Reaching out to the ‘No’ vote

Written By: - Date published: 12:21 pm, August 27th, 2009 - 41 comments
Categories: child discipline - Tags:

I must confess that Key’s position on the repeal of s59 has puzzled me from the moment he started cooperating with the Labour government to get it passed. It’s a principled and evidence based position in stark contrast to his usual ideological blinders and populist posturing. Or perhaps it’s based on a deeply personal conviction. Whatever the reason, on this issue Key has made the right decision, in the face of considerable pressure, and I applaud him for it.

In the aftermath it’s obvious that there’s a lot of irrational anger and bluster out there — on both sides of the Yes No fence. While it’s tempting to sit back and enjoy the spectacle of John Key getting lambasted by much of his support base (and a small but highly visible nutjob fringe), fanning the flames in any way is actually not doing the country any favours. Time to cool things down, if we can. So this is my appeal for us leftie Yes vote activists to make peace with the other side.

I have never been comfortable with characterising the No vote as “beaters” or “monsters”, labels that rightly apply to only a tiny minority. 1.4 Million people voted No for a range of reasons. One of those reasons was the unfounded fear and distrust whipped up by the American fundamentalist funded No campaign, seeds sown in the fertile soil of “Nanny State” hysteria that National worked so hard to cultivate for the last several years. Another significant reason was that the leading question invited a No vote (prior to the referendum the question that was used polled 86% No, while a neutral question polled 50% No). There will be many other reasons for No votes, and very few beaters or
monsters among them.

So if we leftie activists can dial back the rhetoric a bit, that might help grieving and agitated right wing activists calm down, and speed the process of putting all of this behind us. Then one day we might be able to have a rational discussion about the causes of child abuse, and what to do about it.
— r0b

41 comments on “Reaching out to the ‘No’ vote ”

  1. Mark M 1

    “I have never been comfortable with characterising the No vote as “beaters’ or “monsters’, labels that rightly apply to only a tiny minority.”

    excellent comment guest poster and the most sensible comment thats come out of the yes side.

    Im sure a lot of people voted no simply because they were irritated by the constant carping that, vote no and you become a child beater / molester.
    Another large proportion probably voted no , as I did , not because I want to smack my children , but because I dont need to be told how to raise my family.

    The law as it is dosent seem to have prevented a host of child murders either.
    We need to have a law that is clear and enforceable and comes down like a ton of bricks on any one who breaks it.

    Having a law that we are told will only be enforced at the ” discretion” of others is hardly a good way of instilling respect and perhaps a little fear of the law

    • r0b 1.1

      Thanks for the kind words Mark M. One thing:

      but because I dont need to be told how to raise my family

      Are you comfortable with laws that require you to provide appropriate levels of care, send your children to school, use child restraints or seat belts in cars, or not supply them with restricted drugs? Are you comfortable with restrictions imposed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (to which NZ is a signatory)? Are you comfortable with laws that impose restrictions on families that aren’t like yours – is it time to do away with the restriction on gay couples adopting?

      • Swampy 1.1.1

        Are you comfortable that the UNCROC convention was signed without any electoral mandate?

        Are you comfortable that the Labour Party and fellow travellers take contradictory 180 degree positions on the Auckland supercity proposals (Must have a binding referendum etc etc) and the Section 59 issue (must be able to completely ignore public opinion, including a referendum)

        It’s extremely obvious that in the case of the Auckland Supercity, the issue is about Labour’s political power base, while in the Section 59 issue, the party ideology is sacrosanct and can’t ever be challenged or revoked regardless of what the electorate thinks.

        • BLiP 1.1.1.1

          Its extremely obvious that it is The Goober himself who is saying Section 59 is sacrosanct and can’t be revoked and, in fact, National Ltd are trying to undermine the Labour voter base in Auckland with its ACT-driven Super City asset stripping.

        • Pascal's bookie 1.1.1.2

          Another one that’s not too clear on the meaning of ‘Non binding’.

          It’s extremely obvious that in the case of the Auckland Supercity, the issue is about Labour’s political power base,

          is that so? If true then it must equally be true for National and ACT. Are you saying that Nact’s policy is specifically aimed at weakening Labour’s power base? Shocking.

          while in the Section 59 issue, the party ideology is sacrosanct and can’t ever be challenged or revoked regardless of what the electorate thinks.

          There is nothing Labour or the Greens or the mP can do to stop Nact + Dunne from changing the law swampy.

          John Key and National think the policy is working, that’s the standard he set before the election, and that’s the mandate he’s got. If you have a problem with that, take it up with national. It’s got nothing to do with labour or the left. The left lost the election last year, remember?

          • kaya 1.1.1.2.1

            The unelected, no mandate marxist Bradford introduced it, Labour supported it to hang onto power. The insipid Key tried to please everyone by brokering a compromise and failed miserably. (and will suffer for it) It is all to do with Labour and the left, it is why I didn’t vote Labour for the first time in almost 30 years.
            The Labour movement I knew has been hijacked by ideologues and academic idiots. It has forgotten it’s traditional working class roots. Many will not come back until they sort this out.

      • kaya 1.1.2

        WTF is this rOb, “good cop, bad cop” routine? You wrote a sensible piece at the start and then totally undid your good work with the next comment. As for the UN, that is the most corrupt waste of space we have ever seen. Anything they say should be completely ignored.

  2. hear hear!

    I’ll avoid the dig at Key at the top but you are on the lolly elsewhere.

    I haven’t yet had a reply to the comment that most here demand that the Govt listens to the “people” on the super city yet conversely demand (and IMO rightly so) that Key ignores the clamour over the No vote.

    I think you last comments are particularly valid. Those who “lightly” smack are outraged that their generally positive parenting is being linked to the extreme cases that hit the media. I realise it’s not black and white and it is much easy to legislate no smacking than some. As such, this issue has been more about perception than anything else.

    Likewise, as you note, people can be against something for many different reasons but not agree on what they are for.

    Nice job r0b

    • felix 2.1

      “I haven’t yet had a reply to the comment that most here demand that the Govt listens to the “people’ on the super city yet conversely demand (and IMO rightly so) that Key ignores the clamour over the No vote.”

      You’d have to pose an equivalent hypothetical supercity question to measure the response though Dave – what question are you suggesting we compare it to? I can’t imagine many here suggesting that the govt should take note of a supercity referendum if the question were to be framed in a similar way to that of the smacking one. Probably quite the opposite.

      e.g. the smacking equivalent of “Do you support the supercity proposed by the govt?” would be “Do you support the S59 Amendment Act 2007?”

      Apples with apples.

      Ask a straight question on either issue and I expect you’d see a wide public consensus that the govt should take note of the result.

    • r0b 2.2

      Cheers Daveski.

      I’ll avoid the dig at Key at the top

      Sorry – contractual obligation – you understand…

      I haven’t yet had a reply to the comment that most here demand that the Govt listens to the “people’ on the super city yet conversely demand (and IMO rightly so) that Key ignores the clamour over the No vote.

      I tried to answer that question (as put by Rex) over here.

      Likewise, as you note, people can be against something for many different reasons but not agree on what they are for.

      Now ain’t that the truth!

      • Rex Widerstrom 2.2.1

        r0b:

        I missed your reply to that, sorry. I’m glad we can continue the debate here. First, congratulations on not only avoiding the rhetoric spouted by the majority of people in favour of the retention of Bradford’s amendment, including Bradford herself.

        Second, I agree with you completely — it’s time to reach out to the “No” vote because, as I pointed out yesterday, if you combined it with the people who want a referendum on the “supercity” (and aspects thereof, like Maori seats) I suspect you’d have a clear majority of NZers ranging from dreadlocked hippies to pinstriped businessmen and every cliche in between.

        The simultaneous refutation of the “No” vote and refusal to even have a referendum on the “supercity” offers a unique opportunity to form a coalition of groups and individuals to demand that their voices be heard, and heeded, on these and other issues. If that means swallowing a dead rat (or perhaps half of one — support the Borrows/Boscawen amendment as a compromise) — then IMHO it’s worth doing if the result is we gain greater input into the political process.

        felix:

        the smacking equivalent of “Do you support the supercity proposed by the govt?’ would be “Do you support the S59 Amendment Act 2007?’

        Agreed entirely. But for either of those questions to produce an intelligent result still requires an understanding of the underlying issue(s).

        No referendum question can ever explain the issue at stake and encompass the arguments for and against. To produce well-reasoned and thus intelligent result requires that those voting have taken the trouble to inform themselves adequately and at least considered the point of view opposed to the one which they’re first inclined to take.

        So, while I do think most people who voted on S59 knew roughly effect they wanted a “no” vote to have — overturning Bradford’s amendment in some way — regardless of the imprecision of the question, I would grant you that only a portion of them had gone through the thought processes I’d hope they’d have gone through before voting.

