information spokesperson Raymond Huo. ...
    1 week ago
  • Fair and sustainable trade: A Green Party vision for New Zealand’s trading relationships
    Trade is a cornerstone of the New Zealand economy. It provides us with the things we want and need, and enables us to pay for those with exports that generate business opportunities and jobs. However, it should be recognised that ...
    GreensBy Barry Coates
    1 week ago
  • Clean rivers for future generations
    Labour will lead a nationwide effort to restore our rivers and lakes to a clean, swimmable state, says Leader of the Opposition Jacinda Ardern. ...
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand really can do better on health
    Labour’s commitment to affordable access to high quality healthcare will provide a better service for New Zealanders than the current Health Minister, who will not apologise for statements that he made that wrongly criticised hard-working staff in the Southern DHB’s ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour’s plan the answer to motorway chaos
    Labour’s plan to build a light rail network and improve heavy rail and bus services across Auckland is the only answer to the kind of motorway congestion Aucklanders endured this morning, says Labour Transport spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour to build rail to Auckland Airport
    A world class city needs a rail connection from the CBD to its international airport – that’s why Labour will build light rail to Auckland Airport as a priority, says Leader of the Opposition Jacinda Ardern.  “Let’s get Auckland moving ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Is pay equity just too hard for this Govt?
    You are hard pressed these days to find someone that openly admits their misogyny, that men should still be paid more than women. Politicians proclaim that they want to see women paid more, but do their actions back it up? ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour’s commitment to our Rainbow nation
    The Labour Party has reaffirmed its commitment to New Zealand’s rainbow community with its 2017 Rainbow policy, featuring the goal to end HIV in New Zealand by 2025. Grant Robertson says Labour continues a long and proud tradition of advocating ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour’s vision for Auckland more than reheated roads
    Labour is more ambitious for Auckland than the reheated set of transport projects proposed by National, says Labour’s Auckland Issues spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Waiting urology patients are the tip of the iceberg
    The 10 patients waiting for urology surgery at Dunedin Hospital are just the tip of the iceberg, says Labour’s Health spokesperson David Clark.  "Hundreds of patients are waiting for follow-up appointments, but they are not deemed serious enough to be ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Maori Landowners Misled by Maori Party
    Māori landowners are being misled by Government hui being held throughout the country promoting the troubled Māori Land Service (MLS), which underpins the Crown’s unpopular Ture Whenua reforms, says Labour’s Ikaroa-Rāwhiti MP Meka Whaitiri. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government’s Johnny-come-lately approach to multinational tax won’t wash
    It’s a case of baby steps for a Government that still allows multinational companies to avoid paying their fair share of tax, says Labour’s Revenue spokesperson Michael Wood. “After nine years in government, five years after the issue of multinational ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Auckland congestion up there with the world’s worst
    Traffic congestion is costing Auckland up to $2 billion in lost productivity according to the latest report from the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research, says Labour’s Transport spokesperson Michael Wood.  “This is a disaster and underlines the need for ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Experience in Youth Parliament 2016
    Being a Member of Youth Parliament was an unexpected, but fabulous opportunity for me. It provided me a way to connect with other young people who have some things in common, and to learn what it is like to be ...
    GreensBy NZ Green Party
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour backs renters’ call for warm, healthy homes
    80 per cent of renters wish their home was warmer and drier, and that’s what Labour will deliver, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • We can – and must – do better for Kiwi jobs
    Labour has the plan to get more young New Zealanders into jobs and tackle concerns raised in the latest statistics which show an extra 3000 young Kiwis are neither earning or learning compared to the same time last year, says ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Statement from Jacinda Ardern, Leader of the New Zealand Labour Party
    I want to start by giving my thanks to Andrew. His announcement today and the situation we have found ourselves in is not what anyone expected or wanted In my time working with Andrew I know one thing to be ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Better homes for Maori under Labour
    Labour’s vision is that Māori enjoy an equal playing field and have the same home ownership opportunities as non-Māori, says Labour’s Māori Development spokesperson Kelvin Davis. “Today Labour is proud to announce a detailed Māori housing policy from South Auckland’s ...
    3 weeks ago

%d bloggers like this: