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Salvation Army report – NZ “Off the Track”

Written By: - Date published: 8:56 am, February 8th, 2017 - 61 comments
Categories: class war, housing, poverty - Tags: , , , , ,

The Salvation Army has just released its own annual “state of the nation” report. While news is mixed, the overall finding is that we are “off the track” and without a plan. From the report (pdf):

Introduction

However, in some of our most critical areas the nation appears to have stalled or even gone backwards. In publishing this report, The Salvation Army wishes to particularly highlight the following areas:
• seemingly entrenched rates of child poverty and child abuse
• the burgeoning incarceration rates of prisoners, along with high recidivism rates
• an alarming lack of safe, affordable housing that has resulted in a level of homelessness not seen in New Zealand in the lifetime of most Kiwis.

These concerns alone seem sufficient reason to ask the question: Are we off the track?

Our Children

Of greatest disappointment is the persistence of child poverty, which appears to have become embedded in New Zealand’s social and economic settings. The culpability of Government in this lack of progress should be noted —especially through its welfare reforms, which have yet to identify any positive impacts on the lives of poorer New Zealand children.

The Working for Families package of income support was introduced in 2006 in a bid by the Labour-led Government to reduce child poverty, especially amongst working poor families. The programme had this effect, halving child poverty rates amongst working families.7 However, since 2010, the value of Working for Families has been eroded through an opaque series of adjustments to thresholds and abatement rates.

The absence of any meaningful progress in reducing child poverty rates over the past decade—and the lack of interest by Government in using welfare and income support programmes to do so—points to wilful indifference toward the long-term personal and social impacts of this avoidable harm.

Housing

There is little, if any, good news in the housing area unless you are a property speculator, residential property investor or own shares in a bank involved in mortgage lending.

Auckland’s housing shortage has continued to worsen on the back of record immigration. The average sale price of an Auckland house topped $1 million, and housing in that region became yet less affordable with house prices and rents continuing to rise much faster than wages and salaries. Auckland’s difficulties with housing affordability appear to be spreading to other cities in the top of the North Island.

Housing debt and household indebtedness also reached new record highs despite efforts by the Reserve Bank and the main trading banks to curb highly geared lending. Outside of these Reserve Bank’s measures and Government’s small efforts to prop up emergency housing providers with emergency funding, there have been few if any credible public policy initiatives to address these growing problems.

Returning again to the Introduction, it concludes as follows:

In an election year, it is timely to challenge all who would aspire to govern—and, in fact, all New Zealanders who are part of the fabric of Aotearoa New Zealand—to think deeply about the social progress we want to achieve for ourselves and our children. Are we heading off the track in a way that benefits only a few (and perhaps only in the short term), while leaving others at risk? Or will we work together to establish a track leading to a New Zealand where all children and families are able to live, grow and be supported to flourish in a nation we might gladly call ‘God’s own’. The question all voting citizens will consider this year is: Who has the insight, the imagination and the courage to identify a path that might lead to such a country?

Oddly enough, you won’t find many of these quotes in coverage by The Herald or Stuff.

61 comments on “Salvation Army report – NZ “Off the Track” ”

  1. jcuknz 1

    It is the difference between an ambulance at the bottom of the cliff [Nats] and a fence at the cliff top edge [Sallies].

    • weka 1.1

      Very generous of you to suggest that National is offering even an ambulance at the bottom.

      • saveNZ 1.1.1

        The Natz ambulance is privately run and charges taxpayer double markets rates who then charges the occupants who pay back out of their benefit…

        In short the ambulance is only there to make money for private firms and clear the cliff bottoms of bodies so that they remain out of sight.

      • Antoine 1.1.2

        Hmm?

        Here’s Labour supporting National’s measures to put in a fence at a top of a cliff:

        https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/hansard-debates/rhr/document/51HansD_20160601_00000012/social-security-extension-of-young-persons-services-and

        (Sound bite: “The bill requires all 19-year-old parents to access the Youth Service, including having a supportive relationship with a youth coach, parenting and budgeting courses, and support to engage in educational training. Making sure that these young parents have access to the support they need throughout their teen years will support positive outcomes for both them and their children.”)

        Admittedly Carmel Sepuloni expressed some reservations, but as it says at the bottom, Labour did vote for it.

        These sort of measures have halved NZ’s teen pregnancy rate during National’s term.

        A.

        • red-blooded 1.1.2.1

          Actually, Antione, this is a watered down version of a long-standing Labour policy. It’s hardly a surprise that they voted for it, although it’s not as comprehensive as the original policy (which would have seen secondary schools operating as hubs to organise ongoing mentoring of under 20s, and as one-stop-shops for provision of social services, career advice and support for job-seekers, coordination of ongoing training and tertiary education options, some primary healthcare services, counselling…etc).

          • Antoine 1.1.2.1.1

            > Actually, Antione, this is a watered down version of a long-standing Labour policy.

            Just for a change…

            A.

    • Philj 1.2

      You privatize the ambo @ the bottom of the cliff. Good for the bottom line.

  2. michelle 2

    Bill English and his social investment approach is not and will not work it hasn’t worked in USA and it won’t work here but it is his way of getting out of any social responsibility for vulnerable NZers by passing the buck and blaming people when they don’t have the means to help themselves.
    If we want to see a better and fairer NZ we need to invest in our people by educating them and providing them with the means to help themselves. We appear to be good at helping others but not our own we are too busy judging very sad indeed we have become like this.
    The tories have divided our country with their nasty talk and mean spirited policies exacerbating poverty.
    The ladder has been pulled away by the very people that benefitted from a prosperous welfare state.
    We must vote for a change of government the tories have had there chance and they haven’t delivered on the brighter future they promised we all know who has benefitted and will continue to until we get rid of this lot.

    • Stunned Mullet 2.1

      “If we want to see a better and fairer NZ we need to invest in our people by educating them and providing them with the means to help themselves.”

      What do you suggest ?

      • xanthe 2.1.1

        UB! !

        • BM 2.1.1.1

          Labour is not going to do a UBI, that would be electoral suicide

          • AB 2.1.1.1.1

            Quite possibly – because the only people we tolerate getting “something for nothing” are so-called investors getting unearned, untaxed capital gain – especially in the housing market.
            We don’t allow ordinary people to have free money because then they might lose their work ethic eh?

          • saveNZ 2.1.1.1.2

            BM giving advice to Labour! Just not sure why anyone would trust it!

            Hedge bets by offering a referendum on UBI – let Kiwis decide what they want.

      • michelle 2.1.2

        Stunned Mullet do you want me to do the gnats job for them. They cut funding for second chance learners and the most vulnerable we need bridge courses to fill the gaps we need good public education we need good social programs to address the rising social issues we now have in our country. Also we have far too many NEETS in our country and I think the gnats have no new ideas and want people like me to do the thinking for them when these muppets are getting paid for this and need to start doing their job

        • Sorrwerdna 2.1.2.1

          michelle – where were there cuts in second chance education?? As far as I’m aware there has been year on year increases with funding being prioritised to high performing providers

          • michelle 2.1.2.1.1

            night school gone this was a stepping stones to getting into education and one that worked for me , harder to get into universities for mature aged students, caps on social science degrees, increased costs to study , cuts to primary schools and mainstream schools budgets. Hence why we have principles burning out and leaving in there droves.
            Can you tell me Sorrwerdna what second chance educators got increases

            • garibaldi 2.1.2.1.1.1

              You are dead right Michelle, we must invest . Trouble is we have to admit it would be political suicide to propose investing in what has to be done because the amount is now astronomical. It’s not going to happen under our current system. Easier to promise more cops, just like the two Parties responsible for the dire straits we are now in are both doing, in the false hope of fixing things. DUH to them both.

          • UncookedSelachimorpha 2.1.2.1.2

            When I was a teenager and in my early 20’s in Christchurch , schools at night had well – attended night schools for adults who had missed out on school qualifications. I was able to attend adult polytechnic courses for interest (which I did while also at high school – mandarin Chinese and computer programming) . All this, including any later university, was 100% free, and university included a living allowance you could actually live on. It was not that long ago, and nz is just as wealthy now as it was then. The politicians who have destroyed all this, enjoyed it when they were young themselves . All this gone, just so the tax burden on the wealthy could be slashed.

