web analytics

Prince William

Written By: - Date published: 10:00 am, March 10th, 2011 - 94 comments
Categories: International, republic - Tags:

So it seems that we’re to have a visit from Prince William. As might be expected from a PM who restored our archaic “honours” system, John Key has been positively gushing at the prospect:

Prince William will address the thousands of people expected at next week’s national memorial service for the victims of the devastating Christchurch earthquake. St James’s Palace today announced the prince will attend the March 18 service at North Hagley Park on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II, and will also visit Greymouth to speak to the families of the Pike River Coal mine disaster. Prime Minister John Key told reporters today that Prince William would speak at the memorial service.

“This is a heart-warming gesture that will mean a lot to the thousands of people whose lives have been forever changed by these events,” Mr Key said.

“I think all New Zealanders will appreciate the gesture from The Queen to ask Prince William to come down. It’s a very important step that he’s taking because it shows you the international feeling for Christchurch and Cantabrians.”

Mr Key said it would mean “an awful lot” for the prince to make the long trek from Britain to take part in the service.

“The long trek from Britain” – is he coming by camel?

I’ve nothing against members of the Royal Family personally — they didn’t ask for the job. But I do think that as an institution they have no further relevance to NZ, and the sooner we’re a republic (with a special “grandfathering” clause for The Treaty) the better. With respect to this visit, I find it hard to imagine what William, a young man with little life experience and a very privileged background, could possibly contribute once he gets here. What can he say to a family from East Christchurch whose house is in ruins? What can he do for a young mother in Greymouth who lost her husband at Pike River?

We already have a popular but useless celebrity “leader” swanning about the country to make people feel good and hog the cameras. Do we really need a second one? I’m pretty sure that given the choice between Prince William and a plane load of portaloos, the people of Refugee City in Christchurch would opt overwhelmingly for the latter.

All of my posts for March will finish with this note. While life goes on as usual outside Christchurch, let our thoughts be with those who are coping with the aftermath, with the sorrow of so many who were lost, and with the challenges ahead.

94 comments on “Prince William”

  1. marsman 1

    Did Key invite William? More photo ops for Key?

    • Of course he did . I expect he’s hoping for a knightghood as soon as possible. There he will be bobing up,and down touching his forelock and simpering. What could be more embarrassing than the PM of Aotearoa making an ass of himself by pandering to this spoilt over paid beneficiary.

  2. toad 2

    “Wills the Disaster Tourist”. He’s going to Queensland to have a squiz at the flood damage there too.

    And, yes, it looks as though Key did invite him:

    Mr Key said he had known for a week that Prince William would attend, and the timing of the service had been coordinated with the prince’s planned trip to Australia.

    “We started looking at our timing for the memorial service, it all seemed to tie together so it’s working well.”

    Another distraction from the issues that matter in election year.

  3. Rich 3

    He’d have been way more popular if he’d turned up at the Sydney Mardi Gras with his shirt off.

    • bbfloyd 3.1

      thanks for the imagery Rich….. i’m not sure if i will be eating anytime soon…. not sure i’ll be able to keep it down…. eeeeeww!!

    • Deadly_NZ 3.2

      That would be a sight to make your eyes bleed.

  4. Richard 4

    I think a visit by Prince William is appropriate. And it seems late enough that dealing with him is not going to interfer in rescue/recovery operations.

    He does bring international attention, and he is certainly a symbol of an historic and on-going connection between England and New Zealand. And ChCh does portray itself as an “english” city.

    Certainly, he is not of any practical value. But that’s not what he is here for, and no one is pretending that he is. He’s the state equivalent of sending flowers to the bereaved.

    • bbfloyd 4.1

      stick to charlton heston impersonations Richie….they give you more credibility… and it would make that apologist rubbish sound more sincere..

      • Richard 4.1.1

        I think you might have me confused with somebody else.

        • bbfloyd 4.1.1.1

          no i hav’nt…. it isn’t the fact that william is coming that rankles…… it is the way it is being exploited by swishypants that is…. does anyone know yet how accurate the rumour that swishy invited him specifically,,, or whether it was a decision made by the windsors?

          untill we co know for certain one way or the other, i would hesitate to take a firm position.

          no doubt, you are aware of speculation that the memorial service was timed to coincide with the visit… why else would swishy want to hold memorial service when there are still bodies to be found and identified…… don’t you think any memorial service should honour ALL the known victims? where is the need for this unseemly haste? doesn’t this all seem a bit too coincidental to you?

          • Richard 4.1.1.1.1

            Of course, Key will make an arse of himself. No question there. But that’s really independent of anything else. Key is quite capable of making an arse of himself at any time, and in any company.

            And, of course, it makes sense to time the memorial service to the visit (or vice-versa). If William wasn’t coming the British High Commisioner in NZ (or whatever he’s called) would represented England alone. Which would have been fine too. We are presumably going to see a number of ambassadors and so forther there too.

            What’s the problem?

      • Vicky32 4.1.2

        Sorry, I happen to agree with Richard. William’s visit isn’t going to do anyone any harm!
        Deb

    • Lanthanide 4.2

      I agree.

    • BLiP 4.3

      What’s the matter with me, I’m agreeing with a dick?

      I see the visit and its attendant international publicity as a good thing. It will indicate that New Zealand is coping with the clean-up okay, we’re still functioning, most of it its quite safe, so come on over and spend all your tourist money now. That the Crosby/Texter client’s Kiwi Mascot, Clueless, will exploit the situation for all its worth is just the nature of the National Ltd™ beast. I don’t know if what’s-his-name would do any different, to be honest. At least the visit will give Clueless something to do rather than puddle about making things worse for everyone. And, who knows, perhaps there are still many people in New Zealand who can still receive succour from such a stunt.

      . . . the sooner we’re a republic (with a special “grandfathering” clause for The Treaty) the better . . .

      The Maori nation has its own agreement with the Crown via Te Tiriti. We don’t need your steeenking “clauses”, we need sovereignty.

  5. toad 5

    Mind you, if he brought a $100m donation from his granny and dad (they’re one of the richest families in the world) towards the Christchurch recovery effort it might be worthwhile. What’s the chances?

  6. Bill 6

    As the quoted line from JK that is in the post points out, it’s a gesture.

    Elton John rescheduling his second concert to play in Christchurch rather than Dunedin is also a gesture.

    And ‘The Warriors’ playing a match in Greymouth was a gesture.

    As with all gestures, some appreciate them or the people making them, and some don’t.

    And there is an argument that the presence of a Prince will generate media coverage beyond NZ that will have the potential to pull in more in the way of donationas etc.

    I just don’t think it’s worth anyone getting their knickers in a twist. He’s popular. Him and his engagement are all over the ‘womens magazines’. Some people will appreciate his presence…his gesture. It isn’t doing anybody any harm. And it just might result in some practical good.

  7. SMSD 7

    So, we have a couple of major disasters, and our Head of State sends her grandson out for a visit? Awesome.

    • Colonial Viper 7.1

      Our head of state is pretty OLD, even I wouldn’t want her expiring at 35,000 feet on the way over here.

      • SMSD 7.1.1

        Indeed, but I was trying to make the point that our head of state really ought to live here….at least part of the time!

  8. gobsmacked 8

    I don’t have a problem with William’s visit. But the real story here is … why March 18?

    It’s clear that a lot of people in Christchurch aren’t ready yet for a public holiday and a memorial service, next week. So … was the date chosen to meet the needs of the people?

    No. It was chosen to suit the schedule of the Prince, and Australia.

    Perhaps the people of Christchurch might have preferred to wait until April, or later in the year. But the Prince is busy in April, as we all know.

    He’s not coming only to NZ, either. Like most visitors from afar, he’s combining it with Australia. More time has passed since the Australian tragedies (Queensland floods etc), so they may be ready for this. But anyway, they’re bigger, and they lead. So NZ must fit in.

    So, to be clear, this was the decision-making process of John Key:

    1) When can Prince William come?
    2) When is suitable for Australia?
    3) People of Christchurch, we’re not asking you.

    To put it another way – is there any other reason that March 18 has been chosen?

    • Lanthanide 8.1

      Actually I think March 18th was chosen to be 1 month after the quake, but a Friday-ised holiday. I guess they could’ve made it Monday-ised just as easily though.

      • Puddleglum 8.1.1

        Looks like the timing concerns expressed by gobsmacked, me, sophie and others are also shared by local businesspeople.

        Key has defended the decision and claims it was thoroughly thought through … I think that says a lot about the thoroughness of thinking going on over this earthquake from central government.

    • I agree, as I mentioned on another recent post (I was a bit off topic there). I think a memorial service is a fine idea and if William comes along then I won’t complain. But, 18 March is not good timing. Unidentified dead people, resources getting used for an aggregation of people in Hagley Park (as I noted, where will the portaloos come from?), many people living in garages, significant proportions of the population without power, water, sewerage, many people not even here (having temporarily fled), schools and workplaces only just beginning to get going (e.g., my daughter’s first full day is next Wednesday).

      In my other comment I said why not 22 Feb, 2012. Maybe that’s too far out, but one month is just too soon and I predict will be a bitter pill to swallow and a source of some cynical jokes amongst those still barely able to make livable conditions for themselves. But I doubt whether they’ll make the vox pops that show Christchurch people saying how great it is. And I guess that’s all that matters to many.

      Much better to delay it at least till victims have been identified and more of Christchurch can join in other than people from unaffected suburbs (the burglars are going to have an even more open invitation on the day). I strongly suspect the timing of this is for the rest of the country. There may be some international exposure from it but why would people flock to a city that has a memorial service for a major earthquake? It is possible, however, that ordinary people’s pockets might be opened a bit more by it. But presumably the same would be true if it was held after – I don’t know – 100 days from the earthquake?

      I don’t claim I know what everyone is thinking here, it’s just my take on what seems like a hasty, ‘let’s draw a line under this’ decision that was made without really thinking things through.

  9. Herodotus 9

    “As might be expected from a PM who restored our archaic “honours” system” – No ROB he restored only those that were taken away from the deserving general public. Funny enough did not the politicians keep theirs when the rest were removed/renamed – there is a link to Machiavellis writing and how to change society – part being replacing exisiting conventions and replacing them with your own thus severing ties with the old e.g. honourable, Right Honourable etc.
    Hands off pollys perks. something about eating cake seems valid !! 😉

    • bbfloyd 9.1

      i would probably find your comment distasteful, if it made any sense,,,, but as it doesn’t,,,, so it’s just nonsensical bullshit…

      • Herodotus 9.1.1

        Only distasteful thing was that Helen Clark kept the honors relating to her lot i.e. politicians, yet changed that what was bestowed to the public, without any of us having a say.

  10. M 10

    Ten out of ten post – my favourite:

    “This is a heart-warming gesture that will mean a lot to the thousands of people whose lives have been forever changed by these events,” Mr Key said.

    …yeah and might staunch the drop in my popularity for a bit.

    • Anne 10.1

      “This is a heart-warming gesture that will mean a lot to the thousands of people whose lives have been forever changed by these events,” Mr Key said.

      Nothing wrong with William visiting, and personally expressing his sympathy to the people of CHCH. But when Key over-eggs the supposed enthusiasm for the visit (bear in mind most of the worst effected won’t even get to the venue to see William) then you know he’s looking for yet more photo ops. and personal accolades out of it.

      • Anne 10.1.1

        oops… should be affected.

        • M 10.1.1.1

          Anne

          Thank heavens someone knows the difference – such a relief.

          Anti-spam: corrections LOL.

          • Anne 10.1.1.1.1

            That anti-spam thing gives me the creeps sometimes 😀

            Btw, I wish more commenters would learn when to use bought and brought… lost count of their misuse on this blog site. They don’t teach English like they did in my day……..

  11. Thanks for the linkage!

    FWIW, members of the Royal Family need the permission of the British Government to leave the UK, typically an invite. Allegedly Cabinet wanted the Queen to come to NZ to open the new Supreme Court building, but Buckingham Palace decided (for PR reasons, we believe) to send William instead. He’s certainly much more popular than his father, even though Charles is the actual heir.

    So that means the PM probably invited the Royals to send someone. I suspect that happened at the same time as Key confirmed his choice for the next Gov-Gen, announced Tuesday.

  12. sophie 12

    We have lost a family member in the earthquake but we haven’t got her back yet – 18 March is too soon for us.

    The thought of seeing photo-op Key with William all over the media “empathising” with the families of the dead and injured and those who have lost their homes makes me feel sick.

    • Rosy 12.1

      sophie, my thoughts are with you at this dreadful time

    • neoleftie 12.2

      well thats said and done – surely family members of the poor people who lost their lives in this tragic event should have some imput into a date. This isnt some entertainment or ‘show and tell’ exercise. This is about coming togther as a nation or region to ‘show our respects’ and mourn as a nation. This is a tragedy so it should be treated as such, not a side show for the media circus.

    • r0b 12.3

      My condolences sophie – I’m so sorry.

      We had immediate family injured in the quake, but no one lost (as far as we know).

  13. What a mean spirited post. What countries really care about NZ. Few. We should retain the friends we have.

    • Since when have the UK and their bludging hangers on been the friend of Aotearoa? The British missionaries told the Maori to close their eyes and pray and while their eyes were closed they robbed them . The monied came and claimed acres of land. For years our children were brain-washed into the worship of a load of parasites . Then they took our young men and used them as cannon foder in two wars . Then after the last war was over they told us to get stuffed and we no what we can do with our goods . I dont think NZ has any reason to kow tow to anyone let alone a member of a disfuctional sponging family like the Windsor’s.

  14. Britain showed it cared by sending search and rescue teams. As did the US, Japan, Taiwan and China.

  15. pmofnz 15

    “We already have a popular but useless celebrity “leader” swanning about the country to make people feel good and hog the cameras.”

    Is the UN disaster tourist still lurking about then?

  16. Ms M 16

    I was appalled at the announcement the Government was planning a memorial service when so many families still do not have their loved ones back.

    Now we find out the that the memorial service the PM was annoucing last week as an opportunity for the nation and Canterbury to grieve was planned around and worked into royalty’s downunder itinery. The sincerity is absolutely dripping off this photo op.

    It’s at times like this when the PM’s reminds me of the stoner who steals your stuff to sell to buy his drugs but justifies his actions by returning to the scene of the crime and sharing his ill gotten gains with you.

  17. SHG 17

    On the “archaic honours system”:

    Moving parts in rubbing contact require lubrication to avoid excessive wear. Honorifics and formal politeness provide lubrication where people rub together. Often the very young, the untraveled, the naive, the unsophisticated deplore these formalities as “empty,” “meaningless,” or “dishonest,” and scorn to use them. No matter how “pure” their motives, they thereby throw sand into machinery that does not work too well at best.

    — Robert A. Heinlein

    • Marty G 17.1

      Heinlein. Have you read Starship Troopers? There’s basically no plot, just the outlining of a fascist militocracy.

      The movie is a great parody of the book.

      And The Forever War is a brilliant response to it, written by a Vietnam vet, Joe Hadleman. The pro-military Heinlein was in the navy in the 30s but never in wartime.

  18. JD 18

    “That’s cos they’re trying to kid themselves they’re one of them. Mind you, Key only has to open his mouth and he gives himself away!”

    As opposed to Helen Clark opening her mouth and giving us a look at her awful working class teeth?

    Have you munters ever thought that giving Key shit about his accent when a great many Labour supporters and potential voters actually share the same accent is well, stupid?

    Furthermore, what does it say about some who thinks this is actually significant?

    • Its not his accent you twit, its the fact that one can not understand what the hell he is saying,

      I know plenty of people with acccents one has to listen hard to understand . But this PM just blubers .Mind you perhaps its as well we dont know what he’s saying . Perhaps there is method in his slobbering .

    • lprent 18.2

      Not exactly – she was definitely middle-class or above (as far as we have classes) in family origin.

      I suspect that what you’re talking about is her relative lack of vanity compared to the mincer who is the current PM? I can’t imagine him fighting his minders against putting him in front of a mirror – can you?

      • higherstandard 18.2.1

        True she never came across as vain either in the public eye or in private, but why did she allow the PR people to do the airbrushing ?

        • lprent 18.2.1.1

          Beats me if they did. I tend to view it as likely to be a myth that it was air-brushed. I have never seen any evidence that it was.

          I’ve seen Helen slopping around in a dressing gown when I’ve been in her office at home fixing her computer on a sunday (and playing that bloody awful opera loudly). I have also seen her being completely spruced up before heading on stage for a speech. The difference is pretty amazing. I have seen her in real life looking similar to what that photo showed, and that was hours away from the mirror. I suspect that she simply had some artisans working on her before the photos were taken.

          Hell, I have seen Lyn do much the same thing last year when she was heading (ever hopefully) to the Qantas awards. That took a complete day of wandering around face painters, nail trimmers and painters, hair manufacturers, dress insertion procedures, the frantic hunt for the ideal shoes, and the depleted bank account. The result was absolutely stunning (although of course I get quite amused by the whole procedure and simply read a book while making the appropiate noises at the appropriate times).

          I of course did not attend because I’m completely anti-social when it comes to dressing up. If they don’t like me turning up in jeans, tee-shirt, and bare feet or jandals (I have started wearing running shoes – my feet are getting colder as I get older) then I usually won’t attend social functions. If forced to (ie weddings, funerals, and aged relatives birthdays) I will turn up dressed in a suit. For some reason Lyn doesn’t seem to like my early 90’s suit and 80’s tie.

          (Peter seems to have similar attitudes to me. But I suspect he got forced to get suits more frequently – poor bastard).

          • higherstandard 18.2.1.1.1

            I have similar discussions with my wife – basically if people can’t take me as I am at my stage of life I can’t be bothered worrying about it.

            • lprent 18.2.1.1.1.1

              Last time I actively tried to impress anyone was at my last management job, and that was when I was about 30. One of the reasons I like programming is that I can exclude employers who want to get impressed about anything apart from code. After all I am interviewing them…

              Needless to say, I don’t work for corporates unless they are pretty desperate.

          • M 18.2.1.1.2

            ‘Hell, I have seen Lyn do much the same thing last year when she was heading (ever hopefully) to the Qantas awards. That took a complete day of wandering around face painters, nail trimmers and painters, hair manufacturers, dress insertion procedures, the frantic hunt for the ideal shoes, and the depleted bank account. The result was absolutely stunning (although of course I get quite amused by the whole procedure and simply read a book while making the appropiate noises at the appropriate times).’

            Lynn, the conveyer belt motif is good. Women rightly or wrongly either enjoy all of this or feel that they should be doing it. Most men can jump in the shower, comb their hair nicely, slap on some cologne and slip into a suit or good pants and a shirt and look pretty much like they’ve stepped out of a band box. Women do go the extra mile to do shiny and yes men certainly sit up and take notice even though they may chill or complain while it’s all going on.

    • Vicky32 18.3

      “As opposed to Helen Clark opening her mouth and giving us a look at her awful working class teeth?”
      On behalf of all women everywhere with ‘awful working class teeth’, thanks a bunch, mate!
      Key can afford cosmetic dentistry, that makes him a better person? It’s not Key’s accent that bugs me, it’s his mis-pronunciations…
      Deb

      • Morrissey 18.3.1

        It’s not Key’s accent or his mis-pronunciations that bug me, it’s how he says “New Zealanders” (mis-pronounced by Key as New Zealders) instead of “people”. That’s a strategy developed in the United States; it’s virtually compulsory for a senator or congressman to say “the American people” instead of “people”.

        Phil Goff, of course, does exactly the same as Key, except with better pronunciation.

    • felix 18.4

      JD you’re a moron, no-one cares about his accent.

      We care about the fact that he can’t pronounce words, doesn’t appear to know what many of them mean (but uses them more or less randomly anyway), and arranges them into non-sequitous sentences that no-one with any grasp of English can pin a definite meaning on.

      Oh, and that most times he opens his mouth to speak he appears to be at least half-pissed.

  19. Irascible 19

    The Royal family are being used by a cynical media driven political party. While Prince William represents little of substantive value Key’s spin machine has kicked in… expect the visit to disguise further announcements of shock doctrine sales of state assets and cuts in government services to rescue Key & English from their mismanagement of the economy.

  20. Hilary 20

    Is royalty allowed to be used for party political purposes?

  21. happynz 21

    I’m an immigrant from a country without royals. Later this year I expect to be granted citizenship and to do so I have to swear allegiance to some old lady in England? Weird, if you ask me.

  22. JD 22

    “Its not his accent you twit, its the fact that one can not understand what the hell he is saying,”

    I can understand perfectly what Key is saying as can most of NZ. In fact it’s moronic to even suggest that he’s unintelligible. Perhaps it’s you comprehension and listening skills which are lacking or that you’re such a petty, small minded individual that you look for minor faults in individuals.

    Maybe you should go down down to a pub in South Auckland and criticize their standard of English. It’d be wicked to see youse getting the bash. Serve you right for being a c**t cos no one like a c**t.

    “I suspect that what you’re talking about is her relative lack of vanity compared to the mincer who is the current PM? I can’t imagine him fighting his minders against putting him in front of a mirror – can you?”

    Let’s be honest, most politicians are vain in some respect, it simply manifests itself differently. With Clark I think she enjoyed showing off her knowledge of obscure foreign affairs.

    • felix 22.1

      “I can understand perfectly what Key is saying as can most of NZ”

      That’s because the way he strings together his sentences they don’t mean anything in particular. You’re mostly responding positively to his tone and body language.

      It’s not a controversial statement I’m making, JD. It’s blindingly obvious to anyone who can speak English reasonably fluently that Key doesn’t often actually say what it sounds like he says.

      It’s truly sad that your grasp of language is so poor that you don’t recognise this, as that’s essentially how he gets away with it. He speaks to two people with opposing views and they both think he’s sticking up for them.

      Wonder how many will fall for it again?

  23. Carol 23

    Maybe you should go down down to a pub in South Auckland and criticize their standard of English.
    Exactly. I have nothing against working class, South Auckland, or any other accent. But when I watch Key on TV speaking in parliament, he does sound like he has been down the pub and sunk a few in the lunch hour. It does seem kind of odd in a Prime Minister. He speaks in a way that seems to have a touch of street Kiwi, plus something that is peculiar to Key: slurring, sloshing and stumbling over his words.

  24. JD 24

    “Exactly. I have nothing against working class, South Auckland, or any other accent.”

    Bullshit. You’re basing your judgement on a person by the accent they possess. This type of behaviour is nothing but a throwback to the English class system where an accent is telltale sign of a persons social background and schooling.

    All you university educated Grey Lynn/Wadestown liberals may have nothing against the South Auckland working class but I bet it’d be a cold day in hell before you drink in the same establishments.

    You’re all a disgrace.

    • Carol 24.1

      Bullshit. You’re basing your judgement on a person by the accent they possess. This type of behaviour is nothing but a throwback to the English class system where an accent is telltale sign of a persons social background and schooling.

      All you university educated Grey Lynn/Wadestown liberals may have nothing against the South Auckland working class but I bet it’d be a cold day in hell before you drink in the same establishments.

      Now THAT is B/S. And it’s an ad hominem based on what evidence? Nothing there in what I said. How would you know where I drink? Don’t live in Grey Lynn… and as for the UK class system, I lived in Brixton (for many years) and other Sth London working class areas. Taught students in the area and socialised at local pubs frequently.

      Also, I know the difference between an “ordinary” Kiwi accent and someone who has difficult pronouncing the words with that accent…. especially someone who has a uni education and, in JK’s case, probably wouldn’t choose to socialise with less well-off people in Sth Auckland unless there was a great photo op in it.

      Try watching Key speak in parliament. He usually seems like he’s been drinking.

    • Colonial Viper 24.2

      You’re all a disgrace.

      Famous last words from Marie Antoinette, buddy.

      All you university educated Grey Lynn/Wadestown liberals may have nothing against the South Auckland working class but I bet it’d be a cold day in hell before you drink in the same establishments.

      I buy rounds for my working mates in establishments like that. And they buy back for me. You greasy frakker.

    • lprent 24.3

      Ummmph I live in Grey Lynn these days up by the old fire station and I own a apartment in Newton.

      What this young idiot (JD) doesn’t realize is that I was born in Newton Gully when it was one of the worst slums in Auckland (ie in the days before the NE motorway ripped the houses down). Had a very high Irish population in those days and was the favored landing place for young immigrants from the rest of NZ like my father. He worked in the industrial area in Newmarket (long before it became a shopping mall).

      We moved slightly up market in house size when my brother was born into the main Polynesian suburbs at the time – Ponsonby and Grey Lynn. This was when there was anything apart from empty fields in South Auckland. The southern motorway ended at Mt Wellington.

      When my sister was born we moved to Mt Albert to a larger house. That was a classic working class and immigrant community with quite a lot of light industry moving into the area, that both my parents worked in.

      Now all of those areas have gentrified over time with people discovering the joys of city rather than suburb living. One of the great joys in my life has been that my parents were never stupid enough to emigrate to the North Shore or Howick.

      You’ll still find the traces of all of those previous population shifts throughout all of those areas. The old Irish community halls around Newton, the Polynesian churches in Ponsonby and Grey Lynn, and the immigrant halls of the late 50’s and 60’s in Mt Albert (like the Polish hall).

      You’ll also find people like me who grew up around there and prefer to stay here.

      And I’m not exactly a ‘liberal’. I’m just not stupid enough to get my information from talkback radio – which is what JD reads like. I grew up in “working class” and more importantly in Auckland immigrant communities. I went to university because that is what aspiring youth from those neighborhoods did in the late 70’s to improve themselves (and it wasn’t exorbitant to do so). I also went into the TF, worked on farms, in public bars, worked on factory floors, and generally got an education as well as the academic one.

      Basically JD, my ignorant friend, it is clear that you know nothing much about my areas of Auckland (in fact by the sound of it you don’t know Auckland at all)…. And I bet you do ‘learn’ mostly from talkback..

      • Rosy 24.3.1

        “All you university educated Grey Lynn/Wadestown liberals may have nothing against the South Auckland working class but I bet it’d be a cold day in hell before you drink in the same establishments”

        University educated – tick
        Liberal – tick
        not Wadestown but definitely central Wellington
        I grew up waiting for my parents to come home after drinking in “those” establishments.

    • Bright Red 24.4

      Key doesn’t have a working class accent. He isn’t working class. He was raised by immigrant mother who came from a wealthy Austrian family, they just lived in a state house for a while when she was on the widow’s benefit.

      As for Wadestown liberals. You obviously haven’t been there recently. It’s all over-priced houses and Actoids.

      My favourite drinking spot is the old Ferryman’s, got some new name now.

    • Feck JD I grew up in Mangere and my daddy was a boilermaker.

      Although I was a member of Princes Street …

      • Rosy 24.5.1

        “my daddy was a boilermaker” – So was mine…
        Maybe for their own self interest RWNJ should ensure people grow up in well-off households because then they’d have fewer lefties to worry about 😉

        • mickysavage 24.5.1.1

          Good on ya Rosy

          Capcha opportunitys as in everyone should have them, including the children of boilermakers!

          • Bill Browne 24.5.1.1.1

            Luxury!

            I grew up living in an old chip packet on the centre reserve of the Takanini straight

            • Rosy 24.5.1.1.1.1

              🙂 It was! 3 bedrooms, 1/4 acre. Deposit was capitalised family benefit and a fixed low- interest loan.

  25. MrSmith 25

    I wouldn’t bother crossing the road to spit on Prince William the man is a parasite, please can we find some porta lu’s for him to clean while he is here, now that’s something I would cross the road for.

  26. Adele 26

    Teenaa koutou katoa

    As an aside, I once walked into the local bottlestore in Clendon, Manurewa, on my way to visiting a friend living in the area. For those that don’t know Clendon particularly well, it is predominantly Maori, poor, and is frequently bludgeoned by social dysfunction – crime, alcohol and substance abuse, domestic violence etc etc etc.

    Anyway, at the bottlestore, I asked for a dessert wine. The guy absolutely choked himself laughing, and said “lady, look around, this neighbourhood doesn’t ‘do’ dessert wine.” By his reckoning dessert in Clendon is either a joint, a box of DB, or a packet of fags.

    It also follows that his shop was bereft of a decent red.

    • neoleftie 26.1

      oh one could suggest the whole of southland is like that too but seriously adele the class structure within new zealand is being reastablished. maybe we have the rise of the mini elites; upper middle class. Those who have made it outa the gutter of life but still have compassion for those around them

    • Carol 26.2

      I’m not quite sure of the point of that aside. It doesn’t help that I have no idea what a “dessert wine” is?

      • neoleftie 26.2.1

        clever adele was pointing out that most people dont even know let alone have the cash to spend on a dessert wine which is basically the low water concentration to brix ratio in a grape caused by a fungus sucking out the water of the grape usually at late harvest time…a very sweet sticky wine.

  27. JD 27

    “I buy rounds for my working mates in establishments like that. And they buy back for me. You greasy frakker.”

    Yep, some of my best mates are road workers too.

    Anonymously claiming on the internet will win you so much working class street cred. Then you can go back to your mates over at princess st labour and in between discussing your MA thesis drop that bomb.

    • felix 27.1

      You’re not fooling anyone, Tory Boy.

    • Colonial Viper 27.2

      Anonymously claiming on the internet will win you so much working class street cred.

      I didn’t win my working class street cred by blogging you idiot, I won it by dropping glass jawed Toff dickwads like you with a liverpool kiss.

      • vto 27.2.1

        Right. Sounds like a bit of bovver brewing. Lprent, can you rig up some sort of virtual boxing ring on here for these fullas? Needs to look like it would have back in the day in Auckland town. Sounds like mickeysavage can provide some guidance.

      • lprent 27.2.2

        Ummm…. ‘cred’.

        Stuffing a bikers head into a fridge after he came over the public bar I was running. Then negotiating with the rest of the gang about bar access while the police arrived.

        Coming to think of it, it does sound like moderating here.

        I would be more likely to toss JD out for trying to start flame wars. I take a dim view of that. But I will let it play out. JD may surprise us and manage to say something interesting.

  28. JD 28

    “You’re not fooling anyone, Tory Boy.”

    About what? Have I claimed that despite my university education I continue to hang round road labourers – No.

    All I’ve said is that for people who claim to be socialists to give someone shit about their working class accent and then try to claim that you don’t really make a critical judgement about the person because of that trait when a great many supporters of the Labour party share the same accent represents hypocrisy. I suspect deep down you’re all easier talking about the poor in your villas or chardonney rather than interacting with them or else you wouldn’t have brought the issue up in the first place. Well, that or you really stupid.

    As for talkback radio, no I don’t listen to it but then again this place is pretty much it’s literary equivilent given the quality of comments.

    Maybe you should all think about about what you say before you post. Let this be a lesson.

  29. Rodel 29

    Don’t need diseases, bacteria or viruses in Christchurch at the moment. That includes parasites Willie.
    Stay home . We really don’t need you, don’t you think?

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Milestones marked with 2,000+ new cops
    A milestone has been reached with the graduation of more than 2,000 new Police officers since the Coalition Government took office in October 2017. Police Minister Stuart Nash says the graduation today of Wing 335 marks a surge of 2,023 new officers, and coincides with some significant breakthroughs against organised ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • New diploma helps counter cyber security threats
    Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media Minister, Kris Faafoi, and the Minister of Education, Chris Hipkins, have welcomed a new cyber security qualification as a step towards countering cyber threats and keeping New Zealanders safe. Attending the launch of the new Level 6 Diploma of Cyber Security at Auckland’s Unitec Institute ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Celebrating 20 years of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park
    Government Ministers today celebrated 20 years of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park/ Ko te Pataka kai o Tikapa Moana/ Te Moananui a Toi, and recognise there is much to celebrate and so much more to do to give nature a helping hand.   Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage said “New Zealanders care deeply about nature.I want to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • NZ economy in strong position to respond to coronavirus
    Prepared remarks on coronavirus by Finance Minister Grant Robertson to the Auckland Chamber of Commerce and Massey University. Good morning ladies and gentlemen, The topic of this speech is the Budget 2020 priorities. But, given the considerable interest that I imagine is in the room about COVID-19 coronavirus, I do ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Speech at opening of Nadi Women’s Crisis Centre
    E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā iwi, e ngā rau rangatira ma. Tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa. Ni sa bula vinaka. Namaste Thank you Shamima, Hon. Minister Vuniwaqa, community leaders and Women’s Crisis Centre staff for your warm welcome. It’s an honour and privilege to officially ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    16 hours ago
  • Govt acts on fuel market competition
    The Government has released a comprehensive response to ensuring New Zealanders get a fairer deal at the petrol pump. This follows the Commerce Commission fuel market study which found motorists were paying more than they should for petrol and includes: Fuel Market Bill drafting, to pass mid-year Industry consultation in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • Speech at Lautoka Mosque
    E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā iwi, e ngā rau rangatira ma Tēnā koutou katoa Ni sa bula vinaka As-salaam alaikum It is a privilege to be here today. Thank you for welcoming us to your house of prayer. Thank you for your warmth. Thank you for greeting ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Taupō Airport upgrade takes off
    Taupō Airport is to be upgraded and expanded through a $5.9 million Government funding boost, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. “Taupō Airport is the gateway to the Central North Island. It is essential for both keeping local people and businesses connected, but also to bring more people ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • Place-based assessment confirmed for Rotorua
    The Minister of Housing Megan Woods has confirmed the Government is working with Rotorua Lakes District Council and Te Arawa for the second place-based assessment to better understand the housing and urban issues affecting the city. “Every New Zealander has a right to a warm, safe and secure place to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • More houses opened for New Zealanders
    19 new community homes (in addition to 14 opened in December) delivered in Takanini, Auckland 500 people housed by CORT Housing Trust by end of March 2,290 new public housing homes delivered in Auckland (November 2017 – December 2019). Another nineteen new public housing homes are being delivered in Auckland, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • New Zealand and India to strengthen ties
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters and Minister for Trade and Export Growth David Parker met today with Indian External Affairs Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar to discuss ways to strengthen ties between New Zealand and India.   “India is a priority relationship for New Zealand. We share common democratic traditions, growing two-way trade, extensive people-to-people links, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • The Indo-Pacific: from principles to partnerships
    Speech to the Indian Council of World Affairs (ICWA) Delhi, India Wednesday 26 February 2020 [CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY] The Indo-Pacific: from principles to partnerships Distinguished guests, good afternoon and thank you for your invitation.  It is good to be here at a time where New Zealand needs less of an introduction than ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Speech to University of the South Pacific students
    Tihei mauri ora Te Whare e tu nei Te Papa e takoto Tēnā korua  No reira tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa Ni sa bula Vinaka It is a real pleasure to be here today, and to have the honour of addressing you all. If you’ll indulge me I’m ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Proposed new measures to improve Aotearoa’s air quality
      Improved air quality to support better health and environmental wellbeing is the focus of proposed amendments to air quality regulations, says the Associate Minister for the Environment, Hon Nanaia Mahuta.  “Although our air quality is good in most places, during winter certain places have spikes in air pollution, mainly from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Water investment in Raukokore
    The remote eastern Bay of Plenty community of Raukokere will receive a Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investment of $10.6 million for a water storage facility, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones says. “This is great news for the rural community. The landowner, Te Whānau a Maruhaeremuri Hapū Trust, will use ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Lake Ōkaro lakebed transferred to Te Arawa as final piece of Settlement Act
    The Lake Ōkaro lakebed has transferred to Te Arawa Lakes Trust, Minister for Māori Crown Relations: Te Arawhiti Kelvin Davis announced today. Kelvin Davis joined Te Arawa at Te Papaiōuru Marae in Rotorua to celebrate the reinstatement of Te Arawa Lakes Trust as a key decision maker over the bed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Better protection against late payments
    New legislation is being proposed which aims to reduce the stress and financial hardship caused by late payments to small businesses. The Minister for Small Business Stuart Nash is considering stricter rules around payment practices between businesses. “Late payments from large organisations to smaller suppliers can be crippling for these ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Police partnership programme with Fiji launched
    A new partnership programme between the New Zealand Police and Fiji Police will focus on combatting transnational organised crime and enhancing investigative skills, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced on the first day of her visit to Fiji. The programme will see: ·       New Zealand Institute of Environmental Science and Research ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Joint statement from Prime Minister Ardern and Prime Minister Bainimarama
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Prime Minister Josaia Voreqe Bainimarama met today in Suva, and renewed their commitment to continue to strengthen Fiji-New Zealand relations on a foundation of shared values and equal partnership. The Prime Ministers acknowledged the kinship between Fijians and New Zealanders, one that has endured over ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • $19.9 million from PGF for Kawerau
    A $19.9 million investment from the Provincial Growth Fund will help develop essential infrastructure for an industrial hub in the Bay of Plenty town of Kawerau, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones says. “The funding will go to three projects to further develop the Putauaki Trust Industrial Hub, an industrial ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • PGF funds Mahia roading package
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing $8.3 million on a roading package for Mahia that will lead to greater and wider economic benefits for the region and beyond, Under Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced at an event in Mahia today. The $8.3 million announced consists of: $7 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • 18,400 children lifted out of poverty
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has welcomed new reporting showing the Coalition Government is on track to meet its child poverty targets, with 18,400 children lifted out of poverty as a result of the Families Package.   Stats NZ has released the first set of comprehensive child poverty statistics since the Government ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • 20,000 more Kiwi kids on bikes
    Associate Minister of Transport Julie Anne Genter today announced that Bikes in Schools facilities have been rolled out to 20,000 more kiwi kids under this Government. She made the announcement at the opening of a new bike track at Henderson North School in Auckland. “Bikes in Schools facilities give kids ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Benefit settings rise in line with wages as of 1 April
    Benefit settings rise in line with wages as of 1 April   Main benefits will increase by over 3 percent, instead of 1.66 percent, on 1 April with the Government’s decision to annually adjust benefit rates to increases in the average wage. The Minister for Social Development, Carmel Sepuloni, said ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Foreign and Trade Ministers to lead business delegation to India
    Strengthening New Zealand’s political and business ties with India will be the focus of Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters’ and Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker’s visit to India this week. The Ministers are co-leading a high level business delegation to India to support increased people and economic engagement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Minister champions more Pacific in STEM – Toloa Awards
    The Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio continues to champion for greater Pacific participation in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) careers with the announcement of the Toloa Awards, with 8 recipients of the Toloa Community Fund and 13 Toloa Tertiary Scholarships. “The Toloa Programme encourages more Pacific peoples ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Submission period for whitebait consultation extended
    Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage has extended the date for people to have their say on proposed changes to improve management of whitebait across New Zealand.   Submissions were due to close on 2 March 2020 but will now remain open until 9am on Monday 16 March 2020.   “I have ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New international protection for frequent fliers
    The endangered toroa/Antipodean albatross has new international protection for its 100,000km annual migration, thanks to collaborative efforts led by New Zealand, Australia and Chile.   Today, 130 countries agreed to strictly protect Antipodean albatross at the Conference of Parties on the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government to regulate vaping
      No sales to under-18-year-olds No advertising and sponsorship of vaping products and e-cigarettes No vaping or smokeless tobacco in smokefree areas Regulates vaping product safety comprehensively, - including devices, flavours and ingredients Ensure vaping products are available for those who want to quit smoking   Vaping regulation that balances ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Justice Minister represents New Zealand at Berlin nuclear disarmament summit
    Justice Minister Andrew Little will travel to Berlin tomorrow to represent New Zealand at a high-level summit on nuclear disarmament. This year, the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) celebrates 50 years since it entered into force. “New Zealand’s proud record and leadership on nuclear disarmament is unwavering, so it’s important we are present ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Prime Minister to visit Fiji and Australia
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will visit two of New Zealand’s most important Pacific partners, Fiji and Australia, next week. The visit to Fiji will be the first by a New Zealand Prime Minister in four years and comes during the 50th anniversary of Fijian independence and diplomatic relations between our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Next steps in Criminal Cases Review Commission announced
    Justice Minister Andrew Little and New Zealand First MP Darroch Ball, have today announced the appointment of the Chief Commissioner of the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), the location, and the membership of the Establishment Advisory Group. Colin Carruthers QC has been appointed Chief Commissioner of the CCRC for an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Horticultural Ahuwhenua Trophy finalists announced
    Māori Development Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta and Agriculture Minister Hon Damien O’Connor co-announced the first horticultural finalists for the Ahuwhenua Trophy celebrating excellence in the Māori agricultural sector.  The three finalists are Ngai Tukairangi Trust from Mt Maunganui, Otama Marere Trust from Tauranga, and Hineora Orchard Te Kaha 15B Ahuwhenua ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New support for students with dyslexia
    A new kete of resources to strengthen support for students with dyslexia will provide extra tools for the new Learning Support Coordinators (LSCs) as they start in schools, Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin announced today. The Minister launched the kete in Wellington this morning, at the first of three induction ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Rental reforms progress to select committee stage
    The Government continues to make progress on a fairer and more secure rental market for renters and landlords with the First Reading of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill and its referral to the Social Services and Community Select Committee.  “Now is the opportunity for landlords, tenants and others who want ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Papua New Guinea Prime Minister to visit New Zealand
    Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister Hon James Marape will visit New Zealand from 21-25 February, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. “New Zealand and Papua New Guinea have a warm and friendly relationship. I look forward to welcoming Prime Minister Marape here and strengthening the relationship between our two countries,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Free school lunches served up to thousands
    Thousands of children have begun receiving a free lunch on every day of the school week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said. The Government’s free and healthy school lunch programme is under way for 7,000 students at 31 schools in Hawke’s Bay / Tairāwhiti and Bay of Plenty / Waiariki, extending ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Social Wellbeing Agency replaces Social Investment Agency with new approach
    The Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni today announced a new approach that continues to broaden the Government’s social sector focus from a narrow, investment approach to one centred on people and wellbeing. Minister Sepuloni said redefining the previous approach to social investment by combining science, data and lived experience ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government to strengthen protections for whistleblowers
    The Government is strengthening the Protected Disclosures Act to provide better protection for whistle blowers, Minister of State Services Chris Hipkins said today. “The Protected Disclosures Act is meant to encourage people to speak up about serious wrongdoing in the workplace and protect them from losing their jobs or being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • PM speech at Parliamentary Chinese New Year celebration 2020
    Nǐn hǎo (Hello in Mandarin). Xīn Nián Kuài Lè (Happy New Year in Mandarin) Néi Hóu (Hello in Cantonese). Sun Nin Fai Lok (Happy New Year in Cantonese) Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa. Thank you for your invitation to attend this celebration today. I would like to acknowledge ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago