Unemployment worse than it looks

Written By: - Date published: 3:30 pm, August 9th, 2012 - 67 comments
Categories: economy, jobs, national - Tags: ,

How’s John Key’s aggressive recovery going? Not so good:

New Zealand’s unemployment rate unexpectedly rose in the second quarter as the pool of jobs shrank for the time since December 2010.

The unemployment rate increased 0.1 percentage points to 6.8 percent, the highest since June 2010, according to Statistics New Zealand’s household labour force survey.

Economists surveyed by Reuters were expecting the headline rate to come down to 6.5 percent.

That’s bad enough, but read the fine print and the picture is even worse:

Auckland’s unemployment rate fell to 7.3 percent as more people stopped looking for work…

People are giving up, the real situation is worse than the figures suggest (worth remembering next time there is a minor “improvement” in the official rate). Just how many more years of the Nats’ economic “genius” do you want NZ?

67 comments on “Unemployment worse than it looks ”

  1. Moreen 1

    This is not the true number, so many unemployed don’t get to register because even after working for 35 years they are not intitled to a benefit so do not appear in the statistics. A win/ win for the government

  2. Socialist Paddy 2

    Key was on radio calling it a “technical increase”. The bastard should say that to the 2,400 extra unemployed people. And he should tell the 160,000 currently unemployed people what he is doing to get them work.

    • locus 2.1

      rwnj ideology. Maintain unemployment level high enough to ensure sufficient desperation to keep wages low. Put on a show of hiring 25 people in Christchurch to hide total lack of concern. Blame the unemployed for ‘poor’ choices or laziness.then swan off business class to be entertained by your mates in Vegas.

      • McFlock 2.1.1

        I seem to recall in the late 80s and through the 90s that tories were talking about NAIRU (Non-Accelerating Inflation Rate of Unemployment) of 6-8%?
               
        Probably pure coincidence that that’s what we see when National are in charge. 

        • bad12 2.1.1.1

          True, it is not often that anyone addresses the economics of unemployment and the relationship of killing off demand in an economy thus ‘creating’ unemployment is understood by very few,

          Needless to say, without addressing the ‘Chicago School of Economics’ premise on using unemployment as a ‘tool’ in defeating inflationary pushes in an economy, while demand is stifled
          the Reserve Bank will hold or lower the interest rate on money borrowed,

          Given that a 2% rise in the cash rate would make the median mortgage payments rise by a third its so very easy to see why unemployment is allowed to occur,

          Of course the simple ‘fix’ to that is for the Government to become the ‘lender’ thus having the ability to not only produce the money,(if necessary),but also having the ability to also ‘fix’ the interest rates at an appropriate level…

        • rosy 2.1.1.2

          Probably pure coincidence that that’s what we see when National are in charge

          Yeah, coincidence.

          Funny how they seem surprised. What I’m ‘surprised’ about is how New Zealand’s economy is close to recession when it’s major trading partners are not. Notice half of Europe is still growing (albeit slowly), with lower rates of unemployment, despite the Eurocrisis*. Look out when our major trading partners fall over is all I can say.

          *when does a crisis stop being a crisis and become chronic?

            • Rose 2.1.1.2.1.1

              Fascinating. People might be happier too going back to smaller communities and moving away from consumerism.

          • McFlock 2.1.1.2.2

            Personally, I love the terror of inflation as the “rust” of an economy.
                    
            Inflation only affects you badly if you hold onto money.
            If you hold onto goods, and skills, and things of worth, then they gain nominal value.
                   
            Sure, hyperinflation screws the pooch, but 6-8% unemployment is more damaging to the general welfare of the nation than 6-8% inflation. 

            • rosy 2.1.1.2.2.1

              The thing is they can break the link between inflation and unemployment if the will to do so was there, but it isn’t – doesn’t fit the ideology. There’e no way to get a casualised workforce if the unemployment rate is low.

          • Georgecom 2.1.1.2.3

            Abot 2008 onward Rosy. Don’t expect the current bunch to have any idea of this though.

        • Draco T Bastard 2.1.1.3

          Yep, the Tories don’t believe in employment rates above 94% and the reason is to keep wages low.

    • Hami Shearlie 2.2

      Aren’t his turns of phrase fascinating SP? I’m sure the “technical increase” is all down to our “dinnimik environment”!!

      • rosy 2.2.1

        the ‘dinnimik enviroment’ causes a decrease in the employment rate – not an increase in unemployment. Language people! or CT will be on to you.

    • Mooloo magic 2.3

      I also heard Key’s comments , the PM will not tolerate bad news , Why is he so popular when he is such recidivist liar. Why are his often glib or
      disingenuous remarks invariably remain unchallenged . Where is Labour? they too often miss the opportunity to challenge Key. I guess too busy trying to destroy Cunnliffe.
      I despair we have a cruel callous government and the main opposition party that rather attack each puget then the government

      • muzza 2.3.1

        No we have a parliamentary system that is controlled on all sides, thats whats happening to Labour, its not bloody rocket science

      • Roy 2.3.2

        I think Key is popular with some people exactly because he refuses to acknowledge bad news, just Ronnie Reagan was popular with some people because he was eternally optimistic, unlike the more intellectually honest Jimmy Carter who preceded him. Some people seem to like a benignly smiling leader who tells them everything is just fine, and refuse to consider the evidence that he is lying through his teeth.

  3. mike e 3

    No he’s not he’s going to get them to join gangs and go to Australia.

  4. bad12 4

    National’s score for economic success remains at a lowly F for Failed, teacher says little Johnny must concentrate more on the basics,

    A note on the bottom of little Johnny’s school report notes that He must stop lying to the rest of the class….

  5. Vicky32 5

    I’ll just say what I said on FB – ironically, I had not worked all year until last week, and now I have more offers – it’ll amount to 3-4 weeks in all! But it is a solution (in my personal case)? Is it hecks as like!
    It’s still all casual. The call centre has not asked me back after the first week.
    A day here, a day there – it’s better only by contrast with a complete nothing which is what I’ve had from January to July – (not counting 4 days in April-May).
    In Italy, we’re called ‘i precari’, and in Italy we protest. Why not here?

    • Tiger Mountain 5.1

      Precarious ‘employment’ is a worry world over. Friend of mine has just gone to work for the IUF cited at start of this brief piece.

    • Dr Terry 5.2

      People actively protest in many countries, and they wonder at the incredible passivity of New Zealanders. “Opposition” parties (Labour more than others) encourage passivity by example. With no hearty opposition, nothing will ever change for the better. Key loves to keep the populace as a pack of dummies. Maybe that is what we are!! Shearer is almost tripping over himself to be obliging to the Great Master (Key), and that is exactly the way Key always wanted it. He would hate to be obliged to deal with Cunliffe (or the like), who is much too intelligent for him (and for his own party). Dumb, dumb, dumb.
      Those who want not to remain dumb are flocking to fairer fields, and that too suits Key and his lot (helps keep down unemployment figures. Just great!) But I hope that I am not being too “technical”for our Glorious Leader. Dumb, dumb, dumb!

      • rosy 5.3.1

        ah, thanks… I knew there must be a word for it apart from casualisation (which confused people who have self-chosen labour market flexibility).
        Definition:

        Precarity is a general term to describe how large parts of the population are being subjected to flexible exploitation or flexploitation (low pay, high blackmailability, intermittent income, etc.), and existential precariousness (high risk of social exclusion because of low incomes, welfare cuts, high cost of living, etc.) The condition of precarity is said to affect all of service sector labor in a narrow sense, and the whole of society in a wider sense, but particularly youth, women, and immigrants.

        Actually I’d put unskilled labourers in that list as well.

  6. infused 6

    Look outside of NZ. There is no growth, anywhere.

      • infused 6.1.1

        :rollseyes:

      • bad12 6.1.2

        Not exactly a holiday in Cambodia but in the vicinity is Mongolia basking in the economic sunshine of a massive 17.3% ‘growth’,

        For fun in the sun closer to home you just cannot go past Timor-Leste registering an impressive 10.6% ‘growth’, perhaps we could trade Ministers of Finance with them,

        Much of this of course depends upon what baseline the growth is measured from, the fact that here in Godsown we are still borrowing at 300 million bucks a week makes our current rate of growth meaningless as we are still behind where we were prior to the latest ‘event’ in capitalism’s slow train-wreck of self destruction…

        • UpandComer 6.1.2.1

          Interesting countries to choose. You will get impressive growth when you are coming out of years of war (Timor-Leste). For instance, businesses aren’t getting blown up.

          Haha and again a wonderful choice – guess what is driving their growth? 95% of it is fuelled (pun) by petroleum. Natural gas and oil.

          http://www.foreignpolicy.com/timor/content/economics/this_is_what_reform_is_about.php

          Mongolia. Great choice. Guess what is driving Mongolia’s growth?

          Primarily it’s coal. Then gold, iron ore, copper and crude oil. Then agriculture. Also some tin in there. Haha and of course, it’s banking industry is thriving.

          http://moneymorning.com/2012/03/15/investing-in-mongolia-is-it-time-to-buy-the-worlds-fastest-growing-economy/

          http://www.eurasiac.com/files/research_note/Mongolia_Outlook_2020.pdf

          So, if the Mongolian finance Minister turned up in NZ, what would Labour’s reaction be to him emulating that growth in NZ, by seeking to vastly expand our mining, banking, and agriculture?

          • Colonial Viper 6.1.2.1.1

            Those countries are being mined out by foreign multinationals, and their populations garnering only a tiny fraction of the value of the resources.

            But that’s usual neolib corporate practice and I’m sure you are OK with it.

            • UpandComer 6.1.2.1.1.1

              It’s not a tiny fraction. The projection is for Mongolia’s GDP per capita to increase from 2500 per person to over 10000 by 2020. That wealth by definition is not travelling off-shore. That growth will give them the impetus they need to move into a more sustainable commodity based economy or non-commodity based.

              Timor-Leste is also very militant in ensuring the wealth stays in the country, but realistic about the foreign investment needed to exploit it.

              The point is that the huge growth of these two countries is being driven by precisely the policies that Labour and the Greens disparage, and the unreasonable ideological opposition just seems really really silly to me, and most of Labour’s traditional constituents.

              • Draco T Bastard

                And once all the resources are gone the people of both countries will still be in poverty. A few people will be very well off though – for a short while.

          • bad12 6.1.2.1.2

            Aha, just my little attempt at levity, Rwanda also has quite high ‘growth’ figures i am sure no real damage would be done if we were to swap Finance Ministers with that country…

            • Colonial Viper 6.1.2.1.2.1

              Notice digging shit up to fuel the inefficient consumer junk devouring west is what the neolibs are left with now.

              That and monetary and financial market rorts on a massive scale.

            • McFlock 6.1.2.1.2.2

              Quite a few developed nations are outperforming NZ, too. 

              • rosy

                Yep – I compare Austria with NZ everyday – similar population, relies on a larger neighbour, fairly decent agricultural base with limited extractive industries and a potential problem with debt.

                How in the middle of the Eurozone crisis (that NZ is barely exposed to, no matter how many times Key and English use it as an excuse) does Austria have a better GDP than New Zealand, and lower unemployment? Without inflation getting out of control?

                A rhetorical question, of course, but it bugs me to see people being looked after in Austria and dumped into precarity in New Zealand. They certainly don’t use the Austrian School of Economics for the economic template in Austria!

                • bad12

                  Nah, the grad students just made all that up and exported it so they could have a laugh at anyone stupid enough to actually use it,

                  Guess who…

                • UpandComer

                  If you compare Austria’s and New Zealand’s GDP profiles, you will see that since 1990 we have come out ahead the majority of years.

                  Their growth from 2000-2008 was lower then ours on average. As a result of our 90’s reforms, our growth in this period was high, and potentially could have been very high but for well, you know what.

                  They were like us in 2009 – negative 3% +.

                  If you look at 2000-2010 our economy has performed much better then Austria, at least certainly until 2005 when Micheal Cullen’s solid managment was overridden by Helen.

                  Austria is utterly different to us in almost every way aside from population.

                  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/au.html

                  Also they don’t just rely like we do on one state like Australia, because of where they are they can export to these places:

                  http://www.advantageaustria.org/international/zentral/business-guide-oesterreich/exportieren-nach-oesterreich/zahlen-und-fakten/wirtschaft/aussenwirtschaft.en.html

                  Note they can get to the US, because they have ties going all the way back to the Marshall plan and their exports don’t offend America’s execrable farming lobby.

                  They are a service economy, we are an agricultural economy. The former is a bit easier to run when you are in the middle of Europe, surrounded by powerful economies on every side. They are also an industrial/manufacturing economy – again pretty different situation for us and them.

                  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/au.html

                  You will note that National actually did some of the same things as Austria to lessen unemployment – such as subsidize employers so they would retain and hire in 2009.

                  Austria has a good welfare state, I’m not going to disagree with that at all. Their per capita GDP is 42000, ours is 29000. They can afford their excellent welfare state. We actually can’t afford one. I’d like us to be able to afford one without taxing everyone 50% of their earnings.

                  But thanks for pointing me to Austria. I need to think about this some more. I admit I don’t have all the answers at all, but I think we can do better then Austria, and will do better then Austria.

                  • rosy

                    Yeah, it was a rhetorical question, I know some similarities are superficial but it does have some pretty strong structural adjustments it’s making to keep ahead. As for lack of massive growth in the good times, I think there’s more interest in stability – so in the coming low/nil growth environment I think they may be a jump or two ahead of the pack. (notice all the ‘I thinks’ – I’m working on improving that to ‘I understand’)

                    Some of those differences between NZ and Austria are because they didn’t take on the neo-liberal stuff in the ’80s. I’m quite interested in how some of he more regulated market economies have survived the downturn. As Merkel said to Blair when he asked why Germany was doing better she said we still make things.

                    If you really are interested in why their labour market survived take a look at the Labour Market Promotion Act. A couple of sources that might be useful are:
                    Labour market policy (.pdf)
                    – why Austria survived the recession with relatively low unemployment (.pdf).
                    Chamber of Labour

                    Some things I’ve noticed:
                    – Unions are voluntary, but with high membership rates
                    – Belonging to the Chamber of Labour, a policy think tank for employees, is compulsory.
                    – long-term unemployed are re-trained – quickly.
                    – government policy is analysed for impacts on employment and adjusted if needs be.
                    – job subsidisation as required
                    – collectively agreed (not legislated) minimum wages cover 98% of the workforce
                    – technical training
                    – support for small industries and little outsourcing

                    Some of the policies are ones that the left in NZ objects to, but in Austria there are employee safeguards e.g. union/labour council interaction (these safeguards are not the bits of policy picked up by NZ).

                    A personal observation from living here is that employees also take their status seriously – in Vienna, the May Day parades are amazing – the city turns red, and it’s not just protests – it’s a recognition from all sectors of society of the importance of the labour movement. There doesn’t appear to be a conflict between employers and employees at the strategic level. Although they might piss each other off on the detail, they generally understand the need to accommodate each others interests. Anyway just a little hobby of mine to note the differences and similarities.

                    • UpandComer

                      You live in Austria? That must be a great experience.

                      Your post led me to hours of research on Austria. I’ve never compared them with us before.

                      I now know an awful lot about the Austrian system of welfare, tax system, health system, and economy. Cheers.

                    • rosy

                      I do, and yes, it’s a fantastic experience. I’m hoping when I go home I can transfer some of the best bits of the way of life with me. First up will be no personal car and no shopping on Sundays, but I’ll so enjoy getting back to a NZ coffee :-).

                    • UpandComer

                      Hmm. Sorry last comment. I’m on a proletariat night shift watching the goods of the usurious wealthy. The masses seem quiet. The purloined goods under my watchful eye remain undisturbed by any righteous revolutionary (nah I can’t do Chris Trotter, but that’s what I’m actually doing).

                      I think the difference between Austria (Or any generic successful European welfare state) and our own is productivity, and I’m not convinced that the welfare state necessarily compels that productivity. In my view it has to come first, otherwise we get the situation in 2009 with -4% GDP and no return to surplus.

                      The reason I say that is because in reviewing our growth since 1980 I’ve been doing a lot of reading regarding our economy before the infamous mother of all budgets.

                      We certainly had a welfare state prior to Ruth Richardson’s budget. But it didn’t look like Austria’s.

                      In 1991 we only had 80000 more full-time workers then welfare recipients.
                      All of NZ’s PAYE tax was insufficient to cover our welfare payments.
                      A full one third of everything the country could spend had to be spent on welfare.
                      Unemployment was 11%
                      In 1986 when our welfare state was in full flow inflation was 15%
                      Our top marginal rate in 1991 was 66% at 38 thousand! So naturally the tax take was low.
                      We had 330 thousand strike days in 1990. In Austria they don’t seem to strike much. I actually will side with NZ workers here. I’m constantly amazed by the Dilbert middle management, but we couldn’t ‘get on’ with all those strikes.
                      I know I’m leaving a bit out, but ultimately I hope if we do have an attempt to create a real welfare state again, that it looks like Austria’s, and not New Zealand’s in 1991. In order for us to get there, we need to up our GDP per capita so it looks like Austria’s. To do that we need money for education. To do that, we need to mine and change the CGT etc.

                    • UpandComer

                      I always remember that scene in Indiana Jones, when Harrison Ford is about to be shot. The Nazi oberlutant comes forward and strikes him in the face and says ‘zis is how ve say goodbye in germany’. Then the Blonde Austrian beauty comes forward and gives him a sultry kiss and says ‘and zis is how we say goodbye in Austria’. Han solo quips ‘I like the Austrian way better’. Austria seems like a warmer, fuzzier, less odd sense of humour Germany. My cousin’s family had an Austrian demi-pere living with them, and she was lovely and said goodbye to me the Austrian way 🙂 I hope I can go there one day.

                    • rosy

                      Argh I don’t envy you for the nightshift!

                      I don’t think it’s an either/for GDP growth and the welfare state. As for productivity, New Zealand’s is pretty high in terms of labour output. Of more importance is capital and innovation – we’re pretty low on investment-driven productivity. I also think you need to look back to the 1970s oil shocks, and loss of Britain as a major trading partner for what went wrong in the 1980s that led to all that industrial unrest and the takeover by the 1st ACT government. In this, a comparison with how Australia dealt with the shocks can be informative. Australia never had a neo-liberal turn either.

                      Anyway – I appreciate the thought-provoking chat… and I hope no-one disturbs your daytime sleep.

                    • Draco T Bastard

                      I also think you need to look back to the 1970s oil shocks, and loss of Britain as a major trading partner for what went wrong in the 1980s that led to all that industrial unrest and the takeover by the 1st ACT government.

                      The collapse actually started in the 1960s, worsened through the 70s with the final collapse in the 80s. Effectively the Keynesian means of propping up capitalism had come to it’s end. Unfortunately, the path chosen by the politicians was to take us back to the same policies of the 19th century which resulted in the Great Depression and who are now acting surprised by the Great Recession.

                    • rosy

                      Austria seems like a warmer, fuzzier, less odd sense of humour Germany.
                      I can’t comment on the Germans – I don’t know any… but people are people, a mix of good and bad. Austrians are pretty easy-going as long as you observe the social niceties (that you have to find out for yourself). I’ve meet a couple of ex-pats taken aback by some abruptness, but mostly I find people are pretty good, friendly – and almost all are willing to speak English (although that doesn’t help my German).

                      There is, of course, the nationalist underbelly – but you soon work that out. I think the Austrians got off pretty easy post-war, but they are recognising that. I have had it mentioned to me that that is part of of the reason for worker protection being taken so seriously – that the poor, deprived, downtrodden workers led to the rise of the n@zis. So there you go – history matters.

                  • Draco T Bastard

                    Their per capita GDP is 42000, ours is 29000. They can afford their excellent welfare state. We actually can’t afford one.

                    Yes we can. We have an average income of ~$60k/annum. That means that we have the economy to pay every working age adult ~$30k/annum.

                    I’d like us to be able to afford one without taxing everyone 50% of their earnings.

                    There’s two options:
                    1.) Pay everyone equitably from the economy or
                    2.) Tax the beejesus out of the rich

                    You’ll note that the people complaining about taxes are the rich who are paid far more than they’re worth and use tax minimisation schemes to avoid paying the taxes they should.

                    • Plastic Tolstoy

                      “You’ll note that the people complaining about taxes are the rich who are paid far more than they’re worth”

                      Yes indeed, and so desperate to hold onto their inflated self-importance that they will tell you just about anything to justify why they consider themselves worth so much more than others, the most common story being that all you have to do is work harder and you too can ‘earn’ the right to become egotistical, shallow, lacking in empathy and a burden on society.

                      I expect National’s next trick to appear to be trying to solve the unemployment problem will be to increase the tax cuts for the wealthy even further, seeing as the last tax cuts obviously didn’t instill enough confidence in the mystical job-creators for them to start handing out jobs like candy at Halloween. I’m sure the rest of us serfs wont mind another increase in gst or similar to prop up the tax take while those mystical job-creators think deeply about what kinds of jobs they will create with their increased earnings.

                  • tracey

                    Arent we selling assets to not be like other countries with no growth? Anyone care to outline the plan following the sales?

                    • Plastic Tolstoy

                      Hope, pretty much. Hope that the ideology that National follows actually works out in the real world for once, even though it is logically unlikely.

                  • McFlock

                    Their growth from 2000-2008 was lower then ours on average. As a result of our 90′s reforms, our growth in this period was high, and potentially could have been very high but for well, you know what.

                    Fuck I love that bullshit. When things go well under Labour, tories reckon it’s all the effect of the previous tory govt. When things go bad under national, toryboys blame the previous labour govt and the global economy.
                         
                    They never seem to notice that, no matter the length of the previous term, everything takes a nosedive months after tories move in (or improve months after centrist/notsotories move in) and stay that way until the next govt.

          • rosy 6.1.2.1.3

            Or at 4.5% (2012 Q1) growth they could ask the Iceland PM what’s the best way to get moving forward.

            • Colonial Viper 6.1.2.1.3.1

              Let the banks fail on a massive scale, and let bondholders and shareholders get wiped out. Foreign investors in the scams can go hang.

              And prosecute lots and lots of the bankster scum to return confidence to the real economy.

              • rosy

                Exactly. Can’t see the Nacts asking Iceland for advice anytime soon lol.

              • UpandComer

                I don’t disagree with you.

                I think too big to fail is a travesty.

                Fraud should be criminally sanctioned, and Banks should not indulge in the worst forms of hypocritical socialism.

                I think NZ is blessed to have the Financial Markets Authority and the Banking Ombudsman.

                • xtasy

                  Ha, if the Banking Ombudsman is as well resourced as the whole so-called Office of Ombudsmen, then I reserve myself the right to laught out loud at your peculiar comments.

                  I filed a complaint with the Office of Ombudsmen in mid February, about a Health Board refusing to make available info about their own staff having failed in their duties to not take action when being informed about a mental health patient being entrusted in the care of a caregiver, who abused her.

                  It all smelled too much of a cover up, as their response to refuse information about the persons involved and their positions came swiftly within only a couple of days.

                  So I made the complaint. Strangely I never got a response, so in early July I sent an email to them, asking for an update from the Ombudsman. An automated reply assured me they would reply within A MONTH. Nothing ever came though. Hence early this week I phoned their 0800 number, spoke to a staff member, raised the reference file number and myself getting no replies. I was told she would pass the matter on and I would get a call back within 1 to 2 days. NOTHING came after that.

                  So I phoned the 0800 number again on Thursday late afternoon. This time a message left after much debate finally resulted in a team member returning the call.

                  To my absolute astonishment I was told that NOTHING had so far been done re my complaint! They admittedly have a large back-log of complaints to handle, so my one was one of the many “not progressed”. When I raised the serious issues associated with my complaint the woman then assured me that it would now be treated as a priority matter and be dealt with now.

                  Hence take note: The Office of Ombudsmen has a large back-log of complaints about non compliance with the Official Information Act and other legal requirements by various government agencies, health boards and whatever. Many cases have NOT BEEN PROCESSED over 6 months! The excuse given was a large work load and recent restructuring.

                  Does anyone remember Beverley Wakem as Chief Ombudsman complaining not so long ago, that her office does not have the resources to do its job?

                  Maybe inform yourself and do a reality chekc, dear ‘UpAndComer’ down the gurgler.

    • Dr Terry 6.2

      Yes, we are indeed “ïnfused” with stupid and uninformed bullshit like this much too often. Are you being paid to make such obtuse utterances?

  7. Rodel 7

    Interesting how the Christchurch Press shows a back view photo of Bennet ( thanks for that) with happy workers ( actually I think it was one) getting jobs and lauding the wonderful need for 1000 workers in he city…On the same day that real (not media fabricated) data) shows the unemployment rate at 6.8% the highest for 2 years ‘…or is it the highest number of unemployed for 18 years

    ( heeeey just a technical hitch… .”.Look ..excuse me . I have to go to USA to watch my son play baseball…”
    162,000 people out of work!!! on the same day that Australia records a decrease in thhe number of unemployed.
    One really has to wonder about the professionalism of people in our news media.. I guess it’s at about the same level as the National party caucus, but a bit above the ethics of John Banks.
    But do we have to put up with novelists instead of journalists??

  8. tc 8

    ‘Just how many more years of the Nats’ economic “genius” do you want NZ?’

    Based on the pathetic labour caucus as it stands, at least another term…..onya Trev and co.

  9. Dr Terry 9

    tc A half decent novelist would not lack in professionalism. We have to endure, for the most part, journalists employed by news outlets which are slanted much to the Right (otherwise they are sacked, as was Tracey Barnett). Usually just one journalist of the Left is tolerated so as to give a false impression of “moderation”. As for ethics, how many know the meaning of that word today?

  10. It doesn’t surprise me anymore when the unemployment numbers gathered doesn’t reflect the reality of things in the country. This post is spot on, and I can vouch for the situation to be much worse than the numbers on my end.

  11. mike 11

    People relax this is a non-issue because John Key has said he will create 170,000 new jobs.* BAM! QED! Problem solved!

    * (Unless things get dinnamic in which case John Key’s glib promises assume the same value as those of a banker. Oh sh*t hang on…)

  12. xtasy 12

    Key had the audacity to claim the House Hold Labour Force Survey by Statistics NZ was not the best and most reliable survey.

    I could not believe it, when I heard it on National Radio news.

    Not so long ago he answered to questions about growth in poverty and unemployment in NZ by either Jacinda Ardern or another opposition MP, that a Christian Social Services survey that member quoted was not very reliable. Instead the asking member was told BY KEY, that the Department of Statistics offered more reliable surveys.

    So you cannot have it both ways, Prime Minister! Calling it just a “technical” increase is absurd also.

    Every person who knows a bit about unemployment and statistics knows full well, that there are many unemployed that are not included in official statistics. They may be partners of a working person, so they rely on the income of that partner. They may be in some form of training, have extended study or else, knowing that there are no jobs. Others have health issues and are covered by other benefits.

    WINZ does to my information also not count people as unemployed, if they work more than 15 hours a week.

    The true figure is likely to be around 9 or 10 per cent, that is my best guess.

    • Vicky32 12.1

      Key had the audacity to claim the House Hold Labour Force Survey by Statistics NZ was not the best and most reliable survey.

      My ghastly call centre experience the other week was with the HLFS…  I did only 3 days on the phones, as their IT and HR systems went into meltdown (I am waiting to see what happens next – being a casual! We’ll see)
      But I had enough experience to know that it’s a very good and very detailed study!

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  • Government to rollout roadside drug testing
    The Coalition Government will introduce legislation this year that will enable roadside drug testing as part of our commitment to improve road safety and restore law and order, Transport Minister Simeon Brown says.  “Alcohol and drugs are the number one contributing factor in fatal road crashes in New Zealand. In ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Minister responds to review of Kāinga Ora
    The Government has announced a series of immediate actions in response to the independent review of Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. “Kāinga Ora is a large and important Crown entity, with assets of $45 billion and over $2.5 billion of expenditure each year. It ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Pseudoephedrine back on shelves
    Associate Health Minister David Seymour is pleased that Pseudoephedrine can now be purchased by the general public to protect them from winter illness, after the coalition government worked swiftly to change the law and oversaw a fast approval process by Medsafe. “Pharmacies are now putting the medicines back on their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • New Zealand-China Business Summit
    Tēnā koutou katoa. Da jia hao.  Good morning everyone.   Prime Minister Luxon, your excellency, a great friend of New Zealand and my friend Ambassador Wang, Mayor of what he tells me is the best city in New Zealand, Wayne Brown, the highly respected Fran O’Sullivan, Champion of the Auckland business ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • New measures to protect powerlines from trees
    Energy Minister Simeon Brown has announced that the Government will make it easier for lines firms to take action to remove vegetation from obstructing local powerlines. The change will ensure greater security of electricity supply in local communities, particularly during severe weather events.  “Trees or parts of trees falling on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani win top Māori dairy farming award
    Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani were the top winners at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy awards recognising the best in Māori dairy farming. Māori Development Minister Tama Potaka announced the winners and congratulated runners-up, Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, at an awards celebration also attended by Prime Minister Christopher Luxon and Finance Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • DJ Fred Again – Assurance report received
    "On the 27th of March, I sought assurances from the Chief Executive, Department of Internal Affairs, that the Department’s correct processes and policies had been followed in regards to a passport application which received media attention,” says Minister of Internal Affairs Brooke van Velden.  “I raised my concerns after being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • District Court Judges appointed
    Attorney-General Judith Collins has announced the appointment of three new District Court Judges, to replace Judges who have recently retired. Peter James Davey of Auckland has been appointed a District Court Judge with a jury jurisdiction to be based at Whangarei. Mr Davey initially started work as a law clerk/solicitor with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Unions should put learning ahead of ideology
    Associate Education Minister David Seymour is calling on the Post Primary Teachers’ Association (PPTA) to put ideology to the side and focus on students’ learning, in reaction to the union holding paid teacher meetings across New Zealand about charter schools.     “The PPTA is disrupting schools up and down the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Craig Stobo appointed as chair of FMA
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Andrew Bayly today announced the appointment of Craig Stobo as the new chair of the Financial Markets Authority (FMA). Mr Stobo takes over from Mark Todd, whose term expired at the end of April. Mr Stobo’s appointment is for a five-year term. “The FMA plays ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Budget 2024 invests in lifeguards and coastguard
    Surf Life Saving New Zealand and Coastguard New Zealand will continue to be able to keep people safe in, on, and around the water following a funding boost of $63.644 million over four years, Transport Minister Simeon Brown and Associate Transport Minister Matt Doocey say. “Heading to the beach for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Zealand and Tuvalu reaffirm close relationship
    New Zealand and Tuvalu have reaffirmed their close relationship, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters says.  “New Zealand is committed to working with Tuvalu on a shared vision of resilience, prosperity and security, in close concert with Australia,” says Mr Peters, who last visited Tuvalu in 2019.  “It is my pleasure ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Zealand calls for calm, constructive dialogue in New Caledonia
    New Zealand is gravely concerned about the situation in New Caledonia, Foreign Minister Winston Peters says.  “The escalating situation and violent protests in Nouméa are of serious concern across the Pacific Islands region,” Mr Peters says.  “The immediate priority must be for all sides to take steps to de-escalate the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Zealand welcomes Samoa Head of State
    Prime Minister Christopher Luxon met today with Samoa’s O le Ao o le Malo, Afioga Tuimalealiifano Vaaletoa Sualauvi II, who is making a State Visit to New Zealand. “His Highness and I reflected on our two countries’ extensive community links, with Samoan–New Zealanders contributing to all areas of our national ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Island Direct eligible for SuperGold Card funding
    Transport Minister Simeon Brown has announced that he has approved Waiheke Island ferry operator Island Direct to be eligible for SuperGold Card funding, paving the way for a commercial agreement to bring the operator into the scheme. “Island Direct started operating in November 2023, offering an additional option for people ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Further sanctions against Russia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters today announced further sanctions on 28 individuals and 14 entities providing military and strategic support for Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.  “Russia is directly supported by its military-industrial complex in its illegal aggression against Ukraine, attacking its sovereignty and territorial integrity. New Zealand condemns all entities and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • One year on from Loafers Lodge
    A year on from the tragedy at Loafers Lodge, the Government is working hard to improve building fire safety, Building and Construction Minister Chris Penk says. “I want to share my sincere condolences with the families and friends of the victims on the anniversary of the tragic fire at Loafers ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Pre-Budget speech to Auckland Business Chamber
    Ka nui te mihi kia koutou. Kia ora and good afternoon, everyone. Thank you so much for having me here in the lead up to my Government’s first Budget. Before I get started can I acknowledge: Simon Bridges – Auckland Business Chamber CEO. Steve Jurkovich – Kiwibank CEO. Kids born ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand and Vanuatu to deepen collaboration
    New Zealand and Vanuatu will enhance collaboration on issues of mutual interest, Foreign Minister Winston Peters says.    “It is important to return to Port Vila this week with a broad, high-level political delegation which demonstrates our deep commitment to New Zealand’s relationship with Vanuatu,” Mr Peters says.    “This ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Penk travels to Peru for trade meetings
    Minister for Land Information, Chris Penk will travel to Peru this week to represent New Zealand at a meeting of trade ministers from the Asia-Pacific region on behalf of Trade Minister Todd McClay. The annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Ministers Responsible for Trade meeting will be held on 17-18 May ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Minister attends global education conferences
    Minister of Education Erica Stanford will head to the United Kingdom this week to participate in the 22nd Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers (CCEM) and the 2024 Education World Forum (EWF). “I am looking forward to sharing this Government’s education priorities, such as introducing a knowledge-rich curriculum, implementing an evidence-based ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Education Minister thanks outgoing NZQA Chair
    Minister of Education Erica Stanford has today thanked outgoing New Zealand Qualifications Authority Chair, Hon Tracey Martin. “Tracey Martin tendered her resignation late last month in order to take up a new role,” Ms Stanford says. Ms Martin will relinquish the role of Chair on 10 May and current Deputy ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Joint statement of Christopher Luxon and Emmanuel Macron: Launch of the Christchurch Call Foundation
    New Zealand Prime Minister Christopher Luxon and President Emmanuel Macron of France today announced a new non-governmental organisation, the Christchurch Call Foundation, to coordinate the Christchurch Call’s work to eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online.   This change gives effect to the outcomes of the November 2023 Call Leaders’ Summit, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Panel announced for review into disability services
    Distinguished public servant and former diplomat Sir Maarten Wevers will lead the independent review into the disability support services administered by the Ministry of Disabled People – Whaikaha. The review was announced by Disability Issues Minister Louise Upston a fortnight ago to examine what could be done to strengthen the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Minister welcomes Police gang unit
    Today’s announcement by Police Commissioner Andrew Coster of a National Gang Unit and district Gang Disruption Units will help deliver on the coalition Government’s pledge to restore law and order and crack down on criminal gangs, Police Minister Mark Mitchell says. “The National Gang Unit and Gang Disruption Units will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New Zealand expresses regret at North Korea’s aggressive rhetoric
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has today expressed regret at North Korea’s aggressive rhetoric towards New Zealand and its international partners.  “New Zealand proudly stands with the international community in upholding the rules-based order through its monitoring and surveillance deployments, which it has been regularly doing alongside partners since 2018,” Mr ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New Chief of Defence Force appointed
    Air Vice-Marshal Tony Davies MNZM is the new Chief of Defence Force, Defence Minister Judith Collins announced today. The Chief of Defence Force commands the Navy, Army and Air Force and is the principal military advisor to the Defence Minister and other Ministers with relevant portfolio responsibilities in the defence ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government puts children first by repealing 7AA
    Legislation to repeal section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act has been introduced to Parliament. The Bill’s introduction reaffirms the Coalition Government’s commitment to the safety of children in care, says Minister for Children, Karen Chhour. “While section 7AA was introduced with good intentions, it creates a conflict for Oranga ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Defence Minister to meet counterparts in UK, Italy
    Defence Minister Judith Collins will this week travel to the UK and Italy to meet with her defence counterparts, and to attend Battles of Cassino commemorations. “I am humbled to be able to represent the New Zealand Government in Italy at the commemorations for the 80th anniversary of what was ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Charter schools to lift educational outcomes
    The upcoming Budget will include funding for up to 50 charter schools to help lift declining educational performance, Associate Education Minister David Seymour announced today. $153 million in new funding will be provided over four years to establish and operate up to 15 new charter schools and convert 35 state ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • COVID-19 Inquiry terms of reference consultation results received
    “The results of the public consultation on the terms of reference for the Royal Commission into COVID-19 Lessons has now been received, with results indicating over 13,000 submissions were made from members of the public,” Internal Affairs Minister Brooke van Velden says. “We heard feedback about the extended lockdowns in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • The Pacific family of nations – the changing security outlook
    Foreign Minister, Defence Minister, other Members of Parliament Acting Chief of Defence Force, Secretary of Defence Distinguished Guests  Defence and Diplomatic Colleagues  Ladies and Gentlemen,  Good afternoon, tēna koutou, apinun tru    It’s a pleasure to be back in Port Moresby today, and to speak here at the Kumul Leadership ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZ and Papua New Guinea to work more closely together
    Health, infrastructure, renewable energy, and stability are among the themes of the current visit to Papua New Guinea by a New Zealand political delegation, Foreign Minister Winston Peters says.   “Papua New Guinea carries serious weight in the Pacific, and New Zealand deeply values our relationship with it,” Mr Peters ...
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    1 week ago
  • Driving ahead with Roads of Regional Significance
    The coalition Government is launching Roads of Regional Significance to sit alongside Roads of National Significance as part of its plan to deliver priority roading projects across the country, Transport Minister Simeon Brown says.  “The Roads of National Significance (RoNS) built by the previous National Government are some of New Zealand’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand congratulates new Solomon Islands government
    A high-level New Zealand political delegation in Honiara today congratulated the new Government of Solomon Islands, led by Jeremiah Manele, on taking office.    “We are privileged to meet the new Prime Minister and members of his Cabinet during his government’s first ten days in office,” Deputy Prime Minister and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand supports UN Palestine resolution
    New Zealand voted in favour of a resolution broadening Palestine’s participation at the United Nations General Assembly overnight, Foreign Minister Winston Peters says.    “The resolution enhances the rights of Palestine to participate in the work of the UN General Assembly while stopping short of admitting Palestine as a full ...
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    1 week ago
  • Speech to the 2024 Infrastructure Symposium
    Introduction Good morning. It’s a great privilege to be here at the 2024 Infrastructure Symposium. I was extremely happy when the Prime Minister asked me to be his Minister for Infrastructure. It is one of the great barriers holding the New Zealand economy back from achieving its potential. Building high ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • $571 million for Defence pay and projects
    Defence Minister Judith Collins today announced the upcoming Budget will include new funding of $571 million for Defence Force pay and projects. “Our servicemen and women do New Zealand proud throughout the world and this funding will help ensure we retain their services and expertise as we navigate an increasingly ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Climate change – mitigating the risks and costs
    New Zealand’s ability to cope with climate change will be strengthened as part of the Government’s focus to build resilience as we rebuild the economy, Climate Change Minister Simon Watts says. “An enduring and long-term approach is needed to provide New Zealanders and the economy with certainty as the climate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Getting new job seekers on the pathway to work
    Jobseeker beneficiaries who have work obligations must now meet with MSD within two weeks of their benefit starting to determine their next step towards finding a job, Social Development and Employment Minister Louise Upston says. “A key part of the coalition Government’s plan to have 50,000 fewer people on Jobseeker ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago

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