Open mike 04/03/2021

Written By: - Date published: 6:00 am, March 4th, 2021 - 68 comments
Categories: open mike - Tags:

Open mike is your post.

For announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose.

The usual rules of good behaviour apply (see the Policy).

Step up to the mike …

68 comments on “Open mike 04/03/2021 ”

    • Sanctuary 1.1

      Interesting article.

      Politik has a story on the grim outlook for tourism as well here – https://www.politik.co.nz/2021/03/04/what-do-we-do-if-the-tourists-dont-come-bacl/

      Way back when the first lockdown happened and the government unveiled it's emergency packages – including the free apprentice schemes – I noted that if you wanted to know what the government thought of the future of tourism and international education you just had to look at what new job schemes it was funding. So really, the writing has been on the wall for tourism and the international student sectors for a year now. Normal for them just isn't coming back soon, perhaps never.

      Tourism has been exposed as an extremely fragile sector, subject to the whim of global forces well beyond our control. It also has an extremely high environmental cost and carbon footprint. It is however extremely vocal and well connected in the media – let's face it, international tourism is a middle class addiction, an addiction reflected in the middle class dominated MSM obsession with when the borders will re-open so they can flit off to Bali or Bangkok again. I suspect politicians everywhere though see opportunity to meet carbon emission targets by imposing regulations while the tourism and airline industry is currently hors de combat. So chances are good that we'll finally get our country back from hordes of package tourists and our forest edges will become free of the excreta and detritus of freedom campers.

      The lack of support for international students is interesting. Again, I think it tells us exactly what government thinking is on the relative economic benefit of that sector, especially vs. the political fallout of basically unchecked immigration from developing countries via student visas.

      It might have been convenient to blame NZ First to deflect the outraged screams of “racism!!!” from the twitterati and self-interested business elites, but it looks like Labour agreed with their synopsis of the value of cheap immigration all along. Above all, I think – regardless of all the moaners on twitter who want moar Marxism now – at last the government has broken the shackles of worshipping at the altar of neoliberal global labour mobility and sees an opportunity to choke of a major weapon of NZ capitalism to depress wages. Already, controls on immigration and the importation of cheap foreign labour are having an effect on wages – https://www.nzherald.co.nz/hawkes-bay-today/news/300-a-day-for-fruit-picking-potential-goldmine-for-hawkes-bay-workers-as-growers-up-wages/DIP4OYJWPE563T4DOQVMMQFH6I/

      • Pat 1.1.1

        Think it would be wise to focus on the act rather than the rhetoric. We have too many examples of the Gov. acting contrary to message and it would not surprise at all to see an (unheralded) attempt to restart the migrant conveyor once the vaccination programme is complete.

        It has been the strategy for the past couple of decades and theres no indication of an alternative.

        • Sanctuary 1.1.1.1

          I think they political view might be that on the balance, it is currently politically less risky upsetting industries dependent on migrants than it is to keep upsetting people who can't afford houses or have seen wage stagnation due to eight of the last ten new entry level professionals employed by their boss being foreigners fresh off the boat or who can’t get a decent wage picking fruit.

          It wasn't just student visa that were being abused. Every corporate knows how to play the visa game to get a cheap technician. First, restructure. Then advertise the new role at 10-20% less than the current going rate. When no one wants the job because the pay is to low, go to MBIE or whoever and plead shortage, demonstrating your vain efforts to find someone. Then its a piece of cake to get permission from supine and compliant bureaucrats to recruit from Manila or Bangalore or somewhere like that. Hey presto, you’ve got an eager, compliant, skilled worker for less than you’d have to pay a Kiwi – a Kiwi who might also have an opinion and likes his/her time off.

          • Pat 1.1.1.1.1

            Indeed….it would be easier to accept the rhetoric if they outlined a detailed alternative ….which is strangely missing.

            • Sabine 1.1.1.1.1.1

              If you don't have an outlined strategy then you can never be held accountable. You can always just say 'we work with the best data we have today' never mind foresight, hindsight, paid consultants, paid courtiers, paid handmaids, that are all there to help create a strategy.

              And one can easily forgive them for the stuff that happened when Covid came barreling in, but we are a year in, and yes, a bit more strategy would be needed.

              i.e. whats gonna happen to the tutors of the teaching institutes, and that would involve our universities as they too depend on overseas students – who btw pay their service in full.

              b. whats gonna happen to the buildings of these learning institutes, will they be repurposed into schools? Or sold of to the highest bidder with no value to the local communties?

              the tourist trade is dead for the next 10 – 15 years as Covid is slowly but surely eating away on what ever savings/wealth people have the planet over. And without disposable income no one travels even without covid.

              So what is going to replace these industries? What is going to happen to people that will not find a replacement job? And so on and so forth.

              And i would like to remind people that literally all the money that is made in comes from either people coming here to spend, or us sending dairy/fruit/wine etc overseas. How long until Europe etc remember that they have their own dairy/fruit/wine industries and that they should be prioritized?

              What then. Really, how many industries can a country lose in a year or two before it starts hurting, or is this something that we should not care about now – kind and gentle please – and then we leave this to the next government?

              But so as long as the government outlines nothing, they can't be blamed for not achieving nothing. Maybe that is the only thing they learned from their first term, that not having plans means you can't fail.

              • Nic the NZer

                You should not "remind people that literally all the money that is made in comes from either people coming here to spend, or us sending dairy/fruit/wine etc overseas." because it is completely untrue. New Zealand produces the accounting unit it transacts in itself and is not going to run short on the basis of the balance of trade.

                The New Zealand economy is capable of carrying on for itself at least for all goods and services it can produce domestically. For goods and services only available overseas there are two approaches available to the country, either remain dependent on international trade as a source, or develop these same industries in New Zealand.

          • woodart 1.1.1.1.2

            couple of good posts sanctuary

          • aj 1.1.1.1.3

            Every corporate knows how to play the visa game to get a cheap technician.

            Eg the UFB roll-out by Chorus with a large number of immigrant contractors, most of whom were subsequently reaveled to be on about the minimum wage

      • Ad 1.1.2

        Yes this does begin to look like the government doing a 'structural adjustment by stealth' – similar in impact on specific parts of the economy as the Lange-Douglas government.

        Except this time they are just letting the crisis do the economic adjustment for it and just allowing the burn away of those less productive parts of the economy .

        • Sabine 1.1.2.1

          Structural re-arraignment courtesy of Covid. Cause i bet you a dollar that without covid, nothing would have changed. We still would import people on flimsy pretend student visas to be exploited by various Kiwi businesses. We still would import people to freedom camp with abandon.

          Labour has so far shown that it has no guts when it comes to structurally re-organising anything, see housing, see poverty of the adults, see poverty of the children, see no investment in rural areas, etc. etc. etc.

          So yeah, the collapse of the tourism industry is not thanks to Labour its thanks to Covid. And anyone in their right mind who believes that Toursim is going to have a fast comeback has not followed the news (yeah, the news!) and / or is telling outright lies so as to not have to do anything.

          And btw, Ad, define 'less productive' parts of the economy? At the end of the day, all these industries made good GST revenue for the Government, hired a lot of people paying PAYE and then GST, and then the taxes from the businesses themselves. IS your industry productive enough to be saved?

          • Ad 1.1.2.1.1

            You won't find me giving "thanks to Covid". For anything.

            It's not that hard to define productivity.

            We have a whole Productivity Commission that's been going on about it for a while. Go find it if you're interested.

            And yes, my industry is well and truly more productive than most. It is also one of the most state funded: infrastructure.

          • Craig H 1.1.2.1.2

            Agree about tourism, although I think the impact of international climate change agreements would eventually have caused a rethink, but no doubt Covid has accelerated that process dramatically.

            The government took some steps in the international student market when it reduced work rights on student visas and eligibility for post-study work visas and for visas for partners and dependent children of students. That got forgotten about because of Covid, but it was a step in the right direction.

    • Anne 1.2

      The truth, as Paul Simon said long ago, is that people routinely hear what they want to hear and disregard the rest. In my experience people have quite a high “tune out, drop out” rate whenever government starts telling them to do anything.

      And that's what I said on DR about Case L:

      “In other words Case L only took notice of what she wanted to hear/read and ignored the plethora of other advice… ”

      https://thestandard.org.nz/daily-review-03-03-2021/#comment-1781685

      Excellent analysis from Campbell as always. Good journos are a rare commodity these days.

  1. Sanctuary 2

    One more comment – the lack of a plan for a vaccine rollout is either grand incompetence from the MOH or the government simply not willing to commit to a timeline because it is not being able to guarantee it can secure the supplies it needs to commit to anything in what are brutal displays of global real politik going on over vaccine nationalism. I prefer the second option of the above, because it seems to me that if they could have guaranteed supplies, the government would have had a plan out last month and us all vaccinated by October. Instead, they will only commit to vaccinate who they can once the stuff arrives in Auckland.

    Given the febrile, nit picking gotcha myopia of our MSM politically that sort of cautious approach is always going to be the best one.

    • Adrian 2.1

      There is no” lack of plan “ to my mind. Rather the opposite evidenced by early realism that was signaled by giving almost 40 million dollars to a number of possible vaccine producers, knowing full well the inevitability of the political and greedy shitfight that has since broken out in Europe would lead to the infighting and hoarding by national interests and that those without “ skin in the game “ would really be demoted to the hindmost tit and be lucky to get that. It was a given that any US version wouldn’t leave its shores until everybody who would take it got it.
      So please stop bagging the Government for making the very best job of tiptoeing through a an international minefield laid by the the most egregious arseholes in the known universe.

  2. Adrian 3

    It must be perplexing for the official Covid response that the B.1.1.1 variant that it does not seem to be as virulent as it is in Britain. I presume the quick and hard lockdown was because of its reputation. But maybe it isn’t as advertised, is it because after a dry sunny summer Aucklanders have in general very good stores of Vitamin D on tap and this is giving them the protective effect that research has presumed. It may well be more virulent in Britain but only because it raised its unwelcome spike at the start of a cold, wet and miserable winter and at a time the dithering BFJ let people out to prematurely party and go Christmas shopping because business, you know , demanded it at a time when apparently only 4% of Brits had sufficient VitD levels.

    once more, shit we are lucky.

    • Sabine 3.1

      England also has the Brazilian variant now on the Island, so i guess we are going to be able to see some more new variants coming up. California also has detected a new strain.

      It is however a bit concerning that the source of this infection is not known.

      But yes, so far we have been so so lucky. Fingers and toes crossed.

    • Sanctuary 3.2

      A British lockdown is nothing like one of our lockdowns, they seem to be a bit like level 3 minus. Also, in the UK there is a lot of flouting of the rules, more over-crowded cities and housing, and a general cultural & climate driven aversion to fresh air, apart from the fact they seem to have a national alcohol problem.

    • aj 3.3

      does not seem to be as virulent as it is in Britain.

      Or is it because we have adopted as standard practise in level 1 better social distancing and hand sanitising protocols in this country. This alone may have prevented rapid spread.

    • Craig H 3.4

      I think the key is that we don't have Covid here generally, and infectiousness is primarily a function of viral load, which is low because of the lack of Covid in the community, so even people are getting infected, it's by a single person rather than 10-20 people over a few days, so the load is low, so the super spreader events are much less likely.

      That's just my amateur reckons though.

    • McFlock 3.5

      VitD theories aside, b111 is demonstrably more infectious because it becomes the dominant strain. But that doesn't mean it's so infectious that it's changed the game.

      It's like armour on a vehicle. The UK has driven around in jeeps with canvas sides. That armour is easily defeated.

      NZ is like an APC. Bullets bounce off it, but a big gun would blow it up.

      B111 is like a bigger bullet. It hurts the people in the jeep more, but it just causes a bigger dent in the APC.

      The planB dickheads try to tell us that we have put so much armour on the vehicle that it's huge and heavy and only goes at 2kph and 10L/100k.

    • Treetop 3.6

      Possibly the B.1.1.7 strain has a long tail and will show up at day 12. It has shown that a close contact case and a casual plus contact case have become a positive case in NZ.

      Great if our luck was to hold out. Luck cannot be relied on. Following the rules is the luck.

      As for stores of vitamin D, at some point this could be confirmed as being more helpful than realised at the time.

  3. Adrian Thornton 4

    Some truths about post war Russia that for some reason seem to get overlooked, but are vital to contextualize any conversation about Russia today, and why we are spending so much time debating Russia at this moment I am not sure?…anyway a bit of historical objectivity never hurts.

    I don't agree with all of the conclusions here, but you don't have to agree with everything, right?, it is from Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) after all.
    Four Myths about Russian Grand Strategy
    https://www.csis.org/blogs/post-soviet-post/four-myths-about-russian-grand-strategy

    From The Guardian no less…
    The Soviet threat was a myth
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2002/apr/19/russia.comment

    "The cold war began because of Russia's reluctance to allow independence to Poland. Stalin was held to have reneged on promises at Yalta. Roosevelt and Churchill had demanded that Poland be allowed a government that would be "free" and also "friendly to Russia". It was a dishonest formula. As recently as 1920, the two countries had been at war. No freely elected Polish government would be friendly to the USSR. Furthermore, as Stalin pointed out at Yalta, Russia had been twice invaded through Poland by Germany in 26 years, with devastating consequences. The invasion of 1941 had led to the deaths of 20 million Russians. Any postwar Russian government – communist, tsarist or social democratic – would have insisted on effective control at least of Poland, if not of larger areas of eastern Europe, as a buffer zone against future attacks."

    • Ad 4.1

      Go on then, stretch your legs and do an actual post on Russia in the Next 5 Years if you're so obsessed. Spell out your Russia truths.

      You've got to do better than just recycling context-free quotes.

    • RedLogix 4.2

      Adrian,

      Yup that CSIS link is a good one. Yes politics and ideology play their role in these matters – but in the long run it's geography and demography that more than anything else determine the fate of nations:

      Russia simultaneously abutted Europe, the Near East, and the Far East. Such a circumstance should have argued for caution in foreign policy. But Russia had tended to be expansionist precisely in the name of vulnerability: even as forces loyal to the tsar had seized territory, they imagined they were preempting attacks [by other great powers]. And once Russia had forcibly acquired a region, its officials invariably insisted they had to acquire the next one over, too, in order to be able to defend their original gains. A sense of destiny and insecurity combined in a heady mix.

      If this argument is correct—that Russia’s strategic worldview is driven by a deep sense of insecurity and a threat of encirclement rather than the ideology of its current leaders—we must acknowledge an uncomfortable reality about the future. One day, Russia’s current leaders—Putin included—will no longer rule the country. But Russia’s geography and geopolitical realities will remain unchanged …

      Historically the Russian people have occupied a peculiarly vulnerable territory, lacking defined hard borders, they have been invaded repeatedly over the centuries. Arguably the only reason their culture has survived this long has been their oldest enemy and best ally at the same time – their ferocious winter. A winter that has repeatedly repelled outsiders ill-prepared for it.

      But otherwise the wide open steppes and flatlands of the motherland were impossible to defend, so in response the Russian strategy has been to reach out to borders they believed they could defend. This meant expanding until they could reach the mountains of Central Asia, the Caucasus's to the south and the Carpathian's to the west. Normally absorbing so much territory would increase the length of the borders to be defended – but in Russia's case it has the perverse incentive of reducing them.

      This is the underlying, irreducible geography that is essential to understanding Russia, a combination of a realistic fear of invasion, combined with a map that demands they expand in order to counter that fear.

      • Adrian Thornton 4.2.1

        "This is the underlying, irreducible geography that is essential to understanding Russia, a combination of a realistic fear of invasion, combined with a map that demands they expand in order to counter that fear."

        I agree with your conclusion, except that it seems that the word expansion in the context of todays Russia doesn't really hold up, surely it could be more accurately described as maintaining a buffer to offset a "realistic fear of invasion"?
        Russia hasn't been expansionist out side of the historical and usual contested buffer territories on it's boarders over the past 30-40 years as far as I know…though I could stand to be corrected, I am no expert.

        • RedLogix 4.2.1.1

          Think of them as less than "buffer zones" and more like establishing "defendable borders". It's far easier to find the manpower to deal to a relatively short section of flat land between two geographic barriers, than to hold a line thousands of km long in the wide open flatlands.

          The Sulwaki Gap is a good example of this in action.

          • McFlock 4.2.1.1.1

            Two points:

            If the objective were to simply find the most convenient defensible border positions for Russia, there was no reason to occupy Poland or East Germany.

            Russia has had the solution to defending the plains for centuries: scorched earth, and retreat slowly enough for their two key generals to get cracking- General Mud and General Winter. But it still doesn't hurt to have a decent buffer.

            • RedLogix 4.2.1.1.1.1

              Maybe look at a map with contour lines. I specifically mentioned the Carpathians and the Caucasus mountains as desirable 'defendable borders'. As the Afghanis have demonstrated over and again, difficult terrain plays to the advantage of the home team every time.

              • McFlock

                How far do the Carpathians go into East Germany?

                • RedLogix

                  It's extremely improbable that Russia would be interested to extend that far into Germany. (The converse is more likely in my view, but that's a whole other thread.)

                  At present the Russian 'western front' is over 5000km long, almost all in in wide open flatland. That's utterly impossible to defend against land based invasions, especially for a nation suffering from a demographic slump in the young adult generation which comprises any army. The old strategy of retreat and scorched earth is a desperately expensive one, a price Russia can not afford to pay again.

                  Of course the mountains I've named do not form a complete barrier, but they do reduce the open front dramatically. And on the Northern European Plain, the Vistula River makes for a feasible boundary.

                  • McFlock

                    No further territorial demands beyond the vistula, huh?

                    It's not theirs, anyway.

                    • RedLogix

                      It should be obvious that I'm addressing the underlying geopolitical drivers. I'll leave it to you to allocate all the correct rights and wrongs to history.

                    • McFlock

                      Meh.

                      Russia at the moment seems to think buffer states are largely the way to go. E.g. belorus, donbas, chechnya. Lucky for the poles.

                  • Stuart Munro

                    strive to understand is the reasons why they made the decisions they did,

                    The banality of evil, and the dark places of the human heart, need no special consideration.

                    Our concepts of political right and wrong are founded on the consent or assent of individuals making up the state. When those liberties are taken away, the state is necessarily illegitimate, nor has any real world example lent much credibility to the myth of the benign dictator.

                • Adrian Thornton

                  @ McFlock
                  No reason to occupy East Germany?

                  Well I guess just after having over 26 million of it's citizens butchered, it's towns burned to the ground, it's major cities flattened and it's economy destroyed by the most brutal regime in the history of this planet, the Russians people might have felt that they deserved a bit of occupational as well as financial revenge at the very least…pretty hard position to argue with at the time I would assume?

                  Especially hard to argue with considering that the Russians had also just saved nearly the whole of Europe from Hitler's fascism with the blood of their people in quantities unfathomable to any of us today.

                  Now I am not saying I agreed with that occupation, because I don't, but as usual, and for reasons known only to yourself, you can't or won't bring any historical objectivity into your thoughts on Russia.
                  It is because of this inability to contextualize, that your thoughts on this subject remain and have ever only been one dimensional…thereby, sadly, offer nothing really to further the conversation…IMO that is.

                  • arkie

                    Mariya Vasilyevna Oktyabrskaya

                    After her husband was killed fighting in 1941, Oktyabrskaya sold her possessions to donate a tank for the war effort, and requested that she be allowed to drive it. She received and drove a T-34 medium tank

                    Oktyabrskaya proved her ability and bravery in battle, and was promoted to the rank of sergeant. After she died of wounds from battle in 1944, she was posthumously made a Hero of the Soviet Union, the Soviet Union's highest honor for bravery during combat. She was the first of only two female tank drivers to be awarded the title.

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariya_Oktyabrskaya

                  • McFlock

                    OK, if we're going to look at “historical objectivity”, what about Poland in 1939?

                  • Stuart Munro

                    26 million of its citizens butchered

                    There was considerable Russian responsibility for the size of those casualty figures, not least of which lies in inflating the results, which does nothing to support your thesis – other sources put the number at 16 825 000.

                    inability to contextualize

                    There's a lot of it about – in your case recognizing that Molotov-Ribbentrop, with its division of Poland, constituted as manifest an assumption of risk as stepping into a boxing ring would for you.

                    • RedLogix

                      I find myself rarely interested in re-litigating the rights and wrongs of history. After all:

                      "The line separating good and evil passes not through states, nor between classes, nor between political parties either, but right through every human heart."

                      Solzhenitsyn

                      But what we can rightly strive to understand is the reasons why they made the decisions they did, why they acted as they did, and try to see the world through their eyes – in order perhaps to understand our own world better.

    • Stuart Munro 4.3

      It is probably inadequate to attribute a complex political stance to a single cause like Polish independence. It was an embarrassment to Britain however, as Polish forces had joined them against Germany much as they had Napoleon a hundred and some years before. To be sure, there were significant anti-communist interests like US industrialists aligned against Russia with the fall of Germany. But Europe had had a taste of totalitarianism and was not persuaded that the Russian version was any more palatable than the German one.

      Britain was an old hand at the imperial game, and knew perfectly well that despotic regimes like Russia's were ripe for replacement. But all countries were exhausted by the war, and their priority was rebuilding. Russian expansionism, in the form of the permanent occupation of East Germany, looked not too dissimilar from the Nazi occupation of other small countries. They tolerated it because there was little public enthusiasm for defending Germany or prolonging the war. But it was an invidious compromise, with a state that routinely oppressed its subjects.

  4. RedBaronCV 5

    I found this an interesting story. Permanent employee visa due to expire and the company feels it will not be renewed looks to hire a local. Is the answer for the company to give a lot of notice that it won't support a visa renewal so employment ceases when the visa runs out? Or does it have an obligation to support the visa application up to a point and wait for immigration to turn it down? The recruitment notification was issued in Nov 20 for a Jan 21 search? That does see like reasonable forwarning

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/124406551/restaurant-brands-ordered-to-pay-former-worker-18k-for-unjustifiable-dismissal

    • Craig H 5.1

      It's not stated in the article what work visa category it was, but the information suggests it was one of the labour-market tested visa categories, so Restaurant Brands are required to make genuine attempts to recruit a NZ citizen/resident each time one of their potential or current employees applies for a visa. That's a full scale recruitment effort with advertising etc.

      I think the more likely problem is hinted at the end of the article where it says they dismissed him before his visa expired while he was still legally able to work, rather than attempting to support him through application process.

      • RedBaronCV 5.1.1

        So the take away is that the business

        • must advertise for a local and they do appear to have found one

        -but must also support the visa application extension when they have the local alternative lined up so they can't really support it because it fails the work test ?

        • but they need to let a person work until the actual visa expiry date – which I can understand.

        Still sounds like a mess – can someone be a permanent employee when they are on a time limited visa. My head swims. Still it’s not a firm I have a lot of sympathy for.

  5. Adrian Thornton 6

    Interesting piece from Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting, worth a few minute to read, especially for a few of the 'lefties' around these parts…

    Humanitarian Imperialism

    How corporate media sell regime change, Intervention and war to progressive audiences

    "Media are experts in using progressives’ empathy and compassion against them, presenting them carefully selected images and stories of suffering around the world, and suggesting that US military power can be used to alleviate it. As such, intervention is sold to the US left less on the basis of fear than of pity."

  6. McFlock 7

    can't-sell culture strikes again. NZME editors publish an opinion piece, only to discover that it is "unacceptable" to the degree that the contributor will no longer appear on their platforms.

    I mean, it's difficult being a content editor these days. One can't even publish the innocent opinions of tory racists without risking that what you hoped would be click-baiting dogwhistles turn out to be explicit racism that damages your advertisers' revenue.

    • RedLogix 7.1

      It's an easy route to self righteousness to have an enemy – they make a convenient totem on which to place all evil.

      • McFlock 7.1.1

        Dunno about all that, but it seems as if advertisers think racism doesn't sell product like it used to.

  7. greywarshark 8

    There is an obvious need for women supporting women. https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/in-depth/431299/gassed-in-their-cells-begging-for-food-at-auckland-women-s-prison

    These prisoners need TLC. It's time for some letters to Corrections and the token woman at the top here. Time for Corrections to be corrected themselves. Government looking for cheap bargains in delovering (sic) services get cheap results. To follow that logic, we should put government up for tender every three years. We aren't getting satisfactory action from present pollie system – jam tomorrow, or are we out permanently Mum?

    • dv 8.1

      Geez that's a distressing read.

    • Treetop 8.2

      It appears as though full force was always applied when it did not need to be applied. Corrections used no tact when it came to choosing a method which would not be the most humiliating. Not asking a person to stand against a wall to deliver food through a hatch compared to lying face down on the ground is an example. The situation has snowballed and the judge is the circuit breaker. Addressing the PTSD will uncover how the world is seen. Regaining trust will take time.

  8. Morrissey 9

    About time.

    But how come the equally notorious Mike Hosking is still being published by this discredited outfit?

    https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/mediawatch/audio/2018786126/nzme-pulls-racism-article-and-bans-bassett

  9. georgecom 10

    On Staying at home, a self of entitlement and the Tamaki's.

    As I have stated before, the bloke who went to the Gym and Polytech on or around the day he also had a covid test strikes me as being fool hardly, irresponsible and seemingly done with a sense of self entitlement. Likewise 2 women going for a walk under level 3 requirements was fool hardy and irresponsible. It might have been naive if they thought they were allowed to, or self entitled if they decided to flout the rules. Stay home when you are required to.

    Any Aucklander madly rushing to exit the city to go to their beach house prior to level 3 restrictions is also irresponsible, reckless and seemingly done with a sense of self entitlement. Stay in Auckland when you are required to.

    I see in the news the Tamaki's fled Auckland to be with a congregation in Rotorua. Again, fool hardy, irresponsible and done with a sense of self entitlement. Stay in Auckland.

    The justifications for doing such were apparently their ministry demanded they must be in Rotorua. I assume they have a Pastor in that city. I assume they are a perfectly competent and genuine pastor who can lead that congregation. I assume the Tamaki's are not in Rotorua every weekend. Hence why the need to rush out of Auckland when someone competent is available to minister to that congregation.

    It's better for them to be in Rotorua was what they are quoted as saying. Better for the congregation they were in Rotorua, or better for the Tamaki's bank balance? There was it seems an "alter call for cash". If you 'give, give, give' God will give you a blessing, a "Jubilee". Maybe a brand new Tesla car like Hannah Tamaki bought herself.

    My following comments are not about the Tamaki's fleeing Auckland. It is pretty apparent what they should have done, stayed in Auckland, done the right thing. These are comments about this notion of chasing cash. I term it games show christianity. A flash slick games show host and the prize that maybe someone could win a car. Wheel of Fortune, Who wants to be a Millionaire, The Chase, The X Factor, Destiny Alter Call For Cash.

    If you go back to the bible you find some interesting things. John the Baptist lived in the wilderness and ate locusts and wild honey. He baptised Jesus. He didn't have a big house. The greatest Apostle, Paul, was an itinerant tent maker who I suspect didn't die a rich man. He didn't drive a Tesla or ride a Harley Davidson. Paul, formerly a Roman commander who presumably could have lived a comfortable life, he forsook that for ministry. Biblical leaders were not wealthy nor blessed with physical riches.

    • georgecom 10.1

      correction. Paul not a roman commander but rather a Jew whose status and connections could have presumably provided a comfortable living, forsook that for the ministry with no promises of riches or abundance

      • arkie 10.1.1

        The Rich and the Kingdom of God

        A certain ruler asked him, “Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”

        “Why do you call me good?” Jesus answered. “No one is good—except God alone. You know the commandments: ‘You shall not commit adultery, you shall not murder, you shall not steal, you shall not give false testimony, honor your father and mother.’”

        “All these I have kept since I was a boy,” he said.

        When Jesus heard this, he said to him, “You still lack one thing. Sell everything you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.”

        When he heard this, he became very sad, because he was very wealthy. Jesus looked at him and said, “How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of God! Indeed, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.”

        https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke+18%3A18-18%3A25

    • Treetop 10.2

      It sounds like a good idea to do targeting Covid-19 testing in every region.

      I would look at the following, bus drivers, taxi drivers, bar workers, domestic air crew and shops in malls.

      • RosieLee 10.2.1

        And what about teachers? Cooped up in a confined space with around 30 kids?

        Or – the "modern learning environment" where there may be over 100.

        • Treetop 10.2.1.1

          I intended to include teachers, thanks for mentioning them. Hair stylists and dentists as well.

      • georgecom 10.2.2

        bus drivers, taxi drivers, bar workers…….self annointed Apostles

        • Treetop 10.2.2.1

          Back then it would have been those leading the donkey with the passenger and calling into the inn for a mead.

    • gsays 10.3

      I heard Bishop Tamaki on Checkpoint this evening.

      He spoke more of Mammon than God.

      'Being in the people changing business'.

      'The strain on the economy'.

      https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/checkpoint/audio/2018786152/brian-tamaki-responds-to-criticism-after-leaving-auckland-on-eve-of-lockdown

  10. pandemics can have a cleansing effect on wooly thinking.

    global warming is very emetic.

    we live in "interesting times", allegedly an ancient chinese curse wished upon those they disliked.

    economists beware

    hubris is fatal

    [TheStandard: A moderator moved this comment to Open Mike as being off topic or irrelevant in the post it was made in. Be more careful in future.]

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • New Chair for Guardians of NZ Superannuation
    Company director and investor John Williamson has been appointed as the new Chair of the Guardians of New Zealand Superannuation, the Crown entity that oversees the NZ Super Fund and the Elevate NZ Venture Capital Fund, Finance Minister Nicola Willis announced today.  Mr Williamson will take up his new position ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Northland open for business as critical works to repair SH1 Brynderwyn Hills begin
    The Government is encouraging New Zealanders to support, visit, and explore Northland, as the closure and detour of SH1 at the Bryderwyn Hills begins, and critical repair work by the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) gets underway, Transport Minister Simeon Brown says. “Many regions across the country suffered extensive and devastating ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Government backs police to crackdown on gangs
    The coalition Government is restoring law and order by providing police new tools to crack down on criminal gangs, says Justice Minister Paul Goldsmith and Police Minister Mark Mitchell.  “Over the last five years gangs have recruited more than 3000 members, a 51 per cent increase. At the same time, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Northland’s new Kāeo Bridge officially open
    Transport Minister Simeon Brown has welcomed the official opening of the new State Highway 10 (SH10) Kāeo Bridge, which will improve safety and traffic flow for people heading to and from the Far North. “This is an important piece of infrastructure for the Northland region that will help members of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government grants $6.6 million to clean up old landfill sites
    The Government has granted $6.6 million to clean up four historic New Zealand landfill and dump sites vulnerable to extreme weather events and coastal erosion. At the BlueGreens Forum in Paihia today Environment Minister Penny Simmonds said that the Contaminated Sites Remediation Fund grants will go towards fixing former landfills ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Dry weather triggers extra support for farmers and growers across the top of the South Island
    The coalition Government is providing support for farmers and growers as dry conditions worsen across the top of the South Island. “Conditions on the ground across the Marlborough, Tasman, and Nelson districts are now extremely dry and likely to get worse in the coming months,” Agriculture Minister Todd McClay said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Trade Minister heads to Abu Dhabi for key WTO negotiations
    Trade Minister Todd McClay travels to Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates for the 13th Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) today, to take up his role as Vice Chair of the negotiations. The Ministerial Conference is the highest decision-making body within the WTO and meets every ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Appointment round for King’s Counsel announced
    Attorney-General Judith Collins today announced an appointment round for King’s Counsel will take place in 2024. Appointments of King’s Counsel are made by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Attorney-General and with the concurrence of the Chief Justice. The Governor-General retains the discretion to appoint King’s Counsel in recognition ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Retiring Chief of Navy thanked for his service
    Defence Minister Judith Collins has thanked the Chief of Navy, Rear Admiral David Proctor, for his service as he retires from the Royal New Zealand Navy after 37 years. Rear Admiral Proctor will retire on 16 May to take up an employment opportunity in Australia.  “I would like to thank ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Indonesian Vice President to visit New Zealand
    Indonesia’s Vice President Ma’ruf Amin will visit New Zealand next week, the first here by an Indonesian leader since 2018, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters has announced. “New Zealand and Indonesia have a strong partnership,” Mr Peters says.  “The Vice President’s visit is an opportunity to discuss how we can strengthen ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government boost to fight against caulerpa
    The battle to contain the fast-spreading exotic caulerpa seaweed has today received a $5 million boost to accelerate the development of removal techniques, says Biosecurity Minister Andrew Hoggard.  “The time is now to really lean in and build on the work of Biosecurity New Zealand, mana whenua, communities and local ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Minister attending Australian data, digital meeting
    Minister for Digitising Government Judith Collins is in Sydney to attend the first Data and Digital Ministers’ Meeting of 2024.  “This is a great opportunity to connect with our Australian counterparts and identify how we can work together on digital transformation,” Ms Collins says.   “Both our nations are looking into ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Appointments to Antarctica New Zealand Board
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has appointed Leon Grice and Heather Simpson to serve on the Antarctica New Zealand board.  “Since taking office, the Coalition Government has become concerned about the direction of the Scott Base Redevelopment Project,” Mr Peters says.  “It is vital that Antarctica New Zealand has the right ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Strengthening the Single Economic Market
    Finance Minister Nicola Willis has met with Australian Treasurer Jim Chalmers to discuss the opportunities to lower business costs and increase the ease with which businesses and people can operate across the Tasman.     “I have met with Treasurer Chalmers and shared our new Government’s ambitious economic goals, our plans ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government to address business payment practices
    The Government will repeal the Business Payment Practices Act 2023, Small Business and Manufacturing Minister Andrew Bayly announced today. “There is a major problem with large market players imposing long payment terms and routinely paying invoices late. “However, the Business Payment Practices Act is not an effective solution and would ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Greater focus on work will reduce child poverty
    Worsening child poverty rates support the Coalition Government’s focus on reducing the cost of living and getting people into work, Child Poverty Reduction Minister Louise Upston says. Figures released by Stats NZ today show child poverty rates have increased, with the rising cost of living, driven by inflation, making it ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • NZ announces new support for Ukraine
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters and Defence Minister Judith Collins have marked two years since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine by announcing further support and sanctions, and extending our military assistance. “Russia launched its illegal, full-scale invasion of Ukraine, in blatant violation of international law, including the UN Charter,” Mr Peters says. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Finance Minister to meet Australian Treasurer
    Finance Minister Nicola Willis will travel to Australia today to meet her Australian counterpart, Treasurer Jim Chalmers.    “New Zealand and Australia have an incredibly strong trade and investment relationship. The Closer Economic Relations and Single Economic Market are powerful engines for growth on both sides of the Tasman.     “I will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • PM shocked and saddened at death of Efeso Collins
    “I am truly shocked and saddened at the news of Efeso Collins’ sudden death,” Prime Minister Christopher Luxon says. “Efeso was a good man, always friendly and kind, and a true champion and advocate for his Samoan and South Auckland communities. “Our thoughts and deepest sympathies go to his family, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Greater support for social workers
    The Coalition Government is enhancing the professionalism of the social work sector and supporting the vulnerable people who rely on them, Social Development and Employment Minister Louise Upston says.  The Social Workers Registration Legislation Amendment Bill passed its third reading in Parliament today. It amends the Social Workers Registration Legislation ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government delivers greater freedom and choice for sick New Zealanders
    The coalition government is delivering on its commitment to making principled decisions by getting rid of red tape that doesn’t make sense and allowing sick New Zealanders greater freedom and choice to purchase effective cold and flu medicines. A bill amending the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 is being introduced, and changes to the Medicines ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government begins reset of welfare system
    The Coalition Government is taking early action to curb the surge in welfare dependency that occurred under the previous government by setting out its expectations around employment and the use of benefit sanctions, Social Development and Employment Minister Louise Upston says. In 2017, 60,588 sanctions were applied to beneficiaries who ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • State of the Nation
    Ka nui te mihi kia koutou. Kia ora, good morning, talofa, malo e lelei, bula vinaka, da jia hao, namaste, sat sri akal, assalamu alaikum. Thank you for coming to my first State of the Nation as Prime Minister. Thank you for coming to a speech where I don’t just ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • West Coast tourism attractions officially open
    Regional Development Minister Shane Jones will attend the official opening of two highly anticipated tourism projects on the West Coast today – Pike29 Memorial Track, dedicated to the memory of the Pike River miners, and Pounamu Pathway. “The Pike29 Memorial Track is a way to remember and honour the men ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Independent ferry service advisory group in place
    Appointments to the Ministerial Advisory Group tasked with providing independent advice and assurance on the future of KiwiRail’s inter-island ferry service have been made, State Owned Enterprises Minister Paul Goldsmith says. “It’s important for New Zealand that KiwiRail is focused on ensuring safe, resilient, and reliable ferry services over the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Joint statement from the Prime Ministers of Australia, Canada, and New Zealand
    The Prime Ministers of Australia, Canada and New Zealand today issued the following statement on reports of Israel’s planned military operation in Rafah. We are gravely concerned by indications that Israel is planning a ground offensive into Rafah.   A military operation into Rafah would be catastrophic. About 1.5 million Palestinians ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt will deliver on expanded breast screening
    The coalition Government has made the first steps in delivering on its promise to  extend free breast screening to women aged 70-74, Health Minister Shane Reti says. “As part of the 100 day plan, the Government has now met with officials and discussed what is needed in order for the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government announces woolshed roadshows in support of sheep farmers
    The Government celebrates National Lamb Day (15 February 24) and congratulates sheep farmers on the high-quality products they continue to produce. Agriculture Minister McClay hosted bipartisan celebrations of National Lamb Day with industry representatives at Parliament this week to mark the anniversary of the first frozen lamb exports that left ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Speech: Address to the NZ Economics Forum
    It’s great to be back at the New Zealand Economics Forum. I would like to acknowledge everyone here today for your expertise and contribution, especially the Pro Vice-Chancellor, Head of the Waikato Management School, economists, students and experts alike. A year has passed since I was last before you, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government tackling high construction costs
    The Government is focused on reducing sky-high construction costs to make it more affordable to build a home, Building and Construction Minister Chris Penk says.  Stats NZ data shows the cost of building a house has increased by 41 per cent since 2019, making housing even more unaffordable for Kiwi ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Labour’s Three Waters legislation repealed
    The Coalition Government’s legislative plan to address longstanding issues with local water infrastructure and service delivery took an important step today, with the repeal of Labour’s divisive and unpopular Three Waters legislation, Local Government Minister Simeon Brown says. “Repealing this legislation is a necessary first step in implementing our Local ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Cost of living support for beneficiary households
    The Coalition Government is delivering on its commitment to ease the cost-of-living by increasing main benefit rates in line with inflation and ensuring the Minimum Family Tax Credit threshold remains aligned with this change, Social Development and Employment Minister Louise Upston says. The Social Security (Benefits Adjustment) and Income Tax ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government announces agriculture delegations to better support Primary sector
    The coalition Government has announced ministerial delegations to support key areas across the Primary sector to deliver for New Zealand’s food and fibre sector, Agriculture Minister Todd McClay announced today. “I will be supported in my roles as Minister of Agriculture, Trade, Forestry and Hunting and Fishing, by three Associate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Waikato MoU reinforces Govt’s commitment to increase NZ doctors
    The Government has taken an important step forward in addressing a critical shortage of New Zealand-trained doctors, with today’s signing of a Memorandum of Understanding for a third medical school, Minister of Health Dr Shane Reti has announced.  “Today’s signing by the Ministry of Health and the University of Waikato ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Speech – Lunar New Year 2024
    Annyeonghaseyo, greetings and welcome all. It is my pleasure as the Minister for Ethnic Communities to welcome you to the first Lunar New Year Event in Parliament. Thank you to our emcees for greeting us in the different languages that represent the many cultures that celebrate the Lunar New Year. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • More funding to Hawke’s Bay and Tairāwhiti
    Urgent work to clean-up cyclone-affected regions will continue, thanks to a $63 million boost from the Government for sediment and debris removal in Hawke’s Bay and Tairāwhiti.                                                                                                   The funding will help local councils continue urgent work removing and disposing of sediment and debris left from Cyclone Gabrielle.   “This additional ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Budget will be delivered on 30 May
    Plans to deliver tax relief to hard-working New Zealanders, rebuild business confidence and restore the Crown’s finances to order will be unveiled on 30 May, Finance Minister Nicola Willis says. The plans will be announced in the Budget which is currently being developed by Ministers.  “The last government’s mismanagement of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government advances Local Water Done Well
    The Coalition Government is continuing work to restore council ownership and control of water assets by repealing Three Waters and appointing a Technical Advisory Group to provide expert advice on the implementation of Local Water Done Well, Local Government Minister Simeon Brown says. “The Government will pass a bill to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Minister congratulates NZQA Top Scholars
    Education Minister Erica Stanford congratulates the New Zealand Scholarship recipients from 2023 announced today.  “Receiving a New Zealand Scholarship is a fantastic achievement and is a testament to the hard work and dedication the recipients have put in throughout the year,” says Ms Stanford.  “New Zealand Scholarship tests not only ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New diplomatic appointments
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has today announced five new diplomatic appointments.  "Strong and effective diplomacy to protect and advance our interests in the world is needed now more than ever," Mr Peters says.  “We are delighted to appoint senior diplomats from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade to these ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago

Page generated in The Standard by Wordpress at 2024-02-26T04:56:07+00:00