The rise and rise of David Seymour’s ACT

Written By: - Date published: 7:28 am, December 20th, 2022 - 96 comments
Categories: act, david seymour, labour, national, polls - Tags:

I thought David Seymour was the  most interesting speaker at the Victoria University post-election conference at Parliament last year. Two things stood out for me in  his presentation following ACT’s election gains. He opened by offering lengthy and effusive praise to his researcher, then clearly stated his objective to supplant National as the leading party on the right. He’s on track for that, as current media attention shows.

I’ve had a long interest in political research dating back to the late 1980’s when New Zealand Labour started its relationship with Utting Market Research now continuing without John Utting as UMR so my ears pricked up when Seymour praised his researchers so effusively. I don’t know who they are but they do seem to know what they are doing.

What was interesting about the ACT campaign was that it surprised by putting  together a coalition of seemingly unrelated cohorts; the pro-gun lobby and those pro end-of-life choice being just two examples. These groups do not fit into any conventional political paradigm or spectrum, but they are characterised by varying levels of commitment to their cause and receptiveness to the idea of freedom of choice. This indicates that ACT’s research is leading to an organising strategy based on real cohorts not an advertising strategy based on constructed cohorts, which means it is likely to be effective in New Zealand’s advertising-constrained political communication environment.

The next cohort in ACT’s sights would appear to be discontented farmers. Seymour is a clever communicator who knows how to press the right buttons. If he makes real headway among farmers he achieves two things at once, bringing on board a significant cohort and at the same time severely weakening National.

And ACT is a genuine right-wing party. I don’t think Labour and the Left should rejoice too much at the travails of National. It was founded in the 1930s as an anti-Labour coalition of the corporate elite and the country, and could well splinter. But we should be careful what we might wish for.

I also think it would be good for Labour particularly to have a good look at its own cohorts, implied and explicit, to test how strong the connections still are in the 21st century. Also its communication strategy; talking too much about being focused on the middle ground  risks danger. By definition it lacks definition, which is not a good basis for commitment.

Re-posted from August 2021.

96 comments on “The rise and rise of David Seymour’s ACT ”

  1. Ad 1

    Agree, especially with your last paragraph.

    Seymour feels very much like an Anderton in his ability to bring disparate weirdo sets together into a whole, and doing the same job politically against National.

    • I Feel Love 1.1

      Until they confront him in real life, then he backs away from the more nuttiest of his supporters. He's an opportunist, nothing more, nothing less, no less successful, but hollow.

  2. UncookedSelachimorpha 2

    A post-National future…

    ACT – Right

    Labour – Centre Right

    Greens – Left

    ?

    • RobbieWgtn 2.1

      Act is only considered Right (actually pretty moderate centrist compared with eg USA & Oz) is because of the Overton Window: Labour & Nationals decades of Left social re-engineering compromises with their electoral partners under MMP instead of remaining true to a few principles….any principles

      "It's just a step to the left and a jump to the right…"

  3. Anker 3
    • Who would have thought that the dorky looking guy on DWTS would get so far.
    • having recently read Helen Kelly’s biography I think we need a working people’s party, like Labour originally was. Highly recommend the book
    • roblogic 3.1

      100% Anker, It is profoundly immoral that houses are still earning more than workers, and are taxed much less, in the second term of a supposedly "labour" government

      • Gosman 3.1.1

        What about the bright line test? Is that not taxing housing?

      • gsays 3.1.2

        That is a wonderful sentence rob.

      • Adrian 3.1.3

        The majority of houses are owned by workers. Are you suggesting that workers should not be allowed to own appreciating houses?

        • RedLogix 3.1.3.1

          Apparently you shall own nothing – and be happy wink

        • roblogic 3.1.3.2

          I am suggesting that prices should be stable so that the market does not continue its insane trajectory that exacerbates inequality.

          And also I find it disgusting that millions of Kiwis felt perfectly justified getting money for nothing and then charge others excessive rent. Then bitch and moan when the government tries to balance things in favour of the poverty stricken renters.

          FFS

          • mikesh 3.1.3.2.1

            I am suggesting that prices should be stable so that the market does not continue its insane trajectory that exacerbates inequality.

            Obviously. But left to its own devices the market will fluctuate. The issues related to the housing market are more to do with how one goes about controlling those fluctuations.

        • SPC 3.1.3.3

          But do the majority of workers own houses? The numbers over 65 owning property misleads some. The total was 65% owning in 2018 and its still falling.

          https://figure.nz/chart/XNSskMUvk35vqSek

          • SPC 3.1.3.3.1

            18.8 % owning without a mortgage

            27.8% owning with a mortgage

            4.7 % owning no mortgage status

            32% not an owner and paying rent.

            3.4% not an owner and not paying rent

            6.6 % (family) trust without mortgage.

            5.3% (family) trust with a mortgage.

            1.4 (family) trust no mortgage status

        • roblogic 3.1.3.4

          IOW we have a tax regime that rewards capital accumulation and punishes work.

          This is backwards

    • Gosman 3.2

      Didn't NZ have a working people's party in Mana? Also in what way would this working people's party differ from The Greens? They seem to have very left wing policy ideals that I presume would fit with any from a working people's party.

      • DukeEll 3.2.1

        There are people who work with their hands and people who work for the government. the latter sincerely hope the twain never meet

      • weka 3.2.2

        Wrong cultural fit. Yes, the GP have the most progressive lw policies, including pro-worker ones, but politics is also about what people are attracted to and drawn to emotionally and culturally. Saving the planet isn't a big draw for working class people whose values are based in a different milieu.

      • Chris 3.2.3

        "What was interesting about the ACT campaign was that it surprised by putting together a coalition of seemingly unrelated cohorts; the pro-gun lobby and those pro end-of-life choice being just two examples. These groups do not fit into any conventional political paradigm or spectrum…"

        I would say these groups fit firmly within Act's libertarian bent, traditionally anyway, albeit now when it suits them.

    • Hunter Thompson II 3.3

      One of the few good things about being in an opposition party is that you never have to follow through on your promises. Just snipe at the government from the sidelines.

      Leading the nation in a health crisis, making all the decisions and being accountable for them is an entirely different matter.

    • Anker 3.4

      Ha, ha, ha. I asked and Workers Now party has delivered! Fascinating reading one's own comment from 16 or so months ago.

      I will say, having listened to David Seymour on The Daily Blog's Working Group a few times, I have come to realize he is super smart (even if you don't agreee with him) and a very canny politician. He may be a prick, but he is not arrogant. And he has stood up for Democracy, so for that I salute him!

      He has also managed his team of newbys very well

      • Robert Guyton 3.4.1

        You "salute" Seymour?

        Colour me … Karitane Yellow!

      • Tony Veitch 3.4.2

        It's not 'Democracy' Seymour's standing up for, but 'individual' freedom – the right to do what ever you like, if you've the money, and no collective loyalty to the society that nurtured you.

        • Anker 3.4.2.1

          Tony why I say DS is standing up for democracy because.

          1. When Massey University cancelled SUFW and an overseas gender critical speaker, Seymour organised for the meeting to go ahead at parliment. The fact that a university cancelled SUFW is disgraceful and against free speech.

          2. DS was the only sitting member of parliament (that I remember) who tried to liaise with the parliamentary protesters and broker a deal.

