web analytics

Time for Turia to go

Written By: - Date published: 7:30 am, December 11th, 2010 - 65 comments
Categories: foreshore and seabed, Maori Issues, maori party - Tags: ,

It’s been a momentous week on the foreshore. Labour announced that it was dropping its support for the Nats’ Marine and Coastal Areas Bill (replacement for the Foreshore and Seabed Act 2004). All indications are that this is not a stunt, but a recognition that the underlying issue is far from resolved, and that Labour is trying to approach it constructively:

Enduring foreshore and seabed solution needed

Labour has today announced it is withdrawing support for the Marine and Coastal Area Bill. “We are now working with other parties to develop an enduring solution that will fully recognise un-extinguished Māori customary rights and title while guaranteeing access to the foreshore and seabed for all New Zealanders,” said Labour Leader Phil Goff.

Here is an opportunity for Maori to move past the current road block, and make genuine progress on their long held goals. In this context I was astounded and utterly disappointed in Tariana Turia’s response. Here it is in full:

Oh my, how the worm has turned

Press Release: The Maori Party
MEDIA STATEMENT
Tariana Turia
Co-Leader, Maori Party

Maori Party Co-Leader Tariana Turia says the Labour Party’s grand announcement they would not support the Marine and Coastal (Takutai Moana) Areas Bill is hypocritical but entirely predictable.

“This is the same party that pushed through the Foreshore and Seabed Act despite receiving massive opposition to the legislation.

“In fact of the 3946 submissions made 94 per cent opposed the Act, not to mention the tens of thousands of people who marched to their doorstep to voice their opposition,” says Mrs Turia.

“This is electioneering at its worst. They seem to think that every Maori is against it but what they don’t realise is that those same people have not forgotten what they did.

“My how the worm has turned – it’s just a shame that they didn’t see fit to follow public sentiment in 2004.”

Mrs Turia says the Labour Party needs to be reminded that the Ministerial Review Panel that undertook a review of their Act received a large number of submissions opposing the Act.

“In fact 85 percent of the submissions were opposed with 10 percent in favour of extensive amendment or repeal.

“Nothing has changed – public opinion to repeal the Foreshore and Seabed Act remains remarkably consistent.

“I am embarrassed for the Labour Party – they are totally without principle and continue to try and fool people by pretending they care,” says Mrs Turia.

“It must be terribly disappointing for Dr Michael Cullen, who used his last press conference as a Member of Parliament to admit, that with the benefit of hindsight, Labour should never have introduced legislation to prevent Maori from going to the Maori Land Court to seek customary title for the foreshore and seabed.

“If the Labour Party really cared about what people thought then they would never have passed the Foreshore and Seabed Act in the first place.”

That response is so blindly driven by petty personal hatred that it is utterly irrational.

Turia hates Labour because of their position on the foreshore in 2004. All the while she is working closely with National, whose position on the foreshore in 2004 was, lest we forget, hysterical press releases about how “Maori Gain Control Of The Beaches”, and a divisive and racist Iwi / Kiwi campaign. Both major parties have obviously moved on since 2004, but Tariana Turia has not.

The cruelest irony is that Turia’s blindness has forced her to become in effect the very thing that she hates. She is now the one defending a law which is in practice the same as Labour’s law. She is now the one defending a position which the majority of Maori reject. She is the one slamming the door shut on initiaitves that could break through the roadblock. She has herself become the biggest obstacle to progress for Maori on the foreshore and seabed. All for hatred.

Does it get any sadder than this? For the good of her party and her people Tariana Turia should step down, and let cooler heads explore new possibilities.

65 comments on “Time for Turia to go ”

  1. sorry r0b – Tariana ridicules labour -the party, and you abuse her – the person. That is bully behaviour – the cause of so many of this countries problems.

    “She is now the one defending a law which is in practice the same as Labour’s law”

    Fuck me r0b – she has said she believes the repeal is progress from the hated F&S Act (do you remember a hikoi r0b, or that even the proponents of that weak law have distanced themselves from it now) and even if we disagree with her it is fair that she can have her view.

    • bbfloyd 1.1

      marty… i find it slightly amusing your defenition of “abuse”. can you clarify exactly how turia is being “abused” in the post?
      as far back as i can remember, turia has been using every opportunity to rubbish and denigrate eveything the labour party has been doing, or saying… to those of us with the ability to recognize such behavior, it has been obvious she has been driven by her own personal visions of grandeur, and resentment of the labour governments insistence that she work within responsible guidelines with a view to governance.
      can you now characterize that last paragraph as “abuse”?

