web analytics

The responses to the Bain report leak

Written By: - Date published: 8:26 am, February 20th, 2016 - 47 comments
Categories: national, same old national, the praiseworthy and the pitiful - Tags: , , , , ,

The views of various commentators are starting to percolate through and range from the obsequious to the surprisingly well informed.

Obsequious is the only word available to describe this pitiful attempt by Larry Williams who is starting to write in the Herald.  He shows that he has taken the leaker’s spin hook line and sinker and says this:

The judge looking at David Bain’s compensation claim has found it doesn’t meet the legal threshold.

Judge Callinan reasoned Bain is not innocent beyond reasonable doubt. In order to meet the legal threshold for compensation, the judge had to find “exceptional circumstances” and he didn’t.

The process hasn’t been bungled at all. Judge Binnie’s review of the case was flawed, which meant that another judge had to look at it.

The basic problem with his comment is that Minister Amy Adams said the threshold was proof of innocence on the balance of probabilities.  A clearer example of shifting goalposts is hard to imagine.

Why should Bain still be eligible for compensation?  Because if he shows he is innocent on the balance of probabilities it is clear that the original conviction should not have occurred.  There is a wide gap between establishing innocence on the balance of probabilities and proof beyond reasonable doubt.  William’s suggested test, proof of innocence beyond reasonable doubt, is so difficult to meet it would only be in the most exceptional, and probably science assisted, cases that this would occur.

Williams also says that claims the report was leaked by the Government are “preposterous”.  Well someone leaked it.  The Greens are right.  There should be an inquiry into who did.

Duncan Garner’s analysis is more balanced.  He thinks that it is more likely than not that Bain committed the murders.  He then says this:

Which brings me to the compensation claim. I believe this Government is biased against David Bain. I believe the decisionmakers believe David Bain killed his family. Like every other New Zealander, these ministers have read and followed the trials for decades. It’s been impossible to ignore.

They have been unable to divorce themselves from their personal views. It’s completely unprofessional. For that reason, Bain can not get a fair and independent compensation hearing under this Government.

It’s impossible and we’ve seen that. Bain’s claim needs to be heard by a truly independent panel away from the clutches of Government. And this time the findings can’t be ignored because they don’t gel with the ministers think.

But that’s not how it works here. The decision is highly political, not legal. This Cabinet doesn’t want to pay him a cent because they don’t believe he’s innocent.

Ministers have spent millions of dollars shopping around for a report that fits their view. The indisputable fact is that Bain was found not guilty in the retrial.

You might not like that decision, but the justice system stops being a system when politicians can pick and choose the verdicts they approve of. You can’t re-try by shopping around for a judge to write the report you want.

His comments about how the process has been botched up are spot on.

For a more nuanced post Andrew Geddis has written this.  He wonders at the selectiveness of the leak.  A finding that innocence has been proved beyond reasonable doubt may mean that the new report writer agrees with Ian Binnie that Bain is innocent on the balance of probabilities.  Geddis also discusses the test to be applied.  He correctly identifies that proof of innocence on the balance of probabilities is the apparent threshold with a further requirement that extraordinary circumstances also be shown.

Proving innocence beyond reasonable doubt is one possible extraordinary circumstance.  Being the subject of a botched police inquiry could be another although this Government will never want to acknowledge that this occurred.

And if  you want a sharp spot on comment I offer you this from ACT MP David Seymour.  This is possibly the first time ever a Standard writer has agreed completely with something said by an ACT MP.  I have screen shotted it for posterity.

David Seymour on David Bain

Seymour is right. What is happening here is banana republic stuff.  We should all be very uncomfortable with what is occurring.  And the Government needs to launch an inquiry.

47 comments on “The responses to the Bain report leak ”

  1. gsays 1

    while not having a strong opinion on bain’s guilt or otherwise,
    i firmly believe it’s better to have a guilty person free than an innocent person imprisoned.
    therefore it’s better to have a guilty person compensated than an innocent person go without.

    that is if the decision makers are operating on principle rather than opinion

    • weka 1.1

      very good gsays

    • Bearded Git 1.2

      agreed gsays-well put.

    • Carl 1.3

      When all bar one member of a family is dead by the hands of one of those family members which one did it?

    • aerobubble 1.4

      Yes, the question is for me the principle was Bain provided a fair trial. Any case before the courts thirteen years late is likely to be thrown out, similarly a civil case, for want of credible evidemce, witness recollections etc.Bain can not be held accountable for the justice system failing to provide a quick fair trail. And they did finally, a judge found there was enough evidence for a jury to convict and the jury found Bain not guilty. This idea that courts are ideal, or not, is nonsense. The court had to also ask the question is there enough of a case to answer. That however does not immediately mean Bain is civil liable as it seens to be suggested.

      So its really perplexing, the only way i can figute it, is Key alledgely promised a doner not on his watch. Bain would not get compensation.

      As otherwise Key is buying into the belief that courts are perfect, and when they aren’t poltics and opinion should take their place siding with the state, police, prosecutor s, judges, etc all failing; the holes in the swiss cheese lining up and nobody is found wanting, not for the murders, or for the fiasco that sees an individual lose their liberty. Nobody looks good so why can we hold Bain to any standard, standards were broke.

      The state does not get to go over and over, fishing, it waste resources when cases and prosectors can just kick the ball downthe way coz guilty nviction is unrepealable.

  2. Richard Christie 2

    Quality journalism in NZ is dead.

    Why anybody reads or takes seriously the endless opinion pieces of journalists is beyond my understanding.

    Once, when they had the resources to undertake analysis and research the situation may have been different. Now the publications are so padded out by opinion crap that there is little of news value in what remains.

    Journalistic standards are so low opinions are now no more valid than anybody else’s, in addition, because there are obviously political agendas in play by the publishers, opinions are probably less valid than most people’s.

    I stopped reading the opinions of Sullivan, Armstrong and the throng of their associated want-to-be colleagues years back. I suggest more of us do the same.

    ( Not disagreeing with MS’s post, just tired that people take the Garners of the world etc seriously)

  3. Grey Area 3

    “And the Government needs to launch an inquiry”.

    Yes it does. But it won’t because they are the problem. This is just one more thing to add to the growing list of actions by this “government” that deserve to be investigated but won’t be.

    • Manuka AOR 3.1

      “And the Government needs to launch an inquiry”.

      No. There needs to be an entirely independent inquiry into the government handling of this legal case. As Nicky Hager showed us, there is need for the establishment of an Independent Commission against Corruption in NZ. (In this instance, to investigate the handling of this case. ) I wonder if any Party would commit to establishing such a Commission.

      • belledejourNZ 3.1.1

        yeah independent inquiry, bring it on. Cos I heard it was the other side that leaked.

    • Mosa 3.2

      I reckon John Key leaked it
      Has his M O all over it

  4. wyndham 4

    Why hasn’t Key had the guts to follow the example of National Party PM Robert Muldoon In the Thomas case and come out with a firm decision to compensate Bain and have done with it. The matter is now completely politicised, has become farcical and Justice deserves better than that.

    Whatever one’s feelings are about David Bain, the New Zealand I believe in requires that he be treated with compassion and decency. He will have suffered his personal hell over those thirteen years; before and beyond them. That Key is a political animal to his fingertips has no place in this matter; his poll driven decisions do not apply.

    • belledejourNZ 4.1

      yes Key should step up and draw a line under it. Only thing is, he knows who did it and it was not Robin. Tell Bain to go sing opera for his supper – no compo ***ever**** to the killer of 5.

      Police did not stuff up. Just because Karam said it does not make it true. I mean Karam is denying that his side leaked too, isn’t he?

      • aerobubble 4.1.1

        A citizen walks into thei home to find their entire family murdered and it looks like they’ve been framed. Police did not investigate fully in my view because eveyone could see Bain did it.

        Two recent cases. Father kills son when he cant pay him back, and brother kills his young brother. Older people have made more mistakes, Bains’ motive? Insanity?

        • aerobubble 4.1.1.1

          Bain did not get the house, or assets. Bain however did get incarcerated. An insanity verdict ould not have meant incarceration, but treatment.

    • Dorothy Bulling 4.2

      But Muldoon’s action in the Crewe case is exactly the problem here because he made that decision unilaterally in the political sense to gain some popularity, so it was a political decision.

  5. Richard Christie 5

    “Aussie judge who”d previously been investigated in connection with abuse of Court processes”

    Shouldn’t surprise, after all NZ’s go to for patsy opinion (Haig, Bain) has been ex Justice Fisher, who resigned from the Bench because he was caught looking at pornography on his work computer.

  6. The Government needs to launch an inquiry?

    I’m sure the PM could frame terms of reference which would scrupulously get to the bottom of everything. Setting the right lines for inquiries is his thing, a particular skill he has.

    In this case he’d come up with something like:

    1 Determine whether there was a leak of a confidential document.
    2 Determine whether in the event of there being a leak that the wider public opinion became roused.
    3 Determine whether the Minister of Justice Amy Adams is doing a fine job.

    Time for final report:
    During the Olympics, the day that Mahe Drysdale wins a medal, one of our Sevens teams plays its semi-final, Lydia Ko plays her final round and Valerie Adams competes.

    Media release of final report:
    The draft media release has already been prepared thus:
    “A full, deep and inquiry has found no evidence that the office of the Minister of Justice was involved in the leak of a report about Bain compensation. There was wide public interest roused by the early release of parts of the report. The Minister of Justice Amy Adams is doing a fine job. A bloody good job in fact. C’mon Mahe! C’mon Val! C’mon Lydia! Bugger SBW.”

    • Draco T Bastard 6.1

      Yeah, that was my immediate thought as well. Getting this government to inquire into itself is an act of futility as they’ll ensure that the inquiry will find them innocent of any wrong-doing never mind the fact that it’s obvious that they’ve been engaged in massive wrong-doing.

    • Tautuhi 6.2

      What another Inquiry, when has an Inquiry ever found anything here in NZ, the outcomes are often predetermined?

  7. Sacha 7

    That there was a leak at all shows the out-of-control factionalism in the Nat caucus. A competent opposition might skilfully exploit that ..

  8. b waghorn 8

    So Seymour points out that the Nats are crooks and yet he’ll continue to support them.??

  9. Andre 9

    To steal a sentiment from John Oliver, if we’re parsing the minutiae of where the threshold for compensation exactly lies, we’ve already done something very very wrong.

    To those who are dead-set against paying compensation to David Bain, I’d like you to put aside for a moment your views on his guilt and ponder for a while the ramifications of this possibility: what if David is in fact innocent?

    • McFlock 9.1

      And what if he actually did it?

      • Andre 9.1.1

        It’s abundantly clear the cops bungled their job so badly it cannot now be determined with any reliability whether Robin or David did it.

        So if David actually did it but gets a payout, he will have served most of his sentence and then been handed a winning lotto ticket by the cops that totally bungled their job.

        Which is an injustice to the victims to be sure and a (trivial) injustice to the taxpayers that funded the cops screwing up. However, that’s minor compared to the enormity of the injustice of being wrongly convicted, wrongly tossed in the slammer for years, then told “suck it up”.

        • McFlock 9.1.1.1

          So basically you’re telling everyone who lost a friend or a relative in that incident to “suck it up”.

          • Andre 9.1.1.1.1

            I’m saying to those that lost a friend or relative that the cops screwing up is definitely responsible for the horrible situation we have now. But there’s a reasonably good chance that David was not responsible, as determined by disinterested experts with access to all the evidence. And we now have no way to fairly determine the truth, since the cops screwed up.

            So to take a substantial risk of perpetrating further injustice on David, who may in fact be the biggest living victim of all, for the sake of holding someone accountable, is morally wrong. If their anger and grief needs an outlet, the appropriate target is the cops that screwed up.

            • McFlock 9.1.1.1.1.1

              So, basically, suck it.

              “Reasonably good chance” is not good enough to “compensate” someone who is equally or almost as likely to in fact be the perpetrator.

              ‘oh, we’re preeeetty sure we gave the cash and apology to the right person’ is no basis for distributing compensation. We should be damned sure that we’re not just giving an incentive for long-term detainees to keep pushing the appeals process as far as possible on the off-chance they’ll get lucky.

              • Andre

                That’s a view I find astonishingly callous towards the damage done to an individual that is wrongly convicted and imprisoned by the state. So now I’m curious, what’s your view on capital punishment?

                • McFlock

                  Against it.

                  There are many shades of “wrongly convicted and imprisoned”. There’s “completely innocent but the cops fabricated evidence”, there’s “completely guilty but on appeal a good lawyer got a key piece of evidence thrown out, or a witness couldn’t be located for the retrial”, and there’s everything in between.

                  One end of that continuum deserves millions in compensation. To give “compensation” to the other end is a slap in the face to everyone who lost a loved one.

                  You think Bain is innocent, therefore deserves compensation. Fair enough. Personally, I think that the likelihood that he’s a quintiple murderer is at least 50/50. I’m not comfortable with a payout at that rate.

                  • Andre

                    Actually, when it comes to David’s guilt or innocence, I don’t think my opinion is worth shit. I don’t think I’ve seen enough of the evidence to develop a worthwhile opinion. So I have trust the opinions of the experts that have. Ie, the Privy Council, Binnie and so on.

                    The opinion I’m willing to get behind is that the cops appeared to decide very prematurely that David dunnit, and discounted or ignored evidence that pointed to Robin. I feel reinforced in this opinion by the cops’ apparently closed-minded reaction to the possible gun loading markings on Robin’s hand that was pointed out a couple of years ago.

                    Since the dodgy police work failed to follow up and/or subsequently destroyed evidence that may have have conclusively shown Robin to be guilty and thereby maybe exonerated David, it seems to me that convicting and imprisoning someone on the basis of that kind of dodgy work is an exceptional circumstance that justifies compensation. Even though the experts with access to all the evidence only say “balance of probability” rather than “beyond reasonable doubt”.

                    • McFlock

                      The initial police impressions of David might be incorrect. But when the medic tells you that someone who is supposedly in catatonic shock is listening to your conversation, it can be difficult to overcome some preconceptions.

                      Since the dodgy police work failed to follow up and/or subsequently destroyed evidence that may have have conclusively exonerated Robin and thereby shown David to be guilty…

                      That’s the other half that you like to skip over.

                      Like I say: against whom was the injustice committed? If the police investigation were more thorough, would he never have been charged, or would he still be in prison? In the first case he deserves compensation. In the latter case he should count himself lucky with the current result.

                      You like Binnie’s evaluation, even though he excluded evidence with a strong filter. That’s nice, and if the next report says the same and Cabinet pays out on a weak “balance of probabilities”, that’s the process done. And I’ll suck it up. But I still won’t have any indication that he deserves a single red cent of it. “Balance of probabilities”? Toss a fucking coin and be honest about it.

                    • Andre

                      It looks to me like the cops thoroughly followed up any scrap of evidence incriminating David, but ignored evidence incriminating Robin. Apparently Robin’s hands were not tested for gunpowder residue. Apparently allegations that David had talked about planning rape and murder were thoroughly investigated, but incest allegations against Robin were dismissed with a “meh, unreliable witness” and no further investigation, to give just two examples. So I think the equivalence you’ve presented as a false equivalence.

                      Convicting and locking someone up is such a horrible thing to do that we rightly demand a very high standard of proof before we actually do it. If it subsequently turns out that that the actual proof was a long way short, to the point of not even meeting “balance of probabilities” so the initial conviction should never have happened, to then refuse compensation because “well, maybe you did it anyway, so count yourself lucky we let you out” makes an absolute mockery of the idea that conviction and imprisonment should only happen after proof beyond reasonable doubt.

                      Plenty of criminals “get lucky” because of poor investigations. That’s a result of the standard of proof we require and the resources we allocate to police, and as a society we seem to be ok with that. We should view the compensation of David the same way, that he may have just got lucky if he’s actually guilty. Because the awfulness of what we’ve done to him, if he’s actually innocent, vastly outweighs the cost of paying him compensation.

                    • McFlock

                      It only “vastly outweighs the cost” of paying a guilty person “compensation” if we ignore the injustices against five dead people, their relatives and their friends.

                      At least have the courtesy of ensuring that compensation is paid to the right people with odds estimates that are better than a drunk betting on the favourite in a horse race.

    • belledejourNZ 9.2

      The evidence says that is not a possibility. Simple

      As for the leak, who has been running a massive PR drive on the back of this leak?
      not the Govt, in case you hadn’t noticed.

  10. Paupial 10

    [MikeySavage: A typo in the third paragraph before the Seymour quote, you have; “Gaddis also discusses…” instead of “Geddis”. Delete this comment after fixing if you want to.]

    [Ta. Now fixed – MS]

  11. Molly 11

    How difficult would it be to release copies of sensitive material that has hidden characters, or in the case of pdfs – small punctuation changes to keep track of who has released a document?

    You would think this would be basic practice when sharing sensitive documents.

  12. Draco T Bastard 12

    The first trial found him guilty and he got sent to prison.
    Appeals found the first trial to be faulty and thus ordered a retrial.
    The retrial found him innocent.

    All this means that the 13 years he spent in prison was an injustice and that he should thus be compensated. The government refusing to compensate is continuing the injustice.

    Really, it’s not friggen hard.

    • John Shears 12.1

      DTB It’s not hard for you or me and a lots of others ,
      but none so blind as they that cannot see?

    • Richard Christie 12.2

      More than that.
      The system in these cases deliberatly makes the issue of compensation to be all about the wrongfully convicted, i.e. he/she could still have done it.

      It shifts focus away from the system’s own errors and culpability.

      It’s a confidence trick.

    • Chooky 12.3

      +100 DTB…I always thought he was innocent and it was a setup…either through incompetence or to cover up something rather big…

  13. McFlock 13

    It seems pretty simple to me:

    If the legal sysem finds that someone screwed up enough to quash a major conviction, you’d better be damned sure exactly who was the victim of the injustice, because “compensating” the wrong party simply increases the injustice.

  14. Tautuhi 14

    This has been a very weird case from start to finish, and the level of professionalism by all parties has been substandard, right from the start with the Police securing of the crime scene?

    • aerobubble 14.1

      Agreed. No cop, no prosecuctor, no defence lawyer, no judge has lost a thing. Low standards, and no cost. Bain lost his home, his family, his inheritance, his liberyy for over a decade, and all he has to show for is a not guilty conviction. Had he been declared not guilty first atleast he could have been sued civilly years ago. Even thats denied him. Its a very bad outcome that the system can walk away unscathed and an not guilty citizen gets to whether those costs outlined above.

  15. Brigid 15

    It is hardly David Bain’s fault that the prosecution chose not to gather sufficient scientific evidence to prove his guilt or innocence and the defence were denied the opportunity.

    If he is not not guilty enough to be awarded compensation, doesn’t that mean all those found not guilty since the passing of this latest legislation (determining a persons right to compenation) are just as likely, guilty.
    Our justice system is a farce.

  16. linda 16

    i think david bain and rest will need to wait for change government
    there is no justice from a corrupt entity

  17. Tautuhi 17

    This Government does not want to pay out, they would rather fund some more reports and Inquiries, what a shambles, however it gives the media something to write about to put in their rubbish rags.

    Admire Joe Karam for his patience and tenacity.

  18. Jollo 18

    I used to be fairly ambivalent on the whole affair until I was reading a report by Sir Thomas Thorpe, IMO the most brilliant legal and justice Judge we have ever had. He examined in great detail all the alleged miscarriages of justice at the time, and found at least 19 wrongful convictions.

    David Bain wasn’t one of them.

    He examined both sides in excruciating detail and his conclusion was that without a doubt, David had murderded his entire family. So while there were mistakes in the police investigation, we would have a situation where someone has committed a brutal mass murder, not just walking free after only 13 years but becoming a multi millionaire to boot.

    Hes already won one lottery in walking free.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission report shows progress
    Health Minister Andrew Little welcomes the Initial Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission’s assessment that transformation of New Zealand’s approach to mental health and addiction is underway. “This is an important step in the Government’s work to provide better and equitable mental health and wellbeing outcomes for all people in New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Over $300m returned to COVID-hit travellers
    The Government’s Consumer Travel Reimbursement Scheme has helped return over $352 million of refunds and credits to New Zealanders who had overseas travel cancelled due to COVID-19, Consumer Affairs Minister David Clark says. “Working with the travel sector, we are helping New Zealanders retrieve the money owed to them by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Hundreds more schools join free lunches programme
    An additional 88,000 students in 322 schools and kura across the country have started the school year with a regular lunch on the menu, thanks to the Government’s Ka Ora, Ka Ako Healthy School Lunches programme. They join 42,000 students already receiving weekday lunches under the scheme, which launched last ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Govt’s balanced economic approach reflected in Crown accounts
    New Zealand’s economic recovery has again been reflected in the Government’s books, which are in better shape than expected. The Crown accounts for the seven months to the end of January 2021 were better than forecast in the Half Year Economic and Fiscal Update (HYEFU). The operating balance before gains ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Over half of border workforce receive first vaccinations
    More than half of New Zealand’s estimated 12,000 border workforce have now received their first vaccinations, as a third batch of vaccines arrive in the country, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. As of midnight Tuesday, a total of 9,431 people had received their first doses. More than 70 percent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Boost in funding to deliver jobs while restoring Central Otago’s lakes and waterways
    The Government is significantly increasing its investment in restoring Central Otago’s waterways while at the same time delivering jobs to the region hard-hit by the economic impact of Covid-19, says Land Information Minister, Damien O’Connor.   Mr O’Connor says two new community projects under the Jobs for Nature funding programme will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Next stage of COVID-19 support for business and workers
    The Government has confirmed details of COVID-19 support for business and workers following the increased alert levels due to a resurgence of the virus over the weekend. Following two new community cases of COVID-19, Auckland moved to Alert Level 3 and the rest of New Zealand moved to Alert Level ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Govt committed to hosting Rugby World Cup
    The Government remains committed to hosting the Women’s Rugby World Cup in New Zealand in 2022 should a decision be made by World Rugby this weekend to postpone this year’s tournament. World Rugby is recommending the event be postponed until next year due to COVID-19, with a final decision to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Support Available for Communities affected by COVID-19
    Community and social service support providers have again swung into action to help people and families affected by the current COVID-19 alert levels. “The Government recognises that in many instances social service, community, iwi and Whānau Ora organisations are best placed to provide vital support to the communities impacted by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Govt announces review into PHARMAC
    The Government is following through on an election promise to conduct an independent review into PHARMAC, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Health Minister Andrew Little announced today. The Review will focus on two areas: How well PHARMAC performs against its current objectives and whether and how its performance against these ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Impressive response to DOC scholarship programme
    Some of the country’s most forward-thinking early-career conservationists are among recipients of a new scholarship aimed at supporting a new generation of biodiversity champions, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. The Department of Conservation (DOC) has awarded one-year postgraduate research scholarships of $15,000 to ten Masters students in the natural ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Speech to ANZLF Virtual Indigenous Business Trade and Connections Event
    I acknowledge our whānau overseas, joining us from Te Whenua Moemoeā, and I wish to pay respects to their elders past, present, and emerging. Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you all today. I am very pleased to be part of the conversation on Indigenous business, and part ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Main benefits to increase in line with wages
    Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni announced today that main benefits will increase by 3.1 percent on 1 April, in line with the rise in the average wage. The Government announced changes to the annual adjustment of main benefits in Budget 2019, indexing main benefit increases to the average ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Deed of Settlement signed with Ngāti Maru (Taranaki)
    A Deed of Settlement has been signed between Ngāti Maru and the Crown settling the iwi’s historical Treaty of Waitangi claims, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little announced today. The Ngāti Maru rohe is centred on the inland Waitara River valley, east to the Whanganui River and its ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Support in place for people connected to Auckland COVID-19 cases
    With a suite of Government income support packages available, Minister for Social Development and Employment Carmel Sepuloni is encouraging people, and businesses, connected to the recent Auckland COVID-19 cases to check the Work and Income website if they’ve been impacted by the need to self-isolate. “If you are required to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Statement on passing of former PNG PM Sir Michael Somare
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has expressed her condolences at the passing of long-serving former Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea, Grand Chief Sir Michael Somare. “Our thoughts are with Lady Veronica Somare and family, Prime Minister James Marape and the people of Papua New Guinea during this time of great ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Speech to the National Māori Housing Conference 2021
    E te tī, e te tā  Tēnei te mihi maioha ki a koutou  Ki te whenua e takoto nei  Ki te rangi e tū iho nei  Ki a tātou e tau nei  Tēnā tātou.  It’s great to be with you today, along with some of the ministerial housing team; Hon Peeni Henare, the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Drone project to aid protection of Māui dolphin
    The Government is backing a new project to use drone technology to transform our understanding and protection of the Māui dolphin, Aotearoa’s most endangered dolphin.    “The project is just one part of the Government’s plan to save the Māui dolphin. We are committed to protecting this treasure,” Oceans and Fisheries ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New water regulator board announced as major Government reform moves forward
    Major water reform has taken a step closer with the appointment of the inaugural board of the Taumata Arowai water services regulator, Hon Nanaia Mahuta says. Former Director General of Health and respected public health specialist Dame Karen Poutasi will chair the inaugural board of Crown agency Taumata Arowai. “Dame ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • North Auckland gets public transport upgrade
    The newly completed Hibiscus Coast Bus Station will help people make better transport choices to help ease congestion and benefit the environment, Transport Minister Michael Wood and Auckland Mayor Phil Goff said today. Michael Wood and Phil Goff officially opened the Hibiscus Coast Bus Station which sits just off the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Supporting work to protect Northland reserve
    New funding announced by Conservation Minister Kiri Allan today will provide work and help protect the unique values of Northland’s Te Ārai Nature Reserve for future generations. Te Ārai is culturally important to Te Aupōuri as the last resting place of the spirits before they depart to Te Rerenga Wairua. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Critical step to new housing deal for Pacific communities
      Today the Government has taken a key step to support Pacific people to becoming Community Housing providers, says the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio. “This will be great news for Pacific communities with the decision to provide Pacific Financial Capability Grant funding and a tender process to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Consultation opens on proposed Bay of Islands marine mammal sanctuary
    Conservation Minister Kiri Allan is encouraging New Zealanders to have their say on a proposed marine mammal sanctuary to address the rapid decline of bottlenose dolphins in Te Pēwhairangi, the Bay of Islands. The proposal, developed jointly with Ngā Hapū o te Pēwhairangi, would protect all marine mammals of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Three District Court Judges appointed
    Attorney-General David Parker today announced the appointment of three new District Court Judges.    Two of the appointees will take up their roles on 1 April, replacing sitting Judges who have reached retirement age.     Kirsten Lummis, lawyer of Auckland has been appointed as a District Court Judge with jury jurisdiction to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government announces list of life-shortening conditions guaranteeing early KiwiSaver access
    Government announces list of life-shortening conditions guaranteeing early KiwiSaver access The Government changed the KiwiSaver rules in 2019 so people with life-shortening congenital conditions can withdraw their savings early The four conditions guaranteed early access are – down syndrome, cerebral palsy, Huntington’s disease and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder An alternative ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Reserve Bank to take account of housing in decision making
    The Reserve Bank is now required to consider the impact on housing when making monetary and financial policy decisions, Grant Robertson announced today. Changes have been made to the Bank’s Monetary Policy Committee’s remit requiring it to take into account government policy relating to more sustainable house prices, while working ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Investment to reduce cochlear implant waitlist
    The Labour Government will invest $6 million for 70 additional adult cochlear implants this year to significantly reduce the historical waitlist, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “Cochlear implants are life changing for kiwis who suffer from severe hearing loss. As well as improving an individual’s hearing, they open doors to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Māori wards Bill passes third reading
    The Local Electoral (Māori Wards and Māori Constituencies) Amendment Bill passed its third reading today and will become law, Minister of Local Government Hon Nanaia Mahuta says. “This is a significant step forward for Māori representation in local government. We know how important it is to have diversity around ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government delivers 1,000 more transitional housing places
    The Government has added 1,000 more transitional housing places as promised under the Aotearoa New Zealand Homelessness Action Plan (HAP), launched one year ago. Minister of Housing Megan Woods says the milestone supports the Government’s priority to ensure every New Zealander has warm, dry, secure housing. “Transitional housing provides people ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Second batch of Pfizer/BioNTech doses arrives safely – as the first vaccinations take place in the...
    A second batch of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines arrived safely yesterday at Auckland International Airport, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins says. “This shipment contained about 76,000 doses, and follows our first shipment of 60,000 doses that arrived last week. We expect further shipments of vaccine over the coming weeks,” Chris Hipkins said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • $18 million for creative spaces to make arts more accessible
    The Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni has today announced $18 million to support creative spaces. Creative spaces are places in the community where people with mental health needs, disabled people, and those looking for social connection, are welcomed and supported to practice and participate in the arts ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Moriori Claims Settlement Bill passes first reading
    Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Minister Andrew Little today welcomed Moriori to Parliament to witness the first reading of the Moriori Claims Settlement Bill. “This bill is the culmination of years of dedication and hard work from all the parties involved. “I am delighted to reach this significant milestone today,” Andrew ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government action reduces child poverty
    22,400 fewer children experiencing material hardship 45,400 fewer children in low income households on after-housing costs measure After-housing costs target achieved a year ahead of schedule Government action has seen child poverty reduce against all nine official measures compared to the baseline year, Prime Minister and Minister for Child Poverty ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Entries open for the 2021 Prime Minister’s Education Excellence Awards
    It’s time to recognise the outstanding work early learning services, kōhanga reo, schools and kura do to support children and young people to succeed, Minister of Education Chris Hipkins says. The 2021 Prime Minister’s Education Excellence Awards are now open through until April 16. “The past year has reminded us ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Jobs for Nature benefits three projects
    Three new Jobs for Nature projects will help nature thrive in the Bay of Plenty and keep local people in work says Conservation Minister Kiri Allan. “Up to 30 people will be employed in the projects, which are aimed at boosting local conservation efforts, enhancing some of the region’s most ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Improvements to the Holidays Act on the way
    The Government has accepted all of the Holidays Act Taskforce’s recommended changes, which will provide certainty to employers and help employees receive their leave entitlements, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Wood announced today. Michael Wood said the Government established the Holidays Act Taskforce to help address challenges with the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • NZ’s credit rating lifted as economy recovers
    The Government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and faster than expected economic recovery has been acknowledged in today’s credit rating upgrade. Credit ratings agency Standard & Poor’s (S&P) today raised New Zealand’s local currency credit rating to AAA with a stable outlook. This follows Fitch reaffirming its AA+ rating last ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Speech to National Remembrance Service on the 10th anniversary of the Christchurch earthquake
    Tena koutou e nga Maata Waka Ngai Tuahuriri, Ngai Tahu whanui, Tena koutou. Nau mai whakatau mai ki tenei ra maumahara i te Ru Whenua Apiti hono tatai hono, Te hunga mate ki te hunga mate Apiti hono tatai hono, Te hunga ora ki te hunga ora Tena koutou, Tena ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Government reaffirms urgent commitment to ban harmful conversion practices
    The Minister of Justice has reaffirmed the Government’s urgent commitment, as stated in its 2020 Election Manifesto, to ban conversion practices in New Zealand by this time next year. “The Government has work underway to develop policy which will bring legislation to Parliament by the middle of this year and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New creative service aims to benefit 1,000 peoples’ careers
    Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage and Social Development Hon Carmel Sepuloni today launched a new Creative Careers Service, which is expected to support up to 1,000 creatives, across three regions over the next two years. The new service builds on the most successful aspects of the former Pathways to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago