Interview the leaders V: Maori Party

Written By: - Date published: 2:10 pm, April 21st, 2008 - 39 comments
Categories: act, interview, maori party - Tags: , , , , , ,

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Even amateur, part-time bloggers sometimes make mistakes, and last week we didn’t send Clark her questions until Wednesday, rather than Monday, due to a miscommunication between ourselves. So, we extended her deadline to this Wednesday. We’ll post her replies when we get them. In the meantime, here are the questions to ACT’s Rodney Hide that we chose from your suggestions. We promise to remember to send these ones.

The general question remains:

Of which of your achievements in politics are you most proud?

For the two other questions we’ve gone with r0b’s question:

Do you believe that the Earth’s climate is warming? If it is, is the warming dangerous? if it is dangerous, what does ACT believe we should do about it?

and Burt’s question:

Would ACT implement tax deductibility for private health and education fees in recognition that by purchasing these services privately tax payers are funding the public system that they do not use

While we haven’t been able to cover everything you asked we have emailed Hide a link to the questions post so he can have a look at your issues. We’re expecting to post his answers on Monday April 28.

In the meantime, our next leader is the Maori Party’s Tariana Turia. You can place your questions for her in the comments section of this post. Reminder: tough but fair.

39 comments on “Interview the leaders V: Maori Party”

  1. r0b 1

    Assuming that the Maori Party holds the balance of power after the next election, how will you decide which major party (National or Labour) to choose to lead the government? Will you follow your usual practice and consult with your supporters, or if not, what other process will you use?

  2. Daveo 2

    Why did you oppose foreign maritime workers being paid a higher minimum wage?

  3. Rebel Heart 3

    What place do Asians have in NZ?

  4. Freelander 4

    Welfare dependency has been a concern of Maori political leaders since Maui Pomare’s day. Is it a priority for you? And how would you get Maori off benefits?

  5. Daveo 5

    Having an ethnic-based party makes a lot of sense when faced with a dominant settler majority often hostile to indigenous rights, but how do you intend to address the fundamental economic and class contradictions inherent in drawing support from both powerful Maori business interests and the large Maori working class?

  6. Sam Dixon 6

    Maori are not homogenous and they do not all have the same economic interests. How does the Maori Party chose whether to represent the interests of the Maori elite and Maori-owned business or the Maori poor?

    actaully, pretty much what Daveo says, and he says it very well.

  7. Billy 7

    Hey, Daveo, I had no idea you were a settler. I haven’t bumped into one of them since the late nineteenth century. When did your boat arrive? Have you finished clearing your block with your oxen train? Do you have any kauri gum for sale?

  8. And once again Billy substitutes inane humour for well thought-out debate…

    My question to Tariana is what did she think of the Kiwi/Iwi billboards?

  9. Steve Pierson 9

    Billy. This is a settler-state, just like the American countries and Australia are. anglo-celtic settlers have created a state, subsuming the previously existing tribal governance. nothing contraversial in that statement.

  10. Macky 10

    to Turia: how can we create a justice system that is responsive to Maori culture without violating the principle that all should be equal before the law and the law should apply equally to all?

  11. higherstandard 11

    1. Few “full and final’ settlements have been made through The Waitangi Tribunal, and only Ngai Tahu. and of late, Tainui, seem to have handled their settlements efficiently what do you believe the major causes are for this very slow progress.

    2. Maori are over represented in a number of concerning statistics in both the justice and health areas how would the Maori party propose to address these areas.

    3. Sir Apirana Ngata and Sir Peter Buck warned in the 1930s that Maori would be destroyed by easy welfare do you agree of disagree, why ?

    4. A large percentage of all Maori children are now born to women outside of a stable partnership; many grow up not knowing who their fathers are, would the Maori party seek to address this issue if not why not.

    5. Can you envisage a NZ when there is no need for Maori seats in parliamanent ?

  12. Phil 12

    “Assuming that the Maori Party holds the balance of power after the next election, how will you decide which major party (National or Labour) to choose to lead the government? Will you follow your usual practice and consult with your supporters, or if not, what other process will you use” –

    That’s too easy a question r0b! plus, I think we already know the answer…

    A better way to put it would be;

    ” If the result on election night is such that Labour cannot form a workable government that includes the Maori Party, but National can, would you enter into an agreement to that effect?
    If so, what do you believe Maori Party supporters would expect you to achieve from such government? ”

    (re-wording suggestions welcome)

  13. djp 13

    in the second question you should have added “If yes do you think it is caused by human activity” or some such thing… that part is crucial otherwise you could be leaving him wiggle room (btw I hope he says NO 🙂

  14. Matthew Pilott 14

    Phil – I disagree with your interpretation of that question, it discounts the possibility of MP working with Labour (and, conversely, tacitly assumes that this can happen). Maybe I’ve missed something, but I wouldn’t have a clue as to the answer to r0b’s question!

    I would ask “If the Maori vote strongly favours Labour, as it did in the last election, will you be able to work with the party your constituents indicate as their first choice? If not, do you see your party working with National, and what do you believe Maori Party supporters would expect you to achieve from such government?”

    It would be good to include r0b’s point about consultation in there too, thoug a triple-barrelled question is a tad excessive.

  15. gobsmacked 15

    Before the last election, you told voters that you would not support National under Don Brash.

    For example, on September 7 2005, on your Stuff.co.nz blog, you said: “A vote for a Maori candidate gives more value to Maori: it means more Maori in Parliament and will keep National out.”

    After the election, you decided to support Don Brash on confidence and supply.

    So why would anybody believe you this time?

  16. r0b 16

    All rewording suggestions welcome of course. The point of my question was to establish if the MP would “consult their supporters” in deciding who to go with in government.

    It’s not a “tough” question, but I think the answer could be very significant. If they are committed to supporting the party preferred by their supporters then at this stage it appears to rule National out. And if they are not making such a commitment it’s a very telling break with their standard practice.

  17. Steve Pierson 17

    djp.. arguably whether or not climate change is man-made (which i’m sure we agree it is) doesn’t affect whether we should want to prevent it’s negative consequences – just whether or not we are able to do so.

  18. Rocket Boy 18

    You guys are all too polite, ask Tariana if ‘her dislike for Helen Clarke is so great that given the choice she would support the National Party into power over Labour’.

    Also ask her ‘Why in an MMP parliament do we still need the Maori seats?’ and ‘When the Asian population is greater than the Maori population in New Zealand will they get their own seats?’

    Seems to me that the Maori Party are on course to win 7 seats in the next parliament with only 3% of the popular vote, hardly seems like democracy to me.

  19. principessa 19

    Will you make repealing the ForeShore and Seabed Act a condition of coalition?

    Are there any other issues you would likely make as part of a coalition deal?

  20. Billy 20

    Steve, I have settled nothing.

  21. Billy – you seem to have settled for so little.

  22. Billy 22

    And once again ‘sod substitutes inane humour for well thought-out debate

  23. Baby you’re the right-wing ying to my manly and virile left-wing yang…

    Oh and you’ll see I’ve actually managed to ask a proper question in this thread, billy – so far you’ve not.

  24. Billy 24

    Yeah ‘sod. Everyone really appreciates your valuable contributions here.

    Let’s see, working backwards:

    1. You attacked me.
    2. You attacked me.
    3. You attacked me and asked that patsy question you are so proud of.
    4. You attacked Mawgxxxxiv
    5. You attacked John Key (yawn)
    6. You attacked First Time Caller
    7. You attacked Hoolian
    8. You attacked Santi
    9. You attacked FTC
    10. You attacked Santi
    11. You attacked Absolute Power

    This is where I got bored, but I think the pattern is established.

    I am all for this. But don’t you think it is a little childish to accuse me of contributing nothing when I do the same?

  25. Tane 25

    Can you guys stop ruining our thread with your domestic?

  26. lprent 26

    I’d agree. Makes me feel a bit uncomfortable listening in on so intimate a discussion. Sounds like you need to figure out how to trade e-mails.

  27. Gooner 27

    Which other minor party do you feel the Maori Part is aligned to the closest and why?

  28. Jeez Billy – you’re right. I guess I was just in an attacky mood today…

  29. Absolute Power 29

    “attacky mood today” Is my safety assured around these parts as the rather disjointed robinsod character is a nasty piece of work?

    [lprent: Talking to me? Usually – depends what you say. You get used to the ‘sod and other assorted bod’s (left and right) around here. They are highly reactive to posts or other commentors. Eventually they get clipped, either by other more ‘responsible’ commentors, by one of the moderators, or in a more terminal mode by me. So long as it doesn’t get too far out of hand (ie incipient flamewars), we tolerate the usual disjointed blog comment acrimony until it gets too tedious. Very occassionally they actually say something interesting. Often it is a pretty good indicator for figuring out next weeks headlines.

    Been scanning your comments. From your name, comment style, and some rather obvious book promotion I suspect you’re aware of this already. I think you and ‘sod will get on quite well together.]

  30. Absolute Power 30

    Iprent , does a pit ball get on with a poodle?

    [lprent: depends on gender?]

  31. Don’t be so hard on yourself, bro. You’re not that much of a poodle…

  32. Absolute Power 32

    robinsod the come back line is rather gormless. Go to a wit doctor and get back to me. Must go ladies, such a busy schedule these days. I got another overseas interview about the book.

  33. Matthew Pilott 33

    “Pit Ball (sic)” Absolute Power?

    Christ matey, stay away from them, ‘less you want to lose an arm!

  34. Millsy 34

    My question:

    Do you accept that having our welfare system, with all its faults, is much better than than having mothers and their babies sleeping under bridges and begging on the streets?

  35. To either Pita or Tariana:

    Current National Party policy is to ‘combine’ the Maori and General Electoral rolls into one.

    Current Labour Party policy is to stand firm on the issue of the Seabed and Foreshore legislation.

    My question is, assuming that both parties take opposite stands of their opponents, which currently is my observation – do you in your role as leader of the Maori Party value long-term presence in Parliament over your party’s formative issue, or vice-versa?

    And if so, why?

  36. Draco TB 36

    It is highly likely that in the future NZ will become a republic. What do you think is necessary for this to come about?

    In regards to tino rangatiratanga why do you think Maori should be able to live under different rules than everyone else?

  37. What do you say to members of the public who find it disgusting that you are wasting tax payer dollars by calling up MP’s in Parliament who don’t pronounce Maori place names correctly.

  38. Jum 38

    Tariana Turia,

    Please tell me if you deliberately started your political training with Labour because Helen Clark was and is the best politician, but only as training because you had every intention of starting your own party, but needed the expertise first?

  39. Matthew Pilott 39

    Brett Dale, I’m sure she has nothing to say to you. Referring to yourself as ‘members of the public’ is a touch odd though.

    Actually she might call you up on apostrophe misuse, if it’s her thing.

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