web analytics

What is this regenerative agriculture thing anyway?

Written By: - Date published: 11:42 am, September 13th, 2020 - 32 comments
Categories: Environment, farming, farming, food, sustainability - Tags: , ,

The Green Party released their Farm for the Future agriculture policy yesterday, and stands alongside Greenpeace’s ongoing Regenerative Farming Revolution campaign. Given the state of New Zealand land and water, changing how we do farming should be a strong political topic for the left this year. We need to get past the left’s position of blaming farmers for land and water pollution (as if we don’t eat farmed food), and instead build a strong political movement for changing how farming is done, that educates the largely urban public and supports farmers to do the right thing.

Sometimes people say they don’t get what regenag is, so this is a post where I lay out some of the ground for understanding it.  I’m not a farmer, but I garden and have long been in subcultures in NZ were regenag is the norm.

Regenerative agriculture is based on the idea that nature is a powerhouse of sustainability and resiliency. It uses nature mimicry to establish productive systems that are self sustaining, require little external inputs, and that focus on ecological cycles like those that build soil rather than mechanistic systems that artificially force growth and produce large amounts of pollution. Building and maintaining soil biological health is central, because it’s the key to systems that regenerate rather than degrade.

At a basic level this means two things.

  1. Sustainable: this refers to whole systems that are designed to maintain themselves in a good state over time by:
    * being renewable largely within the system (the system produces its own resources rather than importing them from other landbases)
    * being non-extractive (the system doesn’t remove remove more resources or fertility than are being generated)
    * having built-in ways of reintegrating or reusing any waste that is produced (rather than relying on landfill mentality)
  2. Regenerative: refers to the capacity of such systems to not only sustain themselves but to actively restore biodiversity and fertility over time. Inherent in this is the idea that the system has been damaged in some way, usually by how we manage it, and that we need to change the system and remedy the damage.

In regenag terms, it’s not sufficient to do less damage than the farm down the road. Cleaning up a toxic dump, planting riparian strips, reducing nitrate load are all good things to do, and heading in the right direction. They may even be regenerative in the specific site but the whole system itself isn’t necessarily actively regenerative.

Here are three principles:

Soil restoration is a core component. Regenag has soil as a central focus because it recognises that the natural, stable ecosystems that sustain themselves over time are utterly dependent on the soil food web.

Conventional ag practices such as ploughing, pesticide use, artificial fertiliser, burnoffs, reducing biodiversity, and overgrazing tend to degrade soil over time, the system can’t sustaining itself indefinitely, needs more outside inputs and eventually fails. It should be mentioned that many conventional farmers mitigate this, and are trying to move in a better direction (hence the need for political support for regenag). Previously pastoral farming was degrading the soil/fertility relatively slowly, but industrial dairying for instance is doing it on steroids.

Biomimicry. Mimicking natural systems as much as possible because those systems are inherently sustainable, regenerative, stable and efficient. Forests don’t need to import fertiliser nor dump waste, because they are made up of natural systems that cycle most nutrients and wastes in closed loops, and are part of larger systems that the forest sits within that cycle nutrients and waste from and to the outside.

Systems thinking rather than linear thinking. It’s about the relationships between everything, and the nature of those. Counting things matters too but is secondary to understanding how things relate. This is both a conceptual skill and in ag terms is largely, at this time, contained within certain philosophical approaches to farming (eg organics, permaculture, biodynamics, food forestry). Here’s an example from food forestry.

If you want to look at examples of vibrant and successful regenerative farming operations, including in New Zealand, check out these past regenag posts,

Regenerative agriculture: The 11 minute film The Regenerators, from Greenpeace, on New Zealand regenag farmers.

Happy cows and land restoration: a short post comparing industrial beef or soy with regenag.

Climate and food security: annual cropping vs regenerative agriculture

The Essential Forest-Gardener: Robert Guyton’s ten part series on the oldest food forest in New Zealand.

What if plant-based wasn’t the answer?: radical grass farmer Joel Salatin, and Mark Shepherd’s agroforestry system integrating stock and tree systems.

Mod note: If you want to discuss the Greens’ new Farm for the Future policy, please read it first. Greenpeace’s response to the policy is useful too.

 

32 comments on “What is this regenerative agriculture thing anyway? ”

  1. Roy Cartland 1

    Excellent post. It's almost become like the farmer-hatred attributed to the greenies, townies, lefties, etc is a false-flag hit. Yes there are dreadful farmers, but many good ones who would benefit more from going regenag than status quo, and know it.

    Our alliance should be with them AGAINST the despoilers, rather than all farmers vs the rest.

    • weka 1.1

      totally agree. There are distinct problems with orgs like Fed Farmers too, that's another kete of fish. Supporting the farmers who want to do better but face barriers is an imperative. Also, getting funding into research so it's easier for farmers and bankers to get on board and trust the techniques.

  2. Robert Guyton 2

    Conventional ag will try to neuter regenerative ag by claiming "we already do this", in the same way they tried to disable pesky environmentalists by saying, "all farmers are environmentalists!". The next step is to capture and monetise any products the regen ag farmers use. Big Fert and Big Farm Advise won't simply pack up their tent and go home. Failing this, they'll simply demonise – Regenerative Agriculture threatens the entire farming industry, our trade arrangements and our history! It doesn't have to have any basis in fact.

    • weka 2.1

      pretty much. I expect both. Already happening to a degree.

    • Hunter Thompson II 2.2

      Correct, the big players in the ag sector will want to keep the status quo and carry on lining their pockets at the expense of the environment and their grandchildren.

      Farmers used to trumpet the message that they were "guardians of the land". They never mentioned water – why not, I wonder.

      • Draco T Bastard 2.2.1

        Farmers used to trumpet the message that they were "guardians of the land". They never mentioned water – why not, I wonder.

        Because they only saw themselves as guardians of their crops. I suspect that most haven't changed that world-view despite all the evidence proving them wrong.

  3. Draco T Bastard 3

    being renewable largely within the system (the system produces its own resources rather than importing them from other landbases)

    To me this is important but it comes with a flip side:

    If we don't import from other landmasses then we also cannot export to them

    This would only apply to agriculture and it would also mean that human sewage would need to be treated and fed back into the food system. We couldn't dump it in caves/mines/quarries/ the sea etcetera as that would be extracting it from the land and be against this principle:

    being non-extractive (the system doesn’t remove remove more resources or fertility than are being generated)

    IMO, if we kept within in natural cycles and their limits we cannot have an export agricultural sector.

    • Robert Guyton 3.1

      We do though, import sunlight and through that input, the products created by plants that wouldn't be here otherwise. We can also harvest from the ocean and apply that to our pastures as import. Therefore, we ought to be able to send the resulting "meat" off-shore, without depleting our stores. Make sense to you, Draco?

      • Draco T Bastard 3.1.1

        Nope, sounds like a load of bollocks.

        • Robert Guyton 3.1.1.1

          Thanks for your kind words. Plants create enormous amounts of material from bugger all. Mostly, they do it by collaboration. Even the cells that power their processes have "components"that collaborate for the greater good. All this in a closed system where bounty results. Excesses of food that has to be consumed. We have to insert ourselves into that cycle, using collaboration as our admission ticket. Bollocks piled upon bollocks!

          • Draco T Bastard 3.1.1.1.1

            Plants create enormous amounts of material from bugger all.

            Woah, plants are actually Gods?

            I didn't bother reading after that because, well, more bollocks.

            • Robert Guyton 3.1.1.1.1.1

              Plants extract carbon from thin air – they make the etheric, material. Some plants extract nitrogen from thin air. They employ the services of bacterium to do this – collaboration rules! Plants utilise water (it falls freely from the sky) in the process and it's widely-recognised that plants use a magical system called photosynthesis to split molecules, in a God-like fashion, and synthesise new compounds. On top of all this extraordinary alchemy, plants can propagate themselves without the intervention of humans!!! Very few technologies created by humans can do this seemingly simple thing, so, Gods? Perhaps so.

      • Incognito 3.1.2

        The atmosphere is a great storage place and carrier of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen that together form the main building block of and for all life forms. Sunlight provides energy. The natural cycles, however, are slow and humans are impatient.

        • Draco T Bastard 3.1.2.1

          yes

        • Robert Guyton 3.1.2.2

          Ah! Impatience! We should dismiss the opportunity to harness the extraordinarily bounteous offerings of the plant world, because we are impatient?

          • Incognito 3.1.2.2.1

            My bad, Robert, I thought the context was increased production for export (for profit). I shall not interfere again. Take care and stay safe.

  4. Robert Guyton 4

    Seabirds deposit nutrient from off shore. Space and airborne dust rains down upon us constantly. Rain, hail sleet and snow deposit more than water. Tiny insects etc. consume these materials and increase their value, as worm-gut enzymes increase the value of casts – it's a Gestalt thing. Your suggestion of humane is very relevant and the capture of that brown-gold is vital to our continued flourishing here.

  5. Robert Guyton 5

    Minerals continue to be released from the mountains to the plains. We are not a closed system. Up until recently, foreign tourist manure could have been considered an import (were it not wasted, as is the locals’ smiley

    • Stuart Munro 5.1

      It would at least free us from involvement in the conflict over subSaharan phosphate.
      https://www.wsrw.org/a105x4268

      But initiatives in that direction tend to get nobbled by greedy and stupid folk like the ones that killed Christchurch's green edge water treatment plan. They went for the diffuser offshore: "Fisheries? We don't need no steenking fisheries!" they might as well have said.

    • bwaghorn 5.2

      I read an article once (long forgotten where) that suggested that seabirds used to nest all over Aotearoa and there loss contributed to forest die back as they weren't dropping the oceans goodies all over the place . Makes sense that that is the missing link in the nz nutrient cycle.
      Edit I see you say similar upthread.

      • Robert Guyton 5.2.1

        I've been to the mutton bird islands off the south coast where those seabirds still do their thing and the soil there is like potting mix, meters deep!

      • RedLogix 5.2.2

        Yes, before humans arrived NZ was essentially a land of trees, birds, snails and slugs. It was a unique ecosystem that we'll never get back.

        • Robert Guyton 5.2.2.1

          Frogs and geckos too, but we shouldn't hope to bring it all back; we are where we are but we have good brains and now must synthesise, gather in technologies and processes, corral thinkers and make the best of what we have, always believing we can do better than what we have now and better than what was here before we were. Big ask. Only option. Imo.

  6. Dennis Frank 6

    A good outline. There'll be an inflexion point when universities start teaching it, eh? Uptake by farmers will get accelerated when they see the establishment jumping aboard the bandwagon.

    Since it's all about efficiency of land use, economists ought to be able to get their heads around it eventually too. Have you met a Green economist? I haven't. Paradigm not yet shifted, I presume.

    Both of these considerations point to leaders of the Green movement catalysing collaboration in a multi-disciplinary context. The necessity, thereof. Silo-thinking has them locked into merely doing their jobs.

  7. bwaghorn 7

    Thankyou .

    Just a few more dumb questions so I can get simple answers.

    So no inputs at all ? Or is it no non natural inputs.

    Does it have to be organic?

    • Robert Guyton 7.1

      Though you didn't ask me smiley I reckon it's about trend and direction, at this point; no absolutes but moving as fast as possible, toward a minimal-alien-input state; no shipped phosphates, no palm kernel etc. Closing the loop doesn't't mean the loop must be closed instantly; that's impossible, but the direction isn't impossible to take. Globally, this must happen if we humans are going to make it through the tangle we have made. As foreign inputs are reduced, that which is farmed will change in response. Our ancient native forests required little in the way of shipped-cargo-food, so it's clearly possible to grow huge amounts of plants with minimal input from overseas. If stock farmers can tune their practices so that they too can function profitably with the same minimalization of out-sourced materials, their industries could continue.

    • weka 7.2

      "So no inputs at all ? Or is it no non natural inputs."

      I would say rather than absolutes it's about making sure the inputs are part of regenerative and sustainable systems. So no importing PKE that is being exploitatively extracted from rainforests overseas so we can overstock dairy farms. But perhaps a smaller dairy farm converting to organic can bring in minerals as needed to improve the soil initially. We have to start somewhere and I think there's a case for being pragmatic within the disciplines. It helps to think about the whole supply chain and what is involved, in ecological terms.

      "Does it have to be organic?"

      There are many benefits to having certified organic farms and market gardens. The original western organic movement was called Soil and Health. There are clear connections between pesticide use, artificial fert, and soil degradation. It's not that pesticides could never be used ever, but more how one would integrate them into the system. Most people find that when working with a whole system they largely become unnecessary.

      I'm with Robert on the right direction at this point stuff too.

  8. RedLogix 8

    From a political perspective agriculture is one of the top four or five key responsibilities of good government. It deserves to be up there with education, health and security as a top priority IMHO.

    Sustainable agricultural systems are highly desirable and well within our reach, but the kind of sustained research, development and political continuity necessary to implement them are not.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Next steps for Christchurch Hospital campus redevelopment
    Canterbury DHB will be better placed to respond to future demand for services and continue to deliver high quality care, with the next stage of the campus redevelopment programme confirmed, Health Minister Andrew Little says. The Government has approved $154 million in funding for the construction of a third tower ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Five Power Defence Arrangements Defence Ministers’ Joint Statement
    The Defence Ministers from Australia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and United Kingdom reaffirmed their nations’ continued commitment to the Five Power Defence Arrangements (FPDA), and commended the achievements over the past 49 years as the FPDA moves towards its 50th Anniversary in 2021.  The Ministers recognised the FPDA’s significant role ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding protects health of Hawke’s Bay waterways
    A joint Government and Hawke’s Bay Regional Council project will invest $4.2 million to protect local waterways, enhance biodiversity and employ local people, Environment Minister David Parker announced today.   Over two years, the Hāpara Takatū Jobs for Nature project will fence 195km of private land to exclude stock from vulnerable ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Year border exception for seasonal workers in the horticulture and wine industries
    2000 additional RSE workers to enter New Zealand early next year employers must pay these workers at least $22.10 an hour employers will cover costs of managed isolation for the RSE workers RSE workers will be paid the equivalent of 30 hours work a week while in isolation From January ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government increases support for New Zealanders to work in seasonal jobs
    The Government is offering further financial support for unemployed New Zealanders to take on seasonal work. These new incentives include: Up to $200 per week for accommodation costs $1000 incentive payment for workers who complete jobs of six weeks or longer increasing wet weather payments when people can’t work to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government receives Royal Commission of Inquiry report into the Terrorist Attack on Christchurch Mos...
    Minister for Internal Affairs Jan Tinetti has today received the Royal Commission of Inquiry report into the Terrorist Attack on Christchurch Mosques, and will table it in Parliament on Tuesday December 8. “I know this will have been a challenging process for whānau, survivors and witnesses of the terrorist attack ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand Government to declare a climate emergency
    The Government will declare a climate emergency next week, Climate Change Minister James Shaw said today.                                       “We are in the midst of a climate crisis that will impact on nearly every ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Call for urgent action on Pacific conservation
    A declaration on the urgency of the global biodiversity crisis and the need for immediate, transformative action in the Pacific was agreed at a pan-Pacific conference today. The 10th Pacific Islands Conference on Nature Conservation and Protected Areas is taking place this week across the Pacific.  Minister of Conservation Kiritapu ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Speech from the throne
    E aku hoa i te ara o te whai, Kia kotahi tā tātou takahi i te kō, ko tōku whiwhi kei tō koutou tautoko mai. Ko tāku ki a koutou, hei whakapiki manawa mōku. He horomata rangatira te mahi, e rite ai te whiwhinga a te ringatuku, me te ringakape ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Keynote address to Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand conference
    Speech to the CAANZ conference - November 19, 2020 Thank you, Greg, (Greg Haddon, MC) for the welcome. I’d like to acknowledge John Cuthbertson from CAANZ, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue Naomi Ferguson, former fellow MP and former Minister of Revenue, Peter Dunne, other guest speakers and CAANZ members. I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Expert independent advisory group appointed to strengthen the future of Māori broadcasting
    A panel of seven experts are adding their support to help shape the future of Māori broadcasting, Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson has announced today. “Today I will meet with some of the most experienced Māori broadcasters, commentators and practitioners in the field. They have practical insights on the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government to review housing settings
    New Zealand’s stronger-than-expected economic performance has flowed through to housing demand, so the Government will review housing settings to improve access to the market, the Finance Minister Grant Robertson announced today. “Our focus is on improving access to the housing market for first home buyers and ensuring house price growth ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Crown accounts reflect Govt’s careful economic management
    The better-than-expected Crown accounts released today show the Government’s careful management of the COVID-19 health crisis was the right approach to support the economy. As expected, the Crown accounts for the year to June 2020 show the operating balance before gains and losses, or OBEGAL, was in deficit. However that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Community launch marks next step in addressing racism in education
    The launch of Te Hurihanganui in Porirua today is another important milestone in the work needed to address racism in the education system and improve outcomes for Māori learners and their whānau, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis says. Budget 2019 included $42 million over three years to put Te Hurihanganui ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government to consider recommendations on DNA use in criminal investigations
    The Minister of Justice has received the Law Commission’s recommending changes to the law governing the way DNA is used in criminal investigations. The report, called The Use of DNA in Criminal Investigations – Te Whahamahi I te Ira Tangata I ngā Mātai Taihara, recommends new legislation to address how ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to Wakatū Nelson regional hui on trade
    First, I want to express my thanks to Te Taumata for this hui and for all the fantastic work you are doing for Māori in the trade space. In the short time that you’ve been operating you’ve already contributed an enormous amount to the conversation, and developed impressive networks.  I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to Primary Industries Summit
    Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you today about the significant contribution the food and fibres sector makes to New Zealand and how this Government is supporting that effort. I’d like to start by acknowledging our co-Chairs, Terry Copeland and Mavis Mullins, my colleague, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Fast track referrals will speed up recovery and boost jobs and home building
    The Government is taking action to increase jobs, speed up the economic recovery and build houses by putting three more projects through its fast track approval process. “It’s great to see that the fast-track consenting process is working. Today we have referred a mix of potential projects that, if approved, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Papakāinga provides critically needed homes in Hastings
    A papakāinga opened today by the Minister for Māori Development the Hon Willie Jackson will provide whānau with much needed affordable rental homes in Hastings. The four home papakāinga in Waiōhiki is the first project to be completed under the ‘Hastings Place Based’ initiative. This initiative is a Government, Hastings ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand ready to host APEC virtually
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern took over the leadership of APEC earlier today, when she joined leaders from the 21 APEC economies virtually for the forum’s final 2020 meeting. “We look forward to hosting a fully virtual APEC 2021 next year. While this isn’t an in-person meeting, it will be one ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Revival of Māori Horticulturists
    The rapid revival of Māori horticulture was unmistakeable at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy Awards, with 2020 marking the first time this iconic Māori farming event was dedicated to horticulture enterprises. Congratulating finalists at the Awards, Māori Development Minister Willie Jackson said growing large-scale māra kai is part of Māori DNA. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Emergency benefit to help temporary visa holders
    From 1 December, people on temporary work, student or visitor visas who can’t return home and or support themselves may get an Emergency Benefit from the Ministry of Social Development, Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni announced today. Previously, temporary visa holders in hardship because of COVID-19 have had ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • School sustainability projects to help boost regional economies
    Forty one schools from the Far North to Southland will receive funding for projects that will reduce schools’ emissions and save them money, Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced today. This is the second round of the Sustainability Contestable Fund, and work will begin immediately. The first round announced in April ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Farmer-led projects to improve water health in Canterbury and Otago
    More than $6 million will be spent on helping farmers improve the health of rivers, wetlands, and habitat biodiversity in Canterbury and Otago, as well as improving long-term land management practices, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Four farmer-led catchment group Jobs for Nature projects have between allocated between $176,000 and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Tupu Aotearoa continues expansion to Pacific communities in Nelson, Marlborough, Tasman & Northl...
    Pacific communities in Nelson, Marlborough, Tasman and Northland will benefit from the expansion of the Tupu Aotearoa programme announced today by the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. The programme provides sustainable employment and education pathways and will be delivered in partnership with three providers in Northland and two ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New primary school and classrooms for 1,200 students in South Island
    Education Minister Chris Hipkins unveiled major school building projects across the South Island during a visit to Waimea College in Nelson today. It’s part of the Government’s latest investment of $164 million to build new classrooms and upgrade schools around the country. “Investments like this gives the construction industry certainty ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Minister of Māori Development pays tribute to Rudy Taylor
      Today the Minister of Māori Development, alongside other Government Ministers and MP’s said their final farewells to Nga Puhi Leader Rudy Taylor.  “Rudy dedicated his life to the betterment of Māori, and his strong approach was always from the ground up, grassroots, sincere and unfaltering”  “Over the past few ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Prime Minister to attend APEC Leaders’ Summit
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will attend the annual APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting and associated events virtually today and tomorrow. “In a world where we cannot travel due to COVID-19, continuing close collaboration with our regional partners is key to accelerating New Zealand’s economic recovery,” Jacinda Ardern said. “There is wide ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to Infrastructure NZ Symposium
    Tena Koutou, Tena Koutou and thank you for inviting me to speak to you today. This is a critical time for New Zealand as we respond to the damage wreaked by the global COVID-19 pandemic. It is vital that investment in our economic recovery is well thought through, and makes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pike River 10 Year Anniversary Commemorative Service
    Tēnei te mihi ki a tātau katoa e huihui nei i tēnei rā Ki a koutou ngā whānau o te hunga kua riro i kōnei – he mihi aroha ki a koutou Ki te hapori whānui – tēnā koutou Ki ngā tāngata whenua – tēnā koutou Ki ngā mate, e ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Huge investment in new and upgraded classrooms to boost construction jobs
    Around 7,500 students are set to benefit from the Government’s latest investment of $164 million to build new classrooms and upgrade schools around the country. “The election delivered a clear mandate to accelerate our economic recovery and build back better. That’s why we are prioritising construction projects in schools so more ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Keeping Pike River Mine promises 10 years on
    Ten years after the Pike River Mine tragedy in which 29 men lost their lives while at work, a commemorative service at Parliament has honoured them and their legacy of ensuring all New Zealand workplaces are safe. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern attended the event, along with representatives of the Pike ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Additional testing to strengthen border and increase safety of workers
    New testing measures are being put in place to increase the safety of border workers and further strengthen New Zealand’s barriers against COVID-19, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “These strengthened rules – to apply to all international airports and ports – build on the mandatory testing orders we’ve ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • More public housing delivered in Auckland
    The Government’s investment in public housing is delivering more warm, dry homes with today’s official opening of 82 new apartments in New Lynn by the Housing Minister Megan Woods. The Thom Street development replaces 16 houses built in the 1940s, with brand new fit-for-purpose public housing that is in high ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Agreement advanced to purchase up to 5 million COVID-19 vaccines
    The Government has confirmed an in-principle agreement to purchase up to 5 million COVID-19 vaccines – enough for 5 million people – from Janssen Pharmaceutica, subject to the vaccine successfully completing clinical trials and passing regulatory approvals in New Zealand, says Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods. “This agreement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding will leave a conservation legacy for Waikanae awa
    Ninety-two jobs will be created to help environmental restoration in the Waikanae River catchment through $8.5 million of Jobs for Nature funding, Conservation Minister Kiritapu Allan announced today. “The new funding will give a four-year boost to the restoration of the Waikanae awa, and is specifically focussed on restoration through ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New Dunedin Hospital project progresses to next stage
    As the new Dunedin Hospital project progresses, the Government is changing the oversight group to provide more technical input, ensure continued local representation, and to make sure lessons learnt from Dunedin benefit other health infrastructure projects around the country. Concept design approval and the release of a tender for early ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Jump in apprentice and trainee numbers
    The number of New Zealanders taking up apprenticeships has increased nearly 50 percent, and the number of female apprentices has more than doubled. This comes as a Government campaign to raise the profile of vocational education and training (VET) begins. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Education Minister Chris Hipkins announced ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • ReBuilding Nations Symposium 2020 (Infrastructure NZ Conference opening session)
    Tena koutou katoa and thank you for the opportunity to be with you today. Can I acknowledge Ngarimu Blair, Ngati Whatua, and Mayor Phil Goff for the welcome. Before I start with my substantive comments, I do want to acknowledge the hard work it has taken by everyone to ensure ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand's biosecurity champions honoured
    Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor has paid tribute to the winners of the 2020 New Zealand Biosecurity Awards. “These are the people and organisations who go above and beyond to protect Aotearoa from pests and disease to ensure our unique way of life is sustained for future generations,” Damien O’Connor says. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago