Open mike 02/04/2013

Written By: - Date published: 6:00 am, April 2nd, 2013 - 173 comments
Categories: open mike - Tags:

Open mike is your post. For announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose.

The usual rules of good behaviour apply (see the link to Policy in the banner).

Step right up to the mike…

173 comments on “Open mike 02/04/2013 ”

  1. Jenny 1

    With their latest legislation to restrict the rights of protest around mining and drilling, National has declared open season on the environment and environmentalists.

    It all adds up.

    This government is waging open warfare on the environment

    From weakening the Resource Management Act

    To withdrawing from Kyoto

    To downsizing Doc

    For all their numerous big and small other assaults on the environment up and down the country.

    This is clearly a government in the pocket of the polluters, on whose behalf they are waging this undeclared war.

    Have the National Party got a mandate for this war?

    No they haven’t

    Time for all the opposition parties to call a public rally on the steps of parliament to oppose the legislation scrapping the final last remaining level of environmental protection, the right for the public to effectively protest against the actions of the polluters and the wreckers.

    Come on you guys. Do you want to win the next election or not?

    • Ennui 1.1

      Years back environmentalists etc predicted that as resources such as water became scarce there would be a greater grab for the public domain by private capital, alongside a stronger resistance to these grabs. The corollary was that private interests via their own agencies or the state would do their utmost to ensure that resistance was squashed….hence 1 year inside, or $100,000 fines for doing a Lucy Lawless.

  2. karol 2

    So, the game of chess continues. Rio Tinto has turned down the government’s offer of short term help to get over the current problem. Rio Tinto say they want a longer term deal from the government. What a bunch of leeches. They want to bleed kiwi tax payers indefinitely in order to protect their desired profit margin.

    But Prime Minister John Key told Newstalk ZB’s Mike Hosking that the company came back over the weekend to turn down the offer made by the Government, saying they wanted a longer term deal than the Government was prepared to offer.

    Key admitted it was possible the issue would not be sorted out.

    “In the end, that will leave Rio Tinto with their contract,” he said.

    “They will pay more than they otherwise would for that period of time, and then there would be some sort of phase-down of the smelter. That’s definitely a possibility.”

    Why is the PM releasing this info on Newstalk ZB?

    PS: No, that is just where the NZH got their info. It was also disclosed on Firstline this morning, and possibly elsewhere.

    Labour’s state-owned enterprises spokesperson Clayton Cosgrove says Rio Tinto has the Government “bent over a barrel”.
    “They were warned about this by analysts,” he said on Firstline this morning.
    “They were told that if they didn’t tie down the Rio Tinto issue before proceeding to sell Mighty River Power, that the trap would be sprung. The trap has been sprung, and the Government is all over the place.”

    Mr Cosgrove says Rio Tinto executives will be “licking their lips” over the Government’s handling of the issue.
    “All the cards are, of course, in Rio Tinto’s hands because the Government has said [it will sell state-owned power companies] come hell or high water, regardless of the risks.”

    • Ennui 2.1

      Rio Tinto have the perfect negotiating position: they dont really care short term because the whole market is shaky, price may collapse. As a consequence, they will demand all sorts of unrealistic deals because they have nothing to lose short term: NZ however see this as a big loss. Its a little blip on RTs books..

  3. ianmac 3

    “Why is the PM releasing this info on Newstalk ZB?”
    Leaking of the leeches?

    And in the Herald:
    “Rio Tinto has rejected the Government’s offer to subsidise the Tiwai Point Aluminium Smelter power bill……..”
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10874850

    • Morrissey 3.1

      Why is the PM releasing this info on Newstalk ZB?

      NewstalkZB is the semi-official state broadcaster.

      Interestingly, one of its slogans is “Fair and Balanced.” And, yes, that’s also the Fox News slogan.

  4. karol 4

    The Green Party took time out yesterday to have a laugh on themselves, and send up the stereotype of the party peddled by many in the MSM and beyond. In the form of a press release on employment law proposals, it ends:

    Proposed additional statutory holidays

    March 24: Look after the environment day (all)
    April 16 – Rebirth the Earth (Catherine Delahunty)
    May 5 – Buy local, Eat local day (Eugenie Sage)
    May 11: Bob Marley’s commemoration day (all)
    June 20: Love your cycle (not in a dirty way) day (Julie Anne Genter)
    July 12: Bigger words are better day (Kennedy Graham/Eugenie Sage)
    September 20: Dave’s dancing day (David Clendon)
    October 11: Dolphin love day (Gareth Hughes)
    April 1: April’s fool’s day (all)

    All days would be Mondayised or Fridayised as appropriate

    • Rosie 4.1

      LOL, go The Greens! Being able to have a laugh at oneself shows humility and that’s a quality that would be good to see more of in our main opposition party. (not to mention fire in the belly, unity, strong leadership and direction but thats all been said before).

      Sad that the hippy dippy stereotype still prevails after all this time. That clueless buffoon Jesse Mulligan (God only knows why he calls himself a comedian) made a fool of himself on 7 Days when he lampooned The Green Party many episodes ago now. No one else on the panel laughed. It was like they had moved on from the stereotype and he hadn’t. He was also quite patronising towards Mojo Mathers when she was a guest on the show. He was shouting at her. Oh dear. It’s not helpful that someone so ignorant has a role in the media.

  5. Has the Solid Energy board gone rogue?

    I was having a squiz at the batch of Treasury papers that were released and there was this one containing a comment that the board thought that Solid Energy’s current strategy was appropriate and that “a retail-based IPO for Solid Energy is not the appropriate way forward”.

    Are they saying that Solid Energy should not be sold off? I wonder what the Minister thinks?

  6. Draco T Bastard 6

    The veil of deception over money

    This paper from the Real World Economics Review argues that we are being intentionally and systematically mislead about the nature of money and about the role of central banks and commercial banks in the monetary system.

    Understanding our monetary system is vital for all people.

    • Ennui 6.1

      Counter party obligations, bundled securities, rehypothecated debt, repackaged derivatives, debt obligations, etc etc etc. We should understand but the language deliberately obscures understanding. Joe Average (aka me and my greater circle of acquaintances) don’t stand a snow balls chance in Hell of keeping up to speed on the language of fraud (aka finance). Jokey Hen by comparison seems to have either been the author of the terms or to have known the person/s responsible well.

      • Draco T Bastard 6.1.1

        IMO, Once understanding of the basics is known then picking out the BS becomes easier. And the paper linked to is about the basics – how money is actually formed.

        • aerobubble 6.1.1.1

          National keeps hammering home how the Greens want to print money, I mean, the nerve of the Green party to use government to manage the money supply for the good of the people. Even as the partial downgrading of the ability of banks to prime the gearing levers in the housing sector. National want it both ways, and Labour just keep letting them off. Now the attack is on the speaker for not holding ministers to account, geez, if Labour had real pertinent penetrating questions that unbalanced the govt benches you can be damn sure the govt would be answering them. Its in the interests of govt to have a balanced open debating forum, and to keep the debate from uncovering their deceptions. Money is controlled by the people, for the people and of the people (govt), how hard is that for Labour to get out and say????

          Look at farming, capital gains exemption has left farmers in debt and running into regular droughts and floods without a lifeboat (as govt won’t do anything since the market will provide farmers with the incentives to change, like water rights for 35 years that make it uneconomic to invest in farm dams!!!). So whose actually looking after farmers, and citizens? Not National, not Labour.

          • Colonial Viper 6.1.1.1.1

            Labour doesn’t want to be seen as supporting unorthodox monetary policy (even though the G7 is already printing money as fast as they can). Too socialist. Might scare the capitalist market horses.

            Fun fact: since the GFC started, the world’s major central banks have printed an additional US$10T of money into the world economy. For all the good it’s done the ordinary citizen.

            • muzza 6.1.1.1.1.1

              $10T – just the printing ? Does that figure include the TARP schemes, Bond purchases, bail outs etc?

              Expect the number to be magnificantly higher than that!

              • Rob

                So that is the saliant point $10 trillion printed and released and for what.

                • muzza

                  $10T, could be used to provide life sustaining/enhancing systems, for most of the underprivileged, in any part of the world they happen to be!

                  But it went to propping up balance sheets, capital ratios, margin calls, and bonus payments, while preventing the house of cards from collapse! – $10T can support huge amounts of leveregded transactions, and thats what most of the money has been used for!

                  Meanwhile the global derivatives, commodities, and equities markets , forge ahead with scant regards!!!

                  • Colonial Viper

                    $10T can support huge amounts of leveregded transactions, and thats what most of the money has been used for!

                    Indeed, $10T in base money probably turned into US$500T in leveraged financial mechanisms and associated debt.

      • Colonial Viper 6.1.2

        DTB is quite right. Bullshit baffles brains. The thing that TPTB absolutely resist is simplification of the system. They need more and more layers of complexity in order to play their money/debt/obligation shuffling games.

        If we were to stick with the basics it would be around:
        – Fulfilling of fiduciary duty.
        – Sourcing debt free, non interest bearing money.
        – Making banking absolutely boring and basic, aimed at the needs of the real economy.

        But in a situation like that, the big finance banking types couldn’t justify their $5M salaries.

        As for cutting through the financial BS, Max Keiser on youtube is excellent. As is Kyle Bass:

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUc8-GUC1hY

        • muzza 6.1.2.1

          You can apply the same to the legal systems!

          • Ugly Truth 6.1.2.1.1

            The financial system and the legal system both use alternative representations (persons) for the people they deal with. Their systems are paper based, and the alternative representation is a name written in ALL CAPS. This representation has been called a nom-de-guerre, or war name. The enforcers for this system, here and in England, also use military titles (constable & seargant).

            • muzza 6.1.2.1.1.1

              Yes, its unfortunate that you have attracted so much heat from commentators here, although it seeks to illustrate the trouble NZ is in, when the supposed *more thoughful* types, attack information which attempts to explain how the fraud is possible, via the legal/judicial systems which NZ is controlled by.

              Same owners of the financial systems of course, but thats not something which people want to hear about!

              • The good ship status quo doesn’t turn on a dime, muzza. Hopefully everyone involved can put ego aside long enough to think about the points being raised.

    • Recommended viewing on the Federal Reserve from a mainstream source

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8nNzA7v7JA

    • Draco T Bastard 6.4

      BBC admitted their video “How do Banks Work?” was misleading

      but at last it resulted in BBC admitting that the video “left a misleading impression of how banks in fact work, and of the impact of the working of banks on the economy at large.” and the video was removed from the website.

      Seems to have been a long process to get the BBC to admit that they were wrong.

  7. Ennui 7

    Saw this on Open Mike big brother and the screw cru

    The new fascist credit sharing of your info with the biggest parasites in the finance industry you know the ones 40 years ago who use to repo your car at ten at night or before you went to work in the morning usually with a large persuader in the form of a wrestler or someone for hire with no name got the picture
    These thugs now are respectable legal and powerful and who knows who they will be able to swap your credit history to….

    A year ago I was not allowed to pay rego on my scooter because I had no warrant….being slack I left it off the road. Rego bills appeared, attempts to pay were rejected. I remained resolutely slack.

    Next thing: Dun & Bradstreet letter demands money with menaces to my credit worthiness. So I was able to pay. Somehow the cash had now become acceptable despite the other regulations.

    More importantly it raised some very basic questions about my role as a citizen and my relationship to the state. Who out there feels some degree of dis-ease that the state gives your “debt” to them to a private contractor who makes commercial threats against you?

  8. Seti 8

    Do the current crime stats just released, which show the lowest level of recorded offences in 24 years, indicate more people are happy with their lot?

    • Chris73 8.1

      Good news for National…not so good for Labour

      • aerobubble 8.1.1

        No. Youth just realizes that a criminal record means you cannot travel, and given the way the country is run, they need the ability to.

      • If crime has been reduced why the hell would you think that is bad news for Labour. ?
        You bloody Tories are a strange nasty lot .zs a Labour Party member I find that remark most offensive.
        Any way if anyone believes that crime is reduced they will believe anything. the violence in our present society is rapidly rising regardless of what the
        Tory press tell. Just look at the reported acts of violence reported each week.

    • karol 8.2

      The number of “recorded” crimes dropped. Depends if they got stricter/more lax in which crimes were recorded.

      Murders went up – it’s hard not to record a murder, though there is fuzzy territory for how some deaths are classified.

      PS: note this:

      Post-quake Canterbury was one of the few regions to post an increase in crime, with figures showing a 5.6 per cent rise in general crime.

      Acting Commissioner Viv Rickard said the figures reflected front-line police work.

      ie indicates stats went up because police were more vigilant in pursuing and recording reported crimes.

    • lprent 8.3

      Or amount of recording has reduced as traditionally happens under National as they steadily erode the ability of police to effectively deal with any crime.

      It was pointless telling the police about most petty crimes in the 1990s because they didn’t do anything with it. The only reason that anyone did was because the insurance companies insisted. Oh and now the ever increasing cost of insurance is reducing the number of people having it.

      Look at the serious violence crimes and see the picture change. And that will be despite a aging population that is steadily reducing the crime rate, just as it is in every developed country.

      You really are a stupid pissant – relying on total figures without looking at the detail.

      • Chris73 8.3.1

        Relying on total figures when it suits National: Bad
        Relying on total figures when it suits Labour: Good

        • Te Reo Putake 8.3.1.1

          Wow, devasting putdown of your own strawman, Chris. Did you spend all of Easter working this epic effort up?

          • chris73 8.3.1.1.1

            Well it wasn’t a put down more so a statement.

            Like crimes figures are down so the left say its due to non-reporting.
            John Key won’t give extra subsidies to rio tinto (and we all know you lefties lurve subsidies to foreign companies) and you lefties will (probably) say hes doesn’t care about jobs.

            • McFlock 8.3.1.1.1.1

              Actually, a lot of the folk here argued that Tiwai should be closed based on emissions, lower energy costs for the rest of the country, and that subsidy argument you just brought up. I’m one of the few against that on the grounds of the massive harm to Southland should it shut. But even then I’m not in favour of subsidies to Rio Tinto. No real reason against nationalisation, given its regional importance.

              • geoff

                No real reason against nationalisation, given its regional importance.

                It’s a profitless export business, apart from saving jobs why on earth would you nationalise it?

                • McFlock

                  Profitless? I doubt that the energy subsidy is all that is between Tiwai and bankruptcy, but I’m open to correction on that score.

                  It’s a classic value-added industry – import raw material, smelt into higher quality material, export. And the employment injects income into a rural centre so the money flows back through the country into the financial centres.

                  • geoff

                    Rod Oram says that the big picture is that China is rapidly developing its aluminium smelting, with new efficient smelters that Tiwai Point could never compete with unless you spent oodles of money. Rio Tinto is trying to flog off all of its old smelters (like Tiwai Point) because they can’t make money from them.
                    Rio Tinto can’t make money from it but you think if NZ owned it then we could??

        • lprent 8.3.1.2

          Show an instance of me doing it?

          Otherwise you’re really just farting from the fingers yet again with yet another silly myth.

          • chris73 8.3.1.2.1

            Show an instance of me doing it?

            – Sure of course, I’ll just scrawl through the entire back catalogue of The Standard just to find an instance of where lprent showed double standards towards John Key.

            Then after I’ve posted it you’ll probably reply with something along the lines of “you got it wrong”

            Yeah I’ll just do that

      • Seti 8.3.2

        Look at the serious violence crimes and see the picture change. And that will be despite a aging population that is steadily reducing the crime rate, just as it is in every developed country.

        You really are a stupid pissant – relying on total figures without looking at the detail.

        I did look at the detail, did you?

        In the last year –
        Homicide and related offences, down 18.1%
        Acts intended to cause injury (violence), down 3.4%

        Total offences 2010, 2011, 2012 –
        Homicide and related offences – 97; 83; 68, down 30%
        Acts intended to cause injury, last 3 years – 44,515; 42,278; 40,851, down 8.2%

        Since National elected in 2008 to 2012 –
        Homicide and related offences, down 33%
        Acts intended to cause injury, down 3%

        Whose the stupid pissant now?

        • chris73 8.3.2.1

          Don’t bother, someone will just say its either:

          A. More people are reporting crimes (so nothing to do with National)

          or

          B. People aren’t reporting crimes (so everything to do with National)

          Depending on the situation

        • karol 8.3.2.2

          Interesting that “murder and related offences” went down (by 15 offences), while the number of murders went up by 3.

          There’s not only the issue of (under)reporting but differences in what is recorded. From the above linked article:

          A departure in recent years from the way police report domestic violence has lead to a reduction in recorded domestic violence offences.

          “Assaults in dwellings most commonly occur between family members,” Rickard said.

          “Police now have the ability to issue PSOs – Police Safety Orders.

          “These enforce a cool-down period by providing temporary separation of parties in domestic situations where police believe there is a risk of escalation to serious violence.

          In 2012 police issued 10,064 PSOs – up nearly 40 per cent on the number of PSOs delivered in 2011.

          Burlary stats went down, and car thefts. However, if people are not insured, they are less likely to report burglaries.

          These kinds of things will also be impacted by the willingness of police to pursue and/or record the matter:

          Theft and related offences dropped by 11.8 per cent (15,966 offences). This category makes up approximately one third of all recorded offences.

          – Nationally, there were 2917 fewer stolen vehicles than the previous year – a drop of 14.1 per cent. Thefts from cars reduced by 15.8 per cent.

          – Property damage and environmental pollution offences fell by 5.9 per cent.

          • muzza 8.3.2.2.1

            Burlary stats went down, and car thefts. However, if people are not insured, they are less likely to report burglaries.

            I experienced first hand a situation, where an intruder was inside a property, a call placed to the police, the response was, *sorry you will have to make an appointment*, 48 hours.

            When it was repeated there was someone in the house, same answer – 48 hours!

    • muzza 8.4

      Nothing about the crimes being committed against the populace by the government then!

  9. Northshoreguynz 9

    Check out the lead in paint link before starting to apportion votes.
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/07/violent-crime-lead-poisoning-british-export

  10. ropata 10

    US monetary shenanigans summarised : Sundown in America

    Related: Gallery of economic Villains and Heroes

    Capitalism is fscked.

  11. johnm 11

    Banks threaten to increase repossessions as Irish mortgage crisis deepens

    ‘A massive property bubble prior to 2008, brought on by the speculative activities of the banks and encouraged by low tax rates, contributed significantly to the financial collapse five years ago. Since then, the austerity policies implemented by the political elite have shifted the burden of the crisis onto the backs of working people. ‘

    http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/04/01/irel-a01.html

    • Colonial Viper 11.1

      Iceland told the banksters and bondholders to take a leap off a cliff. Their economy is recovering. Greece didn’t, and went along with the plans of the banksters and bondholders.

      Guess how Greece are going in comparison.

      http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-04-01/iceland-vs-greece-pick-winner

      • Populuxe1 11.1.1

        And yet kind of ignoring that the Financial Supervisory Authority of Iceland used emergency legislation to take over the domestic operations of the three largest banks, the IMF Stand-By-Arrangement since November 2008, and Iceland’s application to join the EU in 2009 which was a big factor in restoring international confidence. Currency devaluation effectively reduced wages by 50% making exports more competitive and imports more expensive. Iceland is not the fantasy some people keep trying to sell it as.

        • Colonial Viper 11.1.1.1

          Did I say that there wasn’t hard work and sacrifice involved mate? But at least in the case of Iceland, they charted their own path, pissed off a whole lot of bondholders, and have made it to the other side.

  12. Names have power and they create context and connection that is why I support the changing of the names of the bland and ridiculous ‘North’ and ‘South’ Islands of this country. The fact that the names are not official just shows the idiocy of keeping them. And I don’t support the NZGB’s idea of “that either the English name or the Māori name, or both names together could be used as official.” I say, “FFS just change the names into ‘Te Ika-a-Māui’ (for the North Island) and ‘Te Waipounamu’ (for the South Island). Who in their right mind is attached to ‘North’ and ‘South’ – it is completely bogus and an insult to Māori.”

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1304/S00022/alternative-naming-for-north-south-islands.htm

    http://mars2earth.blogspot.co.nz/2013/04/just-change-nothing-names.html

    • muzza 12.1

      Very right Marty – Why would they not be renamed, is the question.

      What might renaming the island alter in the legal sense?

      There has been little to no contention, (w(h)anganui aside), about the maori naming etc of various locations in NZ, country included, but the North/South Island, seem to the *outside* the conversation!

      • marty mars 12.1.1

        indeed muzza and considering that north and south are not official names is interesting, perhaps more evidence (if it is needed) of the illegitimacy of the colonisation process considering that “on 21 May 1840, Lieutenant-Governor Hobson proclaimed sovereignty over the South Island by discovery”.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Waitangi

        • muzza 12.1.1.1

          If a lie is told, or a fraud committed, the actions thereafter, become focused on hiding the original lie/fraud. Assuming the truth did not come to light, and all lie/fraud related activities , unwound…

          What you end up with, is NZ!

      • Ugly Truth 12.1.2

        Names indicate the character of things, so Māori names for the islands would imply Māori pre-eminence over the land. Arguably this is appropriate since Māori have historical pre-eminence.

    • Draco T Bastard 12.2

      I say, “FFS just change the names into ‘Te Ika-a-Māui’ (for the North Island) and ‘Te Waipounamu’ (for the South Island).

      Would that be changing the names or just giving their rightful names back?

      • marty mars 12.2.1

        + 1 Very true Draco

      • Daveosaurus 12.2.2

        The reaction would be entertaining to watch from a safe distance… just look at how the racist fringe resident in Whanganui have been reacting to a simple fixing up of a spelling mistake!

        • Populuxe1 12.2.2.1

          It’s not a spelling mistake, it’s a travesty of linguistic colonisation. The Ngāti Hau dialect doesn’t have the ‘f’ pronunciation of ‘wh’, therefore the original spelling was perfectly correct phonetically. The so-called “official” standardised Te Reo was originally the version noted down by Professor Samuel Lee working with Hongi Hika and therefore is essentially Ngapuhi. Similarly the Kāi Tahu dialect of the South Island mostly gets ignored except for Aoraki.

        • joe90 12.2.2.2

          >The reaction would be entertaining to watch from a safe distance… just look at how the racist fringe resident in Whanganui have been reacting to a simple fixing up of a spelling mistake!

          They were here, all thirty six of them.

        • Arfamo 12.2.2.3

          Whanganui (when pronounced funganui) is now a common pronunciation mistake. But never mind. Iwi let go of their dialect for the sake of a standard spelling, water under the bridge. Sometimes wonder if the river’s getting back at them via the sewage treatment plant 🙂

          Only problem I have with Te-ika-a-Maui and Te Waipounamu as names is they’re a 6 and 5 syllable mouthful and will get mispronounced horribly.

          • karol 12.2.2.3.1

            Still might be an improvement on “seff illan” and “nuff illan”

            • Arfamo 12.2.2.3.1.1

              Ika (NI) and Pounamu (SI) will be fine by me. But what do we call Stewart Is?

              • Arfamo

                (BTW, most the people I know currently call them “The Naw Thighland”, and “The Sow Thighland”, especially TV newsreaders. 🙂 )

              • Populuxe1

                Rakiura, obviously.

          • Draco T Bastard 12.2.2.3.2

            They’re not hard to pronounce. That said, I think the way Wikipedia has Te Wai Pounamu is probably easier. I don’t know which is the actual correct way or even if there is such a thing.

            • Colonial Weka 12.2.2.3.2.1

              Many people do have trouble pronouncing the ‘ou’ sound correctly. Many Kiwis can’t even pronounce ‘te’ correctly.

    • ropata 12.3

      Te Ika-a-Maui or Nigel ?
      🙂

    • The Al1en 12.4

      Like separatist flag flying on the the harbour bridge, these are just modern day beads and blankets.
      I’m surprised you keep falling for it.

      I reckon, instead of looking for whites under the bed and seeing insults where there are none, you should focus on getting rid of the Maori party collaborators that have done so much harm to Maoridom over the past four and a bit years.

      • marty mars 12.4.1

        fank you 🙂

        • marty mars 12.4.1.1

          Oh dear I missed my spelling mistake 🙂

          • The Al1en 12.4.1.1.1

            “fank you

            Oh dear I missed my spelling mistake”

            I’d guessed as much 😉 😆

        • The Al1en 12.4.1.2

          Change the names or don’t, I’m not bothered either way, but if you think it makes up for a great outrage and insult, then I hope you get your want.
          But the MP are still there, supporting Key all the way to a third term.

          • marty mars 12.4.1.2.1

            I wouldn’t worry too much about the MP they will receive their justice at election time and I’m working quite hard to ensure that happens.

            I wonder how you would feel if the name of your country of birth was changed from England to New Paris for instance – I’m sure you would huff and puff quite a bit. Everytime NZ is used it is a slap in the face to tangata whenua who should be equal in this country. And as for the north and south bit – well you tell me what it means – they only have context in relation to themselves as in north or south of what? and in my mind are quite meaningless and insulting.

            • The Al1en 12.4.1.2.1.1

              “I wouldn’t worry too much about the MP they will receive their justice at election time and I’m working quite hard to ensure that happens.”

              Good on’ya, as the locals say. Shitty self serving politicians are a huge insult in any culture.

              ” Everytime NZ is used it is a slap in the face to tangata whenua who should be equal in this country.”

              It isn’t a slap, and to me, you already are my equal, just like everyone else is.

              “And as for the north and south bit – well you tell me what it means – they only have context in relation to themselves as in north or south of what? and in my mind are quite meaningless and insulting.”

              I’m not sure how you reconcile the insult as you see it, the stealing of your place names, with the insult to generations of New Zealanders by dismissing even the mention of joint names of equal status, crapping all over it so to speak.
              That’s an Achilles heel dressed in the short skirt of reconciliation if ever I saw one.

              You can call anything you like what you want, but I doubt very much it will improve the outcomes of tens of thousands of Maori one little bit.

              • there is no insult by calling the islands their rightful names – that is idiotic and shows you don’t really understand much about it – try some reading on reality before you put your oar in mate.

                • The Al1en

                  “there is no insult by calling the islands their rightful names – that is idiotic and shows you don’t really understand much about it – try some reading on reality before you put your oar in mate.”

                  You do that a lot, tanty throw your position.

                  I will, one time, de-construct my post so you understand it, then after that, if you’ve nothing to offer, I’ll leave you to your revolution.

                  The insult is not in using the original names, but the denial of millions of New Zealander’s to use names they have long used (uninterrupted occupation by word, if you will) on an equal footing, by not accepting joint names, is.

                  It’s the Achilles heel to your argument.
                  Simple as that.

                  • I actually already know what your point is and I care not for it so I’ll just keep tantying on.

                    • The Al1en

                      I believe you think you know my point, which isn’t the same thing, but if you’re happy, it’s not my job to bring you down.

                  • Draco T Bastard

                    Tell me, when was the last time that you heard of Taranaki being referred to as Mt Egmont?

                    IIRC, there was a bit of a huff from some of the more excitable but it died down quite rapidly and everyone just started calling the mountain Taranaki. I think you’ll find the same to be true of Ti Ika-A-Maui and Te Wai Pounamu.

                    • The Al1en

                      Never have heard Taranaki called by it’s other official name, but I wouldn’t be outraged and insulted if I did.

                      I don’t think there’s any credibility in denying joint naming, and agree somewhat perversely enough on a left wing site to, as you point out, let the market decide the outcome.

                    • interestingly on the tour the other day when I described how you could sometimes see Mt Taranaki an older gentlemen said, what about Egmont? I said the times they are a changing.

            • Colonial Weka 12.4.1.2.1.2

              “they only have context in relation to themselves as in north or south of what? ”

              They also have historical context, and therein lies the problem. Removing the names will upset people in the same way that your example of England to New Paris would.

              I take your point about the insult to Maori though. I’m not sure what the solution is exactly, but am pretty sure that those of pakeha middle NZ who might otherwise be in a process of change re Maori rights, would be put off by being told to stop using ‘South Island’ and “North Island’ because they are bland and meaningless.

              • “those of pakeha middle NZ who might otherwise be in a process of change re Maori rights”

                The problem is this incremental change is not really happening imo. Māori have to fight for every scrap of concession and that just isn’t good enough. Middle NZ will continue to focus on their positions and that is the way of it. If it was up to me I’d change all the names back to their Māori names, have an extensive education program to create connection for people about the context of the names and why they are called what they are called, and instigate compulsory te reo Māori classes for everyone living here, or wanting to come here. Those measures would make this country a better place for tangata whenua and everyone else and bind us together much tighter and in more meaningful ways that occurs or is even considered today.

                I don’t see the double naming not happening, so the majority will decide and they will decide without real consideration of Māori – that’s the country we live in.

                • The Al1en

                  “If it was up to me I’d change all the names back to their Māori names, have an extensive education program to create connection for people about the context of the names and why they are called what they are called, and instigate compulsory te reo Māori classes for everyone living here, or wanting to come here. Those measures would make this country a better place for tangata whenua and everyone else and bind us together much tighter and in more meaningful ways that occurs or is even considered today.”

                  😆 Like everyone speaking English has made all our lives better.
                  You may as well wait a few years ’til they have the numbers and learn mandarin or cantonese instead.

                  • Colonial Weka

                    Compulsory Maori lessons

                    Compulsory English lessons

                    Compulsory Cantonese/Mandarin lessons when the Chinese have the numbers

                    Which of these is not like the others?

                    • The Al1en

                      “Which of these is not like the others?”

                      I can’t speak or write any of them properly, how would I know? Best you tell me.

                      I do actually think an induction series for new arrivals is a great idea, and mentioned it in a mail I wrote to Hone last year. Don’t know if it’s part of mana’s policy yet.

                    • Colonial Weka

                      In the context of your previous comment, English and the Chinese languages were/will be tools of colonisation. Marty’s suggestion of compulsory Maori is a restitution of a colonisation process, it’s not a colonisation process itself despite how some pakeha may feel.

                    • The Al1en

                      “Marty’s suggestion of compulsory Maori is a restitution of a colonisation process, it’s not a colonisation process itself despite how some pakeha may feel.”

                      Non Maori don’t need to be compelled to learn a language they have no use for, but if some have a genuine urge to learn it, then sure, assist them to do so, by all means.
                      I don’t think many in NZ would complain about dual labelling and signage like used in Canada, and if Maori have words for things like baked beans with cocktail sausages, then all well and good, but compulsory just won’t fly.

                      “In the context of your previous comment, English and the Chinese languages were/will be tools of colonisation.”

                      I get pendulums swinging back the other way before a state of balance, but there are fights worth having right now that will effect better rights and conditions for all of us, especially Maori as they are sadly represented in poverty figures. Forcing new kiwis to learn Maori is not one one of them.

                    • They would have a use for it – that is the point. And as for the poverty figures ummm maybe they might need some teachers of the compulsory language thus reducing unemployment for Māori, and perhaps other negative social statistics might be reduced as recognition of the importance of indigenous rights takes hold – there are lots of ancillary benefits for the country. Try not to be so one-dimensional because the word compulsory is used.

                    • The Al1en

                      “And as for the poverty figures ummm maybe they might need some teachers of the compulsory language thus reducing unemployment for Māori, and perhaps other negative social statistics might be reduced as recognition of the importance of indigenous rights takes hold – there are lots of ancillary benefits for the country.”

                      I fully support flooding, with cash and good intentions, the bottom end of all NZ negative social statistics. I reckon most here do. If part of that, for you, is teaching your people to speak your own language and practice your own culture, that’s okay by me too.

                      “They would have a use for it – that is the point.”

                      You think they would, but they won’t, and that’s the point.
                      I’d rail against compulsory English lessons for new arrivals too, for the same reasons I derided Norman Tebbit’s cricket test in Blighty, and will always fail it here. I’ve protested against the NF, the BNP and other assorted idiots who make claims that newcomers have to adapt their cultures to assimilate with the new world. It’s bullshit, whatever the colour and creed of the home team. Live by the law, as part of the whole, however you fucking want to, it’s your personal right.

                      You’ll achieve little with compulsory anything.
                      I get why you want your language spoken more, just like welsh and Cornish people do, but forcing an issue that has negative impact is just stupid policy.

                      “Try not to be so one-dimensional because the word compulsory is used.”

                      Try not to be such a princess, just because someone thinks you’re talking shit.

                    • Oh dear seems like I’m not the only one that can throw a tanty.

                      “If part of that, for you, is teaching your people to speak your own language and practice your own culture, that’s okay by me too.”

                      That’s not what I was talking about fool. Do you want me to deconstruct my point for you?

                      “You think they would, but they won’t, and that’s the point.”

                      If as, per my original post, we change all the names then unless they know the language they won’t know where they are or where they are going will they?

                      “I’d rail against…”

                      Yes i know but your northern hemisphere references are not relevant to this discussion.

                      “I get why you want your language spoken more…”

                      For some reason i doubt that very much but thank you for your contribution.

                    • The Al1en

                      ‘being a princess’ and ‘talking shit’ should have come with a smiley.
                      I know you [MM] genuinely believe in your point and though I disagree with your methodology, agree with the reasoning somewhat, we probably a share more than a few common goals.
                      If I read like I dismiss out of hand your views, I’m sorry.

                    • The Al1en

                      “Oh dear seems like I’m not the only one that can throw a tanty.”

                      No tanty, just a language thing 😉

                      “If part of that, for you, is teaching your people to speak your own language and practice your own culture, that’s okay by me too.”

                      “That’s not what I was talking about fool.”

                      I got it, I actually already know what your point is and I care not for it. You can try and bring the argument to compulsory re-education v a few jobs for Maori, but it’s wafer thin. tread carefully.

                      “Do you want me to deconstruct my point for you?”

                      one can’t spell touche without reading touchy. 😆

                      “You think they would, but they won’t, and that’s the point.”

                      “If as, per my original post, we change all the names then unless they know the language they won’t know where they are or where they are going will they?”

                      And as my response, it’s not good policy.

                      “I’d rail against…”

                      “Yes i know but your northern hemisphere references are not relevant to this discussion.”

                      Yep, they are.

                      “I get why you want your language spoken more…”

                      “For some reason i doubt that very much but thank you for your contribution.”

                      Somewhat disingenuous, but no reason why we can’t get along.

                    • All good mate no offence taken and I do actually appreciate your contribution.

                    • The Al1en

                      “All good mate no offence taken and I do actually appreciate your contribution.”

                      Ka amohia atu ia ki tōna wāhi okiokinga; ko ia ko te whakaaio whenua.

                    • Colonial Weka

                      “If part of that, for you, is teaching your people to speak your own language and practice your own culture, that’s okay by me too.”

                      Te Reo Maori is an official language of NZ. It’s OUR language.

                      Al1en, you say that pakeha have no use for Te Reo Maori, but they do. When you expose pakeha to te reo, the begin to understand many things better, including their treaty partners.

                    • The Al1en

                      “Te Reo Maori is an official language of NZ.”

                      No one has said otherwise.

                      “Al1en, you say that pakeha have no use for Te Reo Maori,”

                      I actually didn’t say that at all. I said non Maori, which of course includes Somalians, Egyptians and Chinese for example, among many others who are not sons of European pioneers.

                      ‘but they do. When you expose pakeha to te reo, the begin to understand many things better, including their treaty partners.’

                      People don’t have to do anything they don’t want to, including learning and using languages spoken by a very small percentage of the populace, even if they are first arrivals.
                      For many, even though you might really really want it to, it means nothing, at all.
                      You can’t teach those who don’t care to learn.

                    • Colonial Weka

                      “You can’t teach those who don’t care to learn.”

                      I’m suggesting that te reo be compulsory at schools (and free to adults). Much of the school curriculum is compulsory.

                      Ok, so rephrasing, you appear to be saying that non-Maori have no use for te reo. My point still stands – they do, because it enables them to understand concepts of Te Ao Maori that are hard to grasp otherwise.

                    • The Al1en

                      “You can’t teach those who don’t care to learn.”

                      “I’m suggesting that te reo be compulsory at schools (and free to adults). Much of the school curriculum is compulsory.”

                      No problem with schools, though some parents may wish to opt out and their children learn another language, and that should be ok.
                      No problem with free adult classes for those that want them either.

                      “Ok, so rephrasing, you appear to be saying that non-Maori have no use for te reo.”

                      No, some non Maori have no use for te reo, nor wish to learn it, nor be forced to.
                      *edit Have just read back and I can see didn’t write ‘some’, but the point is the same.

                      “My point still stands – they do, because it enables them to understand concepts of Te Ao Maori that are hard to grasp otherwise.”

                      But the point still remains that some don’t wish to understand better, and whilst understanding and honest dialogue usually always lead to better outcomes, I don’t see the grounds to compel. I mean, what are you going to do, lock them up for not saying Kia ora?

                      So rephrasing, I’d fund the language in school and further education if wanted, continue with Maori tv and Maori language progs on tvnz, run induction classes for new immigrants and dual name anything that moves including the North/South islands and baked beans with sausages.
                      What a cunt I am 😆

                    • Colonial Weka

                      I see te reo as compulsory in schools in the same that way that civics should be. Or that maths, science, English already is. Suggesting an opt out for te reo misses the point.

                      “But the point still remains that some don’t wish to understand better, and whilst understanding and honest dialogue usually always lead to better outcomes, I don’t see the grounds to compel. I mean, what are you going to do, lock them up for not saying Kia ora?”

                      No, they just fail in that subject like in any other. If we can say that all people growing up here need to have an understanding of science, or civics, then why not Te Ao Maori? You’re argument only really makes sense if you believe that te reo is just another language option like Japanese.

                    • The Al1en

                      “You’re argument only really makes sense if you believe that te reo is just another language option like Japanese.”

                      For some, who aren’t as passionate as yourself, or indeed passionate to any degree about it all, that’s all it is and all it ever will be.
                      That’s surely a fact, sad or otherwise depending, you’ll concede?

                      “No, they just fail in that subject like in any other.”

                      In school, of course, but my main point of focus was addressing the suggested compulsory/mandatory learning of a language and culture in order to live here. I didn’t expect or demand it from immigrants to the UK and don’t accept it here either.

                      “If we can say that all people growing up here need to have an understanding of science, or civics, then why not Te Ao Maori?”

                      Because they don’t need to learn Maori any more than Maori need to learn Urdu, French or Welsh to live together.
                      We’re lucky English is the worlds language.

                    • Colonial Weka

                      Just in case this goes on for a wile 😉 I answered here

                      http://thestandard.org.nz/open-mike-02042013/#comment-613664

                    • “a very small percentage of the populace, even if they are first arrivals.”

                      Māori are not just ‘first arrivals’, the culture developed here and that is why they are indigenous to these islands. As wikipedia outlines, “Indigenous peoples are ethnic minorities who have been marginalized as their historical territories became part of a state.[1] In international or national legislation they are generally defined as having a set of specific rights based on their historical ties to a particular territory, and to their cultural or historical distinctiveness from politically dominant populations. The concept of indigenous people may define them as particularly vulnerable to exploitation, marginalization and oppression by nations or states that may still be in the process of colonialism, or by politically dominant ethnic groups.”

                      It is a very important concept to grasp and I emphasise it because too often the line ‘first arrivals’ is used to marginalise and denigrate Māori as if somehow in some strange universe they are not indigenous and by not being indigenous, under this worldview, they are not due the rights and respect that indigenous peoples should be given in this world. I say should because the sad truth is that that rarely has happened unless the dominant culture decides to misappropriate some aspect of the indigenous culture for their own purposes.

                      Understanding the indigenous culture of a land people choose to live in imo should be step 1 otherwise we end up with the sorts of negative social statistics for marginalised indigenous cultures we see here and around the world.

                      I know it is a tangential point but I felt I had to make it to correct any misunderstandings that may be there with the use of the term ‘first arrivals’.

                    • The Al1en

                      Yeah, certainly didn’t use the term as described in your second paragraph, so misunderstanding avoided.

                • Colonial Weka

                  “The problem is this incremental change is not really happening imo. Māori have to fight for every scrap of concession and that just isn’t good enough. Middle NZ will continue to focus on their positions and that is the way of it.”

                  Ae, and that seriously sucks. I guess the way I see it is that if middle NZ can feel like they are still part of something, then the fighting that Maori are doing will be more effective (or, middle NZ will be less resistant).

                  “If it was up to me I’d change all the names back to their Māori names, have an extensive education program to create connection for people about the context of the names and why they are called what they are called, and instigate compulsory te reo Māori classes for everyone living here, or wanting to come here. Those measures would make this country a better place for tangata whenua and everyone else and bind us together much tighter and in more meaningful ways that occurs or is even considered today.”

                  I completely agree. I think most pakeha fail to grasp just how important te reo is in understanding Te Ao Maori, or the land for that matter. Or history. Compulsory te reo at schools would do more for race relations in this country than any other act (apart from treaty setttlements I guess).

    • Colonial Weka 12.5

      I feel a cultural affinity with the name South Island. I have no problem with Te Wai Pounamu being used as the official name, yet myself would also continue to use South Island alongside that.

      I’d like to know more about the history and origins of the name ‘Te Wai Pounamu’ and how the Geographic Board chose it as the best one for an official name.

      I agree ‘Te Wai Pounamu’ is a mouthful for many pakeha, but that’s just a matter of practice and an opportunity for us to improve our pronunciation. ‘Pounamu’ is an excellent word for learning one of the more difficult Maori vowel sounds.

      “the names of the bland and ridiculous ‘North’ and ‘South’ Islands of this country.”

      Could have been worse 😉 …

      “In the 19th century, some maps named the South Island as Middle Island or New Munster, and the name South Island or New Leinster was used for today’s Stewart Island/Rakiura.”

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Island#Naming_and_usage

  13. geoff 13

    Matthew Hooton on nine to noon this morning….

    Hooton completely ripped off Eddie’s analysis on Labour’s factions (http://thestandard.org.nz/labours-three-factions/)

    He didn’t even have the stones to give credit to Eddie.

    Then he proceeded to argue the case, which many on The Standard have been making, about the prospect of Shearer getting ripped to shreds during the election campaign. Must have only just occurred to Hooton…

    The only amusing part was Mike Williams being put on the spot trying to defend Shearer.

    I suppose Hooton believes that any credible coup threat from a properly leftwing labour candidate is now unlikely before the election. He can now change tack and stop publically defending Shearer (as he has been doing on numerous occasions) and start attacking him to help National win the election.

    Near the end:
    http://podcast.radionz.co.nz/ntn/ntn-20130402-1108-politics_with_matthew_hooton_and_mike_williams-048.mp3

    • fender 13.1

      He also managed to turn Shearers offshore ‘bank account’ into Shearers offshore ‘bank accounts’.

      That Hooton really makes for poor radio, no idea why they persist with him, he comes across as venal, rude and immature. Kathryn Ryan could do better in pulling him up on his bullshit, as could Mike Williams who seems to have his head in the clouds too often than not. I’d like to hear different commentators each week rather than these stale crusty leftovers.

      • geoff 13.1.1

        At least Kathryn does pull Hooton up on things, Mike Williams just wheezes and puffs. His head isn’t in the clouds, he’s thinking about his lunch and afternoon nap. It’s unsuprising that the rightwing turds who decided to bring Matthew Hooton into RNZ were also the ones that chose a particularly weak leftwing opponent.

    • Anne 13.2

      The only amusing part was Mike Williams being put on the spot trying to defend Shearer.

      No it wasn’t.

      Mike’s attempt to pass off Lianne Dalziel and David Cunliffe as Labour dissidents was also amusing. Intellectually superior and principled MPs are now dissidents? They lost another when Charles Chauvel walked so they had better be careful…

      • Olwyn 13.2.1

        Labour dissidents? That is just jaw dropping! Someone should point that Mike Williams to the list of Labour values and ask him what he thinks they mean, and what he thinks they are there for.

        • Anne 13.2.1.1

          At that point I turned my radio off Olwyn. This childish aside came from a former Labour Party president – the present incumbent’s immediate predecessor. It sort of helps explain why Labour is not doing anything like as well as it should be given the NAct govt’s appalling management.

          • Olwyn 13.2.1.1.1

            I remember he was known for being a very good fund raiser at the time. I do not know whether he is working for Labour in any capacity now, but calling elected members dissidents on air is astoundingly disrespectful. There is also a sinister undertone in the implication that it is now dissident for a member of a centre left party to show any left wing leanings whatsoever. But on what authority? Not on the party’s principles, not on the wishes of the party’s members, not on widespread public acclaim.

      • geoff 13.2.2

        Yeah Williams is appalling.

        • Colonial Viper 13.2.2.1

          Isn’t it strange that the Labour leadership has expressed their disapproval and asked him to stop his radio appearances? Oh wait. Never mind.

    • emergency mike 13.3

      Yep, shameless theft there, but it’s Matthew Hooten so it’s hard to be too shocked. Indeed it’s a bit of a turn around from his comments on this blog giving hand-claps and other encouragement to Shearer to now saying things like “I don’t see how he can compete,” and being unable to hide his glee at repeatedly bringing up Shearer’s bank account gaffe no matter how irrelevant.

      Mike Williams says he watched parliament last week and was bothered to see John Key ‘making flippant jokes’ about serious issues like the EQC data leak. (Um Mike that’s been his arrogant style since, well always.) Hooten responds with (paraphrasing) “Well, in fairness to John Key, David Shearer’s undeclared bank accounts! *Chortle*” (At about the 20min mark.)

      I also gagged a bit at the end when after Williams tries to defend Shearer and Labour’s current performance, Hooten quips that he would do well as a propagandist in North Korea. Oh dee irony.

      • geoff 13.3.1

        I found it a little interesting that Hooton was so adamant to downplay the effects of the smelter on the Mighty River share price. Makes me wonder if there is something more going on there than merely defending a tory policy…

  14. Colonial Viper 15

    Lianne Dalziel just put up a strong effort representing her constituents on National Radio’s The Panel, but unbelieveably, they cut her off mid sentence saying that they were now going to move on to another topic. I don’t think they even thanked her for her time, they just switched her off. Whoever the guy was on the panel kept up with the Tory spin saying that all which could be done has been done, which was maddening.

    For Lianne, may I suggest the following improvements in radio interview technique:

    – It’s important to stay cool and not to take on a “shrill” tone of voice: it’s off putting to even sympathetic listeners. Maintain an even reasoned tone even in the face of Tory stupidity.
    – Ensure you link your “what would you have done different (and why)” answers to “what Gerry Brownlee needs to do different right now” (don’t refer to what the Government needs to do, put the pressure on King Brownlee)
    – It’s always tricky to challenge a radio show where the tone is basically a defeatist “look the situation is rubbish but hasn’t the Government done so well with the hand it was given”. The most important thing is to pierce the veil early and hard. Your specific example about land swaps was perfect for this, but needed to come in earlier and harder, to halt the shows preprogrammed narrative in its tracks.

    Overall good to hear you on air.

    • Anne 15.1

      She was being seriously provoked CV. The usual story… the ignorant Graham Bell putting her down because she was a stupid woman who didn’t know what she was talking about? It was disgraceful manners. Lianne should lay a formal complaint about her treatment and especially the way Noelle (whatever her surname is) cut her off mid-sentence without so much as a by your leave. Appalling stuff.

    • xtasy 15.2

      Check out the board and editors of RNZ, and I would not be surprised that the present members, and the ones they keep employed as moderators and journalists, fit the National Party line of “allowing” certain things to be said and broadcast, none else.

  15. They are still confiscating Māori land and still pretending to consult with Māori when they have already made up their minds. They use many guises for the process such as roads.

    “Harry Wilson, one of the NZTA Directors stood to make the announcement that the Eastern Arterial Route (EAR) option had been selected for development along the eastern lake side of Rotorua.”

    “This decision will decimate traditional wāhi tapu and disconnect whānau from their papakainga along the Owhata, Ngapuna areas.”

    The response of whānau and hapu members was to all walk out of the meeting showing their strong solidarity and rejection of the decision. This land confiscation is what tangata whenua are fighting against and the fight is the same fight that previous generations have fought.

    http://news.tangatawhenua.com/archives/21532

    http://mars2earth.blogspot.co.nz/2013/04/land-confiscation-2013-style.html

    • Ugly Truth 16.1

      Confiscation can only be done with legitimate authority. If the land is rightfully yours then it cannot legally be confiscated. Of course this does not stop them from assuming authority. It is more difficult for them to assume authority if you can show why they don’t have any. Showing how they are in conflict with the law of the land is one way of doing this.

      http://thestandard.org.nz/open-mike-28032013/#comment-611335

      • Colonial Viper 16.1.1

        Confiscation can only be done with legitimate authority.

        That’s what the Public Works Act is for.

        • Ugly Truth 16.1.1.1

          Acts can’t grant authority that they don’t have.

          • Colonial Viper 16.1.1.1.1

            You do understand that this is about a veneer of legitimacy, right?

            • Ugly Truth 16.1.1.1.1.1

              Faith in the Westminster system doesn’t make it legitimate, but that faith can still motivate people to act as if they were lawfully confiscating the land. Legitimacy is consistent with reason, not with faith.

              People can be mistaken when they say they understand something, especially when it involves the combination of religion and politics.

              • Colonial Viper

                Nah your rationale about power and legitimacy is all up the creek.

                • Legitimate, adj. That which is lawful, legal, recognized by law, or according to law; as, legitimate children, legitimate authority, lawful power, legitimate sport or amusement.

                  Lex est ratio summa, quae jubet quae sunt utilia et necessaria, et contraria prohibet. Law is the perfection of reason, which commands what is useful and necessary and forbids the contrary.

      • marty mars 16.1.2

        ugly – not interested in anything you have to say or as someone recently said to you – fuck off

        http://thestandard.org.nz/open-mike-28032013/#comment-612842

        but I do appreciate your use of macrons.

        • Ugly Truth 16.1.2.1

          With a name like mine, do you think I’m doing this for the popularity?

          • marty mars 16.1.2.1.1

            why are you doing it?

            • Ugly Truth 16.1.2.1.1.1

              You could call it enlightened self interest. I don’t want to see this place go to hell in a handbasket.

              • Anne

                Bullshit UT. You’re up yourself. That’s why you’re doing it. Go and do it somewhere else… that’s a good boy/girl.

                • Project much, Anne?

                  • karol

                    Anne doesn’t come across as being “up herself”. Try again.

                    • Thinking before you type should help with that.

                    • Colonial Weka

                      I’m starting to feel like even the return of PG would be better than this.

                    • xtasy

                      Maori have been ripped off from word go, all else is LIES and bull shit. All the compensation will in part restitute the resources, but there will never be a true justice. If I was Maori, I would have NO TRUST in PAKEHA. I am European, but not descendant of a colonial power that took this land. It could be a much better land anyway, if people here learned and joined together, but that is proved to be a “dream” never to happen.

                      Division, resentment, hatred and down-right neo-colonialism of the wrong kind are ruining this country, especially when joined with right neo lib capitalist sell out agendas, where only a small elite gain and control matters. I have NO hope in this damned piece of earth, that seems to have been cursed for ever.

                      NO social justice, NO fairness, NO joint responsibility and ownership, still a ROTTEN elite owning and running a post colonial back stop that is reality. All else is lies. Too many “Kiwis” are NO “Kiwis”, they are all out for personal gains and self righteousness, hence they leave in droves to sell and buy, to get a turf in a perceived “safer” territory, to save their post colonial skin and betrayed mentality.

                      I an still waiting to meet “real” New Zealanders that stand their grounds and fight for it. I met NONE!

                    • How would you recognize them, xtasy?

                    • xtasy

                      Re my critical rant last night: People like John Minto and Sue Bradford I would exempt from my criticism, as they are truly standing up for justice and the rights of every person, particularly the poor and disadvantaged.

                      I just get so frustrated and angry about Mr and Mrs Average, who I see and meet every day, who do not seem to give a toss about the future of their country.

                      So while Ugly Truth goes on with is interpretation of matters, which I actually understand (due to having met similarly minded people), I feel, he is lost in some marginal lot that believe that common law will set us all free.

                      Google Mary Croft and read some of her stuff, and you know where she comes from. It is all about individualising matters and using legal angles to set yourself free, without any social responsibility and conscience. That is where UT also fails to convince.

                  • muzza

                    Ugly – What you have encountered here, is that they don’t want to hear anything which can’t be *rationalised*, or *solutionalised*.

                    Problem is that there is scant interest in trying to understand where the core issues probably exist, and as such, *rationalising and solutionising*, are being considered under conditions of certain failure, basically , square pegs round holes scenario!

                    In exactly the same scape, that until the monetary supply issue is handled in a way which will allow benefit for this country and all its people, the legal fraud must be exposed and unraveled also, if not, then it is an amplification, of the downward trajectory we have in front of us now!

                    Its as if people are content, acting as an official recorded timeline of scheduled disaster, speculating about remedies which can’t exist, and refusing to consider the reasons why this country continues to be, *legally/financially rooted*

  16. xtasy 17

    Dilma Roussef’s Brazilizan “wonder”, see for yourself , how police deal there to perceived out of hand carnavalistas in Bahia:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=yV0I96MpCGI&NR=1

    Is this another dictatorship in the making???

    • xtasy 17.1

      AND then let us look at “racial harmony” in NZ, which is the biggest dirty lie in NZ history! There is NO harmony! Rectify it, thanks, you liars!

  17. McFlock 18

    Another roy morgan.
    Lab back up to 34.5%.

    [lprent: added charts. ]

    • rosy 18.1

      Labour is picking up support from potential coalition partners – in this case mainly NZ First, not denting National support. Still, I guess to close to call is better than not at all close…. ?

      The confidence rating is better for National than the last poll. Sort of disappointing really.

      • lprent 18.1.1

        The confidence rating is better for National than the last poll.

        Huh? I think you may be reading that wrong. The government got the traditional holiday bump in the GCR (you can see the Dec/Jan/Feb pattern in previous years if you look), but it appears to be going down again (need another downward or flat data point to feel more confident)

        • rosy 18.1.1.1

          I was pretty excited to see the CR dropping in the last couple of polls, but this one? So I was only commenting compared to last poll. It’s back up. Yes compared to last year it’s a little less.

    • lprent 18.2

      Slightly better, and despite the noise I think that there is an upwards trend in there over the last year. Problem is that at the current rate of growth Labour would be well below ~38-40% it needs going into and election and to form a reasonably stable two party coalition post-election.

      Incidentally, have a look at the polls in the second year of last term where there was a higher average poll rating than at present. Then look at what happened in the third year.

      The GCR looks better than after the xmas break

      • Colonial Viper 18.2.1

        There’s perhaps a 50/50 chance that Labour will get to form the next government. But will it be because Labour have made a strong case or will it be because National just keep screwing up enough. And for me the question remains – what major new directions and ethos will Shearer lead in that next government. I can’t tell that yet. At all. Which is pretty concerning from a political party supposedly based on clear values and principles.

  18. Colonial Weka 19

    “You’re argument only really makes sense if you believe that te reo is just another language option like Japanese.”

    For some, who aren’t as passionate as yourself, or indeed passionate to any degree about it all, that’s all it is and all it ever will be.
    That’s surely a fact, sad or otherwise depending, you’ll concede?

    That’s only true if you think that Maori are just another minority. They’re not. They’re the treaty partner of the crown which represents non-Maori.


    “No, they just fail in that subject like in any other.”

    In school, of course, but my main point of focus was addressing the suggested compulsory/mandatory learning of a language and culture in order to live here. I didn’t expect or demand it from immigrants to the UK and don’t accept it here either.

    Yes, but the reason I side more with marty is because once you get successive generations of kids leaving school with a decent grasp of te reo, then society will change dramatically, and how immigrants should/can fit into that will become apparent. Marty says make it compulsory, you say don’t, I say be sneaky.

    “If we can say that all people growing up here need to have an understanding of science, or civics, then why not Te Ao Maori?”

    Because they don’t need to learn Maori any more than Maori need to learn Urdu, French or Welsh to live together.

    Why have any compulsory subject at school then? No-one ‘needs’ to learn maths or science, they do it because they are told to.

    We’re lucky English is the worlds language.

    Maybe, but te reo is the language of THIS land.

    • The Al1en 19.1

      “Just in case this goes on for a wile I answered here”

      It probably won’t, not ’cause were diametric (which I don’t believe we are) but first day off for the week tomorrow and I like to maximise my ‘I did the minimum required, this is my time now’, and don’t want to sleep in and lose precious two fingers to the world saluting time.

      “That’s only true if you think that Maori are just another minority. They’re not. They’re the treaty partner of the crown which represents non-Maori.”

      Adding I fully support the treaty to my list of shame 😉 I think that’s too simplistic a view, even though the answer is probably much more so. I suspect most people just see people, not minority people, and because we’re all in the same boat (waka) as each other, we’ve morphed into a one. Doesn’t necessarily follow that because it’s not so important or even relevant that it’s an attack or an affront.
      I don’t know, I sort of like the concept, but then you might be right and that would be a bit of sad bring-me-down.

      “Yes, but the reason I side more with marty is because once you get successive generations of kids leaving school with a decent grasp of te reo, then society will change dramatically, and how immigrants should/can fit into that will become apparent. Marty says make it compulsory, you say don’t, I say be sneaky.”

      I see his point about promoting the use of te reo, which is why I push for dual naming, which is sort of sneaky, isn’t it?

      “Maybe, but te reo is the language of THIS land.”

      Yes, rightly one of the official languages of NZ, and one of a vast number being spoken by kiwis up and down the country on a daily basis.

      “Why have any compulsory subject at school then? No-one ‘needs’ to learn maths or science, they do it because they are told to.”

      There’s no smart arse set up or wordsmithery. People already get on with their lives without knowing Maori, their language or their culture, this is fact, so I’m not sure the question is relevant, especially given the original context that to some people there is zero benefit in learning it and forcing them to won’t benefit anyone.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Gravity wins, everybody loses
    This government should come with a whiplash warning. Did you hear the Prime Minister just go off about the Black Hole They Left Us? - how much was it, 20 billion? 200 billion? Or was it 2 gazillion billion? God he just gets so excited doing his we were going ...
    More than a fieldingBy David Slack
    2 hours ago
  • Gravity wins, everybody loses
    This government should come with a whiplash warning. Did you hear the Prime Minister just go off about the Black Hole They Left Us? - how much was it, 20 billion? 200 billion? Or was it 2 gazillion billion? God he just gets so excited doing his we were going ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    2 hours ago
  • Willis tells us before dawn about her travel plans and – early this afternoon – she reports on h...
    Buzz from the Beehive Finance Minister Nicola Willis – and press secretary Nick Venter, too, we may suppose – were up and about before sparrow’s fart. Her bags would have been packed and her passport checked. We report this on the strength of an email from Venter which landed in ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    3 hours ago
  • ROB MacCULLOCH: Grant Robertson’s new job sends an awful message to students about meritocracy in ...
      The appointment of Grant Robertson as Vice-Chancellor of Otago University has raised hackles – and questions – among academics.  Robertson’s credentials for the job is one issue.  The appointment process is another.  University of Auckland economics professor Rob MacCulloch has posted these three articles in the past few days ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    6 hours ago
  • Govt's Budget 'just like a household,' says Willis
    TL;DR: Flying in the face of comments from a ratings agency and a mountain of demand for a new long-term sovereign bond issued yesterday, Finance Minister Nicola Willis has again characterised the Government’s finances as too fragile to borrow in its own right to solve Aotearoa-NZ’s infrastructure deficits. She also ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    8 hours ago
  • Untold back-stories: the little things media don't tell us but which are nevertheless pertinent
    ..Thanks for reading Frankly Speaking ! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.In an article entitled "School donations continue to yield millions of dollars for wealthier schools" on RNZ's website on 19 February, Data journalist Farah Hancock reported on the fees ("donations") that (some) schools were ...
    Frankly SpeakingBy Frank Macskasy
    9 hours ago
  • Untold back-stories: the little things media don't tell us but which are nevertheless pertinent
    ..Thanks for reading Frankly Speaking ! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.In an article entitled "School donations continue to yield millions of dollars for wealthier schools" on RNZ's website on 19 February, Data journalist Farah Hancock reported on the fees ("donations") that (some) schools were ...
    Frankly SpeakingBy Frank Macskasy
    9 hours ago
  • Efeso Collins – Gone Too Soon.
    My wife’s breathing was heavy beside me as I woke this morning, still dark. Yesterday, and it’s awful news, came crashing into my head and I lay there quietly crying.Thinking of Efeso’s family and loved ones. Of so many people who knew him and were devastated by the shocking news. ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    12 hours ago
  • Efeso Collins spoke in Parliament only yesterday on bill which will regulate social workers (and vot...
    Buzz from the Beehive Prime Minister Christopher Luxon and other party leaders have been paying tribute to Green MP Fa’anānā Efeso Collins, who collapsed and died during a ChildFund charity run in central Auckland this morning, . The event, near Britomart, was to support local communities in the Pacific. Collins, ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    1 day ago
  • This is corrupt
    Earlier in the month, a panel of "independent" experts in Wellington produced recommendations for the future of housing in the city, and they were a bit shit, opposing intensification and protecting the property values of existing homeowners. Its since emerged that they engaged in some pretty motivated reasoning on the ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 day ago
  • Efeso Collins
    God, life can be cruel sometimes can’t it?If only everyone was like him. He was so very warm, so very generous, so very considerate, so very decent. Plenty of people have those qualities but I can think of hardly anyone I've met who had them as richly as he did.Let me ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    1 day ago
  • CHRIS TROTTER:  Is applying “tough love” to a “fragile” nation the right answer?
      The Question Christopher Luxon Needs To Ask –  And Answer:  How was it possible for a nation of barely three million citizens to create and maintain an infrastructure that functioned, schools and universities that turned out well-educated and enterprising citizens, a health system that kept its people healthy, and a ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    1 day ago
  • DON BRASH: Is an independent foreign policy really feasible?
    Don Brash writes – A week or so ago, Helen Clark and I argued that New Zealand would be nuts to abandon the independent foreign policy which has been a characteristic of New Zealand life for most of the last 40 years, a policy which has seen us ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    1 day ago
  • YVONNE VAN DONGEN: So proud
    Ratepayers might well ask why they are subsidising people who peddle the lie that it is possible to be born in the wrong body and people can change sex. The preponderance of events advertising as ‘queer’ is a gender ideology red flag. Yvonne Van Dongen writes –  It ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    1 day ago
  • S&P slams new Govt's council finance vacuum
    Wellington Water workers attempt to resolve a burst water main. Councils are facing continuing uncertainty over how to pay to repair and expand infrastructure. The Wellington Regional Council was one of those downgraded. File Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: Ratings agency Standard & Poor’s has downgraded the outlooks for ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    1 day ago
  • Grant Robertson Resigns.
    Yesterday the man that I admire most in NZ politics called time.Around the middle of yesterday news began to filter out. People were posting unconfirmed reports that Grant Robertson was taking a new role as Vice-Chancellor at Otago Uni. Within an hour it became clear that he was indeed retiring ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    1 day ago
  • Auckland’s City Rail Link will fail immediately… in the best possible way
    This post was originally published on Linked In by Nicolas Reid. It is republished here with permission. Here’s the thing: the City Rail Link is almost certainly going to be overcapacity from day one, with crowding on the trains at peak times. In the simple terms of popular transport ...
    Greater AucklandBy Greater Auckland
    1 day ago
  • You can’t always get what you want
    Grant Robertson is leaving Parliament for two new careers, having been frustrated and blocked from achieving some of his biggest political ambitions. So, he is returning to Dunedin, and, unusually for a former finance minister, with seemingly no ambitions to enter the business world. Instead, he will become Vice Chancellor ...
    PolitikBy Richard Harman
    2 days ago
  • At a glance – Was Greenland really green in the past?
    On February 14, 2023 we announced our Rebuttal Update Project. This included an ask for feedback about the added "At a glance" section in the updated basic rebuttal versions. This weekly blog post series highlights this new section of one of the updated basic rebuttal versions and serves as a ...
    2 days ago
  • Sharp-elbowed and loving it
    It doesn't seem to take a lot to persuade someone who feels they work their guts out that in fact no one is working as hard as me.It doesn't seem to take a lot to persuade someone who knows somebody taking the welfare system for a ride that they’re all ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    2 days ago
  • Sharp-elbowed and loving it
    It doesn't seem to take a lot to persuade someone who feels they work their guts out that in fact no one is working as hard as me.It doesn't seem to take a lot to persuade someone who knows somebody taking the welfare system for a ride that they’re all ...
    More than a fieldingBy David Slack
    2 days ago
  • Then why did she do it?
    Earlier in the month, Cancer Minister Casey Costello was caught lying to the media about whether or not she had requested advice on cutting tobacco excise tax to benefit the cancer industry. She repeated her lies in Parliament. But today, she stood up and pretended to apologise for "causing confusion" ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 days ago
  • Is Applying “Tough Love” To A “Fragile” Nation The Right Answer?
    The Question Christopher Luxon Needs To Ask –  And Answer: How was it possible for a nation of barely three million citizens to create and maintain an infrastructure that functioned, schools and universities that turned out well-educated and enterprising citizens, a health system that kept its people healthy, and a workforce ...
    2 days ago
  • The limits to realism.
    Realism is a school of thought in the field of international relations (IR). It provides a theoretical framework for analysing the behaviour of States in the world political system. Like other theories (which in the IR literature include idealism, liberalism, … Continue reading ...
    KiwipoliticoBy Pablo
    2 days ago
  • UNSOCIAL MEDIA – Following the Trolls
    From TODAY FM archives — Wilhelmina Shrimpton and Simon Morrow take a deep dive into trolling and cyberbullying. From the high profile to the general public, Kiwis across all walks of life are being targeted, and some are paying the ultimate price. So what drives us to troll, who is ...
    The PaepaeBy Peter Aranyi
    2 days ago
  • Govt prescribes stiff medicine for some beneficiaries while easing access to drugs containing pseudo...
    Buzz from the Beehive One of two new announcements on the government’s official website  – given plenty of publicity by the mainstream media over the past 24 hours – has been pitched as the first steps in a “reset” of the welfare system.  Stiff medicine for beneficiaries, in effect. The ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    2 days ago
  • We’re not as fragile or as lazy as Luxon says
    Luxon says his government is one that is “prepared to make those hard decisions”. File Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: Prime Minister Christopher Luxon has adopted the language of Ruth Richardson before her 1991 ‘Mother of All Budgets’ in arguing for benefit sanctions to bolster the Government finances, which ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    2 days ago
  • Talking over the Silence.
    Please open the doorNothing is different, we've been here beforePacing these hallsTrying to talk over the silenceIf I was to describe what I do, or at least the way it sometimes feels, then talking over the silence wouldn’t be a bad way to do so.Not that there aren’t other voices ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    2 days ago
  • LINDSAY MITCHELL: National needs to go further
    Lindsay Mitchell writes – In today’s State of the Nation speech Christopher Luxon talked repeatedly about getting young people off welfare. It seems that National has devised a traffic light system which will use increasing levels of sanctions – welfare deductions – when beneficiaries fail to meet their ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    2 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on National spreading panic about the economy
    It is a political strategy as old as time. Scare the public with tales of disaster and stampede them into supporting your ideological agenda because they believe There Is No Alternative. Yet, if the NZ economy truly is as “fragile” as PM Christopher Luxon says it is… Then how come ...
    2 days ago
  • The promise of passive house design
    This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Sarah Wesseler Imagine a home so efficient that it could be heated with a hair dryer. That’s the promise of a passive house, a design standard that’s becoming increasingly popular in the architecture community for its benefits to occupants and the climate. ...
    2 days ago
  • Deep in the Uncanny Valley of AI
    Hi,Before we get started, some very big fun Webworm news. I am launching a new journalism fund called Big Worm Farm!A really great thing that’s happened with Webworm over the last four years is that it’s grown. That’s great for a few reasons.Firstly — it means the work here gets ...
    David FarrierBy David Farrier
    2 days ago
  • Introducing: Big Worm Farm
    Hi,I’m excited to tell you about Big Worm Farm.Put simply, the main aim of Big Worm Farm is to support investigative journalists from around the world to be able to devote dedicated time to research and report on a specific story, to be published on Webworm.The stories will capture the ...
    David FarrierBy David Farrier
    3 days ago
  • Why Massey is broke
    The Tertiary Education Commission has named the two universities it says are at high risk financially. They are Massey and Victoria. The Commission appeared before Parliament’s Education Select Committee yesterday and offered a revealing and rare insight into the complex world of university economics. Its Briefing to the Incoming Minister ...
    PolitikBy Richard Harman
    3 days ago
  • You keep Luxin' when you oughta be thruthin'
    Christopher Luxon’s campaign to win last year's election continued yesterday with a speech.Channelling possibly Bruce Willis in Die Hard, he was all, I'm not going to dress it up, I'm going to level with you guys: the state of the nation is fragile.The thing he’s maybe missing is that it ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    3 days ago
  • The PM spoke of the need for tough choices – and then opted to beat a retreat when gays and Gaza a...
    Buzz from the Beehive The PM’s State of the Nation speech – according to a Newshub headline – was a ‘buffet of buzzwords’ and full of ‘nonsense’. Fair to say, the quoted words were attributed to Opposition politicians, who were unlikely to say the speech was visionary and inspiring: PM ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    3 days ago
  • Keynesian Wisdom.
    When the facts change, I change my mind - what do you do, sir?John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946)This posting is exclusive to Bowalley Road. ...
    3 days ago
  • BRIAN EASTON: Puffing policy
    Public policy towards tobacco consumption remains politically sensitive. Brian Easton writes – In 1983, a young researcher was told by a medium-level Treasury official that Treasury policy was to abandon excise duties on tobacco. The senior Treasury economist that I consulted, famed for his commonsense, snorted ‘we ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    3 days ago
  • Is 2.8% per year population growth too much?
    TL;DR: The Government is reviewing migration settings that produced 2.8% population growth last year and is looking at a longer-term strategy of matching population growth to the ‘absorbtive capacity’ of Aotearoa-NZ’s infrastructure.Our population grew last year at its fastest rate since 1947, when large numbers of troops returning from World ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    3 days ago
  • Tough Choices & Tough Love.
    I've been trying to hurt youI've been holding you tightI've been learning to love youAm I doing it right?How are you still breathingWith my hands all over your heart?How do we start healingIf we can't keep out the dark?Yesterday the Prime Minister delivered his State of the Nation, for no ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    3 days ago
  • Will the 2024 RLTP be yet another debacle?
    A couple of years ago, Auckland Council and Auckland Transport found themselves in court over the 2021 Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP). A non-profit alliance for transport decarbonisation, All Aboard Aotearoa, argued that among other factors, the RLTP was unlawful because it failed to give effect to the 2021 Government ...
    3 days ago
  • 2024 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #07
    A listing of 31 news and opinion articles we found interesting and shared on social media during the past week: Sun, Feb 11, 2024 thru Sat, Feb 17, 2024. Story of the week Based on mission alignment, our Story of the Week is certainly Can we be inoculated against climate ...
    4 days ago
  • Immigration Issues.
    Help is comingI heard a whisperWhite caps turningThe breath of summerA distant drummingAnd liar birds callingEscape the anguish of our pastAnd prayOne of the major challenges of the the 21st century will be the mass migration of human beings around our globe.Some seeking economic opportunities, others fleeing repressive regimes, war ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    4 days ago
  • Trust us, we know what we’re doing
    The best trick the National Party ever pulled was to fabricate their reputation as the responsible ones.This would be the National Party that denied us the New Zealand Superannuation Scheme that—Brian Gaynor wrote back in 2007would be worth more than $240 billion today and would have transformed the New Zealand ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    5 days ago
  • The Left’s Timidity
    It is not just Karl Marx – even the most enthusiastic supporters of the market economy (not least Adam Smith) will concede that its normal operation inevitably leads to a concentration of wealth in relatively few hands. Some, at least, of these enthusiasts will accept that such a concentration is ...
    Bryan GouldBy Bryan Gould
    5 days ago
  • OLIVER HARTWICH: Absurd – NZ courts can now decide on climate change
    Oliver Hartwich writes – The World Justice Project ranks New Zealand 7th out of 142 countries on its ‘Rule of Law Index’, narrowly ahead of Australia’s 13th place. However, Australia still has hope – if only because of a recent decision by the Supreme Court of New Zealand. The ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    5 days ago
  • Still waiting on that turnaround
    Hello! Here comes the Saturday edition of More Than A Feilding, catching you up on the past week’s editions.Friday: Week in review, quiz style2. Shane Jones’ demeanour in mocking and deriding climate activists can be observed in what other realm of human behaviour?a. Gleeful little boys pulling wings off fliesb. ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    5 days ago
  • Mihi Forbes and the great Atlas conspiracy
    Graham Adams writes — Last week, Mihingarangi Forbes made an extraordinary claim while interviewing David Seymour on Mata Reports, a taxpayer-funded current affairs programme which, she says, looks at events through an “indigenous lens”. She asked him about Act’s links to the Atlas Network, which fosters connections between centre-right ...
    Point of OrderBy gadams1000
    6 days ago
  • Puffing Policy
    Public policy towards tobacco consumption remains politically sensitive. In 1983, a young researcher was told by a medium-level Treasury official that Treasury policy was to abandon excise duties on tobacco. The senior Treasury economist that I consulted, famed for his commonsense, snorted ‘we need the money’. He explained that no-excise-duty ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    6 days ago
  • Luxon is one of three prime ministers pressing for a ceasefire in Gaza – but the two-state solutio...
    Buzz from the Beehive Two days after hundreds of people rallied outside the New Zealand parliament and the US embassy in Wellington to protest against what they maintain is genocide in Gaza,  Prime Minister Chris Luxon joined with the Prime Ministers of Australia and Canada to express their  concerns that ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    6 days ago
  • All jellied up with possum grease
    1. Shane Jones, addressing the energy industry, called climate concern what?a. The only sane responseb. Undeniably valid c. Our last best hope d. A "religion" 2. Shane Jones’ demeanour in mocking and deriding climate activists can be observed in what other realm of human behaviour?a. Gleeful little boys pulling wings off fliesb. Gleeful ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    6 days ago
  • Equality comes to Greece
    The Greek Parliament has voted for marriage equality: Greece has become the first Christian Orthodox-majority country to legalise same-sex marriage. Same-sex couples will now also be legally allowed to adopt children after Thursday's 176-76 vote in parliament. Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said the new law would "boldly abolish a ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • CHRIS TROTTER:  Iron in her soul.
      “Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster, and if you gaze into the abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.” – Friedrich Nietzsche   Chris Trotter writes – TELEVISION NEW ZEALAND is to be congratulated for inviting Chloe Swarbrick onto its Q+A current affairs show. The Green MP ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    6 days ago
  • The Hoon around the week to Feb 16
    Net emigration of New Zealanders overseas hit a record-high 47,000 in the 2023 year, which only partly offset net immigration of 173,000, which was dominated by arrivals from India, the Philippines and China with temporary work visas. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: The five things that mattered in Aotearoa’s ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    6 days ago
  • Stop Whispering.
    There's nothing to sayAnd there's nothing to doStop whispering, start shoutingStop whispering, start shoutingYesterday our government surprised a few of us by standing up for something. It wasn’t for the benefit of people who own holiday homes and multiple investment properties. Neither were there any tobacco companies or fishing cartels ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    6 days ago
  • “I'm Not Keen on Whataboutism, But What About…”
    Hi,Not sure how your week is going, but I’ve had a pretty frustrating one. I’ve been trying to put my finger on it, and I think it’s perhaps distilled in this message I got on Twitter:What got me a bit riled up is that it was a response to the ...
    David FarrierBy David Farrier
    6 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on National passing bad policies under urgency
    If National really had faith in its welfare policies, it wouldn’t be ramming them through Parliament under urgency – a step that means the policies can’t be exposed to select committee debate, public submissions, expert commentary, media scrutiny and all the normal democratic processes that this coalition appears to hold ...
    6 days ago
  • Weekly Roundup 16-February-2024
    It’s Friday so once again here”s our roundup of some of the articles that caught our attention this week. This Week in Greater Auckland On Monday Matt looked at the Government’s war on Auckland. On Tuesday Matt covered the ongoing issues with the rail network. On Thursday Matt ...
    Greater AucklandBy Greater Auckland
    6 days ago
  • The Dawn Chorus for Friday, February 16
    The six things to note in my view at 6.30 am on Friday, February 16 in Aotearoa-NZ’s political economy are: Read more ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    6 days ago
  • Iron In Her Soul.
    “Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster, and if you gaze into the abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.” – Friedrich NietzscheTELEVISION NEW ZEALAND is to be congratulated for inviting Chloe Swarbrick onto its Q+A current affairs show. The Green MP for Auckland Central is the odds-on ...
    6 days ago
  • Dig this
    Resources Minister Shane Jones yesterday told a breakfast hosted by Energy Resources Aotearoa precisely what they wanted to hear. “We campaigned to rehabilitate relegitimise and stand up for working families who derive their income,  derive their hope and derive purpose in regional New Zealand through a flourishing, growing, forward-leaning energy ...
    PolitikBy Richard Harman
    7 days ago
  • Skeptical Science New Research for Week #7 2024
    Open access notables Physics-based early warning signal shows that AMOC is on tipping course, van Westen et al., Science Advances: Here, we show results of the first tipping event in the Community Earth System Model, including the large climate impacts of the collapse. Using these results, we develop a physics-based and ...
    7 days ago
  • A rejection of the rule of law
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Shrugging-Off The Atlas Network.
    Upholding The Status-Quo: The Left’s election defeat is not the work of the Atlas Network. It is not even the work of David Seymour and Act. It is the work of ordinary citizens who liked the Right’s stories better than they liked the Left’s. If the Right’s stories were made ...
    1 week ago
  • BARRIE SAUNDERS: Treaty Principles – all rather problematic
    Barrie Saunders writes – When ACT’s leader said they wanted legislation to state what the Treaty principles mean, my first thought was this will be controversial and divisive.  Clearly it is. The first reference to the principles of the Treaty were contained in the 1975 Act establishing the Treaty of ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    1 week ago
  • Luxon Rejects The “Rejection Election” At His Peril.
    Fitting Right In: National retailed a reactionary manifesto of right-wing, racially-charged policies to the electorate throughout 2023. No talk back then of ignoring the overwhelming political preferences of the voting public and making a strong stand on principle. If Luxon’s pollsters and focus-groups were telling him that the public was ...
    1 week ago
  • Valentine’s Day went unnoticed on the Beehive website – but it is not “baa, humbug” to celeb...
    Buzz from the Beehive None of our ministers – a quick check with the Beehive website suggests – found cause to mention, let along celebrate, Valentine’s Day. But two ministers – Agriculture Minister Todd McClay and Rural Communities Minister Mark Patterson – ensured that National Lamb Day did not pass ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    1 week ago
  • Are You A Leftist?
    Nothing To Lose But Our Chains: The emancipatory movement which the Left, understood correctly, has always been, cannot accommodate those who are only able to celebrate one group’s freedom by taking it from another. The expectation, always, among leftists, is that liberty enlarges us. That striking-off a person’s shackles not ...
    1 week ago
  • An unlawful directive
    An interesting question in the Parliamentary written questions feed today, from Jan Tinetti to the Minister of Education: Has she or her Office directed the Ministry of Education to not release Official Information Act material prior to the full twenty working days, if so, why? Given that ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • I’ve been doing this all wrong
    Here are six words that are not easy to say but god it can feel good when you finally say them:I’ve been doing this all wrongFive years ago today I said to myself:What if I'm doing this all wrong?Five years ago today I said to Karren: I think I’m going to ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    1 week ago
  • New study suggests the Atlantic overturning circulation AMOC “is on tipping course”
    This is a re-post from RealClimate by Stefan Rahmstorf A new paper was published in Science Advances today. Its title says what it is about: “Physics-based early warning signal shows that AMOC is on tipping course.” The study follows one by Danish colleagues which made headlines last July, likewise looking for early warning signals ...
    1 week ago
  • Drawn
    A ballot for five Member's Bills was held today, and the following bills were drawn: Parole (Mandatory Completion of Rehabilitative Programmes) Amendment Bill (Todd Stephenson) Goods and Services Tax (Removing GST From Food) Amendment Bill (Rawiri Waititi) Income Tax (ACC Payments) Amendment Bill (Hamish Campbell) ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    1 week ago
  • Valentines from ACT.
    Some of us make a big deal out of Valentine’s Day. We’ll buy the flowers, eye watering though the price spike might be. Say the things we should be saying anyway, although diminished by being scheduled for delivery. Some of us will even write long free-form newsletters with declarations of ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    1 week ago
  • Tax cuts paid for by 13k more kids in poverty
    MSD advised the government that the indexation change it passed under urgency last night is likely to put around 7,000 extra children (and potentially up to 13,000) into poverty. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: The Government has reverted indexation for main beneficiaries to price inflation from wage inflation under ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    1 week ago
  • Fuel Tax Fight and Rail Fail update
    The two stories we covered at the start of the week continue to be in the headlines so it’s worth looking at the latest for each of them. Regional Fuel Tax Mayor Wayne Brown promised some ‘argy-bargy’ over the government’s decision to cancel the Regional Fuel Tax and he’s ...
    1 week ago

  • Minister attending Australian data, digital meeting
    Minister for Digitising Government Judith Collins is in Sydney to attend the first Data and Digital Ministers’ Meeting of 2024.  “This is a great opportunity to connect with our Australian counterparts and identify how we can work together on digital transformation,” Ms Collins says.   “Both our nations are looking into ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Appointments to Antarctica New Zealand Board
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has appointed Leon Grice and Heather Simpson to serve on the Antarctica New Zealand board.  “Since taking office, the Coalition Government has become concerned about the direction of the Scott Base Redevelopment Project,” Mr Peters says.  “It is vital that Antarctica New Zealand has the right ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Strengthening the Single Economic Market
    Finance Minister Nicola Willis has met with Australian Treasurer Jim Chalmers to discuss the opportunities to lower business costs and increase the ease with which businesses and people can operate across the Tasman.     “I have met with Treasurer Chalmers and shared our new Government’s ambitious economic goals, our plans ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Government to address business payment practices
    The Government will repeal the Business Payment Practices Act 2023, Small Business and Manufacturing Minister Andrew Bayly announced today. “There is a major problem with large market players imposing long payment terms and routinely paying invoices late. “However, the Business Payment Practices Act is not an effective solution and would ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Greater focus on work will reduce child poverty
    Worsening child poverty rates support the Coalition Government’s focus on reducing the cost of living and getting people into work, Child Poverty Reduction Minister Louise Upston says. Figures released by Stats NZ today show child poverty rates have increased, with the rising cost of living, driven by inflation, making it ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • NZ announces new support for Ukraine
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters and Defence Minister Judith Collins have marked two years since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine by announcing further support and sanctions, and extending our military assistance. “Russia launched its illegal, full-scale invasion of Ukraine, in blatant violation of international law, including the UN Charter,” Mr Peters says. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • Finance Minister to meet Australian Treasurer
    Finance Minister Nicola Willis will travel to Australia today to meet her Australian counterpart, Treasurer Jim Chalmers.    “New Zealand and Australia have an incredibly strong trade and investment relationship. The Closer Economic Relations and Single Economic Market are powerful engines for growth on both sides of the Tasman.     “I will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    10 hours ago
  • PM shocked and saddened at death of Efeso Collins
    “I am truly shocked and saddened at the news of Efeso Collins’ sudden death,” Prime Minister Christopher Luxon says. “Efeso was a good man, always friendly and kind, and a true champion and advocate for his Samoan and South Auckland communities. “Our thoughts and deepest sympathies go to his family, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Greater support for social workers
    The Coalition Government is enhancing the professionalism of the social work sector and supporting the vulnerable people who rely on them, Social Development and Employment Minister Louise Upston says.  The Social Workers Registration Legislation Amendment Bill passed its third reading in Parliament today. It amends the Social Workers Registration Legislation ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government delivers greater freedom and choice for sick New Zealanders
    The coalition government is delivering on its commitment to making principled decisions by getting rid of red tape that doesn’t make sense and allowing sick New Zealanders greater freedom and choice to purchase effective cold and flu medicines. A bill amending the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 is being introduced, and changes to the Medicines ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government begins reset of welfare system
    The Coalition Government is taking early action to curb the surge in welfare dependency that occurred under the previous government by setting out its expectations around employment and the use of benefit sanctions, Social Development and Employment Minister Louise Upston says. In 2017, 60,588 sanctions were applied to beneficiaries who ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • State of the Nation
    Ka nui te mihi kia koutou. Kia ora, good morning, talofa, malo e lelei, bula vinaka, da jia hao, namaste, sat sri akal, assalamu alaikum. Thank you for coming to my first State of the Nation as Prime Minister. Thank you for coming to a speech where I don’t just ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • West Coast tourism attractions officially open
    Regional Development Minister Shane Jones will attend the official opening of two highly anticipated tourism projects on the West Coast today – Pike29 Memorial Track, dedicated to the memory of the Pike River miners, and Pounamu Pathway. “The Pike29 Memorial Track is a way to remember and honour the men ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Independent ferry service advisory group in place
    Appointments to the Ministerial Advisory Group tasked with providing independent advice and assurance on the future of KiwiRail’s inter-island ferry service have been made, State Owned Enterprises Minister Paul Goldsmith says. “It’s important for New Zealand that KiwiRail is focused on ensuring safe, resilient, and reliable ferry services over the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Joint statement from the Prime Ministers of Australia, Canada, and New Zealand
    The Prime Ministers of Australia, Canada and New Zealand today issued the following statement on reports of Israel’s planned military operation in Rafah. We are gravely concerned by indications that Israel is planning a ground offensive into Rafah.   A military operation into Rafah would be catastrophic. About 1.5 million Palestinians ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt will deliver on expanded breast screening
    The coalition Government has made the first steps in delivering on its promise to  extend free breast screening to women aged 70-74, Health Minister Shane Reti says. “As part of the 100 day plan, the Government has now met with officials and discussed what is needed in order for the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government announces woolshed roadshows in support of sheep farmers
    The Government celebrates National Lamb Day (15 February 24) and congratulates sheep farmers on the high-quality products they continue to produce. Agriculture Minister McClay hosted bipartisan celebrations of National Lamb Day with industry representatives at Parliament this week to mark the anniversary of the first frozen lamb exports that left ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech: Address to the NZ Economics Forum
    It’s great to be back at the New Zealand Economics Forum. I would like to acknowledge everyone here today for your expertise and contribution, especially the Pro Vice-Chancellor, Head of the Waikato Management School, economists, students and experts alike. A year has passed since I was last before you, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government tackling high construction costs
    The Government is focused on reducing sky-high construction costs to make it more affordable to build a home, Building and Construction Minister Chris Penk says.  Stats NZ data shows the cost of building a house has increased by 41 per cent since 2019, making housing even more unaffordable for Kiwi ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Labour’s Three Waters legislation repealed
    The Coalition Government’s legislative plan to address longstanding issues with local water infrastructure and service delivery took an important step today, with the repeal of Labour’s divisive and unpopular Three Waters legislation, Local Government Minister Simeon Brown says. “Repealing this legislation is a necessary first step in implementing our Local ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Cost of living support for beneficiary households
    The Coalition Government is delivering on its commitment to ease the cost-of-living by increasing main benefit rates in line with inflation and ensuring the Minimum Family Tax Credit threshold remains aligned with this change, Social Development and Employment Minister Louise Upston says. The Social Security (Benefits Adjustment) and Income Tax ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government announces agriculture delegations to better support Primary sector
    The coalition Government has announced ministerial delegations to support key areas across the Primary sector to deliver for New Zealand’s food and fibre sector, Agriculture Minister Todd McClay announced today. “I will be supported in my roles as Minister of Agriculture, Trade, Forestry and Hunting and Fishing, by three Associate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Waikato MoU reinforces Govt’s commitment to increase NZ doctors
    The Government has taken an important step forward in addressing a critical shortage of New Zealand-trained doctors, with today’s signing of a Memorandum of Understanding for a third medical school, Minister of Health Dr Shane Reti has announced.  “Today’s signing by the Ministry of Health and the University of Waikato ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech – Lunar New Year 2024
    Annyeonghaseyo, greetings and welcome all. It is my pleasure as the Minister for Ethnic Communities to welcome you to the first Lunar New Year Event in Parliament. Thank you to our emcees for greeting us in the different languages that represent the many cultures that celebrate the Lunar New Year. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More funding to Hawke’s Bay and Tairāwhiti
    Urgent work to clean-up cyclone-affected regions will continue, thanks to a $63 million boost from the Government for sediment and debris removal in Hawke’s Bay and Tairāwhiti.                                                                                                   The funding will help local councils continue urgent work removing and disposing of sediment and debris left from Cyclone Gabrielle.   “This additional ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Budget will be delivered on 30 May
    Plans to deliver tax relief to hard-working New Zealanders, rebuild business confidence and restore the Crown’s finances to order will be unveiled on 30 May, Finance Minister Nicola Willis says. The plans will be announced in the Budget which is currently being developed by Ministers.  “The last government’s mismanagement of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government advances Local Water Done Well
    The Coalition Government is continuing work to restore council ownership and control of water assets by repealing Three Waters and appointing a Technical Advisory Group to provide expert advice on the implementation of Local Water Done Well, Local Government Minister Simeon Brown says. “The Government will pass a bill to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Minister congratulates NZQA Top Scholars
    Education Minister Erica Stanford congratulates the New Zealand Scholarship recipients from 2023 announced today.  “Receiving a New Zealand Scholarship is a fantastic achievement and is a testament to the hard work and dedication the recipients have put in throughout the year,” says Ms Stanford.  “New Zealand Scholarship tests not only ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New diplomatic appointments
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has today announced five new diplomatic appointments.  "Strong and effective diplomacy to protect and advance our interests in the world is needed now more than ever," Mr Peters says.  “We are delighted to appoint senior diplomats from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade to these ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Speech to the Committee for Auckland
    It is great to be here today at this event as Minister for Auckland and Minister ofTransport. Let me start by acknowledging each one of you and thanking the Committee forAuckland for hosting this event and inviting me to speak here today. The Committee for Auckland has been a symbol ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Getting Transport Back on Track in Auckland
    Transport Minister Simeon Brown has today confirmed his high-level transport priorities for Auckland, in the lead up to releasing the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport. “Our economic growth and productivity are underpinned by a transport network that enables people and freight to move around safely and efficiently. At ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government to axe Auckland Regional Fuel Tax
    Transport Minister Simeon Brown has confirmed that the Auckland Regional Fuel Tax will end on 30 June 2024. “Today, I can confirm that the Government has agreed to remove the Auckland Regional Fuel Tax in line with our coalition commitments, and legislation will be introduced to parliament to repeal the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Minister Calls for Work to Tackle Kina Barrens
    Changes to fishing rules and a significant science programme are being undertaken to address kina barrens, says Minister for Oceans and Fisheries Shane Jones. “There has been tremendous interest from iwi, communities and recreational fishers who had raised concerns about such kina infestations being a major threat to Northland’s marine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government law and order crackdown begins
    The coalition Government is making good on its promise to restore law and order by removing government funding for Section 27 reports and abolishing the previous Labour Government’s prison reduction target, Justice Minister Paul Goldsmith and Corrections Minister Mark Mitchell say.  “In recent years, the development of Section 27 reports ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Greater focus on getting people into work
    The coalition government will refocus employment efforts and the welfare system so that supporting people who can work into jobs is the number one priority, Social Development and Employment Minister Louise Upston says. “Of concern in the labour market statistics released by Stats NZ today was the number of youth not ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • One year on, NZ appeals for release of Phillip Mehrtens
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has appealed to those holding New Zealand pilot Phillip Mehrtens in remote Papua, Indonesia, to release him immediately.  Phillip Mehrtens was taken hostage a year ago on 7 February in Paro, Papua, while providing vital air links and supplies to remote communities. “We strongly urge those holding ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Ministers reaffirm Pacific connections this week
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters and Health Minister and Minister for Pacific Peoples Dr Shane Reti are reaffirming the importance of New Zealand’s connections to the Pacific by visiting Tonga, Cook Islands and Samoa this week.  “New Zealand enjoys strong and long-standing relationships with our Pacific partners - especially in Polynesia, where we ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Rt Hon Christopher Luxon – Waitangi speech
    E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā iwi, rau rangatira ma. Tēnā koutou katoa. He tino mihi ki te mana whenua o tēnei rohe.  Mihi mai, mihi mai, mihi mai. Te whare e tū nei, tēnā koe.                               He-wāhi whakahirahira tēnei mō Aotearoa. Ka huri nga whakaaro, ki nga mate. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government awards primary sector scholarships to students
    Six university students studying agriculture and science have been awarded scholarships as part of the coalition Government’s efforts to boost on-the-ground support for farmers and growers. “The coalition Government is committed to improving support and operating conditions for farmers and growers,” Agriculture Minister Todd McClay says. “We’re backing a range ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago

Page generated in The Standard by Wordpress at 2024-02-22T05:57:00+00:00