web analytics

Tape of ACC-Pullar meeting raises more questions

Written By: - Date published: 7:06 am, April 30th, 2012 - 47 comments
Categories: ACC, Judith Collins - Tags: , , , ,

Another secret taping, another political scandal. A recording of Pullar and Boag’s meeting with ACC by Pullar appears to show that Pullar did not “blackmail” ACC as alleged. This raises serious questions about how Pullar’s name got into the public arena. And why hasn’t Collins ordered ACC to correct its version of events since its had the transcript for weeks?

If ACC has seriously mis-represented Pullar and Boag’s actions in its report to Collins on the leaking of 6,500 clients details to Pullar, could it also be ACC officials behind the leaking of Pullar’s name?

Until now, the only logical source of the leak had been Collins or her office – bureaucrats would never attack senior figures in the ruling party, ACC would not risk further damaging its reputation by maliciously releasing client information, and government ministers have form on releasing the private information of people who criticise them (eg Bennett and Fuller*).

The Standard’s sources in National pointed the finger at Collins.

Now, it seems credible it could have been ACC officials. Except for one major fact: only Collins’ office and senior ACC officials supposedly had Boag’s email to Collins.

If ACC is out of line, why hasn’t Collins acted? She’s obviously known the contents of the tapes are at odds with ACC’s version of events for weeks. Would ACC persist with it version of events if Collins told them not to?

If her staff are half-competent, Collins’ office must know by now who leaked Pullar’s name, if it didn’t at the time.

And why did the release of this story coincide with an anti-Boag campaign from Collins henchman, Cameron Slater? Why did Collins and Slater go nuclear at the mention of Simon Lusk’s name?

What role, if any, did National’s appointee to head ACC, John Judge, and Nat ACC board member John McCliskie play? If the leak came from ACC, where they acting rogue or at the minster’s behest and, if they were rogue, why hasn’t the minister punished them?

Isn’t it still more plausible that the leak of the Boag email came from the person it was sent to?

This all stinks. Either Collins and her office were involved or ACC is completely out of control under Collins’ watch and she has failed to reel them in when given the chance. Lets hope the various investigations get to the bottom of it. Although I don’t hold out a lot of hope.

And none of this changes the fact that Pullar should not have released the 6,500 ACC clients’ details. How that file happened to come into her hands, of all people, remains a huge unanswered question as well.


* – this to me, is the best argument against Collins’ defamation suit. Defamation is a statement that lowers the reputation of a person in the eyes of the public. Bennett was widely praised for doing what it is claimed Collins did, so what can be defamatory about saying Collins did it?


47 comments on “Tape of ACC-Pullar meeting raises more questions”

  1. rosy 1

    I’m trying to work out why it took so long for this to make the news. Stuff don’t say when they saw the transcript. Oh well, it seems a good enough story to keep the Banks’ saga away from the headline news story…

  2. Sarah 2

    “Pullar should not have released the 6,500 ACC clients’ details.”

    Pullar never released the 6500 ACC client details and she didn’t breach anybodies privacy – ACC did.

    So why are you saying she did?

    The Dominion Post received a file from Pullar WITHOUT any names in it.

    If Pullar hadn’t gone public :
    – there would possibly have been no breach notification by ACC
    – ACC privacy breaches would have continued unabated,
    – ACC would have kept publishing monthly reports containing the names of sensitive claimants, and they did for a further 3 months until March when the matter went public despite Pullar notifying them of the breach in December
    – there would be no inquiry into systemic privacy breaches by ACC
    – nothing would have changed

    Are you suggesting Pullar should have colluded with ACC in a cover up of the privacy breach by saying nothing?

    • toad 2.1

      As far as I am aware, Pullar did not release personal information to the media – she or someone close to her released a version of the files ACC sent to her with the information that could identify individual claimants redacted.

      • just saying 2.1.1

        Are you going to alter this post Eddie?

        It’s been known that Pullar did not breach other claimants’ privacy for some weeks now, but this line keeps being repeated.

        Like her or loathe her, Pullar is a whistle-blower. Even if she believes that blowing the whistle might further her personal best-interests regarding ACC (and that would be unwise), she has a long record of trying to publicise how ACC treats people in her position. There are several inquiries into ACC happening as a result of her embarrassing ACC in this way.

      • An excellent article, and raises the right questions. However I agree with Toad, it is not accurate to say Ms. Pullar released the personal information in the spreadsheet. The information given to the Dom Post had the personal information removed to protect confidentiality of claimants.

  3. tsmithfield 3

    Your article suggests to me that there is more ammunition for Collins in her defamation suit, in that you appear to me to be suggesting that there are other plausible sources for leaks outside Collins and her office (which I believe I was suggesting myself when this topic was last doing the rounds here).

    Not that it means she will be successful of course. Only that her position is strengthened as a result of this. Is that your view?

  4. Jackal 4

    What will crush-less Collins do?

    If Judith Collins has any competence as a minister, we should see heads roll.

  5. Kotahi Tane Huna 5

    If senior ACC employees (eg: to ones it was sent to) leaked the Boag email, that means ACC is “rogue” (rouge is facepaint) all the way to the top, and if this is the case, it’s the minister’s responsibility anyway.

    Are we supposed to believe that the party of croneyism and inapproriate political interference/influence, the party that wants to privatise ACC, hasn’t got its sticky corrupt fingers all over this?

    Yeah right.

  6. Good brave questions Eddie.

  7. Lanthanide 7

    “The Standard’s sources in National pointed the finger at Collins.”

    Is it really The Standard’s (a non-thinking machine, remember) sources in National, or Eddie’s?

  8. Gosman 8

    I love how the attack line has now changed from being definately, without almost a shadow of a doubt, Judith Collins being responsible for the leak to her now being responsible for not dealing with those people in ACC who might now be responsible.

    • Lanthanide 8.1

      Yep, I found that amusing too.

      • Anne 8.1.1

        Umm… from memory, most of us attacked Judith Collins because we suspected she knew who had leaked the information but was pretending she didn’t… not that she had leaked it herself. Not surprisingly there was speculation as to how it may have happened and who may have been involved, but I think today’s revelation tends to confirm that Judith Collins did know where the leak had originated. Yet she was happy for others to be suspected of the ‘crime’ and on her own side of the political fence too. Interesting.

        • Gosman

          What was all that fuss with Mallard and Little then?

          Also from many of the comments on this thread it does indeed seem like many people here are thinking Collins had a direct link to the leaking of the e-mail


          • Anne

            Ask Madam Crusher. She’s the one making all the fuss.

          • felix

            “Also from many of the comments on this thread it does indeed seem like many people here are thinking Collins had a direct link to the leaking of the e-mail”

            I just scanned that thread and of the 96 comments I found maybe 3 or 4 that hinted at what you say, and none that say it outright.

            As usual you’ve looked at the numbers and failed to understand the words.

            • Lanthanide

              Try reading the actual post itself, Felix:

              So, that leaves Collins and her office. Collins denied leaking the email to the media … but leaves a fair bit of wiggle room, doesn’t it? The tipline is, as they say, running hot – and the name on everyone’s lips is Lusk.

              To understand why Collins would give Pullar’s name to Simon Lusk for passing on to the Herald, you need to understand some internal National Party dynamics.

              Even Nats who don’t know, until now, exactly how Collins leaked and to whom will tell you the obvious – the leak can only have come from her office.

              • Rob

                “As usual you’ve looked at the numbers and failed to understand the words”. It looks like Felix jumped straight to the numbers and failed to even read the words.

                • Te Reo Putake

                  Felix wrote about the number of comments in the post Gosman referred to, Rob, not the comments on this post or indeed the post itself*. So it looks rather like it is you who failed to read the words. 
                  *From Gossie’s comment:
                  Also from many of the comments on this thread it does indeed seem like many people here are thinking Collins had a direct link to the leaking of the e-mail

                  • Gosman

                    If you want to get truly pedantic I could argue that the tone of the comments of people were generally supportive of the ideas expressed in the original post and that included a section, (that was highlighted by Lanthanide), which suggested that Collins was directly involved in the leak. However that wouldn’t really serve any purpose, much like yours and Felix’s comments here.

                    • McFlock

                      You could, but you wouldn’t simply because you would never stoop to diverting a thread with a semantic debate as to whether comments indicating “general support” for a post which  suggests the probable identity of a likely culprit equates to those commenters specifically “thinking Collins had a direct link to the leaking of the e-mail”?
                      You would never stoop to such a thing… 

                    • Lanthanide

                      Sticking my oar in here, I didn’t notice that Gosman specifically referred to comments, so felix is correct in his counting.

                      I was referring more to his original comment:
                      “I love how the attack line has now changed from being definately, without almost a shadow of a doubt, Judith Collins being responsible for the leak to her now being responsible for not dealing with those people in ACC who might now be responsible.”

                      Which refers directly to Eddie’s posts, both this one and “They eat their own”.

                      But yes, this looks like more diversion from Gos: I understand his angle, but the words he chose to express it were poor.

                    • felix

                      “If you want to get truly pedantic I could argue that the tone of the comments of people were generally supportive of the ideas expressed in the original post “

                      But you won’t, because if you did I’d insist that you quote the bits you meant so we could discuss the “tone”.

                      And you won’t do that because it would become very apparent that your “many” is actually “very few”.

                      “However that wouldn’t really serve any purpose, much like yours and Felix’s comments here.”

                      My comment above only serves to point out that you’re bullshitting, and I happen to think it does so unequivocally. I get that it doesn’t serve any purpose for you, but I’m not actually here to serve your purposes. Believe it or not.

  9. ghostwhowalksnz 9

    Forensically this is very smart.
    First the email tracking software, then the recording of meetings – which is revealed much later after ACC has dug itself deeper into a hole.

    Its like CSI

    • Te Reo Putake 9.1

      It’ll be just like CSI when we have a dead body. I’ll settle for a dead political career though.

      • Gosman 9.1.1

        It doesn’t look like it will be Judith Collins though based on this rather pathetic attempt at linking her to the leak given the latest revellations. Perhaps you would settle for Trevour Mallard’s head?

  10. ianmac 10

    Well it is alright then. Mr Key questions the validity of the tape. Risky stuff?
    “”Yes there appears to be a difference of opinion although, as we know with recordings, that it might not be the entire recording,” he said.”
    I expect he will find another expert who says the tape says the opposite.

    • Pascal's bookie 10.1

      It’s odd that he’d go out of his way to question the honesty of the account. A brush off due to the various investigations would have been the obvious thing.

  11. Tiger Mountain 11

    ullo, ullo, ullo what ’av we ’ere?….
    is this not a classic situation where it is better for ShonKey to be saying nothing? It is not a slow news day at least.

    “Key Questions Pullar Recording”

    • ianmac 11.1


    • happynz 11.2

      From the same Herald article link…

      Speaking to TVNZ’s Breakfast today, Mr Key raised questions about the recording.

      “Yes there appears to be a difference of opinion although, as we know with recordings, that it might not be the entire recording,” he said.

      “I’m not saying it is or it isn’t, I simply don’t know, but the important point there is that there are three investigations going on … and I’m sure they’ll look at all of the information that’s there.”

      That’s gonna need an industrial-sized barrel of syrup to cover all that waffle.


  12. Akldnut 12

    If Fuller received the information as an email there should have been a disclaimer (I think theyre called) on the bottom threatening legal action/consequences and stating the relevant act if the information was diseminated/dissected in part or whole?

    So if spreading the information would have been illegal, the idea that she would have demanded the 2 yrs payment when she would have been prosecuted would seem fairly implausible.

    So someone in ACC would have been telling porkies.

  13. veryinteresting 13

    Isnt it very interesting.
    The levy payer protects themself from ACC by recording a meeting with them.
    ACC make public allegations.
    The transcript of the recording is released to ACC, ACC refuse to correct their public allegation.
    the PM is quoted:
    “”Yes there appears to be a difference of opinion although, as we know with recordings, that it might not be the entire recording,” he said.”

    wait a minute: I dont recall any such view being put forward on the issue of the Tea Tape.

    This should be an alert to take note – any time you have to meet with ACC record it!

    So i wonder why is it that when a levy payer records ACC and produces a transcript to prove the allegations false is the levy payers recording deemed to have doubt on it.

    we are all levy payers, these issues are cause for concern at the culture within acc hope you never have a serious injury requiring their ” rehabilitation”. BTW the Department of Labour who monitor ACC define rehabilitation as ” exit” .

  14. Kevin 14

    Collins has delivered papers to Mallard and Little last Friday regarding defamation over the source of the leaks. It is entirely possible that Collins was not a party to the leaks, and that she had nothing to do with the release of Bronwyn Pullar’s file.
    It is my view that the leaks could have only come from ACC themselves, from the highest level, and was a bungled attempt at managing damage regarding Bronwyn Pullar’s case and the subsequent fallout which resulted in the resignation of Nic Smith

    • Adele 14.1


      Mallard and Little have only received letters from lawyers advising them that proceedings are being commenced and they have yet to be served with papers. I get the impression that Collins is trying to bully an apology from Mallard and Little to prevent what will be costly litigation on her part (she is personally paying for the defamation proceedings against both parties).

      She may need to ask John Banks on how to source anonymous donations – however, I don’t think in her case Kim Dotcom will be all that forthcoming.

      [lprent: 3 parties. RadioNZ is also on her hit list. I suspect that most of the legal machinations will be directed at them as the weaker link. That way she may get a figleaf apology from one party to cover her embarrassed naked butt as she retreats in triumph. /sarcasm off]

  15. Anne 15

    Collins has delivered papers to Mallard and Little last Friday regarding defamation over the source of the leaks. It is entirely possible that Collins was not a party to the leaks, and that she had nothing to do with the release of Bronwyn Pullar’s file.

    Not only is it possible, it’s beginning to look like it may be probable. However, the point of contention is:

    Did Judith Collins know it was an ACC inspired leak and if so, why did she declare she had no idea who was responsible? She may not have known the name of the ACC staffer who facilitated the leakage, but she must have known what was going on and seemingly chose to be part of the cover-up.

    • Gosman 15.1

      She may have known the source of the leak. She may also be a Reptillian space Alien sent down to rule over us. Unless you have evidence you are merely speculating.

  16. Carmen D 16

    Eddie, do you still contend that Collins leaked the email? A simple yes or no will suffice.

    We await your reply.

    • Ross 16.1

      I think she did leak the email. She provided the email to ACC when the email apparently said it was not to be given to anyone. She printed out the email when it is not clear why she would do so. She has failed to account for her actions. She has made it clear she dislikes Pullar. Paula Bennett made it clear she disliked Natasha Fuller before she (Bennett) disclosed private info to the media.

  17. tsmithfield 17

    “The Standard’s sources in National pointed the finger at Collins.”

    Perhaps this brings into question the wisdom of relying on “sources” within the enemy’s camp. A counter-intelligence op perhaps?

Recent Comments

Recent Posts


  • September benefit figures disappointing
    The Government is out of touch with the reality that fewer people are going off the benefit and into employment or study, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni.  “The quarterly benefit numbers for September are concerning. They show that ...
    3 days ago
  • MFAT officials refuse to back Prime Minister on Saudi sheep claims
    An Ombudsman’s interim decision released about the existence or otherwise of legal advice on the multimillion dollar Saudi sheep deal shows MFAT has failed to back up the Prime Minister’s claims on the matter, says Labour MP David Parker. “The ...
    3 days ago
  • Nats still planning to take Housing NZ dividend
    Housing New Zealand’s Statement of Performance Expectations shows that the National Government intends to pocket $237m from Housing New Zealand this year including a $54m “surplus distribution”, despite promises that dividends would stop, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “After ...
    4 days ago
  • Parliament must restore democracy for Ecan
    Parliament has a chance to return full democracy to Canterbury with the drawing of a member’s bill that would replace the Government’s appointed commissioners with democratically elected councillors, says Labour’s Canterbury Spokesperson Megan Woods. “In 2010, the Government stripped Cantabrians ...
    4 days ago
  • Police struggle to hold the line in Northland
    Labour’s promise of a thousand extra police will go a long way to calming the fears of people in the North, says the MP for Te Tai Tokerau Kelvin Davis.  “Police are talking about the Northland towns of Kaitaia and ...
    4 days ago
  • Urgent action on agriculture emissions needed
    Immediate action is required to curb agricultural emissions is the loud and clear message from Climate change & agriculture: Understanding the biological greenhouse gases report released today by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, says Labour’s Climate Change spokesperson Megan ...
    5 days ago
  • Super Fund climate change approach a good start
    Labour Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson and Climate Change Spokesperson Dr Megan Woods have welcomed the adoption of a climate change investment strategy by the New Zealand Super Fund. “This is a good start. It is a welcome development that the Super ...
    5 days ago
  • Raising the age the right thing to do
    The announcement today that the Government will leave the door open for young people leaving state care still means there is a lot of work to do, says Labour's Spokesperson for Children, Jacinda Ardern "The Government indicated some time ago ...
    5 days ago
  • Coleman plays down the plight of junior doctors
    Junior doctors are crucial to our health services and the industrial action that continues tomorrow shows how desperately the Government has underfunded health, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “Jonathan Coleman’s claim that he has not seen objective evidence of ...
    6 days ago
  • Inflation piles pressure on National and Reserve Bank
    While many households will welcome the low inflation figures announced today, they highlight serious questions for both the National government and the Reserve Bank, Labour’s  Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson said.  "While low inflation will be welcomed by many, the ...
    6 days ago
  • Officials warned Nat’s $1b infrastructure fund ineffective and rushed
    Treasury papers show the Government rushed out an infrastructure announcement officials told them risked making no significant difference to housing supply, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford.  “Like so much of National’s housing policy, this was another poll-driven PR initiative ...
    6 days ago
  • More cops needed to tackle P
    New Police statistics obtained in Written Questions show John Key is losing his War on P, highlighting the need for more Police, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little.  “New Zealanders expect serious action on P but today’s hodgepodge of half-measures won’t ...
    1 week ago
  • MBIE docs show country needs KiwiBuild, not Key’s pretend “building boom”
    John Key’s spin that New Zealand is in a building boom does not change the massive shortfall in building construction as new MBIE papers reveal, says Labour Party housing spokesperson Phil Twyford.  “We can fix the housing crisis, by the ...
    1 week ago
  • 1 in 7 Akl houses now going to big property speculators
    Speculators are running riot in the Auckland housing market making life tougher for first home buyers, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford.  Newly released data from Core Logic shows a 40 per cent increase in the share of house sales ...
    1 week ago
  • Labour mourns passing of Helen Kelly
    Helen Kelly was a passionate advocate for working New Zealanders and for a safe and decent working life, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says.  “Helen Kelly spent her adult life fighting for the right of every working person to ...
    1 week ago
  • Andrew Little: Speech to the Police Association Conference 2016
    Police Association delegates, Association life members and staff, representatives from overseas jurisdictions. Thank you for inviting me here today. The Police Association has become a strong and respected voice for Police officers and for policing in New Zealand. There is ...
    2 weeks ago
  • 1,000 more police for safer communities
    Labour will fund an extra 1,000 Police in its first term to tackle the rising rate of crime, says Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. “Labour will put more cops on the beat to keep our communities safe. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Call for all-party round table on homelessness
    Labour is calling on the Government to take part in a roundtable meeting to hammer out a cross-party agreement on ending homelessness.  Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford said the country wanted positive solutions to homelessness, and wanted the political parties ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Working people carrying the can for the Government
    Today’s announcement of a Government operating surplus is the result of the hard work of many Kiwi businesses and workers, who will be asking themselves if they are receiving their fair share of growth in the economy, Grant Robertson Labour ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Breast cancer drugs should be available
    Labour supports the Breast Cancer Aotearoa Coalition’s campaign for better access to cancer treatments as more patients are denied what is freely available in Australia, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “In the last three years, PHARMAC’s funding has been ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Community law centres get much needed support from banks
      New Zealand’s network of community law centres, who operate out of more than 140 locations across the country, have today received a much needed boost, says Labour’s Justice spokesperson Jacinda Ardern.  “After more than 8 years of static funding ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Just 18 affordable homes in Auckland SHAs – It’s time for KiwiBuild
    New data revealing just 18 affordable homes have been built and sold to first home buyers in Auckland’s Special Housing Areas show National’s flagship housing policy has failed and Labour’s comprehensive housing plan is needed, says Leader of the Opposition ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Pasifika wins big in Auckland elections
    The Labour Party’s Pacific Candidates who stood for local elections in Auckland came out on top with 14 winners, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio. “Our candidates have won seats on one ward, four local boards, two ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Seven7 hikoi to stop sexual violence
    2 weeks ago
  • Road toll passes 2013 total
    The road toll for the year to date has already passed the total for the whole of 2013, raising serious questions about the Government’s underfunding of road safety, says Labour’s Transport spokesperson Sue Moroney.  “According to the Ministry of Transport, ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Bay principals slam charter school decision
    A letter from Hawke’s Bay principals to the Education Minister slams the lack of consultation over the establishment of a charter school in the region and seriously calls into question the decision making going on under Hekia Parata’s watch, says ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government needs to act on voter turnout crisis
    With fewer than 40 per cent of eligible voters having their say in the 2016 local elections, the Government must get serious and come up with a plan to increase voter turnout, says Labour’s Local Government Spokesperson Meka Whaitiri. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Inquiry presents solutions to homelessness – Govt must act
    Labour, the Green Party and the Māori Party are calling on the Government to immediately adopt the 20 recommendations set out in today's Ending Homelessness in New Zealand report. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • A good night for Labour’s local government candidates
    It has been a good night for Labour in the local government elections. In Wellington, Justin Lester became the first Labour mayor for 30 years, leading a council where three out of four Labour candidates were elected. Both of Labour’s ...
    2 weeks ago
  • More contenders for fight clubs
    Allegations of fight clubs spreading to other Serco-run prisons must be properly investigated says Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Minister runs for cover on job losses
    Māori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell’s refusal to show leadership and provide assurances over the future of the Māori Land Court is disappointing, given he is spearheading contentious Maori land reforms which will impact on the functions of the Court, ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwisaver contribution holiday not the break workers were looking for
    The number of working New Zealanders needing to stop Kiwisaver payments is another sign that many people are not seeing benefit from growth in the economy, says Grant Robertson Labour’s Finance spokesperson. "There has been an increase of 14 ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Fight Club failings
    The Corrections Minister must take full responsibility for the widespread management failings within Mt Eden prison, says Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Rethink welcomed
    The Labour Party is pleased that Craig Foss is reconsidering the return of New Zealand soldiers buried in Malaysia, says Labour’s Foreign Affairs spokesperson David Shearer. “For the families of those who lie there, this will a welcome move. The ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Disappointment over UN vote
    Helen Clark showed her characteristic drive and determination in her campaign to be UN Secretary General, and most New Zealanders will be disappointed she hasn't been selected, says the Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little. "Helen Clark has been an ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Māori need answers on Land Court job losses
    Māori landowners, Māori employees and Treaty partners need answers after a Ministry of Justice consultation document has revealed dozens of roles will be disestablished at the Māori Land Court, says Ikaroa-Rāwhiti MP Meka Whaitiri. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Key’s ‘efficiencies’ = DHBs’ pain
          John Key’s talk of ‘efficiencies’ ignores the fact the Government is chronically underfunding health to the tune of $1.7 billion, says Labour’s Acting Health spokesperson Dr David Clark.       ...
    3 weeks ago
  • More than 1,300 schools to face budget cuts
    The latest Ministry of Education figures reveal thousands of schools will face cuts to funding under National’s new operations grant funding model, says Labour's Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Speculation fever spreads around country
    House prices in Wellington, Hamilton and Tauranga are going off as a result of uncontrolled property speculation spilling over from the Auckland market, says Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford.  “Speculators who have been priced out of Auckland are now fanning ...
    3 weeks ago
  • New Zealand lags on aid targets
      The National Government needs to live up to its commitments and allocate 0.7 per cent of Gross National Income on development assistance, says Labour’s spokesperson on Pacific Climate Change Su’a William Sio.  “The second State of the Environment Report ...
    3 weeks ago
  • War on drugs needs more troops
    The Minister of Police must urgently address the number of officers investigating illegal drugs if she is serious about making a dent in the meth trade, says Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash.  “Answers from written questions from the Minister show ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Doctors strike symptom of health cuts
    The notice of strike action issued by the junior doctors today is the result of years of National’s cuts to the health system, says Labour’s Associate Health spokesperson Dr David Clark. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Government starves RNZ into selling Auckland asset
    Just weeks after TVNZ opened its refurbished Auckland head office costing more than $60 million, RNZ (Radio New Zealand) has been forced to put its Auckland office on the market to keep itself afloat, says Labour’s Broadcasting spokesperson Clare Curran. ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Government must be more than a bystander on the economy
    Despite what he might think John Key is not a political commentator, but actually a leader in a Government who needs to take responsibility for the conditions that mean a rise in interest rates, says Labour’s Finance Spokesperson Grant Robertson.  “John ...
    3 weeks ago