web analytics

We still pay, ACC or no ACC

Written By: - Date published: 10:01 am, October 13th, 2009 - 25 comments
Categories: ACC, national/act government, privatisation - Tags:

acc-undermine-200Labour’s David Parker has been a bit slow reacting to National’s latest attack on ACC but now he’s in play he has a killer point to make:

if ACC cover is cut, the costs of what was paid for by ACC will still have to be paid for by society somehow.

The treatments and lost income that ACC covers won’t magically disappear if National cuts cover. Instead, we’ll just have to pay the cost some other way. And it’s likely to be more expensive.

What people tend to forget is that ACC was set up to save New Zealand money and it does an incredibly good job of it. Rather than having employers pay some profit making private insurer for workplace accident insurance, and workers paying for income insurance, and people paying for insurance against them and their families getting injured outside of work it’s all covered by ACC. Nobody misses out here and has to try to cover the costs themselves or find someone to sue (if they can afford it). While other common law countries have court systems stagnated by personal injury litigation, we avoid nearly all that trouble and let the court system deal with more important issues because every one gets cover if they’re injured. In fact the only people who don’t win from ACC are the private insurers – they’ve successfully fought off similar initatives in other countries and here they’ve given millions to National.

So, what costs will we have to cover some other way if National cuts cover? Well, their first targets are physiotherapy and therapy for sexual abuse victims. What will happen when people can’t get ACC cover for these treatments? Well, some will be able to pay for themselves, but many won’t. Instead, their injuries will go untreated and things will often get worse at cost to them, which is a cost to society as a whole. It will be left to charities to try to cover the gaps that should be filled uniformly and fairly by the State.

Their injury may even lead to loss for others. Check out this interview with a man who was sexually abused as a child and is now getting therapy through ACC. What if he had remained effectively self-medicating through alcoholism? We would have borne the cost when he got liver disease or crashed his car into a family.

The cost doesn’t disappear just because the ACC entitlement is cut. We have to pay sometime and, then, the cost is likely to be greater.

25 comments on “We still pay, ACC or no ACC ”

  1. Lanthanide 1

    I posted this in the open mic thread, but I’ll re-post here as its relevant.

    On National radio this morning they were saying that the date for ACC fully funding is going to be put back to 2019, as well as raises in levies and cuts in entitlements.

    How does this gel with this comment from yesterday’s article on ACC:

    “Now, it is going to be harder to complete the move to being fully funded by 2014, which is the Government’s target, without increases to levies. Pretty simple solution to that, push back the date. Labour was going to move the date back to 2019 and the Government has just announced it will adopt that idea. Take ten years to move to fully funded rather than doing it in five. It makes no real difference except there’s no need for big levy hikes.’

    It is implying that all we have to do is put the date back to 2019 and all the problems are solved, yet the government is going to do that *as well* as raise levies and cut entitlements? Why should they need to do that, if pushing back the date to 2019 is enough in itself, in your estimation?

    If your answer is “they’re doing it to build mistrust in the public in ACC’, then you’re saying ACC doesn’t actually need the money and that in a few years time ACC is going to have more extra money than it needs, and the levies in the future will therefore go down due to overfunding at present. If ACC does indeed actually need this extra money, how do you reconcile this with your position that “ACC is fine’?

  2. lprent 2

    L: There is a transition going on from a pay as you go approach to ACC in 1999 to pre-paid one. This means that when a person has an accident, that the money to pay for their ongoing treatment has already been paid. The 1999 system did not do that.

    Like superannuation it didn’t put the forward cost onto those who were caused / had the accident – it pushed it onto their kids and grand-kids. That either results in inter-generational theft (because the generations have different cost structures and priorities), or people going into poverty because they or their employer or sports club had an inadequate scheme.

    Transitions in a funding system can be taken over time and will involve either capital injections or increases in levies in the short term. Unlike the superannuation where this government has abrogated its responsibilities (removing the contributions to the Cullen fund from next year is inter-generational theft), the ACC system is gradually moving to being fully funded. Provided that the transition keeps moving, the time scale difference between5 years and 10 years is of little difference.

    The main thing of interest in this is it points up a big education hole. Many of the right commentators (including the minister Nick Smith as I’ve commented before) appear to have severe maths handicaps. They simply make basic mistakes about the numbers when politically expedient.

    • Lanthanide 2.1

      Yes, I understand all that. I want to know why Marty is asserting that the only thing that needs to happen is the date moved out to 2019, and that that move by itself is enough to keep levies the same.

      The government is going to do that *and* raise levies *and* cut benefits. So clearly Marty, or the government, is wrong. Obviously the government may have ulterior motives, but I’m sure they also have a lot more information and data about the real situation than Marty does, so I want to know how he reconciles the difference.

      • lprent 2.1.1

        L: Perhaps if the government actually released the information that they are using to base the decision on. At present what they are releasing is heavily spun to a political conclusion. They aren’t trying to justify their PR spin by giving enough information about problems, they’re only interested in getting the spin lines out.

        But from my brief look at public reports from the ACC, I can’t see what Nick Smith is going ballistic about. With the exception of some blowouts in the budgets for physio (which is the ONLY reason I’ve ever used ACC – for some preliminary OOS from a lousy mouse), I fail to see anything that looks like a problem. With the physio, I’d like to see some information about what it has saved in potential costs because of prevention. I’d suspect that if I wound up with actual OOS it’d be somewhat more expensive.

        Nick Smith looks increasingly like a hysterical panic merchant. Just look at his lying ‘contribution’ to the ETS debate.

        • Lanthanide 2.1.1.1

          “Perhaps if the government actually released the information that they are using to base the decision on”

          So until such time, perhaps Marty should stop presenting his opinions as fact?

          This reminds me of around budget time when Marty was repeatedly saying that we weren’t going to get a credit downgrade and nothing had to change. I guess he knew more than the actual people who make the decisions and have the overall view of the economy and who talk to the ratings agencies, then? Then, as now, he presented his opinion, not backed by any expert opinion or quotes, as fact.

    • BLiP 2.2

      Jon Bridges put it succinctly on National Radio yesterday when he said:

      “Over the rest of my life I will owe $2 million of power bills. Have I got $2 million now? No. Am I in trouble? No.”

      If a comedian can sum up the situation in 25 words you’d expect there would be at least one media commentator who could get it.

  3. insider 3

    What you are discounting is the possibility that some people are using ACC services when they may not be necessary because it is ‘free’. SO we end up funding an overcautious system that encourages referrals and follow-ups not always all needed

    So the payments equate to a massive transfer of wealth from salary earners to counsellors, doctors, physios etc Cutting back the opportunity might mean that treatment is more focussed and those professions have to work a bit harder for the next new car.

    • lprent 3.1

      Reinterpreting your comment… You forgot to complete it…

      So the payments equate to a massive transfer of wealth from salary earners to counsellors, doctors, physios etc instead of having even larger costs to society going to lawyers and late treatments causing higher payments to counsellors, doctors, physios after the lawyers

      In terms of overall costs, ACC is one of the cheapest systems worldwide because it treats problems early without having to go through a drawn-out legal process in almost all cases.

  4. Lew 4

    Two cracking posts on ACC in a row, Marty, you’ve found your calling.

    To put a figure to one part of that cost: AUT senior lecturer in Business Interdisciplinary Studies Shirley Jülich, in her 2001 PhD thesis, put the total annual cost of the consequences of childhood sexual abuse in NZ at close to $2.5 billion. This is an order of magnitude higher than the annual cost of psychotherapy that survivors consume, and which the new clinical pathways are going to ration.

    L

  5. burt 5

    So…

    The treatments and lost income that ACC covers won’t magically disappear if National cuts cover. Instead, we’ll just have to pay the cost some other way. And it’s likely to be more expensive.

    Last time we were given temporary freedom from the tyranny of monopoly one size fits all money-pit sponsoring my levies and the levies for my company went down. I had more cover and it cost me less. (I picked a size of cover that fitted me rather one that was easy to administer for a monopoly)

    Guess my low risk business wasn’t subsidising some other business that politically it was unacceptable to make them pay their full cost least they don’t vote for the govt that refused to socialise their costs on everyone.

    • snoozer 5.1

      It’s called loss leading, burt. You might have heard about it in your finance class.

      The insurers entering the NZ market wanted to get as much market share as they could, so they loss lead. It wasn’t sustainable.

      Either they would have had to deny a hell of a lot of cover (which is what US insurers spend about 10% of thier income doing), or they would have had to raise premiums, or the businesses would have collapsed.

      In fact, the biggest private insurer in NZ during that period HIH did collapse only a few months later.

    • burt 5.2

      snoozer

      I think it’s called basing your costs on an actuarial model rather than a political acceptable level of socialisation to stay popular and win elections.

      But we will need to agree to differ on why it cost less under a private scheme because I’ve got to go for a bike ride on thousands of dollars worth of mountain bike, taking extraordinary risks preparing for a race I want to win in a few weeks.

      I’m happy that you (assuming you pay tax) are helping cover the rehab costs from my last major spill a month or two back and the high volume physio costs to get me back in form for the race in a few weeks time. Broken bones are such a pain but treatment is free and they heal well if you manage to bump a waiting list patient getting an operation because you are ‘urgent’.

      Oh, cheers for your financial support covering the costs of the risk associated with my high risk recreational activities. I could not afford as much cool mountain bike kit if I had to pay insurance to cover my own risk as well.

    • ghostwhowalksnz 5.3

      You cant have a size of cover of employers liability insurance that ‘fits me’
      The payouts are regulated ( one part of competition they didnt indroduce).
      And yes they were building market share so low premiums were offered to the low risk employers. Just one accident and you would pay till your nose bleeds
      Based on the Australian experience, their premiums are higher where they have ‘competition’ and court based decisions

  6. ieuan 6

    ‘Their injury may even lead to loss for others. Check out this interview with a man who was sexually abused as a child and is now getting therapy through ACC. What if he had remained effectively self-medicating through alcoholism? We would have borne the cost when he got liver disease or crashed his car into a family.’

    I fully believe that treatment should be available but why is this funded via ACC? It’s not an accident. ACC has become a secondary (health) tax and I’m not sure that is what it was originally intended for.

    • Lew 6.1

      ACC provides (nominally) universal no-fault personal injury and liability cover. The word ‘accident’ is branding more than anything else. A ton of stuff which isn’t accidental is covered (such as the impacts of crime, which is what sexual abuse survivors have suffered).

      L

    • snoozer 6.2

      ieuan. Yeah, the cost has to be covered by us somewhere, which makes taking it out off ACC pretty pointless, eh?

      Anyway, ACC covers injuries in general except, I think, those you intentionally inflict on yourself. Mental trauma is an injury and it’s not something the victims intentionally give themselves.

  7. BLiP 7

    Oh – now I get it: pay more, get less.

    Thanks National Ltd® – I’m lovin’ it.

  8. rave 8

    This is fat white abusers rule,
    the ones who fuck their kids in the head
    and then say pay for it when you get a job,
    if you get a job, if you don’t die first.
    Actuary-rilly speaking intergenerational
    abuse is getting too expensive,
    so lets make the victims pay.
    In the old days we used to work the bastards to death,
    or shoot them if they were the wrong color or religion.
    But its cheaper if they top themselves.
    So lets have our sex and make them pay for it too.

  9. This is getting me really angry. Nick Smith and co are out right lying about the financial state of ACC.

  10. Maria 10

    Kia ora tatou, so lovely to come out of the trenches of this battle and read your sane and thoughtful responses – it means so much dear blogsters. From your pens to the minds of the nation I say! Arohanui, Maria

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • New innovation fund for more mental health initiatives
    The government has set up a one-off defined mental health innovation fund to further expand the support available to those who need it, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “This government is transforming Aotearoa - New Zealand’s approach to mental wellbeing with greater focus on care in the community, and more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • New training scheme for lower South Island engineering sector
    An innovative training programme to support jobs and businesses in the engineering and manufacturing sector in the lower South Island has been officially launched in Balclutha. Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash has opened a new skills training academy established with an initial investment of $495,000 from the Provincial ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Speech to Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners Conference 2021
    Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners Conference 2021   Mihi Tēnā tātou katoa. Ki te reo pōhiri, kei te mihi. Ki a koutou ngā pou o te whare hauora o Aotearoa, kei te mihi. He taura tangata, he taura kaupapa e hono ana i a tatou katoa i tenei ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Speech to the Environmental Defence Society annual conference
    Kia ora kōtou katoa. Firstly, thank you for the invitation to speak today. The Environmental Defence Society’s contributions towards environmental policy are invaluable, and alongside that your work in identifying and analysing issues and potential solutions are fundamental in driving transformation. My colleague Minister Parker, who outlined the Government’s environmental ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • New regs on stream for whitebait season
    The 2021 whitebaiting season is about to kick off with new regulations in place to help ensure a healthy future for the fishery. “The new regulations herald a more equitable fishery, easing the pressure on whitebait species while providing better alignment and consistency of fishing rules across the country,” Conservation ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Health Indicators will track better care for all NZers
    The Government’s reform of the health system took a big step forward today with the unveiling of the system that will be used to hold it accountable and ensure it delivers more equitable healthcare for all New Zealanders. Health Minister Andrew Little has already announced the 20 district health boards ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Govt congratulates Lisa Carrington on becoming NZ’s most decorated Olympian
    Sport and Recreation Minister Grant Robertson has today congratulated New Zealand Olympic kayaker Lisa Carrington on her exceptional performance at the Tokyo Olympics which has led to her becoming the most decorated New Zealand Olympian. “Lisa is a phenomenal athlete. To win the K1 200m three Olympics in a row, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    24 hours ago
  • Construction sector transformation continues with Network launch
    Housing Minister Hon Dr Megan Woods and Building and Construction Minister Hon Poto Williams today launched the Construction Sector Accord Network. Designed to bring the sector together to lift performance and drive change, the Network is a collective of businesses, government agencies and other organisations committed to a higher performing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • The ‘Tulī Takes Flight’ scholarships announced
    The Associate Minister of Education, Aupito William Sio, has today announced the establishment of the ‘Tulī Takes Flight’ scholarships as part of the goodwill gesture of reconciliation to accompany the Government’s apology to Pacific families and communities impacted by the Dawn Raids. “Education is the key to unlocking success, opportunity, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • 8,000 additional public housing places delivered in major Government milestone 
    New Zealanders now have an extra 8,000 warm, dry public housing places to call home, under a Government public housing programme that is full steam ahead, says Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern. “Of the 74,337 households now being supported in public housing places, more than six thousand (6,503) are living in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New classrooms and building improvements for central and lower North Island schools
    Six schools across Wellington, Manawatū-Whanganui and Taranaki are getting a funding boost so projects can enter construction and deliver much needed works sooner, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. While visiting Cannons Creek School in Porirua, Chris Hipkins also announced 10 schools in the central and lower North Island that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Restoring the richness of the Rangitata river
    A major Jobs for Nature project to protect and enhance some of the South Island’s most unique habitats and restore the health of the Rangitata River highlights the important role farmers have in caring for the land, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “Canterbury’s braided rivers are an iconic part of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Foreign Minister to take part in ASEAN-related meetings
    Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta will today begin a suite of meetings with her ASEAN and East Asia Summit counterparts, starting with the 11th East Asia Summit (EAS) Foreign Ministers’ Meeting tonight. That will be followed by the ASEAN-New Zealand Ministerial Meeting on Thursday 5 August and the 28th ASEAN Regional ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Arts and heritage venues get helping hand
    A new round of funding to support capital projects will help keep our arts and heritage sector alive and vibrant, Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Kiri Allan announced today.  “Communities work hard to raise funds for arts, culture and heritage related capital projects as they add significant value ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Foreign Ministers welcome opening of New Zealand High Commission in Colombo
    New Zealand and Sri Lanka’s Foreign Ministers, Nanaia Mahuta and Dinesh Gunawardena, have welcomed the opening of the New Zealand High Commission in Colombo next week. The Foreign Ministers, who met virtually yesterday, spoke about the opening of the High Commission as a major milestone in the bilateral relationship. Both ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand to increase NZDF commitment to the United Nations Command, Republic of Korea
      The New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) will deploy three additional personnel to the Republic of Korea, increasing the size of its contribution to the United Nations Command and its Military Armistice Commission from nine to 12 personnel. “Increasing the size of our deployment to the Republic of Korea ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Wages up, unemployment down
    The Government’s efforts to secure the recovery has seen more Kiwis in jobs and higher wages, with unemployment falling to pre-COVID levels and more people in work. Stats NZ figures show unemployment rate fell to 4 percent in the June quarter from 4.6 percent in the March quarter, the lowest ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Poroporoaki: Dr Kihi Ngatai OSM
    Mauao tiketike tūmokemoke mai ana ra koe, papakitia ana e ngā tai kawenga roimata o te motu. E Ngāti Ranginui, mo tō manuhuia kua tīkapea i te rangi. E Ngai Te Rangi, mo tō manutaki kua riro i te hau o Aitū kikini, E Ngāti Pukenga mo tō manutaiko, kua ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government support screen industry with funding for sound stages in West Auckland
    Auckland Film Studios in West Auckland has received funding for a major expansion through the Government’s Infrastructure Reference Group’s (IRG) COVID-19 Response Fund. The Government is investing $30 million of a total $35 million project to construct two 2,000sqm sound stages and development of further workshops and offices, to expand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Protecting unique land for generation next
    The Government is boosting legal protection for critically important natural habitats on private land, Minister of Conservation Kiri Allan says. “An $8 million investment over four years will see Queen Elizabeth II National Trust Ngā Kairauhī Papa (QEII) work with government agencies, councils and others to provide legal protection of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand’s support for Fiji’s COVID-19 response continues with vaccine delivery, operational ...
    Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta has announced further support for Fiji, including funding support for nursing staff and 100,000 doses of vaccines due to arrive in country today. “Our thoughts remain with Fiji during this incredibly challenging period,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “New Zealand has funded 100,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Poroporoaki: Dr Hōhepa (Joe) Mason
    Ko koe tēnā e te hurumanu e Hōhepa, te tōwenetanga a te iti, te māpihi herenga mahara o te tini, ka tauawhi tonuhia koe e to iwi ki te uma pupuri ai. Me pēhea he kupu kia koutou kua puta i nga ākinga a nga tau kua hori, kua waia ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Finance Minister and RBNZ Governor agree to update MOU on macro-prudential policy
    Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Reserve Bank Governor Adrian Orr have updated the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on macro-prudential policy to further protect the financial system and support the Government’s housing objectives. “This change will ensure that the Reserve Bank has the flexibility to respond to emerging financial stability risks ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government commits further assistance for drought and flood-affected rural communities
    Farmers and growers affected by this year’s drought or floods in Marlborough, Tasman, West Coat, Canterbury, Otago and the Chatham Islands will have access to Rural Assistance Payments (RAPs) from today, Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni has announced. “The Government is committed to easing the financial pressures on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Cook Islands youth lead Language Week
    The Cook Islands Language Week theme for 2021 highlights the vital role language plays in maintaining young people’s links to their Pacific home, said Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio.  “The Epetoma o te reo Māori Kūki ‘Āirani – Cook Islands Language Week – theme is ‘Ātuitui’ia au ki ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government offers formal apology for Dawn Raids
    A formal and unreserved apology for the Dawn Raids The Government will offer education scholarships as part of the apology Manaaki New Zealand Short Term Scholarship Training courses Support Pacific artists and historians to develop a comprehensive written and oral account of the Dawn Raids Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Speech to Dawn Raids Apology
    Tēnā koutou katoa, Kia orana kotou katoatoa, Fakaalofa lahi atu ki mutolu oti, Tālofa nī, Mālō nī koutou, Ni sa bula vinaka, Fakatalofa atu, Noa'ia 'e mauri, Kam na mauri, Malo e lelei, Sioto'ofa, Mālō lava le lagi e mamā ma le soifua maua, Oue tulou, tulou atu, tulouna lava ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Bridging the gap – last piece of Northcote Safe Cycle Route now complete
    The opening of two bridges over Auckland’s Northern Motorway is the last link of a cycling and walking route which provides a safe, active alternative for students and commuters, Transport Minister Michael Wood said today. Michael Wood cut the ribbon for the completion of the Northcote Safe Cycle Route, at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Progress in establishment of Aged Care Commissioner
    Recruitment for an Aged Care Commissioner will start next month, to ensure greater oversight of New Zealand’s aged care sector. “This sector is responsible for supporting a large and often vulnerable population. While most people are able to access quality care, there have been cases where that care has fallen ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New record number of homes consented
    In the year ended June 2021, the actual number of new dwellings consented was 44,299, up 18 percent from the June 2020 year. In June 2021, the seasonally adjusted number of new dwellings consented rose 3.8 percent. In June 2021, 4,310 new dwellings were consented, an increase of 3.8 per ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Communities backed to tackle wilding pines
    Twelve community projects across New Zealand will receive a share of $2 million to carry out wilding pine control, Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor announced as part of Biosecurity Week. “Wilding pines are a serious problem that threaten many of the unique landscapes that New Zealanders value. Community groups and trusts ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Health Minister Andrew Little responding to the New Zealand Nurses Organisation's rejection of ...
    I was advised last night that the result of the ballot of Tōpūtanga Tapuhi Kaitiaki o Aotearoa New Zealand Nurses Organisation members have rejected the latest proposal to settle their collective agreement. Let me be clear: the proposal was one they put to the Government. The Nurses Organisation rejected their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Conversion Practices Prohibition Legislation introduced to Parliament
    Legislation has been introduced to Parliament to protect against practices intended to change or suppress someone’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. Introducing the Conversion Practices Prohibition Legislation Bill, Minister of Justice, Kris Faafoi, said the measures proposed were aimed at ending conversion practices which don’t work, are widely ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New kaupapa Māori mental health and addiction services to support people in central North Island
    New mental health and addiction services rolling out across the central North Island will improve outcomes and equity for Māori, Associate Minister of Health (Māori Health) Peeni Henare says. Today the Minister met with providers of the new kaupapa Māori primary mental health and addiction service, Poutama Ora, which will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New kaupapa Māori mental health and addiction services to support people in central North Island
    New mental health and addiction services rolling out across the central North Island will improve outcomes and equity for Māori, Associate Minister of Health (Māori Health) Peeni Henare says. Today the Minister met with providers of the new kaupapa Māori primary mental health and addiction service, Poutama Ora, which will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New school site for booming West Auckland
    The Government will build on a new school site in West Auckland to cope with rapid population growth in the area, Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. The Ministry is working with existing local schools to determine how the 1.5-hectare site at 279 Hobsonville Point Road will be used to support ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Trans-Tasman travel window to close at midnight tomorrow
    A further 500 MIQ rooms released for managed returnees from NSW Further Government actions announced today are balanced to provide more certainty for Kiwis wanting to return from Australia, while continuing to protect New Zealand from COVID-19, acting Minister for COVID-19 Response Ayesha Verrall says. The actions were foreshadowed last ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt investing millions in Hawke's Bay and Tairāwhiti schools
    Napier Boys’ and Girls’ High Schools are among those set to benefit from a $16.5 million investment in the Hawke's Bay and Tairāwhiti region, Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash announced today. The Government has set aside money in Budget 2021 to accelerate five projects in Napier, Hastings, Havelock North ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Game changing Jobs for Nature investment for Northland
    Conservation Minister Kiri Allan has announced Jobs for Nature funding for a portfolio of projects that will create ‘game changing’ gains for nature and communities across Northland/Te Tai Tokerau as part of the Government’s acceleration of the economic recovery from COVID. “This portfolio of 12 projects will see over $20 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Third COVID-19 vaccine receives provisional approval
    New Zealand’s regulatory authority Medsafe has granted provisional approval of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine for individuals 18 years of age and older, Acting Minister for COVID-19 Response Dr Ayesha Verrall announced today. New Zealand secured 7.6 million doses (enough for 3.8 million people) of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine through an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago