web analytics

Greenpeace activism

Written By: - Date published: 10:42 am, July 5th, 2015 - 23 comments
Categories: activism, Conservation, Environment, sustainability - Tags: , , ,

Herald columnist Paul Little has done some good stuff in the past, but today’s effort on Greenpeace is a disgrace. Nothing but ill-informed prejudice on parade:

It’s stunt season for show ponies

Friends don’t let friends work for Greenpeace. When one of my friends told me he was thinking of getting a job with them, I suggested he apply to a different circus.

He’s a smart and tough guy, hard-headed and practical but with a crusading streak that probably clouded his judgment in this instance. Because if you want to make the world a better place, isn’t Greenpeace the last outfit you’d hook up with?

The fiasco that saw a clutch of its members climb on top of Parliament and wave some signs around for a few hours recently can best be seen as the beginning of 2015’s stunt season.

Look forward to the next few weeks seeing publicity whores and show ponies saddle up to do the sort of good works that will get the maximum number of people looking at them and have minimal effect.

This is, of course, Greenpeace’s specialty. The organisation’s modus operandi has always been to gain vast amounts of attention by arranging and performing elaborate and eye-catching feats which have zero effect. ….

And so on.

I don’t know what Little’s problem with Greenpeace is, but he should grow up and get over it. Greenpeace does more good for the world every year than The Herald (which exists to sell advertising and make a profit) has or will manage in its lifetime.

For some reading on Greenpeace’s “zero effect” start with this list of Greenpeace victories. There are well over 100 entries stretching back to the 1970’s, and containing a few classics:

July 2010: New Zealand’s government announced a complete u-turn on plans to mine New Zealand’s best conservation land. There will be no mining in Schedule 4 land or any of New Zealand’s national parks now or in the future.

May 2010: Nestlé agrees to stop purchasing palm-oil from sources which destroy Indonesian rainforests. The decision caps eight weeks of massive pressure from consumers via social media and non-violent direct action by Greenpeace activists as the company concedes to the demands of a global campaign against its Kit Kat brand.

March 7, 2007: The New Zealand government announces cancellation of proposed coal-burning power plant Marsden B. Greenpeace and local activists had mounted a four-year struggle which involved a nine-day occupation, highcourt challenges, protest marches, a record numbers of public submissions, Surfers Against Sulphur, public meetings, and a pirate radio station.

2002: The European Union, followed by Japan, ratifies the Kyoto Protocol on climate change. Intensive Greenpeace lobbying must continue because, for the protocol to enter into force, 55 parties to the convention must ratify it.

1992: France cancels this year’s nuclear tests at Moruroa Atoll, following the Rainbow Warrior visit to the test zone, and vows to halt altogether if other nuclear nations follow suit.

1982: After at sea actions against whalers, a whaling moratorium is adopted by the International Whaling Commission.

1975: France ends atmospheric tests in the South Pacific after Greenpeace protests at the test site.

Or try this much shorter piece:

Greenpeace’s Biggest Victories Against Corporations and Politicians

Greenpeace has secured one of the most high-profile victories in its history, after pressuring Lego to drop its contract with Shell. It’s the latest in a long line of victories Greenpeace campaigners have claimed, often using guerrilla tactics in order to do so. …

For example:

Kingsnorth Power Station

Police surround protesters during a sitdown protest at the gates of Kingsnorth Power Station near Rochester in Kent, southeast England August 9, 2008. Climate protesters breached security to enter the site of the coal-fired power station in southeast England on Saturday but German firm E.ON, which runs the plant, said output had not been disrupted.Reuters
Greenpeace activists ran a long and high-profile campaign to close down the Kingsnorth coal and oil-fired power station in Medway, Kent and have claimed they were instrumental in the plants’ decommissioning in 2012.

Specifically, the station closed as a result of the EU’s Large Combustion Plant Directive, but Greenpeace has claimed success in the government’s decision to shelve plans for a new coal-fired plant on the same site, calling it “the British climate movement’s biggest victory”.

Over a period of three years, a series of Greenpeace activists occupied the power station, occupying their chimneys, causing tens of thousands of pounds in damage and stopping boats from delivering shipments of coal to the station’s terminal.

Greenpeace Campaigner and one of the so-called Kingsnorth Six Ben Stewart said: “Little did we know, as we dragged ourselves up 1053 rungs of a ladder, that a year later we’d be acquitted by a jury which believed the plant posed more of a threat than we did, and that, a year after that, E.ON would kick plans for its new power station into the long grass.”

And so on.

Thank you Greenpeace. Thank you Greenpeace activists for your bravery and for the work that you do. You make the world a better place.

23 comments on “Greenpeace activism”

  1. Paul 1

    Before attacking Greenpeace, Paul Little should ask himself what does he do to avert climate catastrophe?
    Wonder how much the fossil fuel industry paid him to write the article.

  2. Greenpeace and their activists deserve our highest praise and respect and that is what they get from me. Paul Little – sounds like he is envious because he hasn’t done shit to help the planet.

    • Paul 2.1

      As just another captured member of the MSM, he is in fact partially responsive for restricting serious debate on the subject.

  3. Bill 3

    If a message is getting out on an issue, but there is a gap between the volume of the message and the reaction to the issue, then that gap will be filled with people crying ‘fail’.

    I’m all for publicity stunts, they certainly have their place (small numbers of people getting fair media traction) .

    I might have doubts around using those tactics when the issue and the potential levels of participation and buy-in is large, unless they used in a series of high profile rolling actions.

  4. Reddelusion 4

    Green peace do need a PR make over, they loose more people than they gain with their silly stunts, keeps the hard core happy like the above poster, but that’s about it

    • dukeofurl 4.1

      Have you forgotten the old maxim about advertising, ‘50% is wasted but I dont know which 50%’

      Every group with limited resources has a target market. You just are too old or too conservative or both to matter for Greenpeace.

      I think greenpeace know exactly what they are doing, and Im sure it works for them. As an activist group they have to be seen as active in getting publicity about their issues. And it worked !

      Look at Nick Smith in his publicity stunt going around ‘vacant crown land’ to be used for housing. All it produced was an epic fail, and showed that he was incompetent, if you didn’t already suspect it.

    • Paul 4.2

      As if you care about the environment.
      Shill for the 1%.

  5. Enough 5

    Rather a “publicity whore” than a tow-the-Herald line whore!

    • dukeofurl 5.1

      Dont you mean ‘No Herald journalists were taken out to lunch for this story’

  6. red-blooded 6

    Publicity stunts are not enough, by themselves, to solve entrenched problems, but can certainly be part of the mix – especially when so many people try to avoid thinking about the kinds of issues that Greenpeace focuses its energies on. Greenpeace represents care for our planet and each other. What does Paul Little represent?

    • In Vino 6.1

      He represents a veneer of quasi-sophistication over a core of triviality combined with wilful ignorance.

  7. Sable 7

    Yep pretty revolting stuff but then what can you expect from what I consider to be a a turgid right wing rag. This is yet another example of why I don’t trust the MSM in general….

  8. Charles 8

    So further down the Herald article it gets into the central message from Paul Little, “Thou hast much volume”:

    Stephanie from Bootstheory blog has a post on “volume/tone control” when presenting opinions, it was posted here recently,

    “The tone argument is a form of derailment, or a red herring, because the tone of a statement is independent of the content of the statement in question, and calling attention to it distracts from the issue at hand. Drawing attention to the tone rather than content of a statement can allow other parties to avoid engaging with sound arguments presented in that statement, thus undermining the original party’s attempt to communicate and effectively shutting them down.”

    The irony is that these voices are already marginalized. Shouting is often the only way to get heard….

    This obviously applies to tone of written or spoken word, inherent, she says, in the topic being disputed, and that’s true. But now Paul Little says an act, – a scientifically, measurably, quiet action – can have “volume”. That is also true. Climbing Parliament building was a fiasco, he says, “too loud”, it turns people off. All that moving around. All that actually being see in public. Children know better than to be heard. Adults shouldn’t be seen or heard.

    In actual fact Paul isn’t arguing volume anymore, at least not tone, because he contradicts himself:

    “…But if you want to make a real and dramatic change to someone’s life and you don’t need a fuss made of you for doing so, teaching people to read, so that when they get out of prison their chances of getting a job and functioning in society are higher, is about as good as it gets….”

    Here is a quiet act, with potentially “much volume”. So what’s the difference between quietly climbing something and quietly teaching prisoners to read*?

    Culture.

    Children should be seen and not heard.
    Adults should not challenge symbols of authority.
    Parliament buildings are a symbol of authority.
    Only a child would challenge authority so brazenly.
    Those protestors aren’t adults, they’re worse than naughty children.
    They aren’t one of us.

    Greenpeace transgressed the values of a very specific culture. That’s where the volume came from. A bit like using the dessert spoon for your soup course. It’s terribly disconcerting. The lie inherent in the claim is that the members of the culture Paul Little belongs to never were and never will be interested in Greenpeace’s message. They miss the biggest part of the message entirely.

    In quietly and creatively protesting their message the way they did, not only did they shout in the face of the right people (they knew both sides of their potential audience), they presented a way for Stephanie’s “marginalised voices” to out-shout the absurdly restrictive culture of the NZ Herald set.

    No one ever believed that a banner on parliament building was going to end Climate Change, influence National Party policy, or change John Key’s mind. What it did was change the current climate of protest, in irreversible immediate ways. That’s what scares the establishment. No one can stop the various ways to quietly undermine culture. Greenpeace emphasised how to loudly protest the culture that is the root of the problems in NZ: Quiet is the new Loud.

    *There’s another wee catch to his theory of simple quiet success in his example: he does not point out (but certainly illustrates) that the most substantial hurdle standing in the way of ex-cons reintergrating into society isn’t their reading age.

  9. Facetious 9

    The big multi-national corporation called Greenpeace is very adept at political stunts to attract gullible people to donate money to its coffers. Nothing wrong with their business smarts.

    • stever 9.1

      Yeah…sadly being effective costs money.

      I guess you’d prefer they had no money and were therefore ineffective.

  10. Heather Grimwood 10

    Greenpeace activities over the years remind us that to be responsible global citizens, ensuring we move out of our comfort zone and work in whatever ways we can to enable a viable existence for those that come after us. Denigrators have heads in the sand ( quicksand !).

  11. maui 11

    Greenpeace are definitely leading the way in NZ in getting this message out there, the other protest groups are a bit behind but catching up. Who can forget a Lawless up a rig in Taranaki, the cutesy polar bear that gets itself into mischief in more temperate climes -(https://metrouk2.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/article-1342460620360-14153dbe000005dc-16005_636x402.jpg), and now the latest action taking it to government.

    The selfless will keep on getting society to where it should be while the selfish will keep getting in their way. But the tide is turning and there’s nothing they can do to stop it.

  12. The Real Matthew 12

    Paul’s piece was enlightened and bang on the money.

    We need more pieces like this to expose these organisations for what they are whilst focussing on the people who actually make a difference in their day to day lives yet don’t receive the accolades.

    The fact you respond quoting Greenpeace propaganda says it all.

    • In Vino 12.1

      “Paul’s piece was enlightened and bang on the money.”

      It was a trite load of cacklemush.

      I do not believe that you understand what ‘these organisations’ really are, nor what is worthy of what you call ‘accolades’.

      And since what Greenpeace says is ‘Propaganda’ in your view, you obviously also approved of French Nuclear tests in the Pacific, as well as the sinking of the Rainbow Warrior. and the wholesale destruction of whales…

      When people take a simple, vague piece of waffle like ‘Greenpeace Propaganda’ and claim that it ‘says it all’, it simply indicates that they really like to over-simplify everything to suit their fantasies.

      Or have I misunderestimated you?

    • Anno1701 12.2

      “We need more pieces like this to expose these organisations for what they are’

      ok then smart guy

      what exactly ARE Greenpeace ?

  13. Even Captain Paul Watson thinks Greenpeace have lost the point of why he helped set them up.
    I had my doubts about them when they were protesting the nice little baby fur seals being clubbed to death, yet nothing about the cows, chickens or pigs, etc ?
    Then they gave the Anti Vivisection Socity zero support, as if ‘we’ didn’t exist?, AVS managed a 500 ish strong march through Wellington, and a shit load more thanks to mainly one womans efforts (can’t remember her name sorry) And a 100,000 + petition.
    Not that burning bunker oil for the sake of whales is much better.

  14. Save NZ 14

    Go Greenpeace.

    Who bother’s to read the herald these days, anyway. Like TV3, they have gone too far down the propaganda line to be credible, and soon it will be embarrassing for decent journo’s to be associated with them.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Government announces plan to tackle problem plastics and seven single-use plastic items
    Following the success of the phase out of single-use plastic shopping bags, the Government now has plans to phase out more single-use and problem plastics to reduce waste and protect the environment announced Associate Minister for the Environment Eugenie Sage. The proposals are to phase-out: some hard-to-recycle PVC and polystyrene ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • PM comments on Auckland COVID-19 case
    After 102 days we have our first cases of Covid-19 outside of a Managed Isolation or Quarantine facility in New Zealand. Shortly I will ask Dr Bloomfield to set out the details of the case. While we have all worked incredibly hard to prevent this scenario, we have also planned ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Significant investment in Raukūmara Pae Maunga to prevent Raukūmara forest collapse
    An iwi-Crown approach programme to restore the Raukūmara forest on the East Coast of the North Island and boost employment opportunities for whānau, particularly rangatahi/young people, will receive $34 million funding, Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage has announced. “Raukūmara Pae Maunga is a partnership with Te Whānau-ā-Apanui, Ngāti Porou, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New partnership central to delivering more Māori housing
    Government agencies and partners are working closer together to provide more Māori Housing through the Te MAIHI o te Whare Māori – the Māori and Iwi Housing Innovation Framework for Action (MAIHI). MAIHI is a kaupapa Māori approach that drives a system change to give effect and impact on Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Manawatū Gorge replacement highway drives forward
    Site work is soon to begin on Te Ahu a Turanga: Manawatū Tararua Highway, the project to replace the former SH3 route through the Manawatū Gorge, Transport Minister Phil Twyford said today. Phil Twyford was today in Woodville at the signing of a formal agreement by members of the Alliance ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Pacific Ministers meet to discuss regional economic priorities
    The Pacific Islands Forum Economic Ministers Meeting (FEMM) begins today and will focus on the major economic and social impacts of COVID-19 on the Pacific.  FEMM is an important congregation of Economic Ministers and senior officials from around the region, and for the first time, the annual meeting will be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Formal apology and payment to George Nepata
    Cabinet has approved a formal apology and ex gratia payment to former soldier George Nepata, announced Defence Minister Ron Mark. This payment is to recognise the New Zealand Defence Force’s failure to provide Mr Nepata with a safe system of work in April 1989 when, as a result of an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Report into Iain Lees-Galloway’s expenditure
    A report undertaken by Ministerial Services into Iain Lees-Galloway’s ministerial expenditure has found no evidence of any inappropriate transactions or spending. Ministerial Services undertook a line by line review of all his expenditure, including staff and spouse expenses for the period 1 January 2019 to 30 June 2020.  “I commissioned ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Managed isolation charges to start 11 August
    Managed isolation charges for returnees will come into force from 12.01am Tuesday 11th August, after they passed their last cabinet milestone today, Housing Minister Megan Woods said. “The new charging system balances the rights of New Zealanders to return home and helps reduce pressure on the managed isolation and quarantine ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Update on New Zealand and the Cook Islands travel bubble
    The Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern and the Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Henry Puna have welcomed the completion of phase one in the establishment of a travel bubble between New Zealand and the Cook Island. Negotiations on the text of an ‘Arrangement to Facilitate Quarantine-Free Travel ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • One-stop ‘jobs and training’ shop goes live
    The Government has launched a new online, phone and onsite service to help New Zealanders connect to a range of employment support and products for workers and businesses affected by COVID-19, announced Minister of Education Chris Hipkins and Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni. Connected.govt.nz is a one-stop-shop for jobseekers, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • MSD security guards to be paid Living Wage
    Security guards contracted to the Ministry of Social Development will be paid at least the Living Wage from next month supporting the Government’s commitment towards fair pay and employment conditions, announced Minister for  Social Development Carmel Sepuloni.   “MSD was  among the first government agencies to pay its employees the living ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New strategy to ensure nature thrives
    The Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage today launched Te Mana o te Taiao, the Aotearoa New Zealand Biodiversity Strategy - a way forward that envisions Aotearoa New Zealand as a place where ecosystems are healthy and resilient, and people embrace the natural world. “Many of New Zealand’s plants and wildlife species ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Provider Languages Fund will support Pacific Wellbeing approach
    “Pacific languages, cultures and identity are essential to the health, wellbeing and lifetime success of our Pacific peoples and their communities in Aotearoa. The strength and resilience of Pacific Aotearoa is not only vital to their own prosperity but integral to the prosperity of all New Zealanders, and is particularly ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • COVID-19: More funding for schools and boost to construction sector
    ·       $38 million to help schools cover unexpected costs related to COVID-19 ·       $69 million upgrade for online learning ·       $107 million contingency funding to support school construction suppliers facing additional costs due to the lockdown. The Government is releasing $214 million from the COVID-19 response and recovery fund to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Stay safe on the tracks – Rail Safety Week
    Despite the Government installing safety upgrades around the country, people should still take care around rail crossings, said Transport Minister Phil Twyford launching Rail Safety Week. Phil Twyford said installing safety infrastructure is crucial, but we are encouraging people to be more careful around trains too. “We’re making good progress ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government backs Manawatū social housing project
    The Government is providing a cash injection to help Palmerston North City Council complete a programme to provide 78 social housing units for vulnerable tenants. The $4.7 million to build 28 units in the Papaioea Place redevelopment comes from the $3 billion set aside for infrastructure in the Government’s COVID-19 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Major funding boost for Predator Free Banks Peninsula
    A pest free Banks Peninsula/Te Pātaka o Rākaihautū is one step closer with a $5.11 million boost to accelerate this project and create jobs, announced Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage in Canterbury today. “This is a game changer for this ambitious project to restore the native wildlife and plants on Ōtautahi/Christchurch’s doorstep ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Major investment for indoor sports in Hawke’s Bay
    A Government grant of $6.4 million will expand the Pettigrew Arena in Taradale with new indoor courts of national standard. “The project is likely to take 18 months with approximately 300 people employed through the process,” Grant Robertson said. “The expansion will increase the indoor court space up to 11 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New infrastructure for Far North tourist town
    The Far North tourist destination of Mangonui is to receive Government funding to improve waterfront infrastructure, open up access to the harbour and improve water quality, Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has announced. A total of $6.5 million from the $3 billion set aside in the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government remains committed to Women’s Cricket World Cup
    The Government has re-affirmed its commitment to supporting the hosting of the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup, which the ICC has delayed from 2021 to 2022. “This is obviously a disappointing decision for cricket players and fans around the world and for the White Ferns and their supporters here at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Green light for Te Awa River Ride in $220m nationwide cycleways investment
    Cyclists and walkers will now have a safer way to get around Taupō, Tūrangi, and between Hamilton and Cambridge, with funding for shared paths and Te Awa River Ride, Associate Minister of Transport Julie Anne Genter announced today. “The Te Awa River Ride is the latest part of massive growth ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Six major ‘shovel-ready’ cycleways funded in Christchurch
    Six major cycle routes will be completed in Christchurch thanks to funding from the Government’s investment in shovel-ready infrastructure as part of the COVID-19 recovery Associate Minister of Transport Julie Anne Genter announced today. $125 million will be invested to kick-start construction and fund the completion of the following cycleway ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Police facilities for Whanganui
    Plans are underway for a brand new state-of-the-art hub for Whanganui’s justice and social agencies, following confirmation the ageing Whanganui Central Police Station is to be replaced. Police Minister Stuart Nash has announced $25 million in new infrastructure spending to improve facilities for the wider community, and for staff who ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Relativity adjustment for Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu
    An adjustment payment has been made to Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu under the relativity mechanisms in their 1995 and 1997 Treaty of Waitangi settlements, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little announced today. The latest payments to Waikato-Tainui and Ngāi Tahu are $2,700,000 and $2,600,000 respectively to ensure the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Auckland rail upgrades pick up steam
    Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Transport Minister Phil Twyford today kicked off the start of the Auckland NZ Upgrade Programme rail projects which will support over 400 jobs and help unlock our biggest city. Both ministers marked the start of enabling works on the third main rail line project ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • PGF support for Wairoa creates jobs
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investment of $3.78 million in Wairoa will create much needed economic stimulus and jobs, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. PGF projects announced today include: $200,000 loan to Nuhaka Kiwifruit Holdings Ltd (operated by Pine Valley Orchard Ltd) to increase the productivity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Public and Māori housing to trial renewable energy technology
    Tenants in public and Māori housing may be benefiting from their own affordable renewable energy in future – a fund to trial renewable energy technology for public and Māori housing has today been announced by Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods and Associate Minister for Housing (Māori Housing) Nanaia Mahuta. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • $2.7m for Hokianga infrastructure
    Hokianga will receive $2.7 million to redevelop four of its wharves and upgrade its water supply, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. Far North District Council will receive $1.8 million from the Provincial Growth Fund for the work on the wharves. “The work will include the construction of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New fund to support housing and construction sector
    A $350 million Residential Development Response Fund is being established to support the residential construction sector and to minimise the economic impact from COVID-19, the Housing Minister Dr Megan Woods has announced. “The Residential Development Response Fund will help to progress stalled or at-risk developments that support our broader housing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government investment to boost Auckland’s community recycling network
    As part of a broader plan to divert waste from landfill, the Government today announced $10.67 million for new infrastructure as part of the Resource Recovery Network across the Auckland region. “This key investment in Auckland’s community recycling network is part of the Government’s Infrastructure Reference Group ‘shovel ready’ projects ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Te Papa transformation starts at Cameron Road
    The Government is investing $45 million in the first stage of an ambitious urban development project for Tauranga that will employ up to 250 people and help the region grow, Urban Development Minister Phil Twyford announced today. Phil Twyford says the funding has been allocated out of the $3 billion ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Low-emissions options for heavy transport a step closer
    Getting low-emission trucks on the road is a step closer with investment in infrastructure to support hydrogen vehicles, the Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods has announced. The Infrastructure Reference Group has provisionally approved $20 million for New Plymouth company Hiringa Energy to establish a nationwide network of hydrogen-fuelling stations. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • New training centre to upskill workers
    A new trades training centre to upskill the local workforce will be built in the South Waikato town of Tokoroa through funding from the Government’s COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund, Education Minister Chris Hipkins and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. The Government will contribute $10.84 million from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Subsequent children legislation to change
    The Government has agreed to repeal part of the Oranga Tamariki Act subsequent children provisions, Minister for Children Tracey Martin announced today. “There are times when children need to go into care for their safety – the safety and care of children must always be paramount,” Minister Martin said. “But ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Funding to expand mental health support for Pacific peoples
    A $1.5 million boost to grow primary mental health and addiction services for Pacific peoples in Auckland, Hamilton and Canterbury will lead to better outcomes for Pacific communities, Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa says.  Pasifika Futures has received funding to expand services through The Fono, Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Funding boost for sustainable food and fibre production
    Twenty-two projects to boost the sustainability and climate resilience of New Zealand’s food and fibres sector have been announced today by Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. The $18m funding will deliver practical knowledge to help farmers and growers use their land more sustainably, meet environmental targets, remain prosperous, and better understand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Mature Workers Toolkit launched on business.govt.nz
    Employment Minister Willie Jackson welcomes an initiative that assists employers to get mature workers into New Zealand small businesses. The disadvantages that older people face in the workplace was highlighted in the whole of Government Employment Strategy.  In order to address this, a Mature Workers Toolkit has been developed and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Trans-Tasman cooperation in a COVID-19 world
    New Zealand and Australia reaffirmed today the need for the closest possible collaboration as they tackle a global environment shaped by COVID-19, Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters said. “In these challenging times, our close collaboration with Australia is more vital than ever,” said Mr Peters. Mr Peters and his Australian ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Pike recovery efforts now in unexplored territory
    The recovery and forensic examination of the loader driven by survivor Russell Smith means the underground team are now moving into an area of the Pike River Mine that has not been seen since the explosion, Minister Responsible for Pike River Re-entry Andrew Little said. “The fifth and last robot ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago