web analytics

The Government’s Economic Development Plan

Written By: - Date published: 7:35 am, September 30th, 2019 - 15 comments
Categories: business, capitalism, Economy, energy, Environment, farming, housing, labour - Tags:

Last week the government launched its Economic Development Plan. Now, yes, we are two years into the government so it’s a wee bit late. But this kind of stuff is still worth doing.

At a fairly high level, these are its aims:

  • Moving the New Zealand economy from volume to value with Kiwi businesses, including SMEs, becoming more productive.
  • Ensuring people are skilled, adaptable and have access to lifelong learning.
  • Making deeper pools of capital available to invest in infrastructure and grow New Zealand’s productive assets.
  • Strengthening and revitalising regional economies.
  • Enabling a step-change for the Māori and Pacific New Zealand economies.
  • Developing a sustainable and affordable energy system.
  • Utilising our land and resources to deliver greater value and improve environmental outcomes.
  • Transforming our housing market to improve productivity growth and make houses more affordable.

The pdf of it is here, in a mercifully brief and succinct form.

Now, the above crosses a whole bunch of areas you don’t normally see in such a plan. Usually they have a much narrower range. I liked that.

I also liked that it was really hard for the opposition to argue with any of it. The things being aimed for are intuitively useful no matter whether the blue or red teams are in.

I’m interested that it mentions specific strategies for industry sectors. That takes a whole lot of organizing, and once done it’s really hard to make all that bureaucratic effort worthwhile. But for a small country with pretty narrow specialities and really narrow bunch of companies working in any one area, we could always do with some actual coherence and cooperation against the big competitive world.

I didn’t like its post-hoc reasoning to cover broad previously announced policy areas, some of which even the government acknowledges haven’t worked, such as its tertiary fees policy. I also didn’t like that it didn’t have the courage to state what kind of country it wanted as a result of this plan. It knows what the challenges were, sketched out some of the opportunities, but had none of the reach of the Growth and Innovation Plan from back in the day. Doesn’t join all its dots into something that makes a YES! of sense.

Which is a bit of a shame given all the initiatives scanned within it.

And rather than being rolled out with confidence and brio with style and oodles of cash and fireside chats and aged spirits sipped, the whole thing has plopped without ripple like the proverbial dead gumboot of wonkery into the silage pond of media history. 1968 National Development Conference it was not.

But like a mid-episode reveal in a Welsh detective show, guaranteed the same plan will be pulled out stinking from that same pond next term, water blasted off, given a fresh straw hat and a false teeth smile by the next lot.

It also comes with indicators, which is a reasonably easy thing to do when economic times are still good as they are, but a mean-assed bite on the Ministerial ass when they start sliding and you have to start scrabbling round for interventionist techniques that don’t exist and bureaucrats run from. But that surely is what such a plan is for.

However (ahem), for those who want a bit of coherence out of this government’s approach to the economy, this is not a bad place to start. Next time, team, could we have it ready before election day.

15 comments on “The Government’s Economic Development Plan ”

  1. Sabine 1

    yeah, nah nah – my thoughts in bold

    at a fairly high level, these are its aims:

  2. Moving the New Zealand economy from volume to value with Kiwi businesses, including SMEs, becoming more productive.
  3. well sadly they just can't fire half of us 'kiwi business' owners to make the other half more productive, but frankly how about they start with the government and they get a bit of productivity up, after all it took three years to come up with this corporate bullshit.

  4. Ensuring people are skilled, adaptable and have access to lifelong learning.
  5. we decide what skills you need, you will not have enough welfare available in the future so be prepared to train at 65 + to be a barista or a ramen noodle line cook. These courses will be payable of course, but the door to the learning centre is open thus ACCESS is granted.

    • Making deeper pools of capital available to invest in infrastructure and grow New Zealand’s productive assets.
    • the deepest pool of money err capital we could find was outside of NZ. Thus we will continue to push private investment in to our public infrastructure and if possible sell what ever productive assets we have left. You of course will continue to pay for the services that you need to survive, so nothing really changes here.

    • Strengthening and revitalising regional economies.
    • See above, private investment, more forresting, more dairying (or replace that with big industrial sites turning cow waste in to Plant derived meat or something with all the waste that no one knows how to handle), more water extraction, more tourism, and thus……we revitalised. What the rural towns are still dying? T'was not us we did try the littlest.

    • Enabling a step-change for the Māori and Pacific New Zealand economies.
    • can someone please translate this into plain english, cause i do believe that someone just said something there in order to say something and we can’t blame Soimon for it ,

    • Developing a sustainable and affordable energy system.
    • Developping. Cause we are still developing. Developing. Not creating, not investing, not building, but 'developing'. Does anyone remember her? We were told then that we would be 'developing'. But i guess they need to be re-elected so as to have a job and earn a keep. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJJGuIZVfLM

    • Utilising our land and resources to deliver greater value and improve environmental outcomes.

    oh gosh, all the developpers are giddy. I am sure that utilising our land and resources to even greater value will at some stage imporve the enviornmental outcome. Yeah, right TUI.

  6. Transforming our housing market to improve productivity growth and make houses more affordable
  7. oh dear. Transforming. Ey? Not building more better and cheaper, not making government free interest loans available, no CGT, no closing of loopholes that allow prooperty speculators to keep properties empty, set rents so high no one will apply to rent etc and still make a profit courtesy of the NZ Taxpayers.

    this is a load of hogwash, bullshit, nothingness, but I am sure Grant Robertson felt like he did good work and will be given a generous bonus at his next KPI meeting. Right?

    We are to be exited about this? This little piece of hogwash that has no value and will amount to fuck all? Good grief. We are so fucked.

    (video link above is from 1992 when a young girl called Severn Coulis Suzuki addressed the UN in regards to climate change and suff – and no one listened then either).

  • Tiger Mountain 2

    “Spare us” was my reaction after reading the linked .pdf–standard blue skies fare.

    This country suffers daily from almost 30 years of the neo liberal consensus between the main political parties. The NZ underclass are the children of Roger’n’Ruth, as much as the “me me me, mine mine mine” middle classes and managerial layer.

    An economic development plan worthy of the title would involve repealing the Reserve Bank Act, State Sector Act, and returning SOEs to Govt. Dept. status, and restoring power generation and supply to public ownership.

    Even the Reserve Bank fer crissakes is recommending a Govt spend up on infrastructure projects! But no, Mr Robertson clings to the miserly fiscal cap and sends “signals” to business.

    This Govt. has delivered a number of very useful reforms, e.g. Pay Equity for carers, and setting a higher wage floor. I hope they are somehow re-elected against National’s increasingly “Trump junior” style negative campaigning. Generations “rent” and “student loan” will be in the ascendancy as voters come 2023, when it will be time to kick the structural elements of Rogernomics to the curb once and for all.

  • Kevin 3

    So, anything different to what a National led government would have put out?

    I doubt it.

    Other than:

    • Enabling a step-change for the Māori and Pacific New Zealand economies.

    Its just the same old drivel.

  • Stuart Munro. 4

    Economics, not being an objective discipline, struggles with implementing real solutions to contemporary problems, much less strategies to improve future outcomes.

    As Croaking Cassandra was saying the other day, since the neoliberal turn our economic outcomes have lagged those of our trading partners, and the message of this pdf is that the government is still pretending that isn't so.

    We know the CGT was a required modest step to address housing inequality, but for reasons Labour is not disposed to discuss, it's off the table. A competent opposition would have them on the rack for that, but National is more of a howling shitstorm than an opposition. It's fair to say that no or ineffectual action is what the government prefers – which is after all the attraction of neoliberalism to the political class, it absolves them of responsibility, at least in their eyes.

    So what should a modest centrist government be doing that they are not?

    Well they should begin of course by constraining the out of control unskilled immigration normalized by the previous government. It drives wages and conditions down, thus impoverishing the rest of the economy. Conditions matter, and with record suicide running at over twice the road toll, employers imposing unnecessary stressors like the split shifts that cost Wellington bus drivers their jobs need to be viewed distinctly unsympathetically.

    They should be prioritizing cost of living rorts, and in particular rates and utilities. We are at the long end of a global supply chain, but that does not apply to our power companies, whose product is locally produced. Nevertheless, we now have some of the most expensive domestic electricity prices in the world (thankyou Roger Douglas and all your disgusting fellow traitors). There's really no excuse for this, and none of the pathetic burble about markets or 'shopping around' makes it a whit better. The privatizations took place on the promise of cheaper prices and have not delivered them. The companies therefore have no-one but themselves to blame if they are returned to public ownership with minimal compensation – they lied to and defrauded both government and citizens. There are two economic objects in reducing cost of living in this fashion – to make our workers more internationally competitive, which they cannot be if they are being rorted six ways from Sunday, and to increase the cashflow within the economy, which makes small businesses and startups more viable.

    Urgently address rent-rorting and housing insecurity. Although it has been congratulating itself for turning around housing construction, the government is still falling short of demand growth driven by migration. We could really use several hundred thousand extra houses in numerous locations, and in accord with adapting to a more sustainable model, tiny houses are an obvious answer. They use less labour and materials in construction, their portability lends them flexibility, and their energy footprints are likely to be much smaller than those of conventional housing. Far from encouraging them however, councils are aggressively overcharging on permits for them, with permit costs of 30-40k being now typical. Government could drive that down by producing lines of standardized plans with permit and rate caps. You know of course that most prospective tiny house dwellers would have preferred conventional dwellings, but they are forced to these alternatives by the epic incompetence of successive governments, who have pissed away their jobs to migrants and their housing to speculators – (thanks Roger Douglas and all your fellow traitors).

    • Gosman 4.1

      Nasty migrants. Everybody not born here or whose parents were not born here should be forced to go back to their home countries.

      • Stuart Munro. 4.1.1

        Actually they're pretty nice people on the whole – unlike the worthless villains who exploit them in preference to New Zealanders, who know their legal position rather better.

        Their niceness or lack thereof is neither here nor there however, they are bad for the economy – you remember – the altar on which every other positive feature of NZ society has been sacrificed.

        Mind, Russian “oligarchs” and Chinese criminals aren’t people we should be pretending are businessmen – the Russians who supplied the slaveships and crews never operated profitable businesses to buy those, they stole them from the collapsing state, which had need of that capital as it tried to rebuild after the soviet era.

        • Gosman 4.1.1.1

          Most of NZ is either of migrant stock or only one or two generations removed.

          • Stuart Munro. 4.1.1.1.1

            Frankly, so what?

            The yardstick for policy is public good. The evidence is that large scale low end migration is bad for the economy, as are criminals, speculators, and ACT supporters. This being so, few or none of these groups should be allowed in.

      • Dukeofurl 4.1.2

        Only you are using the term 'nasty'

        However the numbers are the issue ( Stats NZ)

        2009 12500 migrants

        2010 16500

        2011 3900

        2012 -3200

        2013 7900

        2014 33100

        2015 53400

        2016 64100

        2017 58900

        2018 48900

    • Nic the NZer 4.2

      Im pretty sure Michael Reddell is for most of the neo-liberal policy agenda. I have never seen any evidence his policy preferences would be very good for NZ, quite the opposite.

      Also his main critique, but productivity, has still been running well ahead of wages for several decades. Most of the economic problems for NZers are still caused by the wage gap caused by productivity running ahead of low end wages. Its important to understand he has a particular policy agenda to what he is saying.

  • Gosman 5

    Most of that is meaningless twaddle.

    Stating that you want to "Add value" to goods and services made here is not an economic development plan.

    • Kevin 5.1

      Would national have said any different? Adding value to goods and services has been a mantra from Labour and National for over 30 years.

      • Gosman 5.1.1

        Exactly. It is meaningless. It is like stating we want to make the most of what we sell. Well D'uh!

  • tc 6

    from the PDF: "Businesses and households can access affordable, clean energy to achieve our economic potential…"

    Can these 2 (robertson/twyford) actually define affordable in $$ terms and exactly how do they expect to do that with the rampant profiteering from generator through to retailer.

    PR brochure ware IMO from a couple of the ABC beltway brigade .

  • mosa 7

    " step change " is a Keyisim for deceit and giving the impression you are going to act while doing absolutely bugger all.

    I am sure that is not the governments intention.

  • Recent Comments

    Recent Posts

    • The Ahuriri Hapū Claims Settlement Bill passes Third Reading – Pānuitanga Tuatoru o te Pire ...
      Kua pahure te Pire Whakataunga Kerēme a ngā Hapū o Ahuriri i tōna pānuitanga tuatoru i te pāremata - he pae nunui i te hātepe whakataunga Tiriti o Waitangi hītori mō ngā Hapū o Ahuriri. “Ko te pae whakahirahira nei te tohu o te tīmatanga hou mō te whakahoanga i ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 hours ago
    • Launch of Te Aorerekura – the national strategy for the elimination of family violence and sex...
      Tēnā tātou katoa Kei a koutou e Te Ātiawa, koutou e kaha tiaki nei, koutou e mau tonu nei ki te mana o tēnei o ngā whenua taurikura, tēnā koutou e te manawhenua, e Te Ātiawa. Kaha tautoko ana ahau i ngā kōrero kua kōrerotia, e ngā mihi kua mihia, ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      7 hours ago
    • A guiding star sets a new path for the elimination of family violence and sexual violence
      Today the Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence Marama Davidson joined tangata whenua and sector representatives to launch Te Aorerekura, the country’s first National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence. “Te Aorerekura sets a collective ambition to create peaceful homes where children, ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      9 hours ago
    • NZ secures new Pfizer COVID-19 medicine
      New Zealand has secured supplies of another medicine to treat COVID-19, Health Minister Andrew Little announced today. “In October, New Zealand was one of the first countries in the world to make an advance purchase of a promising new antiviral drug, molnupiravir,” Andrew Little said. “Today I am pleased to ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 day ago
    • Strong Pipeline for Construction Sector
      Strong pipeline ahead for the construction sector Infrastructure activity forecast to reach $11.2 billion in 2026 Construction sector now the fourth biggest employer with more than 280 000 people working in the industry Residential construction the largest contributor to national construction activity. Minister for Building and Construction Poto Williams says ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 day ago
    • Regenerative agriculture research receives Government boost
      The Government continues to invest in farm sustainability, this time backing two new research projects to investigate the impacts of regenerative farming practices, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. Soil health and regenerative agriculture “We’re contributing $2.8 million to a $3.85 million five-year project with co-investment by Synlait Milk and ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      3 days ago
    • David McLean appointed as KiwiRail chair
      David McLean has been appointed as Chair of KiwiRail Holdings Ltd, the Minister for State Owned Enterprises Dr David Clark and Minister of Finance Grant Robertson announced today. “Minister Clark and I are confident that David’s extensive business knowledge and leadership experience, including his time as former Chief Executive and ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      4 days ago
    • New Ambassador to Turkey announced
      Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Zoe Coulson-Sinclair as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Turkey. “Aotearoa New Zealand and Turkey’s relationship is one of mutual respect and underpinned by our shared Gallipoli experience,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “Turkey is also a generous ANZAC Day host and has ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      4 days ago
    • Announcement of new Consul-General in Guangzhou
      Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Rachel Crump as New Zealand’s next Consul-General in Guangzhou, China. “China is one of Aotearoa New Zealand’s most significant relationships – it is our largest trading partner, and an influential regional and global actor,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “As the capital of ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      4 days ago
    • Government marks International Day of Persons with Disabilities
      The Government joins the disabled community of Aotearoa New Zealand in marking and celebrating the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, Minister for Disabilty Issues Carmel Sepuloni said. The theme for this year’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities is “Leadership and participation of persons with disabilities toward an inclusive, ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      4 days ago
    • Deputy Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, and Advisory panel member appointed
      Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced the appointments of Graeme Speden as the Deputy Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, and Ben Bateman as a member of the Inspector-General’s Advisory Panel.  “These are significant roles that assist the Inspector-General with independent oversight of New Zealand’s intelligence agencies,” Jacinda Ardern said. “While ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      4 days ago
    • Five million COVID-19 tests processed
      Associate Minister of Health, Dr Ayesha Verrall has congratulated testing teams right around New Zealand for reaching the five million tests milestone. Today, an additional 31,780 tests were processed, taking the total since the beginning of the pandemic in 2020 to 5,005,959. “This really is an incredible and sustained team ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      4 days ago
    • Funding for extra ICU capacity
      Care for the sickest New Zealanders is getting a major boost from the Government, with plans to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on expanding intensive care-type services, Health Minister Andrew Little announced today. “Through good planning, we have avoided what the COVID-19 pandemic has done in some countries, where ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      5 days ago
    • “THE LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ZEALAND’S FIGHT AGAINST COVID.”
      Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      5 days ago
    • The legal and constitutional implications of New Zealand’s fight against COVID
      Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      5 days ago
    • Pharmac Review interim report released
      Health Minister Andrew Little has released an interim report by an independent panel reviewing the national pharmaceuticals-buying agency Pharmac. Pharmac was established in 1993 and is responsible for purchasing publicly funded medicines for New Zealanders, including those prescribed by GPs or administered in hospitals. The review, chaired by former Consumer ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      5 days ago
    • Appointment to Network for Learning board
      Former MP Clare Curran has been appointed to the board of Crown company Network for Learning (N4L), Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. Hon Clare Curran served as a Member of Parliament for Dunedin South from 2008-2010. During this time, she held a number of ministerial portfolios including Broadcasting, Communications and ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      5 days ago
    • Putting home ownership within reach of Pacific Aotearoa
      Pacific community groups and organisations will get tools to help them achieve home ownership with the implementation of the Ministry for Pacific Peoples (MPP) Pacific Housing Initiative, said Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio. In July 2021, MPP launched the Pacific Community Housing Provider Registration Support programme and the Pacific ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      5 days ago
    • Coastal shipping will help keep New Zealand’s supply chain buoyant
      Transport Minister Michael Wood today welcomed the release of the Coastal Shipping Investment Approach State-of-Play report as an important step towards a more sustainable coastal shipping sector, which will further diversify New Zealand’s supply chain. “This Government is committed to strengthening our domestic supply chain by making coastal shipping a ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • Response to Human Rights Commission's reports into violence towards disable people
      Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa.   Thank you for that introduction Hemi and thank you for inviting me to respond on behalf of Government to the release of these two important reports (Whakamanahia Te Tiriti, Whakahaumarutia te Tangata -Honour the Treaty, Protect the Person and Whakamahia te Tūkino kore ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • Law change strengthens petroleum decommissioning regulation
      Petroleum permit and licence holders operating in New Zealand will now have an explicit statutory requirement to carry out and fund the decommissioning of oil and gas fields after a new law was given Royal assent today, says Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods. Once in effect The Crown ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • New Zealand Response to assist peace and stability in Solomon Islands
      The New Zealand government has announced that it will deploy Defence Force and Police personnel to Honiara to help restore peace and stability. “New Zealand is committed to its responsibilities and playing its part in upholding regional security,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.  “We are deeply concerned by the recent ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • Continued growth in volume of new home consents
      In the year ended October 2021, 47,715 new homes were consented, up 26 per cent from the October 2020 year. In October 2021, 4,043 new dwellings were consented Canterbury’s new homes consented numbers rose 31% to higher than post-earthquake peak. New home consents continue to reach remarkable levels of growth, ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • Saddle up for summer with cycle trail funding
      New investment will keep the best of New Zealand’s cycle trails in top condition as regions prepare to welcome back Kiwi visitors over summer and international tourists from next year. “Cycle tourism is one of the most popular ways to see the country ‘off the beaten track’ but the trails ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • New Zealand provides additional funding to COVAX for vaccine delivery
      Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced additional funding will be provided to COVAX to support vaccine delivery in developing countries. “New Zealand remains cognisant of the dangers of COVID-19, especially as new variants continue to emerge. No one is safe from this virus until we all are and this ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • COVID-19 Community fund providing support for 160 organisations focused on women and girls
      Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today announced financial support will be allocated to the 160 successful applicants for the COVID-19 Community Fund, to support organisations helping women/wāhine and girls/kōtiro in Aotearoa New Zealand affected by the pandemic. “COVID-19 has had a disproportionate effect on women around the world including in ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • Government delivers reactivation package as Aucklanders reconnect for summer
      A new support package will help revive economic, social and cultural activities in our largest city over summer, and ensure those in hardship also get relief. The Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni and the Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash have announced a Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • Mobile services and broadband come to Chatham Islands for first time
      World class mobile and broadband services have been switched on for the 663 residents of the Chatham Islands, Minister for the Digital Economy and Communications, David Clark and Minister for Economic and Regional Development, Stuart Nash announced today. “This eagerly awaited network will provide fast broadband and mobile services to ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      6 days ago
    • Crown accounts reflect strong economy amid pandemic
      The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect an economy that has performed better than expected, despite the latest Delta COVID-19 outbreak. The Crown accounts for the four months to the end of October factors in the improved starting position for the new financial year. Core Crown tax revenue was $2.5 ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      7 days ago
    • Applications open for new 2021 Resident Visa
      The first round of applications for New Zealand’s new 2021 Resident visa open today (6am). “This one-off pathway provides certainty for a great many migrant families who have faced disruption because of COVID-19 and it will help retain the skills New Zealand businesses need to support the economic recovery,” Minister ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      7 days ago
    • More Vietnam Veterans to receive compensation for Agent Orange Exposure
      Minister for Veterans, the Hon Meka Whaitiri announced today that two new conditions associated with Agent Orange exposure have been added to the Prescribed Conditions List. Under the 2006 Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Crown and representatives of Vietnam veterans and the Royal New Zealand RSA. Vietnam veterans in ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • Government commits to international effort to ban and regulate killer robots
      Minister of Disarmament and Arms Control Phil Twyford announced today that New Zealand will push for new international law to ban and regulate autonomous weapons systems (AWS), which once activated can select and engage targets without further human intervention. “While the evidence suggests fully autonomous weapons systems are not yet ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • New freedom camping rules – right vehicle, right place
      Tougher freedom camping laws will be introduced to prevent abuse which has placed an unfair burden on small communities and damaged our reputation as a high quality visitor destination. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has confirmed that new legislation will be introduced to Parliament following an extensive round of public consultation ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • Government invests to support a classic Kiwi summer
      Vaccinated New Zealanders can look forward to Kiwi summer events with confidence, while artists and crew will have more certainty, following the launch of details of the Arts and Culture Event Support Scheme, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “The Government recognises that the arts and ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • Grace period for expired driver licences cruises into 2022
      Due to the ongoing Delta outbreak and extended lockdowns, all New Zealand driver licences and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will now be valid until 31 May 2022, Transport Minister Michael Wood announced today. “This further extension to the validity of driver licenses recognises that ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • Delivered: 1,000 extra transitional homes
      A further 1,000 transitional homes delivered  New housing development starts in Flaxmere, Hastings  The Government has delivered the next 1,000 transitional housing places it promised, as part of its work to reduce homelessness. Housing Minister Dr Megan Woods is marking the milestone in Hastings at a new development that includes ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • Traffic light levels announced
      The levels at which different parts of New Zealand will move forward into the COVID-19 Protection Framework this Friday have been announced. Northland, Auckland, Taupō and Rotorua Lakes Districts, Kawerau, Whakatane, Ōpōtiki Districts, Gisborne District, Wairoa District, Rangitikei, Whanganui and Ruapehu Districts will move in at Red The rest of ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • Financial support to move to traffic light system
      A new transition payment will be made available particularly for affected businesses in Auckland, Waikato and Northland to acknowledge the restrictions they have faced under the higher Alert Levels. Transition payment of up to $24,000 as businesses move into traffic light system Leave Support Scheme and Short Term Absence Payment ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • New Ambassador to Russia announced
      Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Sarah Walsh as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Russia. “Aotearoa New Zealand and Russia have a long-standing relationship, engaging on a range of regional and global interests including disarmament and Antarctica issues. We also work together as members of the East ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago
    • New Permanent Representative to the UN announced
      Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Carolyn Schwalger as Permanent Representative to the New Zealand Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York. “Aotearoa New Zealand is a founding member of the UN and we have worked hard to ensure our stance on human rights, ...
      BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
      1 week ago