Go, technology, inequality, the future of work

Written By: - Date published: 12:05 pm, March 13th, 2016 - 42 comments
Categories: human rights, jobs, labour, science, wages - Tags: , , ,

This week saw a significant development in Artificial Intelligence (AI), with a Google program AlphaGo resoundingly beating the human champion at Go. This is significant because, unlike chess, Go is difficult to crack with brute-force search. It requires pretty abstract pattern recognition and (what we have called up until now) “intution”. AlphaGo is based on “deep learning”, which is all the rage in AI at the moment, with many practical applications, from driverless cars to speech recognition. (I have an interest because “deep learning” is versions of artificial neural networks, which have been my area of research and teaching for a couple of decades.)

Given this significant breakthrough in AI we should collectively take a moment to consider the implications for society. Coincidentally another piece in The Guardian today covers a similar topic:

Our tech future: the rich own the robots while the poor have ‘job mortgages’

Artificial intelligence expert Jerry Kaplan says those whose jobs involve ‘a narrow set of duties’ are most likely to see their work replaced by automation

Ever since the first vision of a robot appeared on the horizon of mankind, humans have feared that automation will replace the workforce in our dystopian future.

There typically follows a period of reassurance, in which we are compelled to believe that this will be a good thing, and that robots could actually liberate us from the drudgery of daily toil and free us for more enjoyable, cerebral pursuits. Futurist Jerry Kaplan, 63, is among those optimists. He estimates that 90% of Americans will lose their jobs to robots and we should all be happy about it.

“If we can program machines to read x-rays and write news stories, all the better. I say good riddance,” Kaplan said. “Get another job!”

Gulp.

Less discussed is the observation that inequality will be “a dark cloud” over this period of robotic rule. The robots, Kaplan admitted, will be owned by the rich. “The benefits of automation naturally accrue to those who can invest in the new systems, and that’s the people with the money. And why not? Of course they’re reaping the rewards,” he said. …

Read on for more, including the bizarre sounding concept of “job mortgages”. Will the automation of work be captured by the 1% and increase inequality, or is it a chance (with Universal Income) to free people for an egalitarian and creative future? (Given climate change, will we even get to answer that question?)

I don’t have any answers, but I’m glad that at least one political party is thinking about the issues. Well done Labour for its Future of Work initiative.

42 comments on “Go, technology, inequality, the future of work ”

  1. b waghorn 1

    ” liberate us from the drudgery of daily toil and free us for more enjoyable, cerebral pursuits. ”
    It might surprise many , but some of us enjoy a bit of toil in our day and are not interested in to much navel gazing or the arts.

    • joe90 1.1

      Fishing man, fishing!.

      • weka 1.1.1

        Nah, the good fishing spots will be full of robots. Or rich people who’ve banned access. Brave new world.

        😉

        • b waghorn 1.1.1.1

          Or just plane overfished by all the ubi ers subsisting on easy money.

          • weka 1.1.1.1.1

            I don’t know whether to laugh or cry at that comment.

          • greywarshark 1.1.1.1.2

            b waghorn
            Wherefor is this easy money? Tell us more.

            • b waghorn 1.1.1.1.2.1

              If a ubi is introduced , it has to be high enough so all other welfare can be dumped, if it is high enough some will choose to live on that alone, I say this because as a young hoon I went on the dole and the only reason I went off it was because it wasn’t quite enough to keep me in booze smokes and food.

              • weka

                I’d struggle to think of any beneficiary that can survive on a base benefit alone. You’d have to have no housing costs.

                I don’t know how old you are but benefit rates are much lower relative to the cost of living than they used to be.

                Whatever UBI gets introduced it’s unlikely to pay a living income.

                The Living Wage is $19.60, or $784/wk (40hrs) before tax.

                The minimum wage is $14.75 or $590/wk before tax.

                The dole is $210/wk in the hand for single people, or $175 each per couple. Gareth Morgan’s model suggests that rate for the UBI, but it’s predicated on people working as well (I don’t know what he suggests for people that can’t work). How many people could live on that alone?

                • b waghorn

                  Yes you picked the obvious I was living in a shed for $10 a week when I was on the dole.
                  Wasn’t good for me and ultimately would of been bad for the state if I’d done many winters there.
                  Hate to burst the far lefts bubble , but humans aren’t all created equal and some need looking after ,some need guiding some need reigning in and some need a swift kick up the Arse! ( metophorically speaking)).
                  A ubi will not work in nz.

                  • greywarshark

                    b wahorn
                    I think you might be making the mistake that many do of assuming that a change of policy will mean it will be to one that will solve all problems. A UBI will be an assured amount of money but won’t as I understand it for myself, mean much of a living, or mean all problems vanish. One thing will happen though, the number of WINZ workers will reduce by probably 60% and that saving can go into support programs to help people having difficulties, manage better and be more self-sufficient, even enable them to get some part-time work. It will mean that everyone will be entitled to a basic living and won’t feel like shooting WIBZ when those po faced women once again say no nothing for you despite your woes.

                    People will be encouraged to work, at present there is about 80-90% drain off benefits as soon as you get a good few hours, not enough to live on but enough for WINZ to hack at your benefit so you might end up $10 better off after considerable travel, organisation of children, stress at work, and the cost of clothes to suit the job. So there is a lot of lying about people raking off money from the state, and there is always some amazing amount waved about as an example, or words like lazy incompetents, good for nothings, going on by welfare departments and the general public full of spite about beneficiaries. Nasty people, who always know one or two who they think in their wisdom could be out working. They know little of the person’s conditions and actually don’t give a damn about their difficulties.

                    • b waghorn

                      ( out on a limb here) the big picture stuff is that humans are to successful for our own good, once we got past the need for all of us to be actively involved in our day to day survival friction started.
                      I think as a species we should invade space, set up a far east mars company, let those mad brave buggers that will sail a ship into uncharted territories types have a crack , and health and safety be damned.
                      Humans are seekers of the new , conquest is the only thing that would unite us.

                  • weka

                    b, why does it bother you if people don’t work?

                    What did you do with your time when you were on the dole?

                    I still think the number of people able and willing to live on $200/wk will be relatively small.

                    • b waghorn

                      When I was young and out of work I slept till eleven smoked pot and watched TV , and was toying with growing weed while associating with gang members.
                      When times where tough in 08 /09 as a self employed fencer a paced the house and annoyed the wife.
                      I’m sure some do fine filling their days in , but its no good for others,
                      I think the single greatest thing a government could do with welfare is make it easier for people to switch on and off the benefit , so if they find a couple of days work they can take it without having to jump through hoops.

                    • weka

                      I totally agree with your last paragraph. The bureaucracy and the financial penalties are a huge disincentive for many.

                      How much of the issue for you was the unemployment rate? i.e if there had been decent work available would you have taken it? What if there had been work you were really interested in?

                      One would hope that a UBI would be introduced by a govt that saw things a bit more holistically than throwing money at people, and I take your point about the people who need work. But we’re already in that situation with them where many of them can’t get work.

    • Draco T Bastard 1.2

      Obviously someone who’s never engaged his brain. If you had you’d realise that cerebral pursuits does not include navel gazing nor does it exclude a bit of toil in the day but that the toil is to help with the cerebral pursuits and isn’t the job.

      • b waghorn 1.2.1

        Like all good intellectual s you missed the point completely.
        I’ve been unemployed I’ve been self employed I choose to be an employee,yes my job isn’t quite what Id like it to be, but I’d be lost if I didn’t have a little bit of whip to get going in the morning. Not all of us are highly self motivated.

        • Draco T Bastard 1.2.1.1

          And what has that got to do with what I said?

        • greywarshark 1.2.1.2

          You are making a point b waghorn that I think is important. I think most of us who are well need to work, though sometimes it would be easier not to have that discipline. We need to work for our mental and physical health and that is what I can’t agree with DTB about technology doing people out of jobs is a good thing.

          Those who are invalids or with impaired bodies or minds, need something to match their abilities to do that brings them together with others, something to concentrate on and feel a sense of competence. I consider that bringing up small children is work, and that it is so important, that parenting or child caring requires training to ensure that the right psychological skills and values training is understood. After the child is older, then a parent should be able to take on outside part or full-time work, but children still need care and attention even when teenagers which governments don’t seem to allow for.

  2. One Two 2

    The likes of Jerry Caplan, despise the human species. They despise themselves and the organic body which provides them with life. Life which they will see replaced by death

    Ray Kurzweil who has been leading Google research, is another

    • ropata 2.1

      -1 Completely wrong headed. A case of fearing what you do not understand.

      • One Two 2.1.1

        Completely wrong headed is it Ropata ?

        Tell me. What industry do I work in ?

      • Gristle 2.1.2

        Don’t confuse being able to operate the remote control or write a bit of code with understanding technology: Unintended consequences abound whenever something new is introduced.

        You think you understand the application of technology and then somebody points out that there may be a linkage between CFC and holes in the ozone. Who would thought that the “@” would have caused the demise of the post office.

        • Draco T Bastard 2.1.2.1

          Who would thought that the “@” would have caused the demise of the post office.

          I did. In fact, I’m amazed that it’s taken so long.

          I would have thought that the concept of phone numbers would have gone by now as well but the phone companies seem to have found a way to rip us off through their continued use.

  3. greywarshark 3

    My suggestion is to start forming like-minded co operatives committed to supporting each other, living a thoughtful, simplified and affordable life, and aiming to increase supportiveness in their own community. This doesn’t mean that they have to live together but they join up in a Trust or something that can arrange and offer central meeting point, events, talks, demonstrations of skills, visiting experts, social get-togethers.

    Also encouraging local production, and buying most things locally, or made in our own country. So that is most things, some things can be imported and being fairly rare, would be conserved and cared for, not just used a couple of times and discarded. (Thinking of women’s clothes here. I know about the op shop waste, good simple clothes in good condition can hardly be given away in these conformist, fashion conscious days.)

    I think it would be helpful to institute a meeting time held weekly, a few hours on Saturday or Sunday morning where people wanting to live the life mentioned above, can talk about an agreed topic of concern for a set time. Then have a simple tea and sandwiches while people move round and chat. This would be rather like this blog, where like-minded people can share information and hopes and tips and I have found there is a big boost in meeting good people who you can respect.

    There are so many people with whom you can’t speak openly, and this includes family and friends. You can alienate yourself from people who will not turn their minds to reality, to think or talk about, or have built their lives successfully in material terms by thinking exclusively of their own interests, it is an affront to them to discuss this of course. You may love them, and respect them to a great extent, but not be able to speak clearly and honestly to them And this can apply to the wealthy or those managing to scrape a life on the low income strata.

    Ironically religion could be doing this but its ability to handle the future and enable ethics mixed with pragmatism, is often fragile. Turning to the bible is one of their answers, reciting poetic speeches, praying for a divine hand to assist people who have been given the gift of divine life and consciousness, but can’t utilise the gifts adequately. I think we can pray for guidance, but not a proxy to carry out our duties.

    • One Two 3.1

      This is what must happen to ensure continuity and a return to a way of life which our ancient hardware and software is designed for

      The digital world and its owners are hell bent seeing in thier transhumanist agenda.
      Policies which open pathways towards such an era, can be seen throughout the analogue world

      • weka 3.1.1

        That’s an interesting comment One Two.

      • Draco T Bastard 3.1.2

        So, that would make you one of those authoritarians who are scared of social changes then.

        • One Two 3.1.2.1

          Authoritarian, No.

          Scared of social change vs technical dictatorship. No

          The authoritarians you refer to, own the technology and science based industry’s

          • Draco T Bastard 3.1.2.1.1

            No, the authoritarians that I refer to are scared of social change at the individual level. The ones you refer to are also scared of social changes but for different reasons – the social changes that need to come about which will get rid of the rich.

            The problem is that they then coalesce into a grouping against social change that prevents both from happening.

  4. Stuart Munro 4

    Hugh Fletcher notoriously learned Go at on point, but never appeared in competitions – I suspect he never became very good at it. International competition trailed off a bit when JAL withdrew sponsorship after Cho Chihun proved an insurmontable obstacle to Japanese players for a decade or so, rather like the more recent dominance of the US womens’ golf tournaments by Koreans, one of whom is Lydia Ko.

    Go is a great game for learning strategy – the presumptions of chess are too monarchial to extend far into the contemporary world. If Americans played Go instead of chess they might not be quite so prone to believe that toppling a leader like bin Laden or Hussein would end all opposition to their occuppying forces.

  5. ropata 5

    Sorry all you luddites we aren’t throwing away our tech in the foreseeable future… it certainly has a dark side but when used for good, technology can be a massively empowering and democratizing. (That’s probably why the US Gov is trying to steal everyone’s encrypted phone data… democracy is not in their interests)

    Stop blaming IT for an economic and political malaise: i.e. the continual depredations of the wealthy preying upon the poor using the tools of state and media and law

    • weka 5.1

      The Luddites didn’t suffer from political malaise and look out that turned out. I think we have reasons to be concerned even if things were moving in the right direction politically and economically.

      And as always, where’s the climate change analysis?

  6. Draco T Bastard 6

    “If we can program machines to read x-rays and write news stories, all the better. I say good riddance,” Kaplan said. “Get another job!”

    Yep, exactly. We should be destroying jobs as fast as possible. Get rid of the low pay, low skill ones that garner no respect first.

    Then we have face the real problem with capitalism. The fact that the rich demand that everyone else work for them and that if they don’t then they will be destroyed through poverty and discrimination.

    So, along with those lose paying jobs we also need to get rid of the rich.

    • ropata 6.1

      Sounds like you need to join McGillicuddy Serious and help implement the “Great Leap Backwards”

      Do you really think Auckland Council could run better using paper records? (greywarshark does, and his idiotic comment was not contradicted by anyone. I ignored it because it was so naïve… ) Don’t you remember what it was like getting anything done in 70s? A simple phone connection would take months.

      • greywarshark 6.1.1

        ropata
        You are too excitable and inclined to jump to emotional responses despite your connection to scientific technological methods. A very simple process of taking a little time to absorb what you are reading instead of jumping to your opinionated knee jerk reactions will take you and your ideas to the top of whatever you are doing I should think. Time to reflect and understand first will help with mature decisions. If you are middle aged, you had better learn quickly.

        and DTB
        Sometimes your thinking doesn’t join up the dots. Don’t talk down unskilled jobs, just ensure that they get paid a living wage. It is no advantage having advanced economies and technology if the only way they can be successfully used is to deny a lot of people work that enables them to live an enjoyable life doing something they think is worthy and appreciated in society. Bugger technology if it can’t end up with all people better off.

        We may indeed have to live without it soon, so don’t give up doing some things manually in case your arms shrivel and drop off, through maladjustment in understanding that humans need work so they can stay fit mentally and physically to survive.
        edited

        • weka 6.1.1.1

          And who gets to decide which are the useless jobs? I’d have less of a problem with his argument if the people who do those jobs were asked.

          • Draco T Bastard 6.1.1.1.1

            I can assure you that the people cleaning toilets and parks and other similar work don’t want their job because they’re fucken boring and working them to death.

        • Draco T Bastard 6.1.1.2

          Don’t talk down unskilled jobs, just ensure that they get paid a living wage.

          Why? Much better to get rid of them.

          Please note: I’m not talking down the people doing those jobs.

          It is no advantage having advanced economies and technology if the only way they can be successfully used is to deny a lot of people work that enables them to live an enjoyable life doing something they think is worthy and appreciated in society.

          19th century that assumes that people must have a lot of work rather than that technology will be getting rid of the work.

          Bugger technology if it can’t end up with all people better off.

          That’s what we’re trying to do. Many are trying to prevent it by ensuring that they benefit while most become worse off.

      • Draco T Bastard 6.1.2

        You’re not talking to me are you?

        I’m all for more technology and getting rid of jobs with it.

  7. ropata 7

    This comment on HackerNews stuck with me:

    As someone who studied AI in college and am a reasonably good amateur player, I have been following the matches between Lee and AlphaGo.

    AlphaGo plays some unusual moves that go clearly against any classically trained Go players. Moves that simply don’t quite fit into the current theories of Go playing, and the world’s top players are struggling to explain what’s the purpose/strategy behind them.

    I’ve been giving it some thought. When I was learning to play Go as a teenager in China, I followed a fairly standard, classical learning path. First I learned the rules, then progressively I learn the more abstract theories and tactics. Many of these theories, as I see them now, draw analogies from the physical world, and are used as tools to hide the underlying complexity (chunking), and enable the players to think at a higher level.

    For example, we’re taught of considering connected stones as one unit, and give this one unit attributes like dead, alive, strong, weak, projecting influence in the surrounding areas. In other words, much like a standalone army unit.

    These abstractions all made a lot of sense, and feels natural, and certainly helps game play — no player can consider the dozens (sometimes over 100) stones all as individuals and come up with a coherent game play. Chunking is such a natural and useful way of thinking.

    But watching AlphaGo, I am not sure that’s how it thinks of the game. Maybe it simply doesn’t do chunking at all, or maybe it does chunking its own way, not influenced by the physical world as we humans invariably do. AlphaGo’s moves are sometimes strange, and couldn’t be explained by the way humans chunk the game.

    It’s both exciting and eerie. It’s like another intelligent species opening up a new way of looking at the world (at least for this very specific domain). and much to our surprise, it’s a new way that’s more powerful than ours.

    • Stuart Munro 7.1

      It would be interesting to see whether AlphaGo revives GoSeigin’s shin fusekis – the man himself gave them up not because they didn’t work, but they were too much effort compared to less iconoclastic openings.

    • One Anonymous Bloke 7.2

      That makes sense. Everyone wants to learn from it; good players are talking about the beauty of its game.

      Sedol wasn’t just beaten: he was outplayed. Exciting times.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Speech to National Family Violence Conference 2024
    Hon. Karen Chhour  National Network of Family Violence Services  National Family Violence Conference 2024  9:25am Wednesday 29 May 2024    It is an honour to open this conference, and I want to acknowledge the broad range of expertise, experience, and hard work represented by the people here in this room. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Government improves mass arrival management
    The Government has strengthened settings for managing a mass arrival, with the passing of the Immigration (Mass Arrivals) Amendment Bill today.  “While we haven’t experienced a mass arrival event in New Zealand, it is an ongoing possibility which would have a significant impact on our immigration and court systems,” Immigration ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Super Fund to get more investment opportunities
    Finance Minister Nicola Willis has welcomed the passage of legislation giving the New Zealand Superannuation Fund a wider range of investment opportunities. The New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Controlling Interests) Amendment Bill passed its third reading in Parliament today. “The bill removes a section in the original act that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Crown and iwi settle three decades of negotiations
    Three decades of negotiations between iwi and the Crown have been settled today as the Whakatōhea Claims Settlement Bill passes its third reading in Parliament, Treaty Negotiations Minister Paul Goldsmith says. “While no settlement can fully compensate for the Crown’s past injustices, this settlement will support the aspirations and prosperity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New Zealand to support PNG landslide response
    New Zealand will support Papua New Guinea’s response to the devastating landslide in Enga Province, Foreign Minister Winston Peters and Defence Minister Judith Collins have announced.   “Ever since learning of the horrendous landslide on Friday, New Zealand has been determined to play our part in assisting Papua New Guinea’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government to consult on regulation of shooting clubs and ranges
      The Government is consulting New Zealanders on a package of proposals for simple and effective regulation of shooting clubs and ranges, Associate Minister of Justice, Nicole McKee announced today.   “Clubs and ranges are not only important for people learning to operate firearms safely, to practice, and to compete, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Successful New Caledonia repatriation winds up, need for dialogue remains
    Over 300 people have been successfully flown out of New Caledonia in a joint Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) and New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) operation.   As of today, seven New Zealand government aircraft flights to Nouméa have assisted around 225 New Zealanders and 145 foreign nationals ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Minister to Singapore for defence, technology talks
    Defence and Science, Innovation and Technology Minister Judith Collins departs for Singapore tomorrow for defence and technology summits and meetings. First up is the Asia Tech X Singapore Summit, followed by the Five Power Defence Arrangements Defence Ministers Meeting and wrapping up with the Shangri-La Dialogue for Defence Ministers from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Major investment in teacher supply through Budget 24
    Over the next four years, Budget 24 will support the training and recruitment of 1,500 teachers into the workforce, Education Minister Erica Stanford announced today. “To raise achievement and develop a world leading education system we’re investing nearly $53 million over four years to attract, train and retain our valued ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Joint statement on the New Zealand – Cook Islands Joint Ministerial Forum – 2024
    1.  New Zealand Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Rt Hon Winston Peters; Minister of Health and Minister for Pacific Peoples Hon Dr Shane Reti; and Minister for Climate Change Hon Simon Watts hosted Cook Islands Minister of Foreign Affairs and Immigration Hon Tingika Elikana and Minister of Health Hon Vainetutai Rose Toki-Brown on 24 May ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Middle East, Africa deployments extended
    The Government has approved two-year extensions for four New Zealand Defence Force deployments to the Middle East and Africa, Defence Minister Judith Collins and Foreign Minister Winston Peters announced today. “These deployments are long-standing New Zealand commitments, which reflect our ongoing interest in promoting peace and stability, and making active ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Climate Change Commission Chair to retire
    The Climate Change Commission Chair, Dr Rod Carr, has confirmed his plans to retire at the end of his term later this year, Climate Change Minister Simon Watts says. “Prior to the election, Dr Carr advised me he would be retiring when his term concluded. Dr Rod Carr has led ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Inaugural Board of Integrity Sport & Recreation Commission announced
    Nine highly respected experts have been appointed to the inaugural board of the new Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission, Sport & Recreation Minister Chris Bishop says. “The Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission is a new independent Crown entity which was established under the Integrity Sport and Recreation Act last year, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • A balanced Foreign Affairs budget
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters confirmed today that Vote Foreign Affairs in Budget 2024 will balance two crucial priorities of the Coalition Government.    While Budget 2024 reflects the constrained fiscal environment, the Government also recognises the critical role MFAT plays in keeping New Zealanders safe and prosperous.    “Consistent with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New social housing places to support families into homes
    New social housing funding in Budget 2024 will ensure the Government can continue supporting more families into warm, dry homes from July 2025, Housing Ministers Chris Bishop and Tama Potaka say. “Earlier this week I was proud to announce that Budget 2024 allocates $140 million to fund 1,500 new social ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand’s minerals future
    Introduction Today, we are sharing a red-letter occasion. A Blackball event on hallowed ground. Today  we underscore the importance of our mineral estate. A reminder that our natural resource sector has much to offer.  Such a contribution will not come to pass without investment.  However, more than money is needed. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government sets out vision for minerals future
    Increasing national and regional prosperity, providing the minerals needed for new technology and the clean energy transition, and doubling the value of minerals exports are the bold aims of the Government’s vision for the minerals sector. Resources Minister Shane Jones today launched a draft strategy for the minerals sector in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government progresses Māori wards legislation
    The coalition Government’s legislation to restore the rights of communities to determine whether to introduce Māori wards has passed its first reading in Parliament, Local Government Minister Simeon Brown says. “Divisive changes introduced by the previous government denied local communities the ability to determine whether to establish Māori wards.” The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • First RMA amendment Bill introduced to Parliament
    The coalition Government has today introduced legislation to slash the tangle of red and green tape throttling some of New Zealand’s key sectors, including farming, mining and other primary industries. RMA Reform Minister Chris Bishop says the Government is committed to  unlocking development and investment while ensuring the environment is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government welcomes EPA decision
    The decision by Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) to approve the continued use of hydrogen cyanamide, known as Hi-Cane, has been welcomed by Environment Minister Penny Simmonds and Agriculture Minister Todd McClay.  “The EPA decision introduces appropriate environmental safeguards which will allow kiwifruit and other growers to use Hi-Cane responsibly,” Ms ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Speech to Employers and Manufacturers Association: Relief for today, hope for tomorrow
    Kia ora, Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou kātoa Tāmaki Herenga Waka, Tāmaki Herenga tangata Ngā mihi ki ngā mana whenua o tēnei rohe Ngāti Whātua ō Ōrākei me nga iwi kātoa kua tae mai. Mauriora. Greetings everyone. Thank you to the EMA for hosting this event. Let me acknowledge ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government invests in 1,500 more social homes
    The coalition Government is investing in social housing for New Zealanders who are most in need of a warm dry home, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. Budget 2024 will allocate $140 million in new funding for 1,500 new social housing places to be provided by Community Housing Providers (CHPs), not ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • $24 million boost for Gumboot Friday
    Thousands more young New Zealanders will have better access to mental health services as the Government delivers on its commitment to fund the Gumboot Friday initiative, says Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Mental Health Minister Matt Doocey.  “Budget 2024 will provide $24 million over four years to contract the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill passes first reading
    The Coalition Government’s Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill, which will improve tenancy laws and help increase the supply of rental properties, has passed its first reading in Parliament says Housing Minister Chris Bishop. “The Bill proposes much-needed changes to the Residential Tenancies Act 1986 that will remove barriers to increasing private ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Montecassino Commemorative Address, Cassino War Cemetery
    Standing here in Cassino War Cemetery, among the graves looking up at the beautiful Abbey of Montecassino, it is hard to imagine the utter devastation left behind by the battles which ended here in May 1944. Hundreds of thousands of shells and bombs of every description left nothing but piled ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First Reading – Repeal of Section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act 1989
    I present a legislative statement on the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill Mr. Speaker, I move that the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill be now read a first time. I nominate the Social Services and Community Committee to consider the Bill. Thank you, Mr. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First reading of 7AA’s repeal: progress for children
    The Bill to repeal Section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act has had its first reading in Parliament today. The Bill reaffirms the Coalition Government’s commitment to the care and safety of children in care, says Minister for Children Karen Chhour.  “When I became the Minister for Children, I made ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • China Business Summit 2024
    Kia ora koutou, good morning, and zao shang hao. Thank you Fran for the opportunity to speak at the 2024 China Business Summit – it’s great to be here today. I’d also like to acknowledge: Simon Bridges - CEO of the Auckland Chamber of Commerce. His Excellency Ambassador - Wang ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Assisted depatures from New Caledonia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has confirmed a New Zealand Government plane will head to New Caledonia in the next hour in the first in a series of proposed flights to begin bringing New Zealanders home.    “New Zealanders in New Caledonia have faced a challenging few days - and bringing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Assisted departures from New Caledonia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has confirmed a New Zealand Government plane will head to New Caledonia in the next hour in the first in a series of proposed flights to begin bringing New Zealanders home.  “New Zealanders in New Caledonia have faced a challenging few days - and bringing them ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government to rollout roadside drug testing
    The Coalition Government will introduce legislation this year that will enable roadside drug testing as part of our commitment to improve road safety and restore law and order, Transport Minister Simeon Brown says.  “Alcohol and drugs are the number one contributing factor in fatal road crashes in New Zealand. In ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Minister responds to review of Kāinga Ora
    The Government has announced a series of immediate actions in response to the independent review of Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. “Kāinga Ora is a large and important Crown entity, with assets of $45 billion and over $2.5 billion of expenditure each year. It ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pseudoephedrine back on shelves
    Associate Health Minister David Seymour is pleased that Pseudoephedrine can now be purchased by the general public to protect them from winter illness, after the coalition government worked swiftly to change the law and oversaw a fast approval process by Medsafe. “Pharmacies are now putting the medicines back on their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand-China Business Summit
    Tēnā koutou katoa. Da jia hao.  Good morning everyone.   Prime Minister Luxon, your excellency, a great friend of New Zealand and my friend Ambassador Wang, Mayor of what he tells me is the best city in New Zealand, Wayne Brown, the highly respected Fran O’Sullivan, Champion of the Auckland business ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New measures to protect powerlines from trees
    Energy Minister Simeon Brown has announced that the Government will make it easier for lines firms to take action to remove vegetation from obstructing local powerlines. The change will ensure greater security of electricity supply in local communities, particularly during severe weather events.  “Trees or parts of trees falling on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani win top Māori dairy farming award
    Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani were the top winners at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy awards recognising the best in Māori dairy farming. Māori Development Minister Tama Potaka announced the winners and congratulated runners-up, Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, at an awards celebration also attended by Prime Minister Christopher Luxon and Finance Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • DJ Fred Again – Assurance report received
    "On the 27th of March, I sought assurances from the Chief Executive, Department of Internal Affairs, that the Department’s correct processes and policies had been followed in regards to a passport application which received media attention,” says Minister of Internal Affairs Brooke van Velden.  “I raised my concerns after being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • District Court Judges appointed
    Attorney-General Judith Collins has announced the appointment of three new District Court Judges, to replace Judges who have recently retired. Peter James Davey of Auckland has been appointed a District Court Judge with a jury jurisdiction to be based at Whangarei. Mr Davey initially started work as a law clerk/solicitor with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Unions should put learning ahead of ideology
    Associate Education Minister David Seymour is calling on the Post Primary Teachers’ Association (PPTA) to put ideology to the side and focus on students’ learning, in reaction to the union holding paid teacher meetings across New Zealand about charter schools.     “The PPTA is disrupting schools up and down the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Craig Stobo appointed as chair of FMA
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Andrew Bayly today announced the appointment of Craig Stobo as the new chair of the Financial Markets Authority (FMA). Mr Stobo takes over from Mark Todd, whose term expired at the end of April. Mr Stobo’s appointment is for a five-year term. “The FMA plays ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago

Page generated in The Standard by Wordpress at 2024-05-30T00:34:03+00:00