      • marty mars 1.1.1

        “blindly driven by petty personal hatred that it is utterly irrational”

        is that abusive language?

        How about – bbfloyd is blindly driven by petty personal hatred that is utterly irrational.

        sound like a compliment to you?

        • bbfloyd 1.1.1.1

          marty.. sounds like you havn’t got anything else but personal invective to argue with… not particularly relevant or cogent.

          • marty mars 1.1.1.1.1

            why not answer the point – you asked for an example and I gave it and then I contextulised it to emphase the point – what is wrong with that? It wasn’t personal it was an illustration.

        • felix 1.1.1.2

          No marty, that’s not abusive language. Now if that’s all you’ve got then fuck off.

          (That was)

          • marty mars 1.1.1.2.1

            no felix – you fuck off

            or you could give me an example or description of abusive language to show me the error of my ways if you have the gumption.

            • felix 1.1.1.2.1.1

              I just did, moron. Oh look there’s another.

              You claim there’s abuse in the post, it’s up to you to show it – not me.

              Fact is you can’t address the substance of the post so you feign offence, then when called on it you can’t come up with anything to justify the outrage.

              • well I see I’m getting under your skin a bit – I gave the example – you disagree – your bullshit lines won’t work on me felix – the fact is it is you who reacted and can’t back it up.

                • felix

                  meh, perhaps you’re just the most sensitive person in NZ.

                  If you think it’s abusive to describe someone’s motivations as petty or blind then ce la vie. It must be a full time job being offended if that’s your threshold.

          • salsy 1.1.1.2.2

            Take it easy Felix, the Standard should never be a dumbed down community – patting each others backs, how boring. We need to flesh out ideas here, argue them down to bone and get the to truth of the situation. I hate to see a contributor get attacked in such a meaningless way, just for critiqing a post – even with a bit of passsion. Blind ideology is a useless as political apathy.

            • felix 1.1.1.2.2.1

              Are you calling me an ideologue and a back-patter?

              I’m offended and upset and I’m going to go have a cry with marty mars

    • lprent 1.2

      I have to agree with r0b, that press release from Tariana is completely over blown and outright politically stupid.

      In the end any legislation that goes through will require a substantial level of support to make sure it doesn’t become a political football in the future. This round started with widespread support, but simply got too compromised by compromise. This was reflected in the submissions and active hostility towards it by both Maori and pakeha for various reasons. Consequently the political and public support has fallen away to the point that if in the unlikely event that this current bill passes, the law will be perceived as being as illegitimate as the forming Maori Party perceived the F&S to be.

      Tariana points out with malicious glee that this lack of public support is similar to the 2004 bill, but does not seem to apply the lessons that Labour had to learn to her support of the current bill. If there isn’t enough support for the compromises, then don’t persist with a failed approach. Move on.

      I get the impression that Tariana is more interested in the headline that she has overturned labours F&S legislation than actually getting a workable solution. Since the only way that she can get National to support that repeal is to put in new legislation, she will accept any law, unsustainable as it is, to achieve that.

      • burt 1.2.1

        I get the impression that Tariana is more interested in the headline that she has overturned labours F&S legislation than actually getting a workable solution.

        A workable solution…. now that’s an original idea from a lover of self serving govt.

    • Muzza 1.3

      r0b, i have come to expect petty point scoring and unfair analysis from the Standard commentators, nevertheless the MCA bill is far more robust in its creation and far more honest in its intent that the hated 2004 Act. However, i must admit the MCA is roughly similar to the 2004 Act in a practical sense.

      For Maori the primary goal at the moment is repeal of the F&S Act 2004. Whether something is passed to replace the law is a secondary concern.

      But hell r0b, you made a few good points – pity you had to denigrate Turia to make them. Calm down.

      • lprent 1.3.1

        I think that you are indirectly making the same point in your second para as I did in my final paragraph on 1.2. Bearing in mind that F&S legislation will not be repealed until there is a suitable replacement in place. Could you tell me why replacing one unpopular bit of legislation with an even more unpopular peice of legislation is useful? And to whom?

        Apart from the reason I gave that is?

      • bbfloyd 1.3.2

        M.. so you indulge in petty point scoring in order to accuse others of doing just that… bit of a fruedian slip there old chap..

        • Muzza 1.3.2.1

          Indeed bb, emotion may have got the better of me on that occasion.

          lprent, you are right in suggesting we are making similar points – albeit roughly similar. Turia knows that repeal of the 2004 Act is her pass mark – sadly it appears to her what comes after is less important and can be left for future generations.

          Essentially, I think you misunderstand the Maori position. There is no deep dissatisfaction among Maori concerning the content of the MCA bill compared to the anger and contempt that swept Maoridom in 2004, although that anger was directed more at the perceived intent of the government and the way they conducted themselves. I genuinely believe the MCA bill is vastly more popular in comparison. Do you see tens of thousands of Maori marching the streets? Do you see Maori leaders frothing at the mouth in opposition to the bill? No. There is concern and some opposition from iwi leaders who feel they may be short changed e.g. Mark Soloman but the depth of feeling just does not run very deep with this bill.

          Where concern does arise surrounds whether or not customary marine title is sufficient to restore mana whenua and whether the test for CMT is too high – borderline unachievable for iwi and hapu who believe they have a legitimate claim to the foreshore and seabed. Of course Maori are not united in their views but overwhelmingly (I say this from anecdotal experience on Marae etc) Maori support the MCA bill on the grounds that it is an improvement from the 2004 Act in both its content and intent. If Maori see the bill as an improvement then repeal and replacement is justified in my opinion.

    • roger nome 1.4

      Marty – rob like so many others is sick of Turia seeking to discredit any left parties whilst providing John Key’s government a false and tacit endorcement from her constituents – many thousands of Maori. Now – the stats overwhelmingly show that people who vote for the Maori paper want them to work with the labour party, not National. Her and PS have signed an agreement with National which gags them from speaking out against virtually anything politically important that National does. Because they’re not speaking on behalf of thier constituents any more – they’re not fulfilling the role that they were elected to do – therefore they abrogate thier right to call themselves representitives of Maori. Both Turia and Sharpels should go.

      • marty mars 1.4.1

        Kia ora Roger,

        The context of the press release was a response to labour pulling it’s support and therefore it is legitimate to mention labour. I have no love for the right wing agenda and whoever is pushing it and I support opposing those voices at every turn.

        Whether they are representatives of maori is for ballot box to show – and it will – in fact I wish that could be tested now.

      • sweetd 1.4.2

        “Now – the stats overwhelmingly show that people who vote for the Maori paper want them to work with the labour party, not National.”

        What stats?

        • felix 1.4.2.1

          In 2008 the party votes certainly showed that. I’d be interested to know if there are more recent polls on the matter though.

          • Bunji 1.4.2.1.1

            As i recall there was also specifically a poll held shortly after the election of Maori voters that said that… but there’s not been anything since that I’m aware of.

  2. The Voice of Reason 2

    Good call, R0B. Tariana’s tunnel vision has blinded her to the fact that the new law is just the old law with a name change. It changes nothing for maori, but for the Maori Party it’s the end of their relevance.

    My abiding memory of Turia is her waddling into the Whanganui Job Summit and receiving a standing ovation from the pakeha businessmen in the room. They got what she still doesn’t; the Maori Party have been bought fair and square by John Key and their presence in his cabinet is similar to that of an elephant’s head in a hunter’s trophy room.

  3. gingercrush 3

    No you assume Maori are on board with this proposal. You assume this is a genuine proposition from Labour. Basically you’re taking out your arse. I see no iwi or hapu applauding Goff.

    Most of the praise is coming from Act and the Coastal Coalition. That suggests to me what Labour has done has actually done far worse for Maori. You r0b exhibit the same denial where you still believe Labour acted honourably in 2004.

    True conensus requires support from Maori and I’m not seeing that at the moment.

    • bbfloyd 3.1

      G… so where are you looking? up your own arse by the sound of it…

      • gingercrush 3.1.1

        Ok then wise guy please point me to Iwi and Hapu supporting Labour’s move? Go on away you go.

        • bbfloyd 3.1.1.1

          G if you can get your head out of that dark place for a while, you might recognize that my comment relates to your obviously biased sympathies, which lead you to make questionable claims… it is not my job to educate you, or give you opportunities to attempt to bog down any discussion with petty arguments over minutiae. if you wish to interpret the information you have in your own way, then so be it, but don’t act surprised when you get called on it..