        So I come back to my “multi-choice non-partisan questionnaire before voting” idea. Perhaps it’s time to disenfranchise the indolent and the stupid?

        [I’ll go hide now]

    • nic 2.3

      Hear hear on [the writers on] The Standard’s cognitive dissonance towards democracy concerning the Super City and democracy on the “smacking” debate. Like you, I strongly oppose the idea that parents should be free to beat their children.

      Still, I’d like someone to lay out what the rules are for whether or not a governmen has to respect the voice of the majority.

  3. Ianmac 3

    I guess some of the anxiety is not just the YES/NO vote but my perception that we ordinary folk are being manipulated by “the unfounded fear and distrust whipped up by the American fundamentalist funded No campaign” or the Textor mob for that matter. Is it possible that the flow on effect of the election tactics is still visible, but not now directed against Helen but ironically John.
    Quite happy to back off from an admittedly moderate position thanks Rob.

    • r0b 3.1

      Cheers Ianmac.

      Is it possible that the flow on effect of the election tactics is still visible, but not now directed against Helen but ironically John.

      I think that’s dead right. It’s poetic justice in one sense (and I feel guilty for enjoying the irony), but in my opinion these tactics are a step backwards for democracy in the bigger picture. Look to America.

      • Swampy 3.1.1

        The American states have binding referenda for significant issues, much more democratic than NZ. The courts can even challenge the government’s laws.

    • Swampy 3.2

      This is typical xenophobic hysteria (especially against Americans) being whipped up by the usual sources.

  4. greenfly 4

    Tempting to say “No”.

  5. bobo 5

    I take it the majority of Labour voters voted no like I did? The party needs to accept the view of the general public on this and move on. I like Sue Bradford as she has done alot for NZs most vulnerable but I disagree with her on this issue in the same way I disagree with her on hers parties view on legalizing cannabis, but it’s wrong to call people monsters for lightly smacking and laying on some guilt trip.

  6. RedLogix 6

    Those who “lightly’ smack are outraged that their generally positive parenting is being linked to the extreme cases that hit the media.

    Which while it’s perfectly understandable, still seems to me a less than self-honest response. I’ve always tried to use the word ‘hitting’ because it’s a more or less neutral term that covers the whole spectrum from the trivial and tolerable smack, all the way through to the most horrendous abuse that we all universally condemn.

    It’s more or less the same with say alcohol. We all recognise the enormous harm and costs the abuse of alcohol imposes on us as a society, yet whether it’s one harmless glass of red with dinner, through to a rage fueled blind-bender… it’s still the same thing. Most people can drink responsibly, but some cannot, and the two groups are indissolubly linked. As long as the majority continue to assert their ‘right’ to a few harmless drinkies, then we will always have with us the alcoholics who will cause so much grief.

    When the Americans imposed a Prohibition on alcohol (because of the enormous harm it caused), it didn’t work because so many people were not ready to admit to the connection between their casual acceptance of getting a little bit drunk and destuctive alcoholism… and carried on obtaining alcohol anyway. In many ways the reaction to the S59 repeal has been very similar, because so many ordinary people are not ready to honestly examine the role of violence and abuse in our society… in ALL it’s forms.

    It was of course always wrong to label as ‘child beaters’ ordinary parents who smacked their kids from time to time, equally as it was counterproductive to label the S59 repeal the “Anti-Smacking Bill”. Neither label was ever accurate or fair.

    Yet in all the shouting past each other, I would dare say we have all learnt a thing or two, and maybe been forced to be a little more honest with ourselves. I know for certain that there were a couple of incidents with my own children, that in retrospect were mistakes. Just as I think all sides in this fractious debate have made some bad mistakes.

    Time for a bit of graciousness, and some proper listening.

    • Daveski 6.1

      If i start agreeing with r0b and redLogix, i should be banned 🙂

      I had the same views on alcohol which I was thinking of adding and came to similar conclusion.

      I largely agree with your other comments particularly the use of labels which turned the whole thing into an emotional charade rather than an attempt to improve the way we parent. There are serious issues which the charade is covering over.

      I’ll ban myself for the rest of the day to protect the credibility of r0b and RL!

      • r0b 6.1.1

        I’ll ban myself for the rest of the day to protect the credibility of r0b and RL!

        Well goodness yes, we don’t want peace and goodwill breaking out all over, wherever would it end???

        • RedLogix 6.1.1.1

          Well r0b, there is no end anytime soon, as it fairly puts the onus back on the left to re-frame this whole ’emotional charade’… as Dave accurately puts it… into terms that the majority of people will accept.

          Until then all this pointless policy squabbling about bottom spanking won’t get us very far.

  7. toad 7

    Yeh, I agree rOb that Idiot/Savant probably went a bit far with that post.

    But I also know how easy it is to get wound up by the vitriol and disinformation spewed by Baldock, McCroskie & Family Fist, and their wingnut supporters over at Farrar’s troll farm.

    I agree that we can make peace with the middle ground of the No voters, but not with those who argue that parents have a duty to beat the sin out of their children with the rod of correction. They must be marginalised as the extremists.

    • r0b 7.1

      You’ll notice in the call for peace missive I did still call Farrar’s crew the “nutjob fringe”. I was expecting to have been called on my inconsistency by now.

      So I agree, there are some who are beyond reason and their extreme views should be pointed out. It’s the angry alienated middle ground no voters – as you say – that we should be reaching out to. That didn’t come out right in the last paragraph of the original post.

      • So Bored 7.1.1

        I for one never thought that the ‘smacking issue” was ever a left / right division across the board. There are control freaks with punative mentalities living at the extremes of both left and right, and if one side percieved the other to be telling it what to do it was always going to start a fire.

        And I have never thought that the majority of “no” voters want to beat their children. They just dont want the state interfering in what they percieve as their domain as parents.

        If the majority on both sides might agree that assaulting children is totally unnacceptable in any context (in the same way that assaulting adults is) then the views of punative control freaks at both ends of the spectrum can be marginalised. And we can get on with giving our children the expectation of a safe and loving environment free from adult violence.

  8. the sprout 8

    that’s a very generous stance you’re taking r0b, good for you.
    i think a lot of the animosity has been fuelled by a great deal of misinformation and ignorance.
    a softer approach would probably be helpful for reaching some kind of resolution. from my experienc of talking to a LOT of people who were very upset about the s59 amendment at the time, once they understand a bit more of the arguments for and against they do calm down and see things differently.

  9. randal 9

    I wanna give bosco a few taps around the chops to see if he likes that.
    okay?

  10. Jeremy 10

    I actually never got a ballot, but then I’ve actually never seen any evidence at all that the local postie can read.
    I think the amended section 59 is about as confusing as anyone ever claimed the referendum question was. Hence so many people thinking it outlaws things that it probably doesn’t. Even without that confusion, most people don’t like letting facts get in the way of a good rant.

  11. “Time to cool things down, if we can. So this is my appeal for us leftie Yes vote activists to make peace with the other side.”

    Sorry r0b i don’t agree with you on this one. Any slippage will be pounced on by the opposition. The debate is a personal freedom debate now, hopefully us left/yes advocates will be able to be more successful on this battlefield but i don’t really believe it.

    Why are you suggesting this? for the good of the country?

    Try to get the left to take their foot off the maori party throat would be a better way to go ‘for the good of the country’ IMO

  12. BLiP 12

    Yeah – what is the Goober up to with this one? It gets curiouser and curiouser. The performance of Crusher, Basher, Chopper, Folly Acid, and We’llmissya Lee indicates that National Ltd are not in anyway interested in attracting the female vote.

    Given that Key’s a money-changer, there’s little room in his psyhe for humanitarian principles, let alone morals. This smacking position and his “Prime Ministers Fund For Unfortunate Children” is getting more than just a little creepy. But, rather than assume the most sinister, on this occasion, I will take it that Key realises most people didn’t understand the referrendum question or the existing law and, further, that the upcoming holiday camps for kiddies will be good for tourism and assist greatly in the transfer of the provision of social services to the private sector. Plus, the Old-Testament-spouting knuckle dragging testicle bearers really don’t have anywhere to go if they spit the dummy at National Ltd.

    As an aside – while its good to see young Patrick Gower doing a half-decent job on covering Crusher’s attempt to bully the unions, what a shame to see Armstrong on the same page is running his “dolla-a-tug-job” franchise from that grotty little caravan he’s got parked up permanently at Premier House.

  13. roger nome 13

    “So if we leftie activists can dial back the rhetoric a bit, that might help grieving and agitated right wing activists calm down, and speed the process of putting all of this behind us.”

    You’re assuming that these right-wing activists are against violence and abuse. I’m not so sure that they all are. Many of them may crave the power they feel when throttling a defenseless child. Many more may feel that some things written in the bible give them the right too abuse, while still more may just find it too hard to change their behaviors.
    They’d rather cling on to harmful practices than admit that they are wrong and change their ways. There are a hell of a lot of people out there that just can’t admit that they way they’ve been living is wrong. You see this particularly on the conservative right with issues like climate change and smacking these conservative, macho types so often see admitting mistakes as a sign of weakness.

    • kaya 13.1

      and any possible consideration I had thought of giving to the original piece has just slid down the toilet bowl along with that dribbling shite, just reminded me that there are jsut as many nutjobs on the left as on the right.

  14. side show bob 14

    “”There are a hell of a lot of people out there that just can’t admit that the way they’ve been living is wrong”, well done roger spoken with the authority of a true socialist. The world will be a much better place when you tell us all how to live, just don’t get do you. Sad really.

  15. ak 15

    Then one day we might be able to have a rational discussion……

    ahhh, rational….that’s the trouble r0b: we’re not talking about rational adults here. And in this busy world of shiftwork, mortgages etc (and often with both standardistas working), there’s often simply not the time, and a good sharp clip round the ears of these commenters is exactly what’s called for. Never did me any harm.

    But seriously folks, this entire issue is quite simply the ugly, straggling tail of an insane hysteria that has gripped this country since 2005. How such “issues” as “speedgate”, “paintergate”, “bulbgate”, “EFAgate”, “NOcardgate” etc could have gained political traction at all – let alone provoked the reaction they have – is utterly surreal. Practical, down-to-earth kiwis reduced to a paranoid stocking up on incandescent light bulbs. A loving smack.
    The extreme of what we have witnessed over the last four years is currently on display in the US: apparently rational and intelligent individuals openly labelling Obama a N*zi. Conspiracy whackjobs and the poison-pen letter gone mainstream.

    And as in the current melee here (over an “issue” the almost exact equivalent of the law forbidding driving over 100k), the finger can be pointed directly at the media. Talkback and shallow sensationalism are our own petit – Fox News: spewing fear and confusion into the void created by increasing societal anomie. For many, “their” talkback host is quite literally their best friend.

    So sure, r0b, time out and talkies for behaviour correction. But for insanity, strong medicine is sometimes needed to stall the metastasis. I’ve found the “Baby-bashers-for-Jesus” pill shakes up the grey matter of all but the terminal quite nicely – with intriguing side effects.

  16. JD 16

    “Many of them may crave the power they feel when throttling a defenseless child. Many more may feel that some things written in the bible give them the right too abuse, while still more may just find it too hard to change their behaviors.”

    Did you glean this insight from your upbringing?

  17. Swampy 17

    You could start by dropping all the claims against the referendum question. It apparently took Sue Bradford over a year to decide that the question was confusing or inappropriately worded, and that the matter only surfaced on the eve of the referendum itself appears to be a late smear tactic by her camp.

  18. BLiP 18

    Do you live under a rock? The Green Party has been calling that duplitious question “confusing” since it was formulated.

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    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Focus on outstanding minerals permit applications
    New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals is working to resolve almost 150 outstanding minerals permit applications by the end of the financial year, enabling valuable mining activity and signalling to the sector that New Zealand is open for business, Resources Minister Shane Jones says.  “While there are no set timeframes for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Applications open for NZ-Ireland Research Call
    The New Zealand and Irish governments have today announced that applications for the 2024 New Zealand-Ireland Joint Research Call on Agriculture and Climate Change are now open. This is the third research call in the three-year Joint Research Initiative pilot launched in 2022 by the Ministry for Primary Industries and Ireland’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Tenancy rules changes to improve rental market
    The coalition Government has today announced changes to the Residential Tenancies Act to encourage landlords back to the rental property market, says Housing Minister Chris Bishop. “The previous Government waged a war on landlords. Many landlords told us this caused them to exit the rental market altogether. It caused worse ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Boosting NZ’s trade and agricultural relationship with China
    Trade and Agriculture Minister Todd McClay will visit China next week, to strengthen relationships, support Kiwi exporters and promote New Zealand businesses on the world stage. “China is one of New Zealand’s most significant trade and economic relationships and remains an important destination for New Zealand’s products, accounting for nearly 22 per cent of our good and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Freshwater farm plan systems to be improved
    The coalition Government intends to improve freshwater farm plans so that they are more cost-effective and practical for farmers, Associate Environment Minister Andrew Hoggard and Agriculture Minister Todd McClay have announced. “A fit-for-purpose freshwater farm plan system will enable farmers and growers to find the right solutions for their farm ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New Fast Track Projects advisory group named
    The coalition Government has today announced the expert advisory group who will provide independent recommendations to Ministers on projects to be included in the Fast Track Approvals Bill, say RMA Reform Minister Chris Bishop and Regional Development Minister Shane Jones. “Our Fast Track Approval process will make it easier and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Pacific and Gaza focus of UN talks
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters says his official talks with the United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in New York today focused on a shared commitment to partnering with the Pacific Islands region and a common concern about the humanitarian catastrophe in Gaza.    “Small states in the Pacific rely on collective ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government honours Taranaki Maunga deal
    The Government is honouring commitments made to Taranaki iwi with the Te Pire Whakatupua mō Te Kāhui Tupua/Taranaki Maunga Collective Redress Bill passing its first reading Parliament today, Treaty Negotiations Minister Paul Goldsmith says. “This Bill addresses the commitment the Crown made to the eight iwi of Taranaki to negotiate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Enhanced partnership to reduce agricultural emissions
    The Government and four further companies are together committing an additional $18 million towards AgriZeroNZ to boost New Zealand’s efforts to reduce agricultural emissions. Agriculture Minister Todd McClay says the strength of the New Zealand economy relies on us getting effective and affordable emission reduction solutions for New Zealand. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • 110km/h limit proposed for Kāpiti Expressway
    Transport Minister Simeon Brown has welcomed news the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) will begin consultation this month on raising speed limits for the Kāpiti Expressway to 110km/h. “Boosting economic growth and productivity is a key part of the Government’s plan to rebuild the economy and this proposal supports that outcome ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand Biosecurity Awards – Winners announced
    Two New Zealanders who’ve used their unique skills to help fight the exotic caulerpa seaweed are this year’s Biosecurity Awards Supreme Winners, says Biosecurity Minister Andrew Hoggard. “Strong biosecurity is vital and underpins the whole New Zealand economy and our native flora and fauna. These awards celebrate all those in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Attendance action plan to lift student attendance rates
    The Government is taking action to address the truancy crisis and raise attendance by delivering the attendance action plan, Associate Education Minister David Seymour announced today.   New Zealand attendance rates are low by national and international standards. Regular attendance, defined as being in school over 90 per cent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • World must act to halt Gaza catastrophe – Peters
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has told the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in New York today that an immediate ceasefire is needed in Gaza to halt the ongoing humanitarian catastrophe.    “Palestinian civilians continue to bear the brunt of Israel’s military actions,” Mr Peters said in his speech to a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to United Nations General Assembly: 66th plenary meeting, 78th session
    Mr President,   The situation in Gaza is an utter catastrophe.   New Zealand condemns Hamas for its heinous terrorist attacks on 7 October and since, including its barbaric violations of women and children. All of us here must demand that Hamas release all remaining hostages immediately.   At the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government woolshed roadshow kicks off
    Today the Government Agriculture Ministers started their national woolshed roadshow, kicking off in the Wairarapa. Agriculture Minister Todd McClay said it has been a tough time for farmers over the past few years. The sector has faced high domestic inflation rates, high interest rates, adverse weather events, and increasing farm ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • PM heads to Singapore, Thailand, and Philippines
    Prime Minister Christopher Luxon will travel to Singapore, Thailand and the Philippines this week (April 14-20), along with a senior business delegation, signalling the Government’s commitment to deepen New Zealand’s international engagement, especially our relationships in South East Asia. “South East Asia is a region that is more crucial than ever to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Prime Minister launches Government Targets
    Prime Minister Christopher Luxon has announced further steps to get New Zealand back on track, launching nine ambitious Government Targets to help improve the lives of New Zealanders. “Our Government has a plan that is focused on three key promises we made to New Zealanders – to rebuild the economy, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Natural hydrogen resource should be free of Treaty claims entanglement
    Natural hydrogen could be a game-changing new source of energy for New Zealand but it is essential it is treated as a critical development that benefits all New Zealanders, Resources Minister Shane Jones says. Mr Jones is seeking to give regulatory certainty for those keen to develop natural, or geological, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government responds to unsustainable net migration
    ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand on stage at global Space Symposium
    Space Minister Judith Collins will speak at the Space Symposium in the United States next week, promoting New Zealand’s rapidly growing place in the sector as we work to rebuild the economy. “As one of the largest global space events, attended by more than 10,000 business and government representatives from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago

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