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National’s Standards

Written By: - Date published: 2:59 pm, December 13th, 2017 - 74 comments
Categories: education, schools - Tags: , , , , ,

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It’s great to see Chris Hipkins abolishing ‘National Standards’ as a matter of priority. This policy was nothing but an unfortunate bit of populism from the previous government, and a Prime Minister in John Key who specialised in band-aid solutions to problems that required stitches.

While it may have made some people feel better that it looked like action was being taken on literacy and numeracy in Primary Schools, in practice National Standards were more hindrance than help.

The policy stigmatised children with disabilities and learning difficulties, it narrowed the curriculum and worst of all it put too much focus on measuring and labelling instead of things that can make a real difference.

Just because I can measure how bad I am at golf by looking at my handicap, and by feeling the sting of it being the maximum number possible, doesn’t mean I can do much to improve it without some intensive one-on-one coaching from a pretty amazing teacher.

Which brings us to the real problem in education. There are lots of pretty amazing teachers out there but we need to attract more. And I would strongly argue that it’s hard to achieve this when the starting salary for a teacher with a Bachelor’s degree is $48,000 and there are plenty of less stressful jobs out there that pay more.

It would certainly take more than that to convince me to spend my working life trying to impart knowledge onto other people’s children in groups of thirty plus at a time.

It’s by no means a less stressful job, but Police start on $56,000 and have their training fully funded so aren’t starting with a student loan. Having good dedicated motivated and talented teachers should be just as high a priority for us as a country as good dedicated motivated and talented cops.

In fact, more of one could lead to needing less of the other.

You also need to provide the best possible learning environment for children and that means better teacher student ratios to allow more specialised help as well as smaller class sizes.

It’s not rocket science. Those are the problems that need addressing if we are serious about lifting educational achievement. They are more expensive than just giving everyone a test and hoping for the best. But hey, you get what you pay for right?

74 comments on “National’s Standards”

  1. One Anonymous Bloke 1

    band-aid solutions to problems that required stitches.

    Nope: in this case the lying lowlife invented a problem that didn’t exist at all.

    WHEN SEVEN EQUALS 20

    20% – children Anne Tolley says are failing
    16% – the actual number who failed NCEA in 2009. Of these:

    -6% – students who are capable of passing NCEA but chose not to try
    -3% – students with multiple disabilities who can’t pass
    7% = students who could pass but don’t…

  2. Stuart Munro 2

    There is probably significant institutional reform overdue in teaching, and it would be good to borrow a bit more from best practice. Which is Scandinavia.

    Small chance of my hobby horse getting a run – peer tuition. Lifts results by two orders of magnitude. Not expensive. Never mind.

    • Stunned Mullet 2.1

      A number of high schools in Auckland have active peer tutoring programmes – and you are correct they are very effective.

    • greywarshark 2.2

      A hobby horse of mine would give effective outcomes. We have a rich resource in we older people, some of whom will have been ‘kept’ by the government and not expected to do anything for a third of their lives if they live to about 99.

      If each one that was suitable could mentor a child through school for half to an hour a day, the country would boost its rate of initiative by 200% plus, it being rather low at present.

      There isn’t much demand for cow-like stares in the world, which is what comes from the broad mass of the populace especially the older ones. So more clever cows with less of them on the fields, and less bovine humans in the suburbs and rural areas, and we could be world winners.

      Nutty eh!

      • Stuart Munro 2.2.1

        It could work well, I notice U3A is very popular down here. Maybe we could even aim for something along the lines of Japan’s lifelong learning program – knowledge circulating in communities gets expressed in surprising ways.

        • greywarshark 2.2.1.1

          Thanks Stuart I like your ideas.
          And I apologise to all older people who resent the cow-like stares bit. I was just venting at the so often complacent retired generation that I know and which possibly form a great part of the National Party’s conservative, self-centred base who don’t want their boat (cruise ship) rocked.

  3. It’s by no means a less stressful job, but Police start on $56,000 and have their training fully funded so aren’t starting with a student loan. Having good dedicated motivated and talented teachers should be just as high a priority for us as a country as good dedicated motivated and talented cops.

    It’s a function of demand.

    Police total employees (p7): 13,787
    Teaching total staff: 55,020 (excel link but I don’t know if it will work)

    The more people required for a job the less they will be paid. This, apparently, applies across the board and is the complete opposite of what economics tells us.

    • greywarshark 3.1

      I wonder what economics says about the fact that teachers have separate individuals with different variables to which a standardised set of details has to be extended with a variable outcome according to a number of factors, weather, food and energy output, controlled use of brain, parental urgings or not, etc. and for politicians as well as parents there is a lot of delayed gratification.

      Then police look for certain characteristics and are more likely to result in having suitable candidates to send to courtroom or jail. In economic terms that is I suppose a success rate, and each one ‘spoken to’ and discharged is a failure.

    • Enzo 3.2

      It’s also worth noting that the police are male dominated while teachers are female dominated.

      • greywarshark 3.2.1

        Yes the research has tended to indicate that male and female dominated sectors are viewed differently so that could well be a factor.

  4. Chris 4

    I will wait to see what they are replacing it with before getting to excited.

    NS was by no means perfect and needed a massive overhaul but some sort of gauge of where your child is out comparative to the average is IMO quite useful

    IN TANDEM WITH THE TEACHER’S EVALUATION AND OPINION.

    • …but some sort of gauge of where your child is out comparative to the average is IMO quite useful

      Only if you want to destroy some children’s belief in themselves. If you need to divide the community into haves and have-nots.

      • Ed 4.1.1

        ‘Only if you want to destroy some children’s belief in themselves’

        That was the intended result.

      • Chris 4.1.2

        How exactly does it destroy their belief in themselves?

        Are you saying their teachers will give them crap or announce it to the class?

        Because the vast vast majority of parents wouldnt and will just have an idea of what they need to help them with at home in conjunction with the teachers ideas

        • The Fairy Godmother 4.1.2.1

          Except National Standards were very broad and only told you if your child was working below at or above the standard. They didn’t tell you what specific thing they were working on.

          • Chris 4.1.2.1.1

            Agreed

            Which is why I said it needed overhauling

            But I have yet to hear a reason why having a form of it suddenly means you can’t have the teachers evaluation

            Forgive me if people think it is stupid, but in my opinion having a gauge AND a teachers evaluation of your child is ideal to know both how the teacher is going to progress with your child and things you can also help with, that you can actually trust and understand the end goals.

            And no. I am not saying teachers are shit with the trust comment

            • The Fairy Godmother 4.1.2.1.1.1

              Which is what we had before National Standards. Pre National Standards had far more useful information that ns ones. My child was simply reported as well above standards. I felt she was disadvantaged over her brother and sister who weren’t in the ns era because I felt ns encouraged teachers to teach to the middle and get the ones just below the standard above it leaving less time for children at the other ends of the scale.

              • mpledger

                “Well above standard” wasn’t an official NS term – there was only well below, below, at and above. That was part of the problem – the gifted kids got ignored,

                It would be interesting to see if our drop in international tests was because the whole group moved down, the tail-end dropped or the high end dropped. I’m betting on the latter.

            • cathy 4.1.2.1.1.2

              the thing is, children mature at different rates, same as they grow at different rates.

              children that young should not be measured against an arbitrary average but against their own potential, which the teacher who knows the kid can do but national standards cannot.

              like “could do better” means something different in each case depending on what the kid is capable of

              and national standards were meaningless because there was not enough funding to staff our schools adequately, let alone all the other reasons

        • One Anonymous Bloke 4.1.2.2

          How exactly does it destroy their belief in themselves?

          By measuring them to such a narrow “standard”.

          The fact is, National’s changes to education policy are designed with one goal in mind: the wholesale privatisation of the education system and the destruction of teachers’ unions.

          That’s why they copy right wing US “policies” rather than apolitical Finnish ones.

          It’s the only explanation that makes sense.

        • Draco T Bastard 4.1.2.3

          How exactly does it destroy their belief in themselves?

          By telling them that they’re failures.

          Are you saying their teachers will give them crap or announce it to the class?

          It’s going to be on their reports. That’s what anything below and ‘A’ is – a failure according to the limited measurements of National Standards.

          Because the vast vast majority of parents wouldnt and will just have an idea of what they need to help them with at home in conjunction with the teachers ideas

          The vast majority of parents seem to be a bunch of ignorant schmucks that never talk to the child’s teachers. They just want the same, simple and failed system that they had at school. This is what National Standards provided.

          What it didn’t do was provide any information about how best to help the child.

          • Chris 4.1.2.3.1

            So in your world parents walk around saying their kids are failures if they aren’t great at something.

            I think I’ll avoid your world

            • Draco T Bastard 4.1.2.3.1.1

              No, that’s what grades do. It’s what National Standards do.

              The Case Against Grades

              The Effects of Grading

              Most of the criticisms of grading you’ll hear today were laid out forcefully and eloquently anywhere from four to eight decades ago (Crooks, 1933; De Zouche, 1945; Kirschenbaum, Simon, & Napier, 1971; Linder, 1940; Marshall, 1968), and these early essays make for eye-opening reading. They remind us just how long it’s been clear there’s something wrong with what we’re doing as well as just how little progress we’ve made in acting on that realization.

              In the 1980s and ‘90s, educational psychologists systematically studied the effects of grades. As I’ve reported elsewhere (Kohn, 1999a, 1999b, 1999c), when students from elementary school to college who are led to focus on grades are compared with those who aren’t, the results support three robust conclusions:

              * Grades tend to diminish students’ interest in whatever they’re learning. A “grading orientation” and a “learning orientation” have been shown to be inversely related and, as far as I can tell, every study that has ever investigated the impact on intrinsic motivation of receiving grades (or instructions that emphasize the importance of getting good grades) has found a negative effect.

              * Grades create a preference for the easiest possible task. Impress upon students that what they’re doing will count toward their grade, and their response will likely be to avoid taking any unnecessary intellectual risks. They’ll choose a shorter book, or a project on a familiar topic, in order to minimize the chance of doing poorly — not because they’re “unmotivated” but because they’re rational. They’re responding to adults who, by telling them the goal is to get a good mark, have sent the message that success matters more than learning.

              * Grades tend to reduce the quality of students’ thinking. They may skim books for what they’ll “need to know.” They’re less likely to wonder, say, “How can we be sure that’s true?” than to ask “Is this going to be on the test?” In one experiment, students told they’d be graded on how well they learned a social studies lesson had more trouble understanding the main point of the text than did students who were told that no grades would be involved. Even on a measure of rote recall, the graded group remembered fewer facts a week later (Grolnick and Ryan, 1987).

              Research on the effects of grading has slowed down in the last couple of decades, but the studies that are still being done reinforce the earlier findings. For example, a grade-oriented environment is associated with increased levels of cheating (Anderman and Murdock, 2007), grades (whether or not accompanied by comments) promote a fear of failure even in high-achieving students (Pulfrey et al., 2011), and the elimination of grades (in favor of a pass/fail system) produces substantial benefits with no apparent disadvantages in medical school (White and Fantone, 2010). More important, no recent research has contradicted the earlier “big three” findings, so those conclusions still stand.

              Grades Do More Harm Than Good

              For decades, grades have been the primary form of communicating and reflecting student mastery. A myth that has taken hold, but ironically no one thinks grades are able to communicate learning with any sort of accuracy or consistency. Teachers feel compelled to “grade,” (the verb form) any and all student work, believing that a letter or percentage will indicate to students and parents a measure of skill. Students feel conditioned to only pursue summative values and to get “As and Bs” to make mom and dad happy. Parents feel reliant upon teachers to instruct, assess, and communicate learning outcomes through the assignment of grades.

              Thing is, the fact that grading of students is detrimental has been known for decades. Since long before I was born and yet we still use them and National doubled down on the failure.

    • The Fairy Godmother 4.2

      National Standards was great for selfish individuals with a bit of money who don’t care about any children other than their own. This way they don’t have to pay anymore in taxes to make our schools good for all children and if their little precious is not at the working above expectations level it alerts them to the need to pay for tutoring.

      • In Vino 4.2.1

        +1 Good analysis.
        Not many people get to actually care about other people’s children the way teachers do.
        This makes the teacher unions very unpopular with the profit-gouging set.

      • ropata 4.2.2

        +1 Also, the school league tables were offensive and wrong on every level.

    • greywarshark 4.3

      Yes good Chris, but it should mean that the child has room to excel at what is really interesting to them – as well as – getting the basics. I have heard that the rigid factory results required by NatStand has forced teachers to be economical with the truth with some kids.

      Old saying, you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear. Some children are just not able to study, and act out, and help needs to be available to keep those kids on track, and have them enjoying their little successes at school, even if they don’t get much positive from home. I would like to see the simple personal psychological management practice of transactional analysis taught at school, which enables kids to handle their times of upset by recognising their own state and knowing how to remediate it.

      Teaching should be able to be more wide reaching, getting the kids primed up to do their favourite things by ensuring they attend to the basics, sort of like having pudding after the veg. Probably some teachers will be able to get double the results that the kids have at present.

    • repateet 4.4

      And the main thing about it being some sort of gauge of where your child is comparative to the average and that being ‘useful’, is that you can go to your workplace or club and brag about how great your kid is. If they’re classed as well above average.
      Or be smug and walk taller knowing your kid is so capable. If she’s classed as well above average.
      And if you don’t have that satisfaction because your kid is not classed as well above average or at expected levels, you can complain about teachers being hopeless.

  5. roy 5

    And for the video featuring Ill Bill ‘rapping’ about it…

  6. Ad 6

    Enzo surely with a Labour-led government and one of the last powerful union near-monopolies around, and a surplus on the government books like we haven’t seen in a bit, teachers should be able to get a major pay rise this term?

    • dv 6.1

      If they want teachers in Ak schools that will have to be a given.

    • aom 6.2

      Don’t be an prick Ad. Go get yourself qualified as a teacher and bust your arse for a teacher’s wages with long hours and very challenging work days. Bet you won’t then tell the union you don’t want their support, expertise, training assistance and hard won but meagre improvements in pay and conditions. Not likely though eh? Better to support the likes of National Standards and throw stones at the teacher’s unions, even though they predictably said theygoing down that track would compromise the country’s international rankings.

  7. funstigator 7

    I think it’s a bad move. I & other parents from our school found it a useful tool – the class teacher was uninterested/incapable/not supported in maths teaching and NS showed this up, giving us the ability to get remedial in. How many commenters in this thread are parents of primary level children I wonder?

    • dv 7.1

      the class teacher was uninterested/incapable/not supported in maths teaching and NS showed this up,

      I assume the ‘uninterested/incapable/not supported’ teacher did the NS evaluation.

      So how can you be sure the grades were accurate?

    • One Anonymous Bloke 7.2

      It’s a great move: chucking out ignorance based-drivel. Just so long as they replace it with sound pedagogy and ignore the politically-motivated whinging from people who know jack shit about learning.

      As a parent, I think people who vandalise our education system for money – yes, that’s what this is about: privatisation – belong in court, defending themselves against charges of attacking children.

      Look at the top comment on this post: the policy was based on lies in the first place. When you believe lies the problem is you. Sharpen up.

  8. ianmac 8

    “You also need to provide the best possible learning environment for children and that means better teacher student ratios to allow more specialised help as well as smaller class sizes.”
    Good point ENZO. Smaller classes are necessary to facilitate good learning practice. The bigger the class the more necessary it becomes to mass teach rather than individualise according to need. Think about those very bright kids who sink into sleepiness from lack of specific assistance.
    (If big class teaching techniques are still being used when given smaller classes, the kids are no better off. Adapt.)

  9. Grantoc 9

    Hipkins blames National Standards for poor educational outcomes in the primary school sector.

    However National Standards are not responsible for these poor educational outcomes. Standards are designed to measure outcomes. They are not over arching educational strategies or philosophies or learning methodologies or educational systems designed to educate children. They measure how well these elements are performing.

    If educational outcomes in primary school are not what they ‘should’ be then that is the fault of the systems that are in place to educate children. Standards are not designed to educate children, they exist to measure the effectiveness of those systems that actually do educate children.

    Hipkins is using the standards as a whipping boy for poor educational systems. He doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

    • ropata 9.1

      Funny that the NZEI is completely opposed to everything you just said. You don’t know what you’re talking about.

      https://www.nzei.org.nz/NZEI/Media/News_public/2017/Briefing_to_the_Incoming_Minister.aspx

      • Grantoc 9.1.1

        Roparta

        Well I must be saying the right things then. I have little regard for the teacher unions – they strike me as only being interested in protecting the apparent ‘rights’ pf their members.

        They are in my opinion conservative, rigidly ideological and actually, sadly, largely opposed to new developments in educational thinking and practice.

        • ianmac 9.1.1.1

          That is so wrong. Very few teachers go to Union meetings. There is no direction from the union. The teachers provide feedback to the union who represent those views. What has happened over the last nine years is that restrictive ideology has been imposed on what had been a progressive innovative teaching force. Teachers don’t teach for the pay.

          • Grantoc 9.1.1.1.1

            Ianmac

            However they probably have a record of going on strike for pay more so than any other group of unionised workers. And too bad about the disruption to children’s education and parents expectations.

            What was one of their first requests/demands of Hipkens when he took on the mantle of Minister of Education a few weeks ago? Why a pay increase – 5% I think it was.

            Pay and conditions are clearly a prominent factor in their thinking.

            • millsy 9.1.1.1.1.1

              Last time I looked, I could count the amount of times teacher went on strike over the past 30 years on one hand, and have plenty of fingers left over.

        • ropata 9.1.1.2

          You didn’t read the link did you. You have no idea what teachers do. When were you kicked out of school? 1976?

    • Ian 9.2

      This is Hipkins moment and it will be his downfall. He has been totally sucked in by the teachers union that is backing lazy,incompetent teachers.

      • One Anonymous Bloke 9.2.1

        They’re all Marxists too. They’ll be seizing all the private schools any day now. Better get your inbred mokos to Randistan quick!

      • ropata 9.2.2

        Public schools are just education camps for the revolution, giving young Kiwis hope for the future. Those bastard teachers. /sarc

        • In Vino 9.2.2.1

          Ian
          You need an apostrophe after teachers (teachers’ unions – OK?) unless you are happy to be a lazy, incompetent writer. Think about an apostrophe for Hipkins as well – how would you insert it? (It is needed there too.)
          Over 80% of teachers belong to and support their unions. No, they are not protecting the incompetent. Nobody likes picking up the extra work that incompetent teachers cause others to get. In my experience, over 80% of the best teachers and over 80% of those who should not be teaching all belong to the union. I have known a few really good teachers who did not like the union. I have also known a few duds who also refused to join the union.
          Your view is that of someone who knows very little about it all, as I see it.

          • Ian 9.2.2.1.1

            Your rambling nonsence is hard to decipher. I have had a lot to do with teachers over many years and have a great respect for
            good teachers. I have no respect for unioinised ,brainwashed fuckwits that put their personal aspirations ahead of their students.

            • ropata 9.2.2.1.1.1

              Yes everybody went to school Ian.

            • In Vino 9.2.2.1.1.2

              Ian – you have revealed that you are not a good reader. The word is nonsense, not the silly way you spelt it. I just told you that 80+% of good teachers support their union, but you claim to know otherwise.
              Should anyone have any respect for the crap that you are writing?

            • repateet 9.2.2.1.1.3

              And of the teachers you have had a lot to do with, how many were unionised, brainwashed fuckwits who put their personal aspirations ahead of their students? How was that exhibited?

              How welcome do you think “unionised, brainwashed fuckwits who put their personal aspirations ahead of their students” are amongst their colleagues?

            • tracey 9.2.2.1.1.4

              I have no respect for individually contracted, brainwashed fuckwits that put their personal financial and career aspirations ahead of their students.

            • greywarshark 9.2.2.1.1.5

              Ian – You missed the ‘some of my best friends are teachers’ line. That’s a popular one to throw into an argument to make some sort of illusory point. Of the type that you specialise in.

      • JanM 9.2.3

        Spouting that sort of tripe is simply feeding into the devious plot to downgrade the professionalism of teachers to make them the powerless servants of neoliberalism. They were meant to produce, not the creative reflective citizens who were able to make our world a better place, but ‘factory fodder’.
        The unintended consequence of this has been, of course, that teaching is no longer an attractive profession for the people with the intelligence and education to enter, so we have an impending crisis of numbers.
        Well done!!!

    • ianmac 9.3

      “However National Standards are not responsible for these poor educational outcomes. Standards are designed to measure outcomes….”
      Fair comment if only the National Standards did that. Well they don’t.
      Like saying which street is best? Rather depends on the criteria, who is judging, and how they are to be compared to others. That street is best but, but, but….

    • Stuart Munro 9.4

      It’s surprising how much what you measure becomes what you do. Conforming to arbitrarily or worse, interestedly set standards will sabotage any non-standard strategies like tailoring lessons to a class or optimizing for acquisition or deep processing.

      I’ve spent a lot of time teaching in Korea, where measurement is required for every little thing. They spend more per capita on ELT than almost any other country, and for worse results. Try to run a little productive practice as an add-on and they demand assessment – which traumatizes the students and eats all your free time ensuring an objective measure.

  10. greywarshark 10

    The systems in education are set up as a way of educating the children. The National Standards set up a narrow pathway which was closely monitored and all children had to follow it.

    The authorities decided that concentrating on the NS and the pathways to it was the most important part of education. If the children could not learn the required exercises, or rote learn, then they were not regarded as educated. The NS were very restrictive as all were expected to advance together like a herd.

    Children who didn’t enjoy the restrictive NS teaching learned less than they would have normally because so much of the other subjects could not be taught until they had achieved the required NS. The answer is to keep teaching across the curriculum and give extra tutoring to help them understand the concepts for what replaces NS.

  11. Incognito 11

    National Standards was a restrictive straitjacket that prescribed a narrow normative model (one size fits all) that teachers and children had to conform to. It was about power & control; no wonder that National loved it so much, as if it was tailor-made for them …

    • tracey 11.1

      It was a throwback to 50 years ago and was doomed to failure in the world today which bears no resemblance to that of yester-yore. Of course there are bad and lazy teachers. There are those in all professions. That is a giant red herring.

  12. James 12

    It seems to me, reading through the comments that most of the anti NS feeling is ideological and partisan. I have 4 children, a 20yo, currently a student at MIT and went through the NCEA system. a 7yo girl, 9yo boy and a 3yo girl.
    As an involved parent in my children’s education and life, it has been an interesting journey so far. The NCEA system is deeply flawed and promoted mediocrity and an almost “anyone can pass” attitude from the schools, low on credits in one subject make them up somewhere else. Everyone’s a winner and even the most lazy 16 and 17yo’s in the south Auckland school my oldest son attended “achieved”.
    The NS was a good way to measure where my younger two were at in relation to the rest of the kids in the country and was easy to see where we needed to do more work with our children at home as well as where the teachers need to direct that child. My 9yo boy is a high functioning Autistic student and has for his entire life been below NS for his age group, until a few months ago where he made the NS in reading for the first time.
    Above Draco said “Only if you want to destroy some children’s belief in themselves. If you need to divide the community into haves and have-nots.”
    This is rubbish, as at no time was my son made to feel like a have not because he was below nation standards. We simply put more time into his subjects that he was behind in. with my 7yo daughter she has been above and below NS and we have worked with her teacher on individual plans.
    I truly believe that any fall in education standards is not due the NS as NS is only a measure.

    • Robert Guyton 12.1

      The effects of requiring this particular measure, National Standards, has contributed to the recent fall in education standards, no question about it.

    • One Anonymous Bloke 12.2

      Who cares what you believe? Children should be taught on the basis of sound pedagogy, not your reckons.

      The only comment you need to read to understand the issue is at 4.1.2.3.1.1.

      • James 12.2.1

        Geez OAB, a bit harsh there… And hard to make out what your saying “Who cares what you believe? Children should be taught on the basis of sound pedagogy, not your reckons.”
        As you are a parent, is it NS that is making them not achieve, your parenting, the curriculum or the teacher? Also if your children are achieving well is that measured against NS or your idea of where the child should be.
        Is it OK to have an opinion that is not so ideologically aligned with yours?
        As a foot note, I spent my school life in the late 70’s and 80’s split between a Rudolf Steiner school (I was living next door to and went to school with Jeanette Fitzsimons and her children) and State school, both had their merits and drawbacks.
        But the real world is not all flowers and honey unlike my childhood growing up on a farm with hippy parents and an “off the grid lifestyle”.

        • tracey 12.2.1.1

          The real world comes in many guises and does not conform to one perspective. By all means consider NS has been a success for your children. Another possibility is the teaching has been a success for your children and tgat NS was a method by which you coukd acknowledge it cos you didnt trust it was competent before NS?

          Individual plans, btw, are not unique to NS. They existed before as an integral part of teaching.

          You appear to conflate reporting to you against an external measure of “normal” with advancing your child’s learning.

        • One Anonymous Bloke 12.2.1.2

          As a parent, my children travel across bridges, therefore civil engineers should take my reckons into account in their calculations.

          No? And poof! There goes the whole “parental anxiety trumps expertise” argument.

          The National Party creates a constituency for its education policies greedy vandalism by appealing to parental anxiety. Sharpen up.

          Edit: Is it OK to have an opinion that is not so ideologically aligned with yours?

          Sure it is. I am a self-described nobody – my reckons have no value whatsoever. I’m just not sure that pedagogy is ideology but.

          • tracey 12.2.1.2.1

            Nice to point out a difference between ideology and pedagogy. Something Nats struggle with despite having a chief science advisor

    • tracey 12.3

      Where is he in non reading areas?

      You know the work you did with the teacher? Multiply that by the number of children in tge class. Imagine most of your class has english as a second language. Now think about those individual plans and working with each set of parents etc… none of which is time spent preparing lessons and teaching, going to meetings, doing duty.

  13. greywarshark 13

    teachers who have supportive family up till now may spend evening hours up till 11 pm working on keeping up with NS requirements. Most will like to put that time into planning interesting new lesson plans that will be enjoyed and advance the children through their age-specific learning.

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    1 day ago
  • Next steps in Criminal Cases Review Commission announced
    Justice Minister Andrew Little and New Zealand First MP Darroch Ball, have today announced the appointment of the Chief Commissioner of the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), the location, and the membership of the Establishment Advisory Group. Colin Carruthers QC has been appointed Chief Commissioner of the CCRC for an ...
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    1 day ago
  • Horticultural Ahuwhenua Trophy finalists announced
    Māori Development Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta and Agriculture Minister Hon Damien O’Connor co-announced the first horticultural finalists for the Ahuwhenua Trophy celebrating excellence in the Māori agricultural sector.  The three finalists are Ngai Tukairangi Trust from Mt Maunganui, Otama Marere Trust from Tauranga, and Hineora Orchard Te Kaha 15B Ahuwhenua ...
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    1 day ago
  • New support for students with dyslexia
    A new kete of resources to strengthen support for students with dyslexia will provide extra tools for the new Learning Support Coordinators (LSCs) as they start in schools, Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin announced today. The Minister launched the kete in Wellington this morning, at the first of three induction ...
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    1 day ago
  • Rental reforms progress to select committee stage
    The Government continues to make progress on a fairer and more secure rental market for renters and landlords with the First Reading of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill and its referral to the Social Services and Community Select Committee.  “Now is the opportunity for landlords, tenants and others who want ...
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    2 days ago
  • Papua New Guinea Prime Minister to visit New Zealand
    Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister Hon James Marape will visit New Zealand from 21-25 February, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. “New Zealand and Papua New Guinea have a warm and friendly relationship. I look forward to welcoming Prime Minister Marape here and strengthening the relationship between our two countries,” ...
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    2 days ago
  • Free school lunches served up to thousands
    Thousands of children have begun receiving a free lunch on every day of the school week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said. The Government’s free and healthy school lunch programme is under way for 7,000 students at 31 schools in Hawke’s Bay / Tairāwhiti and Bay of Plenty / Waiariki, extending ...
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    2 days ago
  • Social Wellbeing Agency replaces Social Investment Agency with new approach
    The Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni today announced a new approach that continues to broaden the Government’s social sector focus from a narrow, investment approach to one centred on people and wellbeing. Minister Sepuloni said redefining the previous approach to social investment by combining science, data and lived experience ...
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    2 days ago
  • Government to strengthen protections for whistleblowers
    The Government is strengthening the Protected Disclosures Act to provide better protection for whistle blowers, Minister of State Services Chris Hipkins said today. “The Protected Disclosures Act is meant to encourage people to speak up about serious wrongdoing in the workplace and protect them from losing their jobs or being ...
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    2 days ago
  • PM speech at Parliamentary Chinese New Year celebration 2020
    Nǐn hǎo (Hello in Mandarin). Xīn Nián Kuài Lè (Happy New Year in Mandarin) Néi Hóu (Hello in Cantonese). Sun Nin Fai Lok (Happy New Year in Cantonese) Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa. Thank you for your invitation to attend this celebration today. I would like to acknowledge ...
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    2 days ago
  • IPANZ Annual Address
    Kia ora. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki te Whare Pāremata. E ngā mana whenua ki tēnei rohe Taranaki Whānui, Te Upoko o Te Ika, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Raukawa – kei te mihi, kei te mihi, kei te mihi. E ngā mana, e ...
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    3 days ago
  • 2020 IPANZ Annual Address
    Kia ora. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki te Whare Pāremata. E ngā mana whenua ki tēnei rohe Taranaki Whānui, Te Upoko o Te Ika, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Raukawa – kei te mihi, kei te mihi, kei te mihi. E ngā mana, e ngā ...
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    3 days ago
  • Tougher penalties for gun crime a step closer
    Tougher penalties for gun crime are a step closer with the passage of firearms reform legislation through another stage in Parliament. The Arms Legislation Bill has tonight passed its Second Reading. “The changes have one objective - to prevent firearms falling into the wrong hands,” said Police Minister Stuart Nash. ...
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    3 days ago
  • Arms Legislation Bill: Second Reading
    Introduction Mr Speaker We all know why we are here today. It has been a long journey. The journey did not actually begin on 15 March 2019. It began on 30 June 1997. Almost 23 years ago, Justice Sir Thomas Thorp told us what was wrong with our firearms legislation. ...
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    3 days ago
  • New era for vocational education
    The Government’s work to put trades and vocational education back on the agenda took another major step forward today with the passing of the Education (Vocational Education and Training Reform) Amendment Bill, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said. “This is a watershed day for trades and vocational education. These law changes formalise ...
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    3 days ago
  • Bill to Amend the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act
    Speeding up the return of Christchurch regeneration activities to local leadership is behind the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Amendment Bill introduced to Parliament today by Minister Megan Woods. “As we approach nine years since the February 2011 earthquake in Canterbury, and with the transition to local leadership well underway, the time ...
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    3 days ago
  • Milford Track to partly reopen after storm damage
    Hundreds of New Zealanders and international visitors will be able to get back out into nature with the Milford Track partially reopening next week, after extensive assessments and repairs, the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage announced today. The popular Great Walk has been closed since 3 February after an extreme ...
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    3 days ago
  • Government drives low-emissions transport momentum
    Up to 110 new EV chargers nationwide in cities and regions 50 electric vehicles for ride-sharing The Government is helping deliver more infrastructure and options for low emissions transport through new projects, Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods says. Tauranga, Nelson, Levin, New Plymouth and Oamaru are just some ...
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    3 days ago
  • Kiwis better off under Coalition Government
    New Zealanders are increasingly better off under this Government as wages rise and families have more disposable income, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. Stats NZ reported today that average household disposable incomes after housing costs rose 4.9% in 2019. This was the highest rise in four years and came as ...
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    4 days ago
  • Another step towards restoring rights for screen production workers
    All New Zealanders need to have their voices heard at work to ensure we have an inclusive and productive economy. Today we introduce a Bill to do this for workers in the New Zealand screen industry, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Iain Lees-Galloway says. “The Screen Industry Workers Bill will ...
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    4 days ago
  • Enhanced Taskforce Green for Southland and South Otago
    The Government has announced further help for the Southland and Otago regions to speed up recovery efforts from the floods.  “I’ve approved Enhanced Taskforce Green (ETFG), making $500,000 available to help with the clean-up in Fiordland, Southland, and the Clutha district in Otago,” Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni said.  ...
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    4 days ago
  • Employers and Industry take the lead to connect students to vocational education
    Following the announcement that more than 340 schools will be funded to run events promoting vocational education, the Government has announced it will fund a further 257 events to be run by employers and industry. “These industry-run events will allow more than 30,000 students to connect with more than 2,000 ...
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    4 days ago
  • Rental reforms a step closer with the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill
    Today the Government is making progress on a fairer and more secure rental market for renters and landlords with the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill in Parliament.  “This Bill includes a series of reforms to improve the wellbeing of the 609,700 households that live in rented homes, and ...
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    5 days ago
  • Biosecurity Minister announces world first eradication of pea weevil
    A Government programme to wipe out pea weevil has achieved a world first, with Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor today announcing the successful eradication of the noxious pest from Wairarapa. This means the nearly four-year ban on pea plants and pea straw was lifted today. Commercial and home gardeners can again grow ...
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    5 days ago
  • Temporary Accommodation Service activated for Southland flooding
    Southland residents hit by flooding caused by heavy rainfall can now access help finding temporary accommodation with the Government activating the Temporary Accommodation Service, Minister of Civil Defence Peeni Henare announced today. “The Temporary Accommodation Service (TAS) has been activated by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to help ...
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    5 days ago
  • Bridges: Over-hyped and under-delivered
    “Is that it?” That’s Finance Minister Grant Robertson’s response to Simon Bridges’ much-hyped economic speech today. “Simon Bridges just gave the most over-hyped and under-delivered speech that I can remember during my time in politics,” Grant Robertson said. “It’s not surprising. Simon Bridges literally said on the radio this morning ...
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    5 days ago
  • Police to trial eye in the sky in Christchurch
    A trial deployment of the Police Eagle helicopter in Christchurch will test whether the aircraft would make a significant difference to crime prevention and community safety. “The Bell 429 helicopter will be based in Christchurch for five weeks, from 17 February to 20 March,” said Police Minister Stuart Nash. “The ...
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    5 days ago
  • Momentum of trade talks continues with visits to promote Pacific and Middle East links
    The Government has kept up the pace of its work to promote New Zealand’s trade interests and diversify our export markets, with visits to Fiji and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker. Building momentum to bring the PACER Plus trade and development agreement ...
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    5 days ago
  • Coalition Govt’s investment in Customs nets record drugs haul: 3 tonnes stopped at borders in 2019
    The Coalition Government’s investment in a strong border and disrupting transnational organised crime produced record results for stopping drugs in 2019, says Minister of Customs Jenny Salesa. The illegal drugs were seized at the New Zealand border by Customs, and overseas by Customs’ international border partners before the drugs could ...
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    6 days ago
  • Separated scenic cycleway starts
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford today kicked off construction of a separated cycleway alongside Tamaki Drive. A two-way separated cycleway will be built along the northern side of Tamaki Drive, between the Quay Street Cycleway extension and Ngapipi Road. There will be a separate walking path alongside. Phil Twyford said giving ...
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    6 days ago
  • Earthquake-Prone Building loan scheme: eligibility criteria announced
    Owner-occupiers of unit and apartments living in earthquake-prone buildings will have certainty about the financial support they’ll be eligible for with the release of criteria for an upcoming assistance scheme, Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa says. The Residential Earthquake-Prone Building Financial Assistance Scheme will help unit owners facing ...
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    6 days ago
  • Travel restrictions to remain in place as coronavirus precaution
    Temporary restrictions on travel from China will remain in place as a precautionary measure to protect against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. The restrictions which prevent foreign nationals travelling from, or transiting through, mainland China from entering New Zealand have been extended for a further 8 days. This position ...
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    1 week ago
  • Over $1 million to help Tairāwhiti youth into employment
    Employment Minister Willie Jackson announced today that Tairāwhiti rangatahi will benefit from an investment made by the Government’s He Poutama Rangatahi (HPR) scheme. The funding will go to the Tautua Village, Kauneke programme and the Matapuna Supported Employment Programme which will fund 120 rangatahi over two years. “Both programmes work ...
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    1 week ago
  • School attendance has to improve
    All parents and caregivers need to ensure that their children go to school unless they are sick, Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin said today. “The school attendance results for 2019 show, across the board, a drop in the number of students going to school regularly,” the Minister says. “Apart from ...
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    1 week ago
  • Crown and Moriori sign a Deed of Settlement
    A Deed of Settlement agreeing redress for historical Treaty claims has been signed by the Crown and Moriori at Kōpinga Marae on Rēkohu (Chatham Islands) today, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little has announced. Moriori have a tradition of peace that extends back over 600 years. This settlement ...
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    1 week ago
  • Waikato Expressway driving towards completion
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford today with Māori King Tuheitia Pōtatau Te Wherowhero VII officially opened the country’s newest road, the $384 million Huntly section of the Waikato Expressway. The 15km four-lane highway with side and central safety barriers takes State Highway 1 east of Huntly town, across lowlands and streams ...
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    1 week ago
  • 3400 New Zealanders treated in first year of new hepatitis C treatment
    The rapid uptake of life-saving new hepatitis C medicine Maviret since it was funded by PHARMAC a year ago means the elimination of the deadly disease from this country is a realistic goal, Health Minister David Clark says. Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus which attacks the liver, proving fatal ...
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    1 week ago
  • Kaupapa Māori approach for homelessness
      Kaupapa Māori will underpin the Government’s new plan to deal with homelessness announced by the Prime Minister in Auckland this morning. “Māori are massively overrepresented among people experiencing homelessness, so, to achieve different outcomes for Māori, we have to do things very differently,” says the Minister of Māori Development ...
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    1 week ago
  • Government steps up action to prevent homelessness
    1000 new transitional housing places delivered by end of year to reduce demand for emergency motel accommodation. Introduce 25% of income payment, after 7 days, for those in emergency motel accommodation to bring in line with other forms of accommodation support. Over $70m extra to programmes that prevents those at ...
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    1 week ago