          3. David S is calling for discussion about Hepuapua (which the govt kept hidden from Peters and NZders) and discussion on the Treaty with a referendum going forward. As Jim Bolger said recently, the PM needs to tell NZders what she means by co-governance and where she sees the country going with it. Not doing so it leading to anxiety and anger and creating division. I agree with Bolger on this. Just spit it out Jacinda. Is it Hepuapua? Is it the Rotorua Admin Bill (that Labour tried to sneak through by stealth). David S wants up to have that conversation and a referendum

  4. KJT 4

    Just like Dunne's party. Once the public get a good view of the real degree of fruitcakery ACT represent, they will go back to holding their voters meetings in a telephone box.

    • Cricklewood 4.1

      Not if they hold onto the right wing rump and force the Nats further into the centre…

      Makes for some interesting possibilities then…

  5. coreyjhumm 5

    Act are really interesting in that in a lot of ways they are just the fourth labour and national govts.

    A lot of former lefty's are going to act over the guns issue but most importantly hate speech which has been handled appallingly badly by the minister and the pm in a coms sense.

    Act have a really really good mental health policy. Creating an entirely new department that dishes out the funding. I like it

    I wouldn't vote act but the way the left is handling the rise of act is ill thought out , trying to shut them down and calling them facsists is turning them into martyrs because it's wrong… They aren't they are just bog standard neoliberals with a libertarian streak.

    Seymour is probably the most successful mp in nz he was mocked laughed at had little funding and multiplied his caucus by 10 and his only rising. He picks his battles and only a fool would seriously believe this young neoliberal dweeb is a bigot.

    How do we beat him? We debate him. Stop acting like he's some big scary new thing and expose him for what he is a neoliberal. An undiluted neoliberal. If the left can't crush Seymour in a debate we have issues

  6. McFlock 6

    "Cohorts" seems to be "market segmentation" by another name. The trouble with applying that to politics is that there's only so far one can go before one cohort alienates another – e.g. juco nats alienating their young nats with some social conservative votes.

    And, as KJT points out, rapid increases in MP numbers increases the chances of one or two of them failing to maintain a reasonable and approachable face. To give them credit, they've done well so far.

    • Stuart Munro 6.1

      Cohorts are, strictly speaking age classes, as both Sparta and Rome organised troop formations by age. Population biologists grabbed the term and used it properly, but marketers, no doubt due to the lack of Linnaean Latin, use it improperly.

      A cohort is a group of organisms of the same species that are born during the same year.

  7. Stephen D 7

    When we drill down into ACT’s caucus, what have we got.

    David Seymour, the most hypocritical parliamentarian. All for deregulation, except for the bunch of NIMBYs in his electorate.

    Brook van Velden, who seems quite reasonable.

    Crazy gun lady.

    Some farmer??

    And the rest?

    At some point they will come under scrutiny. Then it will be interesting to see how disciplined they are.

    • Janice 7.1

      You forgot about the Scottish man.

      • Gosman 7.1.1

        There is no Scottish man in the ACT party caucus. Did you mean Damien Smith? He's from Northern Ireland originally.

        • Shanreagh 7.1.1.1

          Oh dear.

          Mind you when I first heard Aubrey Begg, MP for Awarua during parliamentary broadcast sessions I thought he must be from the US, not having heard the Southland accent before.

    • Gosman 7.2

      They have been incredibly disciplined so far. Normally around this time is when any loose cannon in a caucus becomes known.

      Interesting you think Nicole Mckee is a "crazy gun lady". On what basis do you make that claim? Her views on gun reform are a World away from the NRA's free for all and she was a firearm safety trainer. She does not advocate firearms be used for personal protection and in fact has come out against having the Police armed all the time.

      • Bearded Git 7.2.1

        By disciplined you mean the the other ACT MPs have STFU. Hardly the basis for a successful party….one of Seymour's many failings is that he hasn't given other ACT MPs a higher profile.

        He is a nasty (remember Maori “thugs”) opportunistic very right wing AP.

    • Anker 7.3

      Karen Chour, (not sure I have spelt that correctly). Maori women who was in care growing up. Came from a very troubled background. Kelvin Davis had the audactiy to tell her she needed to stop seeing the world through a vanilla lens and cross the bridge in to Te Ao Maori (or something like that). F…g cheek Davis telling this women how she should think.

      Guy who stood for the Hamilton byelection. I thought he was reasonable articulate

  8. Patricia Bremner 8

    Like Bob Jones Jim Anderton and Winston Peters, they come, and on the loss of their Leader, they go. They are at most a disaffected 20%, who sway the vote mainly towards the right. David is clever and able to present a public image, but where are their policies? I don't mean slogans and sticking plasters for each perceived problem.

    They are all for "Freedom" Ok look where that got other countries, who yabbered about freedom while their lives were decimated by covid. So how is that freedom looking now? In Britain 100 deaths a day and over 30 000 catching covid… some freedom. Act’s lauded Mental health scheme would get swamped!!

    That is the difference between big talkers and do-ers, and don't mix up which is what!!

    • Gosman 8.1

      David Seymour, unlike the three other leaders you mention, is preparing the ground for when he steps down from Parliament. You can see this in how Brooke van Velden is being pushed forward more in relation to policy announcements etc.

      • Robert Guyton 8.1.1

        Seymour is stepping down?

        Peaked too soon.

        • Incognito 8.1.1.1

          Well, ACT should tell the NZ media. I looked at the media exposure of No. 2 in ACT, Brooke van Velden. Very crudely, using Google and searching on full name (“first name + surname”) only over the last month: Seymour outnumbers van Velden about 10 to 1 on NZH; even more so on RNZ; Seymour blows van Velden completely out of the water and into space on Stuff.

          • Robert Guyton 8.1.1.1.1

            van Who?

            • Incognito 8.1.1.1.1.1

              Well, tell Gossie that. He seems to think that Seymour has ‘retirement’ plans and is grooming van Who to take over. Gossie completely ignores the fact that Seymour is having a blast & a ball (on DWTS). And he made his outlandish comments in August; always good for a laugh though, our Gossie.

      • Patricia Bremner 8.1.2

        Seymore's recent traction is because the Leaders? the right have put up are not up to the job, and his experience has him appear more effective. He makes Luxon look staid.

        I still think David is an opportunist who has taken over the NZ First next generation. Most of the thinking appears rather binary, and has a narrow focus. Simplistic solutions are like his Charter Schools … good for some. He pretends to be harmless, so is like Key, deceptively dangerous. imo

        He is probably at peak powers, as National pull themselves from the brink.

        It behoves the Government to present stability and most of all hope. ( Muldoon’s famous “light at the end of the tunnel” )

      • SPC 8.1.3

        As spokesperson for health, housing, trade and foreign affairs she can/should be in the media a lot.

        Iran and free speech.

        https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/brooke-van-velden-women-life-freedom/6GLRGBGWVZFA7MLATXJ7YLPKFI/

  9. Michael 9

    People support Labour because it has done a good job fighting Covid. Not a perfect job, and it can't afford to admit its mistakes in hostile political environment, but a lot better than the political Right, which would have vaccinated the rich and powerful, then let 'er rip. Apart from that (not downplaying the scale of Labour's achievement), it's results seem threadbare. It hasn't built nearly enough social and community housing to take the pressure off low-income earners. Mental health remains as cruel and dysfunctional as ever. Welfare and ACC, ditto. Yes, there were increases in main benefit rates: immediately clawed back by cuts to supplementaries; any increase was switftly gobbled up by landlords and power companies (unintentional?). In short: this govt has a problem getting things done.

  10. Stuart Munro 10

    The challenge that lies before ACT is to use its current numbers to 'nut out' (a job for which they seem singularly well-equipped) a broad coherent set of policies and positions…

    Sounds tough, but:

    …that is more rational and coherent than National's. A walk in the park really, until one sees who they have to do the job – rofl.

  11. Gosman 11

    What fruitcakery does ACT represent? Is it the take on free speech or the housing policy or perhaps the mental health policy you are meaning.

    • vto 11.1

      It represents the fruitcakery which think that society's policies should be based around individualism rather than socialism.

      Humans are nothing but social. We come together to do anything and everything. Absolutely everything.

      Humans achieve nothing individually, absolutely nothing

      Individuals end up dying, dead.

      Yet there is an entire political party set up around basing everything on the individual – go figure.

      • Gosman 11.1.1

        Are you claiming anything that does not support a collective and statist approach to solving societal issues is "fruitcakery"? That means a large number of people are most likely supportive of such ideas.

    • Robert Guyton 11.2

      Less fruit-cake, more soufflé, I reckon.

  12. barry 12

    I am always surprised that the government hasn't removed zoning from the Epsom-based grammar schools and put on buses from South Auckland. That is what Epsom people voted for when they voted ACT.

  13. Muttonbird 13

    ACT are probably currently polling around 20 or 30% higher that their normal base rate. If that is called success, so be it, but they're only being talked about as contenders because National appears to have papered over the cracks for now.

    What you called real cohorts I called fringe nutters and their are more of them now post-pandemic where a few health and safety rules flushed these idiots from under their rocks.

    They're furious precisely because Labour has moved on bold, socially-conscious change. Proper leftie change, so I don't understand why the criticism Labour is too focussed on the middle?

    • bwaghorn 13.1

      "They're furious precisely because Labour has moved on bold, socially-conscious change

      Are you sure, I couldn't get my kid into the local Dr's yesterday said id be ok with just seeing a nurse. they wouldn't even let me book a spot later in the week.

      This is the shit that's getting people grumpy.

      • Adrian 13.1.1

        The nurse you may have seen may well have been a Nurse Practioner, highly trained and only a year or so short of a GP in an academic sense. Her/his job is a sought of super triarger, if anything required further hospital or other assessment that result would have been no different to seeing a doctor, and they are fully trained to dispense medications. You are being elitist by disparaging nurses. Good fucking luck without them.

        Every country in the world is short of senior medical staff because only a small proportion of the population have the IQ to manage the complexity of medical training, and that group now has a multitude of other options to purse careers in that do not have such onerous working conditions such as night shifts and the potential loss of whole careers because of small yet crucial mistakes.

        • bwaghorn 13.1.1.1

          You might want to reread what I said ,then retract and apologize me old mate.

          I said I was OK with seeing a nurse,

          Even thoug about 5 years ago I went in to Dr in the am and only got a nurse, got sent home with light antibiotics, by 6 o'clock was spitting up rusty water so went to the hospital, immediately admitted with pneumonia!

        • RedLogix 13.1.1.2

          Agreed. Especially your last para.yes

          Much of the conventional medical paradigm is under severe pressure from many different fronts. Personally whenever I visit my GP these days I come away feeling more sorry for him than myself.

          • Adrian 13.1.1.2.1

            Sincere apologies BW, should have read it better, I'm so used to reading uninformed complaints about the medical fraternity I over reacted. My wife trains nurses for a Uni and works shifts in an ICU to stay current and gleaned from her experiences I know most of what is stated about various things is complete bullshit. Even English born, speaking and trained nurses need extensive re-orienting to "fit in " to our systems. Dont even mention the problems with English as a 2nd or 3rd language nurses, mostly very, very well qualified medically, but care requires clear and precise communication to avoid what could be serious consequences.
            Sorry about the Pneumonia its not much fun is it. There are a lot more NPs about these days so I think the skills have upgraded at lot at surgeries.

            Again, mea culpa.

            And to RedL, I know what you mean ,i always leave my GP more worried about her state of health than my own.

      • Anker 13.1.2

        Feel for you and your child Bwagon.

        The state of our health system (staffing wise) terrifies me. I am very angry about it

        • bwaghorn 13.1.2.1

          Turned our a minor issue, but a trip to a Dr I'd better than worrying.

          From what I'm hearing the abuse those in the front line recieve is terrible, I assure you that didn't happen on this case.

  14. ianmac 14

    Question Time.

    Luxon: Predictable. Inflexible. Scripted.

    Seymour: Sharp. Flexible. Specific. Relevant.

    Hate to say it but Seymour gets 9/10. Luxon 4/10

    • RedLogix 14.1

      The reason for this difference is that ACT have an internally consistent set of principles and policies, which means they can apply them effectively to any situation. Seymour is working this playbook well.

      By contrast I really do not get any sense of what National believe in. This lack of ideas is I think, a legacy of John Key's passionless pragmatism. It was popular with the electorate for a time, but has left National philosophically unmoored, unable to clearly articulate fresh or relevant policy.

      Luxon may well have brought a necessary discipline to his Party, but he has not been the person they needed to solve this larger problem.

      • Patricia Bremner 14.1.1

        yes Especially your last sentence.

      • Tony Veitch 14.1.2

        National aspire to govern from one cliche to the next – and will be easy meat for a 'so-called' principled party like Act.

        A vote for Natz in '23 is a vote for all of Act's wacky policies!

        • Bearded Git 14.1.2.1

          Agreed Tony V, but as somebody said above Seymour may well demand Finance as a price for coalition if the vote is say 36/12. That is a really scary thought.

    • Rodel 14.2

      I'm happy if Seymour overtakes Luxon but if Luxon gets worried all he has to do is not have the triennial cuppa tea, instruct the Epsom aristocracy to vote National again whereupon the Act leader and his mediocre band will dissipate back into oblivion from whence they came.

  15. millsy 15

    ACT want an across the board reduction in wages and living standards. That is the first reason why they need to be stopped.

    If they had their way, most workers would be stuck on the same wage in real term for most of their careers.

  16. Incognito 16

    Seymour is the Mr Hyde of NZ politics and leading another NZ political party on the power of persuasion of personality politics. ACT’s policy portfolio is much stronger and more mature than National’s and this is entirely intentional. Since it is likely that National will have more MPs regardless after the next General Election, they have no reason to rock the waka with seaman Seymour doing the steering.

  17. Ed1 17

    There is a tendency to see any party as being totally represented by the leader, but for larger and older parties there are expectations built on the past. Most of the comments above are based on left / right differences, but other factors can impact on impressions.

    I suggest looking at the political compass – see https://www.politicalcompass.org/nz2020

    That introduces an authoritarian / libertarian dimension. The results are based on questions that have remained much the same of quite a few years. Your view of the labels may differ slightly – look at the results and assess whether you think the 0-0 position is in the correct place. Then look at the position of the different parties – is Labour really closer to National than to the Green Party on a left / right basis? Is ACT further to the right than National? I suspect for most people, if you shift the center, the relative positions of parties may be reasonable close to your opinions. I suspect there could be another dimension – where does concern / preparedness to act on Climate change influence different policy positions of parties?

    Now look at the graphs for earlier years going back to 2017, 2014, 2011 and 2008. Are the changes in relative positions what you would expect? ACT has shown the biggest movement – in 2014 and 2017 they were further authoritarian and further right than National – Rodney Hide then Don Brash trying to be more National than National?

    Then in 2020 there is a radical change – perhaps not evident to many as they only look at left / right differences, and ACT is anything moved further right, but on both axes moved to what David Farrar has given as his personal position on the Political Compass Test – a large change – and whether influenced by Farrar or not, it has meant that the ''definitely not a political party" NZ Taxpayer Union appears to support both National and ACT; and also to have taken over from National as commissioning polls from Curia.

    The Libertarian position explains the sympathy with gun owners, perhaps less so the ''pro-life choice'' protestors (although they may not have felt they had anywhere else to go) and the willingness of Seymour to be seen to talk (albeit briefly) with "Freedom" protestors, and the possible support from farmers for ACT.

    There was talk of ACT seeking to take votes from the Greens from the libertarian perspective, but I suspect perceived differences on support for environment and global warming issues have limited movement in support from Greens to ACT.

    Does Labour need the Green Party to take a more aggresive approach to libertarian issues?

  18. SPC 18

    The National Party strategy is to have two options as coalition partners to play them off against the other ACT and MP 2008-2017. Peters is suggesting ACT or NZF this time around.

    This will allow Luxon to diminish Seymour, and this is what Peters is offering NZF as a vehicle to realise – and why Luxon will not exclude NZF from consideration.

    Irritants, like an ungrateful upstart from Epsom Alice in Wonderland and the black flag nationalist (aka NZF) repellant.

  19. swordfish 19

    .

    … then clearly stated his objective to supplant National as the leading party on the right. He’s on track for that, as current media attention shows.

    and

    (National) could well splinter

    Both of these predictions seem very unlikely to me.

    It's the kind of wild speculation that went on when Labour fell to its nadir in the polls during discrete periods of the Key Government … the nonsense that the Greens would rapidly supersede Labour as the major party of the Left & that Labour was in great danger of splitting. Never, of course, happened.

    Moreover, that speculation occurred when polling suggested there was very little prospect of Labour or the Left Bloc winning the following election against the Key Govt.

    In stark contrast, each of the last 6 polls put National ahead of Labour … as well as the Right Bloc ahead of the Left.

    And, perhaps more importantly for the issue at hand, they place National support anywhere from 25-31 percentage points ahead of ACT.

    The next cohort in ACT’s sights would appear to be discontented farmers … If (Seymour) makes real headway among farmers he achieves two things at once, bringing on board a significant cohort and at the same time severely weakening National.

    Bear in mind, ACT always did well among farmers in certain regions (esp rural booths in the Rural & Provincial Upper North Island seats) during its earlier heyday from 1996-2002. And they did so without coming anywhere near to displacing the Nats as the lead party of the Right.

    • swordfish 19.1

      .

      Of course, a key problem with the post is that it's a year & a half out of date … when it was first posted in August 2021, Collins was still leader & the Nats were polling in the 20s, their poll ratings frequently little more than twice as high as ACT's (occasionally even less).

      The public mood has changed significantly since then.

    • Bearded Git 19.2

      Sword……when you add the MP to Lab/Gr things look a lot closer.

      An election is a year away and Labour are now promising to concentrate on the economy and ditch some unpopular policies

      The MP will never go with ACT after Seymour's "thugs" attack.

      Jacinda will rip Luxon apart in the election debates. The Green vote is solid

      It's all to play for

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    Graham Adams writes that while Web of Chaos gets a rerun on TVNZ, River of Freedom is left out in the cold. If you are a film-maker looking for an injection of taxpayer cash, a pitch focused on fake news purportedly propagated by “conspiracy theorists” looks to be a good ...
    Point of OrderBy gadams1000
    14 hours ago
  • At a glance – What is the link between hurricanes and global warming?
    On February 14, 2023 we announced our Rebuttal Update Project. This included an ask for feedback about the added "At a glance" section in the updated basic rebuttal versions. This weekly blog post series highlights this new section of one of the updated basic rebuttal versions and serves as a ...
    17 hours ago
  • Nicola Willis brings us up to date with state service job cuts – while Tamatha Paul (is this overk...
    Buzz from the Beehive Finance Minister Nicola Willis has estimated the loss of around 2500 jobs from the public sector during the cost-saving since the general election last October. Another 1150 vacancies in Government departments have been removed from the books  and 500 are expected to go, she said during ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    20 hours ago
  • Bryce Edwards: Is it time for an Integrity Commission to monitor conflicts of interest?
    News that the Government’s new Parliamentary Undersecretary for Health, Todd Stephenson, has been pressured today to sell his investments in pharmaceutical companies shows how New Zealand is becoming more sensitive and suspicious about politicians’ “conflicts of interest”. Yet, we need to get much more serious about creating rules and procedures ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    20 hours ago
  • Forget the loud-hailers Minister, what you need is TikTok
    Chris Trotter writes – It almost worked. “Matua Shane”, local supporters in tow, advanced down the main street of Blackball. Had the Minister for Resources, Shane Jones, been supplied with a full-sized loud-hailer to amplify his pro-mining slogans, then the photo-op would have been an unqualified success. Unfortunately, the ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    23 hours ago
  • Did the Reserve Bank massage its OCR forecasts to help Labour keep power? (we’ve found evidence po...
    Rob MacCulloch writes –  Last year, in the lead up to the national election, Governor Orr said in May 2023 that he was “very confident” there would not be further interest rate hikes, stating the Reserve Bank had done enough in terms of rate rises. He was interviewed by ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    23 hours ago
  • Parliament’s increasingly toxic ethnic identity wars
    Bryce Edwards writes Toxicity and disinformation are becoming a big part of New Zealand politics. And much of this relates to debates about ethnicity, race, and racism. We should all be concerned about this trend. Personal abuse, dishonesty, and contempt in the public sphere are bad for democracy, ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    24 hours ago
  • Bernard’s Dawn Chorus and pick ‘n’ mix for Tuesday, May 28
    House-building and infrastructure industry leaders are begging the Government for project-pipeline certainty and warning of a 2009/10-style exodus of skilled staff overseas. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: The National-ACT-NZ First Coalition Government won last year’s election with a pledge to ‘get things done’ and ‘get New Zealand back on ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    1 day ago
  • Slippery People.
    What's the matter with him? (He's alright)How do you know? (The Lord won't mind)Don't play no games (he's alright)Love from the bottom to the top.You’re alright, but how about her, or him? What makes them tick? Are they a solid citizen or a slippery fecker? Why are we all so ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    1 day ago
  • Children’s Voices in Auckland’s Future
    Recently, the transport consultancy Crank publicly released a report about children’s vision for transport in Auckland. It was produced in 2023 to help shape Auckland Council’s Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) Reduction Strategy. That got me thinking, and after going back to the recent Long Term Plan Consultation Feedback results, one ...
    Greater AucklandBy Connor Sharp
    1 day ago
  • Med school backdown the “right thing” says Seymour
    One of National’s showpiece election promises appears to be in more trouble with Waikato University yesterday withdrawing its call for tenders to develop a new medical school. The move will delay any substantial increase in the number of doctors being trained in New Zealand. The University’s decision just over a ...
    PolitikBy Richard Harman
    1 day ago
  • Of ‘said’ and Dialogue Tags in Writing
    Today, I ran across a Twitter thread about writerly use of the word ‘said’: https://x.com/APoetForThePyre/status/1794895108581859794 As a writer, I have my opinions about this, and since it has been a long, long time since I offered thoughts on the unwritten rules of writing, I thought I would explore the matter ...
    2 days ago
  • The silent tragedy of local restrictions on renewable energy
    This story by James Goodwin was originally published by The Revelator and is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. Communities across the United States may soon find themselves facing a grim scenario. By adopted local ordinances that obstruct the development of new renewable energy resources within ...
    2 days ago
  • Bryce Edwards: Parliament’s increasingly toxic ethnic identity wars
    Toxicity and disinformation are becoming a big part of New Zealand politics. And much of this relates to debates about ethnicity, race, and racism. We should all be concerned about this trend. Personal abuse, dishonesty, and contempt in the public sphere are bad for democracy, social cohesion, and the integrity ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    2 days ago
  • What to say on the government’s racist Māori wards bill
    I've spent the afternoon working on my submission on the Local Government (Electoral Legislation and Māori Wards and Māori Constituencies) Amendment Bill - National's racist bill to eliminate Māori representation from local government. It's an important bill, and the timeframe for submissions is tight - only two days left! National ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    2 days ago
  • Collins will be abroad when critics react to science funding – but Matauranga money should not be ...
    Buzz from the Beehive With just a few days to go before Finance Minister Nicola Willis delivers her first Budget speech, her colleagues have been focused in recent days on issues beyond our shores. Education Minister Erica Stanford made the only announcement of concern to citizens who want to know ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    2 days ago
  • New Caledonia’s troubles
    James Kierstead writes –  White sand beaches. Palm trees waving in a gentle breeze. Seas of turquoise and ultramarine, cobalt and denim stretching out as far as the eye can see.  Such is the view of New Caledonia that you get on travel websites. And it’s not an ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    2 days ago
  • The Negative social impact of taxpayer-funded partisan charities
    Bryce Edwards writes –  Whenever politicians dole out taxpayer funding to groups or individuals, they must do so in a wholly transparent way with due process to ensure conflicts of interest don’t occur and that the country receives value for money. Unfortunately, it’s not clear that this has ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    2 days ago
  • The Letter from Mayors & Chairs
    Frank Newman writes –  Earlier this week Local Government NZ sent a letter to the leaders of the coalition parties and Ministers Simeon Brown and Tama Potaka. It was signed by 52 local government leaders (see list appended). The essence of the letter is this: Our position…is ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    2 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell on South Africa’s harsh election choices
    T he ANC’s goal in Wednesday’s election will be to staunch the bleeding of its support. The ANC has reason to feel anxious. For months, the polls have been indicating the ANC will lose its overall majority for the first time since the Mandela election of 1994. The size of ...
    2 days ago
  • The Kaka’s diary for the week to June 3 and beyond
    TL;DR: The six key events to watch in Aotearoa-NZ’s political economy in the week to June 3 include:PM Christopher Luxon is expected to hold his weekly post-cabinet news conference at 4:00pm today.Parliament’s Environment Select Committee resumes hearing submissions on the Fast-track Approvals Bill from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm today.Auckland ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    2 days ago
  • May-24 AT Board Meeting
    Tomorrow the AT board meet again and I’ve taken a look through the items on their public agenda to see what’s interesting. It’s also the first meeting for two recently appointed directors, former director at Ritchies Transport, Andrew Ritchie and former mayor of Hamilton, Julie Hardaker. The public session starts ...
    2 days ago
  • Bernard’s Dawn Chorus and pick ‘n’ mix for Monday, May 27
    The Government is looking again at changing fringe benefit tax rules to make it harder to claim a personally-used double-cab ute as a company vehicle. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: Having repealed the previous Government’s ‘ute tax’ last year, the new Government is looking at removing a defacto tax ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    2 days ago
  • Some Dark Moments from Netflix's Dark Tourist
    Hi,I pitched a documentary to a big streamer last week and they said “no thanks” which is a bummer, because we’d worked on the concept for ages and I think it would have been a compelling watch. But I would say that because I was the one pitching it, right?As ...
    David FarrierBy David Farrier
    2 days ago
  • 2024 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #21
    A listing of 34 news and opinion articles we found interesting and shared on social media during the past week: Sun, May 19, 2024 thru Sat, May 25, 2024. Story of the week This week's typiclal compendium of stories we'd rather were plot devices in science ficition novels but instead ...
    3 days ago
  • National’s bulldozer dictatorship bill
    This National government has been aggressively anti-environment, and is currently ramming through its corrupt Muldoonist "fast-track" legislation to give three ministers dictatorial powers over what gets built and where. But that's not the only thing they're doing. On Thursday they introduced a Resource Management (Freshwater and Other Matters) Amendment Bill, ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    3 days ago
  • Bryce Edwards: The Negative social impact of taxpayer-funded partisan charities
    Whenever politicians dole out taxpayer funding to groups or individuals, they must do so in a wholly transparent way with due process to ensure conflicts of interest don’t occur and that the country receives value for money. Unfortunately, it’s not clear that this has occurred in the announcement this week ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    3 days ago
  • My Lovely Man.
    Last night began earlier than usual. In bed by 6:30pm, asleep an hour later. Sometimes I do sleep odd hours, writing late and/or getting up very early - complemented with the occasional siesta, but I’m usually up a bit later than that on a Saturday night. Last night I was ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    3 days ago
  • Pressing the Big Red Button
    Early in the COVID-19 days, the Boris Johnson government pressed a Big Red Button marked: act immediately, never mind about the paperwork.Their problem was: not having enough PPE gear for all the hospital and emergency staff. Their solution was to expedite things and get them the gear ASAP.This, along with ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    3 days ago
  • Of Pensioners and Student Loans: An Indictment on New Zealand
    Up until 1989, you could attend a New Zealand University, and never need to pay a cent for your education. That then changed, of course. The sadists of the Fourth Labour Government introduced substantial fees for study, never having had to pay a cent for their own education. The even ...
    3 days ago
  • Putting children first
    Ele Ludemann writes –  Minister for Children Karen Chhour is putting children first: Hon KAREN CHHOUR: I move, That the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill be now read a first time. I nominate the Social Services and Community Committee to consider the bill. It’s a privilege ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    4 days ago
  • Te Pati Maori go personal
    David Farrar writes –  Newshub reports:    Applause and cheers erupted in the House on Wednesday afternoon as Children’s Minister Karen Chhour condemned Te Pāti Māori’s insults about her upbringing. Chhour, who grew up in state care, is repealing section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act – sparking uproar from ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    4 days ago
  • Threads of Corruption
    I could corrupt youIt would be uglyThey could sedate youBut what good would drugs be?Good Morning all,Today there’s a guest newsletter from Gerard Otto (G). By which I mean I read his post this morning and he has kindly allowed me to share it with you.If you don’t already I ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    4 days ago
  • The days fly by
    Hello! Here comes the Saturday edition of More Than A Feilding, catching you up on the past week’s editions.Share Read more ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    4 days ago
  • Aotearoa, you’re being dismantled… so take the blinkers off and start talking honestly about it.
    Is the solution to any of the serious, long term issues we all have to face as a nation, because many governments of all stripes we can probably all admit if we’re deeply truthful with ourselves haven’t done near enough work at the very times they should have, to basically ...
    exhALANtBy exhalantblog
    5 days ago
  • Has Labour Abandoned the Welfare State They Created in 1938?
    The 2018 Social Security Act suggests that Labour may have retreated to the minimalist (neo-liberal) welfare state which has developed out of the Richardson-Shipley ‘redesign’. One wonders what Michael Joseph Savage, Peter Fraser and Walter Nash would have thought of the Social Security Act passed by the Ardern Labour Government ...
    PunditBy Brian Easton
    5 days ago
  • Bryce Edwards: MPs’ financial interests under scrutiny
    MPs are supposed to serve the public interest, not their own self-interest. And according to the New Zealand Parliament’s website, democracy and integrity are tarnished whenever politicians seek to enrich themselves or the people they are connected with. For this reason, the Parliament has a “Register of Pecuniary Interests” in ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    5 days ago
  • Mastering FLICC – A Cranky Uncle themed quiz
    By now, most of you will have heard about the FLICC taxonomy of science denial techniques and how you can train your skills in detecting them with the Cranky Uncle game. If you like to quickly check how good you are at this already, answer the 12 quiz questions in the ...
    5 days ago
  • Shane Jones has the zeal, sure enough, but is too busy with his mining duties (we suspect) to be ava...
    Buzz from the Beehive The hacks of the Parliamentary Press Gallery have been able to chip into a rich vein of material on the government’s official website over the past 24 hours. Among the nuggets is the speech by Regional Development Minister Shane Jones and a press statement to announce ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    5 days ago
  • Cut the parliamentary term
    When Labour was in power, they wasted time, political capital, and scarce policy resources on trying to extend the parliamentary term to four years, in an effort to make themselves less accountable to us. It was unlikely to fly, the idea having previously lost two referendums by huge margins - ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    5 days ago
  • More terrible media ethics
    David Farrar writes – The Herald reports: When Whanau Ora chief executive John Tamihere was asked what his expectations for the Budget next Thursday were, he said: “All hope is lost.” Last year Whānau Ora was allocated $163.1 million in the Budget to last for the next four years ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    5 days ago
  • Bringing our democracy into disrepute
    On Monday the government introduced its racist bill to eliminate Māori represntation in local government to the House. They rammed it through its first reading yesterday, and sent it to select committee. And the select committee has just opened submissions, giving us until Wednesday to comment on it. Such a ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    5 days ago
  • The censors who’ll save us from ourselves… yeah right!
    Nick Hanne writes – There’s a common malady suffered by bureaucracies the world over. They wish to save us from ourselves. Sadly, NZ officials are no less prone to exhibiting symptoms of this occupational condition. Observe, for instance, the reaction from certain public figures to the news ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    5 days ago
  • The case for commissioners to govern the capital city
    Peter Dunne writes – As the city of Tauranga prepares to elect a new Mayor and Council after three and a half years being run by government-appointed Commissioners, the case for replacing the Wellington City Council with Commissioners strengthens. The Wellington City Council has been dysfunctional for years, ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    5 days ago
  • Thoughts about contemporary troubles.
    This will be s short post. It stems from observations I made elsewhere about what might be characterised as some macro and micro aspects of contemporary collective violence events. Here goes. The conflicts between Israel and Palestine and France and … Continue reading ...
    KiwipoliticoBy Pablo
    5 days ago
  • Gordon Campbell On Blurring The Lines Around Political Corruption
    It may be a relic of a previous era of egalitarianism, but many of us like to think that, in general, most New Zealanders are as honest as the day is long. We’re good like that, and smart as. If we’re not punching above our weight on the world stage, ...
    5 days ago
  • MPs own 2.2 houses on average
    Bryce Edwards writes – Why aren’t politicians taking more action on the housing affordability crisis? The answer might lie in the latest “Register of Pecuniary Interests.” This register contains details of the various financial interests of parliamentarians. It shows that politicians own real estate in significant numbers. The ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    5 days ago
  • King Mike & Mike King.
    I built a time machine to see you againTo hear your phone callYour voice down the hallThe way we were back thenWe were dancing in the rainOur feet on the pavementYou said I was your second headI knew exactly what you meantIn the country of the blind, or so they ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    5 days ago
  • Bryce Edwards: MPs own 2.2 houses on average
    Why aren’t politicians taking more action on the housing affordability crisis? The answer might lie in the latest “Register of Pecuniary Interests.” This register contains details of the various financial interests of parliamentarians. It shows that politicians own real estate in significant numbers. The register published on Tuesday contains a ...
    Democracy ProjectBy bryce.edwards
    5 days ago
  • How much climate reality can the global financial system take without collapsing?
    Microsoft’s transparency about its failure to meet its own net-zero goals is creditable, but the response to that failure is worrying. It is offering up a set of false solutions, heavily buttressed by baseless optimism. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: Here’s the top six news items of note in ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    5 days ago
  • Weekly Roundup 24-May-2024
    Another Friday, another Rāmere Roundup! Here are a few things that caught our eye this week. This Week in Greater Auckland On Monday, our new writer Connor Sharp roared into print with a future-focused take on the proposed Auckland Future Fund, and what it could invest in. On ...
    Greater AucklandBy Greater Auckland
    5 days ago
  • Earning The Huia Feather.
    Still Waiting: Māori land remains in the hands of Non-Māori. The broken promises of the Treaty remain broken. The mana of the tangata whenua languishes under racist neglect. The right to wear the huia feather remains as elusive as ever. Perhaps these three transformations are beyond the power of a ...
    5 days ago
  • Bernard’s Dawn Chorus and pick ‘n’ mix for Friday, May 24
    Posters opposing the proposed Fast-Track Approvals legislation were pasted around Wellington last week. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: One of the architects of the RMA and a former National Cabinet Minister, Simon Upton, has criticised the Government’s Fast-Track Approvals bill as potentially disastrous for the environment, arguing just 1% ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    5 days ago
  • The Hoon around the week to May 24
    There was less sharing of the joy this week than at the Chinese New Year celebrations in February. China’s ambassador to NZ (2nd from right above) has told Luxon that relations between China and New Zealand are now at a ‘critical juncture’ Photo: Getty / Xinhua News AgencyTL;DR: The podcast ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    5 days ago
  • Beijing troubleshooter’s surprise visit
    The importance of New Zealand’s relationship with China was surely demonstrated yesterday with the surprise arrival in the capital of top Chinese foreign policy official Liu Jianchao. The trip was apparently organized a week ago but kept secret. Liu is the Minister of the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) International Liaison ...
    PolitikBy Richard Harman
    5 days ago
  • UK election a foregone conclusion?  That’s why it’s interesting
    With a crushing 20-plus point lead in the opinion polls, all the signs are that Labour leader Keir Starmer will be the PM after the general election on 4 July, called by Conservative incumbent Rishi Sunak yesterday. The stars are aligned for Starmer.  Rival progressives are in abeyance: the Liberal-Democrat ...
    Point of OrderBy xtrdnry
    6 days ago
  • Skeptical Science New Research for Week #21 2021
    Open access notables How much storage do we need in a fully electrified future? A critical review of the assumptions on which this question depends, Marsden et al., Energy Research & Social Science: Our analysis advances the argument that current approaches reproduce interpretations of normality that are, ironically, rooted in ...
    6 days ago
  • Days in the life
    We returned last week from England to London. Two different worlds. A quarter of an hour before dropping off our car, we came to a complete stop on the M25. Just moments before, there had been six lanes of hurtling cars and lorries. Now, everything was at a standstill as ...
    More Than A FeildingBy David Slack
    6 days ago
  • Forget about its name and focus on its objective – this RMA reform bill aims to cut red tape (and ...
    Buzz from the Beehive A triumvirate of ministers – holding the Agriculture, Environment and RMA Reform portfolios – has announced the introduction of legislation “to slash the tangle of red and green tape throttling development in key sectors”, such as farming, mining and other primary industries. The exact name of ...
    Point of OrderBy Bob Edlin
    6 days ago
  • More National corruption
    In their coalition agreement with NZ First, the National Party agreed to provide $24 million in funding to the charity "I Am Hope / Gumboot Friday". Why were they so eager to do so? Because their chair was a National donor, their CEO was the son of a National MP ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • Submit!
    The Social Services and Community Committee has called for submissions on the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill. Submissions are due by Wednesday, 3 July 2024, and can be made at the link above. And if you're wondering what to say: section 7AA was enacted because Oranga Tamariki ...
    No Right TurnBy Idiot/Savant
    6 days ago
  • Reading the MPS numbers thinking about the fiscal situation
    Michael Reddell writes –  The Reserve Bank doesn’t do independent fiscal forecasts so there is no news in the fiscal numbers in today’s Monetary Policy Statement themselves. The last official Treasury forecasts don’t take account of whatever the government is planning in next week’s Budget, and as the Bank notes ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    6 days ago
  • Charter Schools are a worthwhile addition to our school system – but ACT is mis-selling why they a...
    Rob MacCulloch writes – We know the old saying, “Never trust a politician”, and the Charter School debate is a good example of it. Charter Schools receive public funding, yet “are exempt from most statutory requirements of traditional public schools, including mandates around .. human capital management .. curriculum ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    6 days ago
  • Paranoia On The Left.
    How Do We Silence Them? The ruling obsession of the contemporary Left is that political action undertaken by individuals or groups further to the right than the liberal wings of mainstream conservative parties should not only be condemned, but suppressed.WEB OF CHAOS, a “deep dive into the world of disinformation”, ...
    6 days ago
  • Budget challenges
    Muriel Newman writes –  As the new Government puts the finishing touches to this month’s Budget, they will undoubtedly have had their hands full dealing with the economic mess that Labour created. Not only was Labour a grossly incompetent manager of the economy, but they also set out ...
    Point of OrderBy poonzteam5443
    6 days ago
  • Rishi calls an Election.
    Today the British PM, Rishi Sunak, called a general election for the 4th of July. He spoke of the challenging times and of strong leadership and achievements. It was as if he was talking about someone else, a real leader, rather than he himself or the woeful list of Tory ...
    Nick’s KōreroBy Nick Rockel
    6 days ago
  • Photo of the Day: GNR
    This post marks the return of an old format: Photo of the Day. Recently I was in an apartment in one of those new buildings on Great North Road Grey Lynn at rush hour, perfect day, the view was stunning, so naturally I whipped out my phone: GNR 5pm Turns ...
    Greater AucklandBy Patrick Reynolds
    6 days ago
  • Choosing landlords and the homeless over first home buyers
    The Government may struggle with the political optics of scrapping assistance for first home buyers while also cutting the tax burden on landlords, increasing concerns over the growing generational divide. Photo: Lynn Grieveson / The KākāTL;DR: The Government confirmed it will dump first home buyer grants in the Budget next ...
    The KakaBy Bernard Hickey
    6 days ago
  • Orr’s warning; three years of austerity
    Yesterday, the Reserve Bank confirmed there will be no free card for the economy to get out of jail during the current term of the Government. Regardless of what the Budget next week says, we are in for three years of austerity. Over those three years, we will have to ...
    PolitikBy Richard Harman
    6 days ago

  • Government improves mass arrival management
    The Government has strengthened settings for managing a mass arrival, with the passing of the Immigration (Mass Arrivals) Amendment Bill today.  “While we haven’t experienced a mass arrival event in New Zealand, it is an ongoing possibility which would have a significant impact on our immigration and court systems,” Immigration ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Super Fund to get more investment opportunities
    Finance Minister Nicola Willis has welcomed the passage of legislation giving the New Zealand Superannuation Fund a wider range of investment opportunities. The New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Controlling Interests) Amendment Bill passed its third reading in Parliament today. “The bill removes a section in the original act that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Crown and iwi settle three decades of negotiations
    Three decades of negotiations between iwi and the Crown have been settled today as the Whakatōhea Claims Settlement Bill passes its third reading in Parliament, Treaty Negotiations Minister Paul Goldsmith says. “While no settlement can fully compensate for the Crown’s past injustices, this settlement will support the aspirations and prosperity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    18 hours ago
  • New Zealand to support PNG landslide response
    New Zealand will support Papua New Guinea’s response to the devastating landslide in Enga Province, Foreign Minister Winston Peters and Defence Minister Judith Collins have announced.   “Ever since learning of the horrendous landslide on Friday, New Zealand has been determined to play our part in assisting Papua New Guinea’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • Government to consult on regulation of shooting clubs and ranges
      The Government is consulting New Zealanders on a package of proposals for simple and effective regulation of shooting clubs and ranges, Associate Minister of Justice, Nicole McKee announced today.   “Clubs and ranges are not only important for people learning to operate firearms safely, to practice, and to compete, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    21 hours ago
  • Successful New Caledonia repatriation winds up, need for dialogue remains
    Over 300 people have been successfully flown out of New Caledonia in a joint Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) and New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) operation.   As of today, seven New Zealand government aircraft flights to Nouméa have assisted around 225 New Zealanders and 145 foreign nationals ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    23 hours ago
  • Minister to Singapore for defence, technology talks
    Defence and Science, Innovation and Technology Minister Judith Collins departs for Singapore tomorrow for defence and technology summits and meetings. First up is the Asia Tech X Singapore Summit, followed by the Five Power Defence Arrangements Defence Ministers Meeting and wrapping up with the Shangri-La Dialogue for Defence Ministers from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Major investment in teacher supply through Budget 24
    Over the next four years, Budget 24 will support the training and recruitment of 1,500 teachers into the workforce, Education Minister Erica Stanford announced today. “To raise achievement and develop a world leading education system we’re investing nearly $53 million over four years to attract, train and retain our valued ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Joint statement on the New Zealand – Cook Islands Joint Ministerial Forum – 2024
    1.  New Zealand Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Rt Hon Winston Peters; Minister of Health and Minister for Pacific Peoples Hon Dr Shane Reti; and Minister for Climate Change Hon Simon Watts hosted Cook Islands Minister of Foreign Affairs and Immigration Hon Tingika Elikana and Minister of Health Hon Vainetutai Rose Toki-Brown on 24 May ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Middle East, Africa deployments extended
    The Government has approved two-year extensions for four New Zealand Defence Force deployments to the Middle East and Africa, Defence Minister Judith Collins and Foreign Minister Winston Peters announced today. “These deployments are long-standing New Zealand commitments, which reflect our ongoing interest in promoting peace and stability, and making active ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Climate Change Commission Chair to retire
    The Climate Change Commission Chair, Dr Rod Carr, has confirmed his plans to retire at the end of his term later this year, Climate Change Minister Simon Watts says. “Prior to the election, Dr Carr advised me he would be retiring when his term concluded. Dr Rod Carr has led ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Inaugural Board of Integrity Sport & Recreation Commission announced
    Nine highly respected experts have been appointed to the inaugural board of the new Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission, Sport & Recreation Minister Chris Bishop says. “The Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission is a new independent Crown entity which was established under the Integrity Sport and Recreation Act last year, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • A balanced Foreign Affairs budget
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters confirmed today that Vote Foreign Affairs in Budget 2024 will balance two crucial priorities of the Coalition Government.    While Budget 2024 reflects the constrained fiscal environment, the Government also recognises the critical role MFAT plays in keeping New Zealanders safe and prosperous.    “Consistent with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New social housing places to support families into homes
    New social housing funding in Budget 2024 will ensure the Government can continue supporting more families into warm, dry homes from July 2025, Housing Ministers Chris Bishop and Tama Potaka say. “Earlier this week I was proud to announce that Budget 2024 allocates $140 million to fund 1,500 new social ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Zealand’s minerals future
    Introduction Today, we are sharing a red-letter occasion. A Blackball event on hallowed ground. Today  we underscore the importance of our mineral estate. A reminder that our natural resource sector has much to offer.  Such a contribution will not come to pass without investment.  However, more than money is needed. ...
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    6 days ago
  • Government sets out vision for minerals future
    Increasing national and regional prosperity, providing the minerals needed for new technology and the clean energy transition, and doubling the value of minerals exports are the bold aims of the Government’s vision for the minerals sector. Resources Minister Shane Jones today launched a draft strategy for the minerals sector in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government progresses Māori wards legislation
    The coalition Government’s legislation to restore the rights of communities to determine whether to introduce Māori wards has passed its first reading in Parliament, Local Government Minister Simeon Brown says. “Divisive changes introduced by the previous government denied local communities the ability to determine whether to establish Māori wards.” The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • First RMA amendment Bill introduced to Parliament
    The coalition Government has today introduced legislation to slash the tangle of red and green tape throttling some of New Zealand’s key sectors, including farming, mining and other primary industries. RMA Reform Minister Chris Bishop says the Government is committed to  unlocking development and investment while ensuring the environment is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Government welcomes EPA decision
    The decision by Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) to approve the continued use of hydrogen cyanamide, known as Hi-Cane, has been welcomed by Environment Minister Penny Simmonds and Agriculture Minister Todd McClay.  “The EPA decision introduces appropriate environmental safeguards which will allow kiwifruit and other growers to use Hi-Cane responsibly,” Ms ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to Employers and Manufacturers Association: Relief for today, hope for tomorrow
    Kia ora, Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou kātoa Tāmaki Herenga Waka, Tāmaki Herenga tangata Ngā mihi ki ngā mana whenua o tēnei rohe Ngāti Whātua ō Ōrākei me nga iwi kātoa kua tae mai. Mauriora. Greetings everyone. Thank you to the EMA for hosting this event. Let me acknowledge ...
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    6 days ago
  • Government invests in 1,500 more social homes
    The coalition Government is investing in social housing for New Zealanders who are most in need of a warm dry home, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. Budget 2024 will allocate $140 million in new funding for 1,500 new social housing places to be provided by Community Housing Providers (CHPs), not ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • $24 million boost for Gumboot Friday
    Thousands more young New Zealanders will have better access to mental health services as the Government delivers on its commitment to fund the Gumboot Friday initiative, says Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Mental Health Minister Matt Doocey.  “Budget 2024 will provide $24 million over four years to contract the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill passes first reading
    The Coalition Government’s Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill, which will improve tenancy laws and help increase the supply of rental properties, has passed its first reading in Parliament says Housing Minister Chris Bishop. “The Bill proposes much-needed changes to the Residential Tenancies Act 1986 that will remove barriers to increasing private ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Montecassino Commemorative Address, Cassino War Cemetery
    Standing here in Cassino War Cemetery, among the graves looking up at the beautiful Abbey of Montecassino, it is hard to imagine the utter devastation left behind by the battles which ended here in May 1944. Hundreds of thousands of shells and bombs of every description left nothing but piled ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First Reading – Repeal of Section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act 1989
    I present a legislative statement on the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill Mr. Speaker, I move that the Oranga Tamariki (Repeal of Section 7AA) Amendment Bill be now read a first time. I nominate the Social Services and Community Committee to consider the Bill. Thank you, Mr. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First reading of 7AA’s repeal: progress for children
    The Bill to repeal Section 7AA of the Oranga Tamariki Act has had its first reading in Parliament today. The Bill reaffirms the Coalition Government’s commitment to the care and safety of children in care, says Minister for Children Karen Chhour.  “When I became the Minister for Children, I made ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • China Business Summit 2024
    Kia ora koutou, good morning, and zao shang hao. Thank you Fran for the opportunity to speak at the 2024 China Business Summit – it’s great to be here today. I’d also like to acknowledge: Simon Bridges - CEO of the Auckland Chamber of Commerce. His Excellency Ambassador - Wang ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Assisted depatures from New Caledonia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has confirmed a New Zealand Government plane will head to New Caledonia in the next hour in the first in a series of proposed flights to begin bringing New Zealanders home.    “New Zealanders in New Caledonia have faced a challenging few days - and bringing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Assisted departures from New Caledonia
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters has confirmed a New Zealand Government plane will head to New Caledonia in the next hour in the first in a series of proposed flights to begin bringing New Zealanders home.  “New Zealanders in New Caledonia have faced a challenging few days - and bringing them ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government to rollout roadside drug testing
    The Coalition Government will introduce legislation this year that will enable roadside drug testing as part of our commitment to improve road safety and restore law and order, Transport Minister Simeon Brown says.  “Alcohol and drugs are the number one contributing factor in fatal road crashes in New Zealand. In ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Minister responds to review of Kāinga Ora
    The Government has announced a series of immediate actions in response to the independent review of Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities, Housing Minister Chris Bishop says. “Kāinga Ora is a large and important Crown entity, with assets of $45 billion and over $2.5 billion of expenditure each year. It ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pseudoephedrine back on shelves
    Associate Health Minister David Seymour is pleased that Pseudoephedrine can now be purchased by the general public to protect them from winter illness, after the coalition government worked swiftly to change the law and oversaw a fast approval process by Medsafe. “Pharmacies are now putting the medicines back on their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand-China Business Summit
    Tēnā koutou katoa. Da jia hao.  Good morning everyone.   Prime Minister Luxon, your excellency, a great friend of New Zealand and my friend Ambassador Wang, Mayor of what he tells me is the best city in New Zealand, Wayne Brown, the highly respected Fran O’Sullivan, Champion of the Auckland business ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New measures to protect powerlines from trees
    Energy Minister Simeon Brown has announced that the Government will make it easier for lines firms to take action to remove vegetation from obstructing local powerlines. The change will ensure greater security of electricity supply in local communities, particularly during severe weather events.  “Trees or parts of trees falling on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani win top Māori dairy farming award
    Wairarapa Moana ki Pouakani were the top winners at this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy awards recognising the best in Māori dairy farming. Māori Development Minister Tama Potaka announced the winners and congratulated runners-up, Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, at an awards celebration also attended by Prime Minister Christopher Luxon and Finance Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • DJ Fred Again – Assurance report received
    "On the 27th of March, I sought assurances from the Chief Executive, Department of Internal Affairs, that the Department’s correct processes and policies had been followed in regards to a passport application which received media attention,” says Minister of Internal Affairs Brooke van Velden.  “I raised my concerns after being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • District Court Judges appointed
    Attorney-General Judith Collins has announced the appointment of three new District Court Judges, to replace Judges who have recently retired. Peter James Davey of Auckland has been appointed a District Court Judge with a jury jurisdiction to be based at Whangarei. Mr Davey initially started work as a law clerk/solicitor with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Unions should put learning ahead of ideology
    Associate Education Minister David Seymour is calling on the Post Primary Teachers’ Association (PPTA) to put ideology to the side and focus on students’ learning, in reaction to the union holding paid teacher meetings across New Zealand about charter schools.     “The PPTA is disrupting schools up and down the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Craig Stobo appointed as chair of FMA
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Andrew Bayly today announced the appointment of Craig Stobo as the new chair of the Financial Markets Authority (FMA). Mr Stobo takes over from Mark Todd, whose term expired at the end of April. Mr Stobo’s appointment is for a five-year term. “The FMA plays ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Budget 2024 invests in lifeguards and coastguard
    Surf Life Saving New Zealand and Coastguard New Zealand will continue to be able to keep people safe in, on, and around the water following a funding boost of $63.644 million over four years, Transport Minister Simeon Brown and Associate Transport Minister Matt Doocey say. “Heading to the beach for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago

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