      • Skeptic 2.1.3

        Minimum wage = livable wage BY ENTRENCHED LAW. Independent assessment based on survey of income compulsorily supplied by everyone – income = all remuneration and total income package. Minimum/livable wage set BY LAW at 1/7th of top 10% income bracket. All hours over 40 MANDATORY double time (tired worker = health and safety issue, so very heavy penalties). All temp and contract labour outlawed/forbidden.
        All medical and dental care free – doctors and practitioners trained at taxpayer expense and bonded to public service for 10 years. Private medical care outlawed in NZ.
        Re-develop NZ internal economy through fully funded state provided housing program and 1st home mortgage at discounted interest rate. HCNZ revamped and independent by entrenched law (so that the bastards can’t change if they get back into power)
        Quite a few other ideas that appeal to lower paid income bracket.

  3. Tarquin 3

    I can remember back in the good old days when the Salvation Army were a church group that helped people. Somehow they have morphed in to a political pressure group. Maybe they should stick to their core business.

    • Draco T Bastard 3.1

      Churches have always been political.

      But it’s not surprising that the RWNJs would try and defend the indefensible actions by this government by saying that people who do actually do good works shouldn’t criticise them.

      It’s the typical patronising BS that we always get from authoritarians as their beliefs and policies cause so much harm and people start calling them on it.

    • AB 3.2

      Maybe you should read the gospels? I am not religious myself but there is a very strong tradition of Christians speaking out in defence of human dignity and the intrinsic worth of each person.

    • shorts 3.3

      I guess in the good old days things weren’t getting progressively worse thus there was little need to try and pressure the powers that be to help kiwis, they did that by default

    • Whispering Kate 3.4

      Tarquin – Read your history dumbwit, for as far back as 1000 years ago and even before that churches, monastries and nunneries and have dealt with the vulnerable, nursed plague victims when nobody else cared enough to nurse them, built charity hospitals and cared for people who had fallen through the cracks. She-it some people give me a pain in the ass. The Sallies have been looking after very vulnerable people for as long as they have existed. If you want to talk rubbish do it somewhere else. These churches got very involved in politics – Thomas Beckett for one – get some history under your belt.

    • The Fairy Godmother 3.5

      Doubtless you are unfamiliar with the Bible. However Jesus does mention hell, not in relation to gay people or others who do not follow the personal morality proscribed by some conservatives. The people who he says in Matthew 25: 31 46 are destined for hell are those who didn’t feed the hungry, give a drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, take care of the sick and those in prison and didn’t welcome strangers. Interestingly it seems that the Salvation army are doing their best to follow the scriptures and good on them. The so-called Christians who follow the likes of Donald Trump, are, according to the scriptures they claim to follow are destined for hell.

      • Skeptic 3.5.1

        Yeah – personally I like the parable where he finishes with “Whatever you do to the least of my brethren, you also do to me.” I think that ought to be quoted to more often to benefit bashers, crim bashers, gay bashers and poor bashers. In fact, it should be put up in lights in suburbs like Fendalton, Remuera, Ohouria etc.

    • Paul 3.6

      What a ghastly comment.

  4. Draco T Bastard 4

    NZ has been off track since the 4th Labour government introduced neo-liberal ideology to our nation. Since then we’ve seen a rise in poverty and a massive increase in inequality.

    The government now rules for the rich and not the people in general.

    • michelle 4.1

      Draco we need to move on from who started what and when it sounds like a kid saying but he did it so why cant I. In the last 8 years we have gone down hill why ask yourself why and how has this happened ?

      • Draco T Bastard 4.1.1

        I’d like to agree with you but we really do need to understand what went wrong. Without that then we can’t make a move in a better direction.

        Now, what went before then also didn’t work and it was failing. That was the pressure that pushed the neo-liberal reforms through. The difference is that back then we did care for our people.

        Now we’ve got a failing system, little to no care for our people and no apparent understanding of how we got here.

        The point is that it’s not just the last 8 years that we’ve gone downhill but the last 30+ if we add in the fact the the previous system, Keynesianism, was failing.

        What it comes down to is that we have to accept that capitalism itself simply doesn’t work and then we need to replace it.

        • Tarquin 4.1.1.1

          I don’t disagree with you on this subject Draco, what I’m trying to get across is that the Salvation Army were always utterly non judgemental, their only real rule is don’t drink. I have donated a lot of money to them over the years for this very reason and will continue to do so. I hope taking this tack doesn’t affect their income.

          • red-blooded 4.1.1.1.1

            Actually, the Sallies have not always been non-judgemental. They campaigned viciously against homosexual law reform. Again, this was a long time ago, but it’s still part of “always”. They do some great work, though, and deserve respect for the practical support they continue to offer all sorts of people and the moral courage they show in speaking up for the oppressed.

        • michelle 4.1.1.2

          I see what I see draco and I have been here all my life and my people have been here for thousand of years despite our history being told by others. I see in the last 8 years things have gotten worse we have experienced more begging more homelessness and this is what happens when we have a recession we all have to pay for others greed. I also see more racism and discrimination towards my people ( Maori) and divisiveness and it makes me very angry indeed when I know our people made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. You see what you want to see but your not Maori and your experiences of NZ are not the same as our peoples and never will be .

          • Whispering Kate 4.1.1.2.1

            Draco is correct, of course the past eight years has gone seriously down hill, but to learn from history you have to go back to the origins of how this neo-lib nightmare started, and sorry folks but it was a Labour Government under the pig farmer who got this ball rolling. Obviously National didn’t create this mess as they haven’t the bottle to do anything seriously disrupting to the country – they are gutless , Labour has always done the visionary things but this one time it got it terribly wrong. National just picked up the ball, breathed a sigh of relief, ran with it and embellished it like they would have loved to have done, had they the courage to do so.

            It’s Labour’s to own.

            • garibaldi 4.1.1.2.1.1

              Yes , it is Labour’s to own, but they won’t. They say they have ‘moved on’. What they are really saying is that they don’t want to spook the horses of Capital and to that end they are merely offering a slight tweak to ‘more of the same’. This to me is what is wrong with trying to unify the left at the moment. It’s just a Claytons effort if we remain in the clutches of Neoliberalism.

              • Draco T Bastard

                +1

                Yep, Labour say that they’ve moved on from then but then they come out with policies that fit that framework. It puts the lie to what they say and indicates that they don’t wish to go back and investigate, don’t wish to have people questioning them about it and that shows deceit.

                • red-blooded

                  Labour has always been the party of vision and change. Yes, the economic policies of the 4th Labour government were painful and extreme. (They did lots of other things that were worth celebrating.) They were reacting against a painful and extreme situation, though – a wage-price freeze (which froze wages but not prices), inflation nearing 20%, international lenders downgrading our credit status, rampant unemployment… The effects of Muldoonism were pretty bloody awful and they (presumably) thought they were opening up opportunities and giving people choices. They were heedless and out of touch and they went too far. Working people and beneficiaries paid the price. Lange’s “cup of tea” break came too late (but thankfully headed off the flat tax rate that Rogers wanted to impose).

                  I don’t think it’s fair to keep saying that Labour hasn’t addressed this issue, though. The policies of the Clark government were much more focused on giving support to those in need and on trying to reduce inequality, and current policies are driven by strong social values and a clear view of the responsibilities of the state. They aren’t using exactly the same mechanisms as they would have used in the 1930s, Draco, but that’s not “deceit”, it’s common sense. The world is different and while the driving principals may be very much the same (but now including many issues that weren’t considered when the party started), it’s not surprising that some different mechanisms may be used.

                  I think you’re being overly simplistic and overly negative about Labour, Draco. I also think it’s this kind of thinking that sees people opting out rather than getting politically active. If you don’t like what you see of Labour, then either:
                  a) Join up and work to change it from within, or
                  b) Vote and campaign for the Greens.

                  Either way, you’d be helping to elect a more caring government. Just bagging Labour achieves nothing positive.

                  • Draco T Bastard

                    The effects of Muldoonism were pretty bloody awful

                    Ah, but was that the effect of Muldoon or capitalism?

                    Because from where I’m sitting, it looks remarkably the same. And we need to remember that the whole world was suffering at the time from the same malaise.

                    I don’t think it’s fair to keep saying that Labour hasn’t addressed this issue, though.

                    I do because they’re still maintaining the same policies. Sure, they’ve taken some of the sharp edges off but it’s still more about rewarding the rich for being rich than it is about making things better for the country as a whole. In other words, they still maintain capitalism.

                    They aren’t using exactly the same mechanisms as they would have used in the 1930s, Draco, but that’s not “deceit”, it’s common sense.

                    The reversion to common sense is the demand that everyone think the way you do no matter what the evidence shows. And the evidence really does show that capitalism doesn’t work.

                    Just bagging Labour achieves nothing positive.

                    It does have the possibility of doing so – if they bother to listen and do a bit of introspection and looking at the evidence. I really don’t see any of that happening though.

                  • Doogs

                    Thank you rb. This is the most sensible, comprehensive and clear-headed comment so far. There are so many rear-focused and blinkered commentators who are determined to ‘pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey’ that they place it anywhere but the correct spot.

                    Labour does represent forward thinking. Labour does have a socially focused agenda. Labour does recognise past faults. They have said so time and again. To re-hash past agendas and castigate the current set of MPs and party members for things done by others in a different time is madness – and seriously counter-productive. Think present day Germany vis-a-vis the Nazis.

                    Look people, get positive. We know the enemy. Let’s not turn the guns on ourselves. Support the left for a positive change.

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      Labour does represent forward thinking.

                      No, they don’t.

                      They still support the same failed system that has always failed – capitalism.

                      They’re not even thinking about removing it.

                      Support the left for a positive change.

                      I do – unfortunately, we don’t see a lot of positive change but just more of the same.

    • Richard McGrath 4.2

      “The government now rules for the rich and not the people in general.”

      Surely if that were true the middle-class non-rich would have cottoned on years ago and stopped voting for them.

    • Skeptic 4.3

      There was no 4th Labour Government – there was the 1st ACT Government of 1984 to 1990 and the 2nd ACT Government of 1991 to 1999. Remember – all participants of National and Labour in those government packed a sad when MMP was voted in and formed ACT. Some of the pricks were even bloody knighted for the efforts of crippling NZ.

  5. Ad 5

    Not that I want to get the knotted cords out of the cupboard again, but as a practising Catholic it is bonkers that the only regular and coherent report about New Zealand’s social deprivation comes not from the largest and best-resourced Christian denominations, but from a tiny little uniformed bunch of Methodist splitters. And of course this is not to criticise every good bit of social work the Catholic church and its orders and staff and volunteers and workers are doing. I am really glad that the Sallies work so hard, and advocate so hard. Robust prophets are hard to find. Even harder to find ones that are listed to respectfully.

    Good on the Salvation Army for doing the job every Christian organisation should be doing.

  6. Michael 6

    I’m surprised you posted this as Labour does not come out well out of the Working For Families exercise (it deliberately excluded the children of people unable to work from its flagship poverty alleviation measure, for one thing). It’s media statement earlier today implies that using taxpayer funds to build a few $600,000+ houses for middle class Aucklanders (coincidentally, Labour’s key target market in this year’s campaign) will solve all the problems. This is disingenuous to put it mildly. Can I suggest you take a look at CPAG’s media statement instead, and click the link to its recommendations on how to make WFF into a genuine tool to reduce child poverty?

    • Korero Pono 6.1

      Michael +1. The WFF package was never designed to lift poverty levels for non-working families and frankly once tax cuts and GST changes were implemented from 2010, many families found themselves worse off. Food bank usage has increased significantly over the last 30 plus years and the only time during that period that food bank use actually dropped was when the Government of the time (think it was the Nats) loosened criteria for food grants, however that didn’t last long and food bank use sky-rocketed again. Meanwhile food banks nationally are reporting increased demand, with a significant number of working families now relying on charity to feed their families. We are being told this incredible lie that people who work are better off, try telling that to working families using food banks. Those in charge can come up with every conceivable social program to lift people out of poverty but if people don’t have enough money to live on and rents are too high then nothing is going to change. Meanwhile let’s subject the poor to budgeting and other programs to fix their supposed deficits and ignore the systemic causes of poverty. Labour or Nats it matters not to me, they are both complicit in what we see today.

  7. jcuknz 7

    I do not know if I am getting the right message by frequenting both KB and TS and reading what the nut jobs on both sites are writing?
    We have Weka et al. taking me literally when the Ambulance was not refering to the St Johns but the increase in police numbers and the concept of picking up the mess at the cliff bottom rather than doing something to stop folk from falling off the top.
    From KB I get the idea that all beneficiaries are bludgers … I am sure there are some but ‘Northland Wahine’ at the coalface told us some are, some are not.
    Then here at TS we have the concept that big business is the enemy which is also is rather silly.
    Since the National Party is proving to be quite left wing I see my idea of a meld being the logical solution and the left needs to discipline both itself [ the Willie Jackson carry-on] and those abusers of the system and support common sense measures, rather than foolish concepts .
    By the by as ex-media I get very angry and frustrated by front peoples views until I remember the Devils Advocate principle and try to work out if that is play or genuine views.
    Since National is the government it seems sensible for the more sensible lefties join it and stop the RW extremists from ruining what is left of NZ’s social security system and to build it up again..

    • Antoine 7.1

      jcuknz, don’t think you’re going to get much traction around here if you think National is left wing, good luck in the search for truth though

      A.

    • One Anonymous Bloke 7.2

      …big business is the enemy…

      I daresay you can find a few comments that might reflect that sentiment. Hardly a majority view. Looking askance at eg: Mr. Peter Talley and his human rights abuses is not the same thing.

      Neither is criticising the National Party for taking thinly-disguised bribes and selling government policy, not to mention public property.

      James Shaw’s commencement speech includes lots of praise for big business. Where was the chorous of criticism? In your mind?

  8. greywarshark 8

    “Avoidable harm” is a very apt term to describe what the neo libs both National and Labour have inflicted on the NZ lower income and a large number of young people.

    To attempt to turn the economy over to attempt greater efficiency and more exporting, should have been accompanied by intelligent use of the now excess man and woman power where there was a crying need for attention around the NZ rohe. But the ineptness of the politicians, and the silo vision of the economists du jour have left us with running sores that the government is uninterested in salving and curing. Despicable stuff.

    • Richard McGrath 8.1

      Don’t worry, GWS, any vestige of neoliberalism has been stamped out in Bill English’s National Socialist Party. According to the great man himself, the government’s agenda includes pay equity legislation, stronger taxation of multinationals, more social housing, reforming the RMA (probably making it even more fascist than it already is), and more spending on “infrastructure” (i.e. more public spending rather than deregulation and encouragement of the private sector). Lefties everywhere should be rejoicing!

  9. Charmaine 9

    It’s not just the North Island this is affecting in housing terms. I am a Registered Nurse working rurally in Otago. I have just been given notice to vacate my rented house after 6 years as my landlord needs it for staff. There is nothing for rent here in this little town. All the rentals and houses for sale at a reasonable price are gone. We have had an influx of kiwis here from Auckland, Hamilton and Christchurch who have been driven out of their home towns. Immigration and NZ being for sale to the entire world is the cause. My colleagues, friends and family can see what is happening to our beloved country. This has to stop. I hope NZ First for this reason alone gets a massive vote this coming election.

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    4 days ago
  • Call for urgent action on Pacific conservation
    A declaration on the urgency of the global biodiversity crisis and the need for immediate, transformative action in the Pacific was agreed at a pan-Pacific conference today. The 10th Pacific Islands Conference on Nature Conservation and Protected Areas is taking place this week across the Pacific.  Minister of Conservation Kiritapu ...
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    4 days ago
  • Speech from the throne
    E aku hoa i te ara o te whai, Kia kotahi tā tātou takahi i te kō, ko tōku whiwhi kei tō koutou tautoko mai. Ko tāku ki a koutou, hei whakapiki manawa mōku. He horomata rangatira te mahi, e rite ai te whiwhinga a te ringatuku, me te ringakape ...
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    4 days ago
  • Keynote address to Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand conference
    Speech to the CAANZ conference - November 19, 2020 Thank you, Greg, (Greg Haddon, MC) for the welcome. I’d like to acknowledge John Cuthbertson from CAANZ, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue Naomi Ferguson, former fellow MP and former Minister of Revenue, Peter Dunne, other guest speakers and CAANZ members. I ...
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    5 days ago
  • Expert independent advisory group appointed to strengthen the future of Māori broadcasting
    A panel of seven experts are adding their support to help shape the future of Māori broadcasting, Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson has announced today. “Today I will meet with some of the most experienced Māori broadcasters, commentators and practitioners in the field. They have practical insights on the ...
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    6 days ago
  • Government to review housing settings
    New Zealand’s stronger-than-expected economic performance has flowed through to housing demand, so the Government will review housing settings to improve access to the market, the Finance Minister Grant Robertson announced today. “Our focus is on improving access to the housing market for first home buyers and ensuring house price growth ...
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    6 days ago
  • Crown accounts reflect Govt’s careful economic management
    The better-than-expected Crown accounts released today show the Government’s careful management of the COVID-19 health crisis was the right approach to support the economy. As expected, the Crown accounts for the year to June 2020 show the operating balance before gains and losses, or OBEGAL, was in deficit. However that ...
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    6 days ago
  • Community launch marks next step in addressing racism in education
    The launch of Te Hurihanganui in Porirua today is another important milestone in the work needed to address racism in the education system and improve outcomes for Māori learners and their whānau, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis says. Budget 2019 included $42 million over three years to put Te Hurihanganui ...
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    6 days ago
  • Government to consider recommendations on DNA use in criminal investigations
    The Minister of Justice has received the Law Commission’s recommending changes to the law governing the way DNA is used in criminal investigations. The report, called The Use of DNA in Criminal Investigations – Te Whahamahi I te Ira Tangata I ngā Mātai Taihara, recommends new legislation to address how ...
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    7 days ago
  • Speech to Wakatū Nelson regional hui on trade
    First, I want to express my thanks to Te Taumata for this hui and for all the fantastic work you are doing for Māori in the trade space. In the short time that you’ve been operating you’ve already contributed an enormous amount to the conversation, and developed impressive networks.  I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Speech to Primary Industries Summit
    Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you today about the significant contribution the food and fibres sector makes to New Zealand and how this Government is supporting that effort. I’d like to start by acknowledging our co-Chairs, Terry Copeland and Mavis Mullins, my colleague, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor, ...
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    7 days ago
  • Fast track referrals will speed up recovery and boost jobs and home building
    The Government is taking action to increase jobs, speed up the economic recovery and build houses by putting three more projects through its fast track approval process. “It’s great to see that the fast-track consenting process is working. Today we have referred a mix of potential projects that, if approved, ...
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    1 week ago
  • Papakāinga provides critically needed homes in Hastings
    A papakāinga opened today by the Minister for Māori Development the Hon Willie Jackson will provide whānau with much needed affordable rental homes in Hastings. The four home papakāinga in Waiōhiki is the first project to be completed under the ‘Hastings Place Based’ initiative. This initiative is a Government, Hastings ...
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    1 week ago
  • New Zealand ready to host APEC virtually
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern took over the leadership of APEC earlier today, when she joined leaders from the 21 APEC economies virtually for the forum’s final 2020 meeting. “We look forward to hosting a fully virtual APEC 2021 next year. While this isn’t an in-person meeting, it will be one ...
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    1 week ago
  • Revival of Māori Horticulturists
    The rapid revival of Māori horticulture was unmistakeable at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy Awards, with 2020 marking the first time this iconic Māori farming event was dedicated to horticulture enterprises. Congratulating finalists at the Awards, Māori Development Minister Willie Jackson said growing large-scale māra kai is part of Māori DNA. ...
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    1 week ago
  • Emergency benefit to help temporary visa holders
    From 1 December, people on temporary work, student or visitor visas who can’t return home and or support themselves may get an Emergency Benefit from the Ministry of Social Development, Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni announced today. Previously, temporary visa holders in hardship because of COVID-19 have had ...
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    1 week ago
  • School sustainability projects to help boost regional economies
    Forty one schools from the Far North to Southland will receive funding for projects that will reduce schools’ emissions and save them money, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. This is the second round of the Sustainability Contestable Fund, and work will begin immediately. The first round announced in April ...
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    1 week ago
  • Farmer-led projects to improve water health in Canterbury and Otago
    More than $6 million will be spent on helping farmers improve the health of rivers, wetlands, and habitat biodiversity in Canterbury and Otago, as well as improving long-term land management practices, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Four farmer-led catchment group Jobs for Nature projects have between allocated between $176,000 and ...
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    1 week ago
  • Tupu Aotearoa continues expansion to Pacific communities in Nelson, Marlborough, Tasman & Northl...
    Pacific communities in Nelson, Marlborough, Tasman and Northland will benefit from the expansion of the Tupu Aotearoa programme announced today by the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. The programme provides sustainable employment and education pathways and will be delivered in partnership with three providers in Northland and two ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • New primary school and classrooms for 1,200 students in South Island
    Education Minister Chris Hipkins unveiled major school building projects across the South Island during a visit to Waimea College in Nelson today. It’s part of the Government’s latest investment of $164 million to build new classrooms and upgrade schools around the country. “Investments like this gives the construction industry certainty ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Minister of Māori Development pays tribute to Rudy Taylor
      Today the Minister of Māori Development, alongside other Government Ministers and MP’s said their final farewells to Nga Puhi Leader Rudy Taylor.  “Rudy dedicated his life to the betterment of Māori, and his strong approach was always from the ground up, grassroots, sincere and unfaltering”  “Over the past few ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Prime Minister to attend APEC Leaders’ Summit
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will attend the annual APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting and associated events virtually today and tomorrow. “In a world where we cannot travel due to COVID-19, continuing close collaboration with our regional partners is key to accelerating New Zealand’s economic recovery,” Jacinda Ardern said. “There is wide ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Speech to Infrastructure NZ Symposium
    Tena Koutou, Tena Koutou and thank you for inviting me to speak to you today. This is a critical time for New Zealand as we respond to the damage wreaked by the global COVID-19 pandemic. It is vital that investment in our economic recovery is well thought through, and makes ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Pike River 10 Year Anniversary Commemorative Service
    Tēnei te mihi ki a tātau katoa e huihui nei i tēnei rā Ki a koutou ngā whānau o te hunga kua riro i kōnei – he mihi aroha ki a koutou Ki te hapori whānui – tēnā koutou Ki ngā tāngata whenua – tēnā koutou Ki ngā mate, e ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Huge investment in new and upgraded classrooms to boost construction jobs
    Around 7,500 students are set to benefit from the Government’s latest investment of $164 million to build new classrooms and upgrade schools around the country. “The election delivered a clear mandate to accelerate our economic recovery and build back better. That’s why we are prioritising construction projects in schools so more ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Keeping Pike River Mine promises 10 years on
    Ten years after the Pike River Mine tragedy in which 29 men lost their lives while at work, a commemorative service at Parliament has honoured them and their legacy of ensuring all New Zealand workplaces are safe. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern attended the event, along with representatives of the Pike ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Additional testing to strengthen border and increase safety of workers
    New testing measures are being put in place to increase the safety of border workers and further strengthen New Zealand’s barriers against COVID-19, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “These strengthened rules – to apply to all international airports and ports – build on the mandatory testing orders we’ve ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • More public housing delivered in Auckland
    The Government’s investment in public housing is delivering more warm, dry homes with today’s official opening of 82 new apartments in New Lynn by the Housing Minister Megan Woods. The Thom Street development replaces 16 houses built in the 1940s, with brand new fit-for-purpose public housing that is in high ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Agreement advanced to purchase up to 5 million COVID-19 vaccines
    The Government has confirmed an in-principle agreement to purchase up to 5 million COVID-19 vaccines – enough for 5 million people – from Janssen Pharmaceutica, subject to the vaccine successfully completing clinical trials and passing regulatory approvals in New Zealand, says Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods. “This agreement ...
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    2 weeks ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding will leave a conservation legacy for Waikanae awa
    Ninety-two jobs will be created to help environmental restoration in the Waikanae River catchment through $8.5 million of Jobs for Nature funding, Conservation Minister Kiritapu Allan announced today. “The new funding will give a four-year boost to the restoration of the Waikanae awa, and is specifically focussed on restoration through ...
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    2 weeks ago