        • pollywog 3.1.1.2

          Aren’t Ngati Kahungunu and Ngai Tahu in support of not supporting the bill also, and if Hone is opposing it then he’s prolly got Nga Puhi backing him up too ?

          it seems more like Labour are supporting the groundswell coming from hapu and iwi…

  4. Turia should attempt to stay. If her position is so unpopular – all Labour needs to do is run an effective candidate against her.

  5. Bill 5

    Still reckon the unspoken crux of the matter is the right to exploit resources.

    Under the F&S the right to exploit resources resided with the Crown. Under the Nat scenario, Maori have a veto option on exploitation. In practice, that veto gives Maori leverage to negotiate partnership arrangements.

    So what is it the Labour Party want to in relation to rights of exploitation?

    The formation of a Maori elite who set up companies and who then become the principle beneficiaries of exploitation of resources is not something I favour. But Labour’s idea of investing all decisions around potential exploitation with the Crown is disempowering, not just to ordinary Maori (as is the Nat scenario), but also to Maori elites. If Labour haven’t moved on that detail, then it would explain Turia’s ongoing opposition to Labour on the issue.

    Access, as in can you, I or whoever go to the beach isn’t really the issue as far as those interests are concerned. That’s just a convenient ‘story’ for the public arena. At the end of the day, ordinary Maori and ordinary Pakeha will be sidelined by business interests. The only real question being considered is who will gain control over those business interests…private Pakeha and/or Maori business interests in partnership with the Crown or private Maori business interests in partnership with private Pakeha business interests…

    • Draco T Bastard 5.1

      Still reckon the unspoken crux of the matter is the right to exploit resources.

      Exactly, and it needs to reside with all of us under democratic control.

  6. Draco T Bastard 6

    “In fact of the 3946 submissions made 94 per cent opposed the Act, not to mention the tens of thousands of people who marched to their doorstep to voice their opposition,” says Mrs Turia.

    Doesn’t mean that 94% of the people opposed the act.

  7. r0b 7

    Ahh I knew I was going to get beat up on this one!

    marty mars and others, I apologise for the offence. Two points however. First, it’s hard to write about that press release without mentioning Turia individually by name. That isn’t the Maori Party position — I certainly hope — that is Turia’s position. And second, it wasn’t my intention to attack her as an individual. You can say that pointing out that she is driven by irrational hatred is an attack, if you like, but first tell me if you think that the claim is incorrect.

    And I certainly stand by the point of the post. Turia is now sitting in the very same position that she attacked Labour for in 2004. She’s defending essentially the same law against essentially the same Maori popular unrest. She wanted to be part of the solution, but instead she has become part of the problem. It’s very sad, and I think the best way that she can further her goals is to step down and let calmer heads have a go.

    • Bill 7.1

      She’s defending essentially the same law…

      Nope. Not the same law. This time around, Maori elites get to veto development meaning they get a ‘buy in’ which means they potentially get their hands on lots of filthy lucre.

      • Colonial Viper 7.1.1

        Ahhh, the law makes much more sense now.

      • burt 7.1.2

        which means they potentially get their hands on lots of filthy lucre.

        That’s the crux of the problem isn’t it. If Maori have a chance to manage their own destiny they won’t be voting for more welfare and where will Labour be then ?

        • Zorr 7.1.2.1

          Actually this is a grab by the Maori elite which does very little for the average Maori struggling to raise a family. Try another one burt.

          Perfect captcha: lacking – just like burt

          • burt 7.1.2.1.1

            That be as it may, who are we to tell Maori how they are to manage their own resources and governance structure?

    • Fair enough r0b – IMO it is legitimate to ask whether tariana is an impediment to a lasting solution – I think that is a reasonable question to ask and an understandable position to take.

      She thinks that the repeal gives a forward movement to maori aspirations – I oppose that view and think that it reduces any forward movement. No biggies in all that.

      I can’t say why tariana feels about labour the way she does – but I have noticed she didn’t attack goff or clark and her mention of cullen wasn’t personal against him IMO.

      • Lew 7.2.1

        marty, I can. Cullen’s personal statement aside, Labour haven’t ever come out and said the FSA was bad law born out of bad process. Perhaps it’s because (like certain commentators around here, notably micky savage) they continue to labour (heh) under a delusion that it’s good law born out of good process; but in my view the reason is that they simply haven’t got an alternative. I hope that what we’ve seen this week indicates a change on that front.

        L

  8. Name 8

    The Maori Party is as valid, and ridiculous, as a “People called Jim” Party.

    “Mr. Speaker, I represent everyone called Jim and on their behalf vote for/against this piece of legislation.”

    • Lew 8.1

      To the extent that people called Jim vote for them, they’re dead right. That’s who the māori party represents: people who vote for them. Who happen to make up a majority of those voting in five out of seven Māori electorates.

      No more stupid than the National and Labour parties both claiming to represent “hard-working Kiwis”.

      L

      • Marty G 8.1.1

        actually, they didn’t win the party vote in any seat, did they? (checking -no)

        The true Maori Party is the Labour Party because more Maori vote Labour than any other party.

        Maybe it should be called ‘the Five Individuals with Local Mana Party’

        • Im still trying to find out who” her people are ” that she keeps mentioning . Its certainly not the main stream Maori as they gave their party vote to Labour, by a huge majority.To tell the truth this woman gives me the creeps ,I would not trust her for one moment. As for Sharples well he is just her poodle.

        • Lew 8.1.1.2

          That’s largely down to smart tactical voting in those electorates — partly the awareness that party votes would be wasted since they were already looking to get 4+ MPs without them; and partly a hedge and (as you say) a signal to the leadership as to preference. Party vote indicates who you want in government; electorate vote indicates who you want working for you locally. Tariana and Pita Sharples disregarded that signal, and may yet pay a high price for doing so. Fair enough if they do.

          L

    • Jim Nald 8.2

      say wot?

  9. Lew 9

    r0b, I also think you’ve laid it on a bit thick but I see where you’re heading. However in Tariana’s defence Labour still haven’t really resiled from the FSA — and in fact they still spend a lot of their time defending it. While National aren’t much better in policy terms, and are showing a similar reluctance to make meaningful concessions, they have changed direction considerably since Iwi/Kiwi and are at least prepared to work with the māori party.

    On present form neither party is a friend of Māori. So while Labour has an opportunity to demonstrate that they’ve changed, I don’t think a little cynicism is unreasonable. But ultimately your reasoning is right: if Turia stands in the way of genuine progress, she should be punished in the court of public opinion and at the ballot box.

    L

  10. Bored 10

    I am sort of reminded of Nero fiddling whilst Rome burned. But who is playing Nero?

  11. dave 11

    That isn’t the Maori Party position — I certainly hope — that is Turia’s position.
    It was a Maori Party media release, not a Tariana Turia media release. Could you explain why Labour wants to reinstate the the right to go to court to test claims to the foreshore and seabed after passing a bill that prevented it?

    • r0b 11.1

      Because people can learn in six years? Honestly, that’s a pretty stupid question if you accept National’s much more extensive flip flop on the issue.

    • Bunji 11.2

      Any press release Turia makes will be a Maori Party press release – it doesn’t mean the rest of the party agree with it (although it does make it hard for them to resile from it)

      On election night 2008 Turia said she was just going to do one more term, because she wanted to spend more time with her mokopuna – does that position still hold, or has she got that taste for power now?

  12. MrSmith 12

    “It must be terribly disappointing for Dr Michael Cullen, who used his last press conference as a Member of Parliament to admit, that with the benefit of hindsight, Labour should never have introduced legislation to prevent Maori from going to the Maori Land Court to seek customary title for the foreshore and seabed.”

    Someone enlighten me please as to what this statement is all about, I though Labour just announced they would let the courts decide if re-elected?

  13. noironyintended 13

    If Labour was serious about making amends for one of the worst race relations disasters in recent times then they would stop cozying up to the Maori Party and work with ACT who know even more about what Maori want than Labour.

    • Alexandra 13.1

      I agree with Rob,
      Turia’s outburst are indicative of her hatred of Labour generally, and this one is no exception, Turia’s silence and indeed support of this governments actions, that are detrimental to most Maori, is what I find to be irrational . How she can demonstrate such patience and tolerance towards the nats and yet hold such a short fuse for Labour, generally speaking? Perhaps she’s inherently tory at heart and her outbursts are part of an enduring campaign to assist the nats stay in power. Turia underestimates her own people, most of whom, want to see the back end of this government and this will be reflected at the ballot box next year. I’m guessing Turia will perfer to stay around as long as the nats are in power, and will step aside when that changes.

      • Anne 13.1.1

        “Perhaps she’s inherently tory at heart and her outbursts are part of an enduring campaign to assist the nats stay in power.”

        That’s the truth in a nutshell. Turia is fundamentally a Tory and Labour made a big mistake encouraging her to stand as a candidate for them in the first place.

        captcha: relevant. That thing is spooky.

  14. peterlepaysan 14

    Labour blocked Maori access to Courts over customary title issues regarding the foreshore and sea bed.

    The rights or wrongs of this action are,clearly,debatable.

    There are many, regardless of political allegiance, or racial affiliation, who thought the issue should have been able to be taken to Court. There are equally many,regardless of racial or political connections who think otherwise.

    This is going to be a long debate.

    Goff is quite right in saying the proposed legislation is not durable.

    Ironic that he and his colleagues enacted the existing legislation. Sigh.

    • Anne 14.1

      “Ironic that he and his colleagues enacted the existing legislation. Sigh.”

      Yes it is ironic, but at least they owned up to their mistake earlier this year. I guess they deserve brownie points for that.

    • millsy 14.2

      Yes, god forbid that New Zealanders should have the right to access the beach without a bunch of rich iwi elites petitioning the courts to lock up vast swathes of the recreational estates. If people like you had your way all the beaches and the parks and lakes and moutains would be owned be iwi elite who will charge big bucks to access.

      The court system does not exist to deprive new zealanders of their recrational birthright,

  15. George,com 15

    An opinion of mine is that this issue will probably only be fully sorted when the like of Turia, Goff etc have retired. The same goes for Labour-MP relations. Turia has too much bitterness to welcome warm relations with Labour. Clark going fixed one of the relationship issues, Turia is a blockage. When she retires the next leadership of the MP may be able to build stronger ties. It is still all too personal for her.

  16. daveg 16

    I think Labour need to face some cold hard reality. They let Maori down badly when enacting the original legislation and ended up looked like the ‘rednecks’ they purport to dislike, although I’ve never been convinced of that, given the demographic of support they have. Its bad politics to do this, example – Winston Peters. The simple reason its bad politics, is that NO-ONE CARES ANY MORE”. The divisions in this country are made by politicians and their knee-jerk reactions. The Foreshore and Seabed Act was one of the worst pieces of legislation in this genre and to deny culpability is to live in vastly delusional world.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • NZ secures new Pfizer COVID-19 medicine
    New Zealand has secured supplies of another medicine to treat COVID-19, Health Minister Andrew Little announced today. “In October, New Zealand was one of the first countries in the world to make an advance purchase of a promising new antiviral drug, molnupiravir,” Andrew Little said. “Today I am pleased to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Strong Pipeline for Construction Sector
    Strong pipeline ahead for the construction sector Infrastructure activity forecast to reach $11.2 billion in 2026 Construction sector now the fourth biggest employer with more than 280 000 people working in the industry Residential construction the largest contributor to national construction activity. Minister for Building and Construction Poto Williams says ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Regenerative agriculture research receives Government boost
    The Government continues to invest in farm sustainability, this time backing two new research projects to investigate the impacts of regenerative farming practices, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. Soil health and regenerative agriculture “We’re contributing $2.8 million to a $3.85 million five-year project with co-investment by Synlait Milk and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • David McLean appointed as KiwiRail chair
    David McLean has been appointed as Chair of KiwiRail Holdings Ltd, the Minister for State Owned Enterprises Dr David Clark and Minister of Finance Grant Robertson announced today. “Minister Clark and I are confident that David’s extensive business knowledge and leadership experience, including his time as former Chief Executive and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Ambassador to Turkey announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Zoe Coulson-Sinclair as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Turkey. “Aotearoa New Zealand and Turkey’s relationship is one of mutual respect and underpinned by our shared Gallipoli experience,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “Turkey is also a generous ANZAC Day host and has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Announcement of new Consul-General in Guangzhou
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Rachel Crump as New Zealand’s next Consul-General in Guangzhou, China. “China is one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s most significant relationships – it is our largest trading partner, and an influential regional and global actor,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “As the capital of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government marks International Day of Persons with Disabilities
    The Government joins the disabled community of Aotearoa New Zealand in marking and celebrating the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Minister for Disabilty Issues Carmel Sepuloni said. The theme for this year’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities is “Leadership and participation of persons with disabilities toward an inclusive, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Deputy Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, and Advisory panel member appointed
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced the appointments of Graeme Speden as the Deputy Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, and Ben Bateman as a member of the Inspector-General’s Advisory Panel.  “These are significant roles that assist the Inspector-General with independent oversight of New Zealand’s intelligence agencies,” Jacinda Ardern said. “While ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Five million COVID-19 tests processed
    Associate Minister of Health, Dr Ayesha Verrall has congratulated testing teams right around New Zealand for reaching the five million tests milestone. Today, an additional 31,780 tests were processed, taking the total since the beginning of the pandemic in 2020 to 5,005,959. “This really is an incredible and sustained team ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Funding for extra ICU capacity
    Care for the sickest New Zealanders is getting a major boost from the Government, with plans to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on expanding intensive care-type services, Health Minister Andrew Little announced today. “Through good planning, we have avoided what the COVID-19 pandemic has done in some countries, where ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • “THE LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ZEALAND’S FIGHT AGAINST COVID.”
    Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • The legal and constitutional implications of New Zealand’s fight against COVID
    Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Pharmac Review interim report released
    Health Minister Andrew Little has released an interim report by an independent panel reviewing the national pharmaceuticals-buying agency Pharmac. Pharmac was established in 1993 and is responsible for purchasing publicly funded medicines for New Zealanders, including those prescribed by GPs or administered in hospitals. The review, chaired by former Consumer ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Appointment to Network for Learning board
    Former MP Clare Curran has been appointed to the board of Crown company Network for Learning (N4L), Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. Hon Clare Curran served as a Member of Parliament for Dunedin South from 2008-2010. During this time, she held a number of ministerial portfolios including Broadcasting, Communications and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Putting home ownership within reach of Pacific Aotearoa
    Pacific community groups and organisations will get tools to help them achieve home ownership with the implementation of the Ministry for Pacific Peoples (MPP) Pacific Housing Initiative, said Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio. In July 2021, MPP launched the Pacific Community Housing Provider Registration Support programme and the Pacific ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Coastal shipping will help keep New Zealand’s supply chain buoyant
    Transport Minister Michael Wood today welcomed the release of the Coastal Shipping Investment Approach State-of-Play report as an important step towards a more sustainable coastal shipping sector, which will further diversify New Zealand’s supply chain. “This Government is committed to strengthening our domestic supply chain by making coastal shipping a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Response to Human Rights Commission's reports into violence towards disable people
    Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa.   Thank you for that introduction Hemi and thank you for inviting me to respond on behalf of Government to the release of these two important reports (Whakamanahia Te Tiriti, Whakahaumarutia te Tangata -Honour the Treaty, Protect the Person and Whakamahia te Tūkino kore ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Law change strengthens petroleum decommissioning regulation
    Petroleum permit and licence holders operating in New Zealand will now have an explicit statutory requirement to carry out and fund the decommissioning of oil and gas fields after a new law was given Royal assent today, says Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods. Once in effect The Crown ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Zealand Response to assist peace and stability in Solomon Islands
    The New Zealand government has announced that it will deploy Defence Force and Police personnel to Honiara to help restore peace and stability. “New Zealand is committed to its responsibilities and playing its part in upholding regional security,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.  “We are deeply concerned by the recent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Continued growth in volume of new home consents
    In the year ended October 2021, 47,715 new homes were consented, up 26 per cent from the October 2020 year. In October 2021, 4,043 new dwellings were consented Canterbury’s new homes consented numbers rose 31% to higher than post-earthquake peak. New home consents continue to reach remarkable levels of growth, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Saddle up for summer with cycle trail funding
    New investment will keep the best of New Zealand’s cycle trails in top condition as regions prepare to welcome back Kiwi visitors over summer and international tourists from next year. “Cycle tourism is one of the most popular ways to see the country ‘off the beaten track’ but the trails ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Zealand provides additional funding to COVAX for vaccine delivery
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced additional funding will be provided to COVAX to support vaccine delivery in developing countries. “New Zealand remains cognisant of the dangers of COVID-19, especially as new variants continue to emerge. No one is safe from this virus until we all are and this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • COVID-19 Community fund providing support for 160 organisations focused on women and girls
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today announced financial support will be allocated to the 160 successful applicants for the COVID-19 Community Fund, to support organisations helping women/wāhine and girls/kōtiro in Aotearoa New Zealand affected by the pandemic. “COVID-19 has had a disproportionate effect on women around the world including in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government delivers reactivation package as Aucklanders reconnect for summer
    A new support package will help revive economic, social and cultural activities in our largest city over summer, and ensure those in hardship also get relief. The Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni and the Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash have announced a Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Mobile services and broadband come to Chatham Islands for first time
    World class mobile and broadband services have been switched on for the 663 residents of the Chatham Islands, Minister for the Digital Economy and Communications, David Clark and Minister for Economic and Regional Development, Stuart Nash announced today. “This eagerly awaited network will provide fast broadband and mobile services to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Crown accounts reflect strong economy amid pandemic
    The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect an economy that has performed better than expected, despite the latest Delta COVID-19 outbreak. The Crown accounts for the four months to the end of October factors in the improved starting position for the new financial year. Core Crown tax revenue was $2.5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Applications open for new 2021 Resident Visa
    The first round of applications for New Zealand’s new 2021 Resident visa open today (6am). “This one-off pathway provides certainty for a great many migrant families who have faced disruption because of COVID-19 and it will help retain the skills New Zealand businesses need to support the economic recovery,” Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • More Vietnam Veterans to receive compensation for Agent Orange Exposure
    Minister for Veterans, the Hon Meka Whaitiri announced today that two new conditions associated with Agent Orange exposure have been added to the Prescribed Conditions List. Under the 2006 Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Crown and representatives of Vietnam veterans and the Royal New Zealand RSA. Vietnam veterans in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government commits to international effort to ban and regulate killer robots
    Minister of Disarmament and Arms Control Phil Twyford announced today that New Zealand will push for new international law to ban and regulate autonomous weapons systems (AWS), which once activated can select and engage targets without further human intervention. “While the evidence suggests fully autonomous weapons systems are not yet ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New freedom camping rules – right vehicle, right place
    Tougher freedom camping laws will be introduced to prevent abuse which has placed an unfair burden on small communities and damaged our reputation as a high quality visitor destination. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has confirmed that new legislation will be introduced to Parliament following an extensive round of public consultation ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government invests to support a classic Kiwi summer
    Vaccinated New Zealanders can look forward to Kiwi summer events with confidence, while artists and crew will have more certainty, following the launch of details of the Arts and Culture Event Support Scheme, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “The Government recognises that the arts and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Grace period for expired driver licences cruises into 2022
    Due to the ongoing Delta outbreak and extended lockdowns, all New Zealand driver licences and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will now be valid until 31 May 2022, Transport Minister Michael Wood announced today. “This further extension to the validity of driver licenses recognises that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Delivered: 1,000 extra transitional homes
    A further 1,000 transitional homes delivered  New housing development starts in Flaxmere, Hastings  The Government has delivered the next 1,000 transitional housing places it promised, as part of its work to reduce homelessness. Housing Minister Dr Megan Woods is marking the milestone in Hastings at a new development that includes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Traffic light levels announced
    The levels at which different parts of New Zealand will move forward into the COVID-19 Protection Framework this Friday have been announced. Northland, Auckland, Taupō and Rotorua Lakes Districts, Kawerau, Whakatane, Ōpōtiki Districts, Gisborne District, Wairoa District, Rangitikei, Whanganui and Ruapehu Districts will move in at Red The rest of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Financial support to move to traffic light system
    A new transition payment will be made available particularly for affected businesses in Auckland, Waikato and Northland to acknowledge the restrictions they have faced under the higher Alert Levels. Transition payment of up to $24,000 as businesses move into traffic light system Leave Support Scheme and Short Term Absence Payment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Ambassador to Russia announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Sarah Walsh as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Russia. “Aotearoa New Zealand and Russia have a long-standing relationship, engaging on a range of regional and global interests including disarmament and Antarctica issues. We also work together as members of the East ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Permanent Representative to the UN announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Carolyn Schwalger as Permanent Representative to the New Zealand Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York. “Aotearoa New Zealand is a founding member of the UN and we have worked hard to ensure our stance on human rights, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Further COVID-19 economic support for Cook Islands and Fiji announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced a further package of support for the Cook Islands and Fiji for COVID-19 economic support and recovery. “Aotearoa New Zealand remains committed to supporting our Pacific fanau and vuvale to respond to the impacts of COVID-19 on their economies, and move towards long-term ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New law will clear the air for tamariki in vehicles
    From today, it’s illegal to smoke or vape in most vehicles carrying children aged under 18 years old - whether the vehicle is moving or not. “Second-hand smoke poses an unacceptable risk to our tamariki and rangatahi,” Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall said. “We know children in vehicles ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Nine countries designated very high risk
    Nine southern African countries are being added to the very high risk countries list following public health advice around the newly discovered COVID-19 variant Omicron, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said. This afternoon, a public health risk assessment was carried out to assess the emerging evidence and any risk to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago