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Another broken promise from our con-man PM

Written By: - Date published: 9:04 pm, May 11th, 2012 - 68 comments
Categories: slippery - Tags:

Key looked the Pike River families in the eye and promised to get their mens bodies out. It was a promise he never should have made. But he did to make people like him. He wouldn’t even talk about it today. Coward. And what of his promise to make things right for Christchurch? Or his promise of an aggressive recovery? Or his promise to help the underclass? Or that brighter future?

And don’t get me started on his “not being against” marriage equality. This is the guy who voted against civil unions (he bravely blames that on his electorate). Now wants to jump on the Obama bandwagon. But can’t actually do it for fear of losing the rednecks. Pathetic. Guess it’s a step up from “wait till my book”.

68 comments on “Another broken promise from our con-man PM”

  1. Fiji Bill 1

    Somewhere deep inside something’s got a hold of me. And its making me want to spew, like a pool in the desert.

  2. Pike River is going to burn Key’s support and reputation off.

    He made all the good noises when the tragedy happened but he milked it for political advantage.  He has not delivered.  A Crown entity has bought the mine but is not promising to get the bodies out because of the possible effect on the bottom line.  So it is time for some moral outrage to be heaped on him for his cynical political posturing.

    You can fool all of the people some of the time … 

    • Yep, I don’t have any problem with politicians benefitting from tragedy, if they actually serve the people involved well. I imagine the rest of the voting public is just as unimpressed as I am about how National has handled Pike River.

    • Well Balanced: a Chip on Both Shoulders 2.2

      +1, Well said Micky. This is an issue that touches the core of NZ values and the origins of the Labour Party. It also exposes the damage of the campaigns run by the right and supported by Media in the past 6 years: attacking OSH and work-place safety; attacking organised labour; attacking any type of regulation; the whole anti PC thing. The 29 died because so many of the good practices, regulations, behaviours and learnings of the past 100 years were dismissed by a “non PC” mindlessness.

      • Jim Nald 2.2.1

        Oh, of course, the Government’s role in promoting good practices, regulations, behaviours and learnings was also condemned by the Natz, while in opposition, as being “Nanny State.”

    • freedom 2.3

      February 2011 the Pike River Miners’ Relief Fund stood at 7 million dollars and was still growing, i imagine i am not alone wondering just where it all went?
      http://www.pikeriverdonations.org.nz/donation-update/
      and it is not hard to notice the page has not been updated in over a year

      Shonkey seems so keen on getting the US to decide our future, why not ask some of the US Marine Specialists that are heading to our shores to offer their advice? The Marines do know a fair bit about never leaving a man behind. They have been involved in enough loss of life to know how important retrieval can be to the propoganda machine.

    • Reagan Cline 2.4

      Those bodies still in there will be hard on the miners and families working for the new owner.

      There needs to be closure.

      It would be in all interests to either seal it off and declare it a mass grave.

      Or get the bodies out – might cost in the medium term, but long term people are no longer haunted by the sense of something unfinished and therein lies intergenerational grievance – not just for the families directly involved.

      Present government is not factorinhg in peoples deeper feelings and passions – too superficial.

  3. tc 3

    Not only was it brazenly opportunistic but also just plain stupid given it was an inferno in an underground unknown situation.

    Cautionary statements about recovery would be appropriate but the ‘whatever it takes’ line was the type of BS that is second nature to Sideshow John and flows without hesitation whenever he’s rattled.

  4. Blue 4

    I couldn’t believe what I was reading this morning when I clicked on an article and read that the recovery of the bodies hinges on….profitable commercial mining operations? I’m sorry, what?

    I had to read it again and again for it to sink in that I was actually reading that.

    In all seriousness, that is the situation at Pike River. The bodies will not be recovered unless someone is making some dollars.

    I know this is the new and improved NZ where we only care about money and not people, but fucking hell. This is really the limit.

    There is supposed to be something called a Government. Whose job it is to do the things private corporations will not do because there’s no money in it for them.

    Recovering the bodies from Pike River, or at least doing everything that is possible to try to recover them, is a job for the GOVERNMENT not for some fucking corporate trying to make a fast buck from a tragedy.

    If anyone wonders when we truly lost our souls here in NZ, mark it down as now.

    • Janice 4.1

      Yes but soon 49% of Solid Energy will be sold and the “mums and dads” will want a return on their investment and not have profits spent on body recovery. They will have the votes to stop it and Shonkey will be able to say he can’t interfere in the market.

      • Reagan Cline 4.1.1

        Janice, as one of the “Mums and Dads” I would not sleep easy if I thought some of my income should have been spent on recovering the bodies- if that is what it takes to heal all this.

        I would not invest in the first place, sell existing investment, speak up at the Annual Meeting.

        “Mum” investors are like you, trying to get through life in a capitalist system.

        Profit taking is only part of the story – the other is contributing a small part of the capital required to sustain businesses that are good employers, obey regulations and produce useful and non-harmfull products.

        Maybe coal products are harmfull – they are certainly useful until a substitute is found.

    • Kiore 4.2

      Blue, you are completely right of course, but hey heres a thought, they could have used the money they spent cooking up terrorism charges and legal fees for Tuhoe on something that would actually mean something to the public…

  5. Policy Parrot 5

    It is the job of any responsible government to at least regulate the market, so that corner-cutting by corporates doesn’t happen and cause tragedy. Pike River is a prime example, so was the leaky homes. All this hatred against regulations from vested interests, is actually what protects people/employees/consumers from the vagarities of unscrupulous operators.

    • Reagan Cline 5.1

      Regulations have to be enforced.

      Need trained inspectors independant of the building and mining firms.

      The “she’ll be right” “It’s who you know” “suck it up” attitudes don’t help.

  6. Dr Terry 6

    Really good and caring comments here. It is, I suppose, a matter of when the pot will boil over for the Government and its grasping allies. This is taking such a long time, and might take more yet. People hate to see their idols crash down to the earth. Eventually, they become angry. As hard as this is, we do well to remain patient a while yet. Hang in there, good friends.

    • LynW 6.1

      Totally agree Dr Terry re all the caring and thoughtful comments here but just hoping karma comes sooner rather than later, before too much irreparable damage occurs.

  7. vto 7

    Attack building regulations and get a leaky homes disaster.

    Attack banking regulations and get a global financial crisis.

    Attack mine safety regulations and get 29 dead men at Pike River.

    Attack bio-security regulations and get a fruit fly disaster.

    Someone a while ago (Stephen Franks?) suggested that a charge of corporate manslauighter be introduced similar to other nations. I suggest that is a good idea but must also include a charge of political manslaughter. After all, those 29 men died as a direct result of the attack on mine safety regulations (among other things) and the so-called leaders must be held to a level of responsibility higher than that of the people they ‘rule’. So if it is good enough to have personal manslaughter and corporate manslaughter then political manslaughter must follow.

  8. vto 8

    The families of the Pike River men epitomise the anti-Key feeling which is now rife among the population. Yesterday they referred to his lies. His inaction. His clear bullshit. If there is one thing coasters can spot it is bullshit – and Key has just been called on it.

    The only reason the anti-Key feeling hasn’t showed up too much yet is because the dawning has just risen and people are cautious to change tunes too quickly. But they see Key. They see his twitches. They see his lies. His lies. His lies. His lies. They see him making things up as he goes. They see him doing deals rather than governing. They see him laughing and not caring about everything. They see a little boy who has now had enough.

    It is over for Key.

    • mike e 8.1

      ConMankey takes all the publicity when the going is good no where to be seen when the shit hits the fan!

  9. lefty 9

    Slack mining safety regulations are only part of the reason Pike River was able to operate a dangerous mine.

    Company law that allows shareholders to go into receivership and swan off into the sunset when things go wrong was also a big contributer to the tragedy because it provides an incentive to act irresponsibly.

    Wealthy companies that were major shareholders in Pike River are unashamedly still operating their profitable businesses while the families of the miners continue to suffer and unsecured creditors go unpaid.

    And this sort of behaviour is the norm rather than unusual.

    If capitalists refuse to act responsibly why should the state continue to provide a legal framework that protects them when things go wrong. Maybe its time to withdraw limited liability and other legal barriers to holding shareholders accountable for their actions.

    After all the pricks are all for personal responsibility and encouraging the right choices.

    • mike e 9.1

      Corporate crime in this country is higher than any other OECD country.
      Its time corporates face up to their responsibilities just like their political allies demand of the public.

      • The Baron 9.1.1

        Bold call – I’m not aware of the OECD corporate crime index. Would you please educate me a bit on this?

        • mike e 9.1.1.1

          while we have one of the lowest public service corruption rates our corporate rate is amongst the highest!

      • Colonial Viper 9.1.2

        Corporate crime in this country is higher than any other OECD country.

        I really don’t think that corporate crime is higher in NZ than in the US or Ireland. The whole western business world seems to have gotten rotten to the core.

        Even Japan is not immune (look up the Olympus fraud scandal).

  10. DH 10

    I’m struggling to understand why they’re doing this. The costs of recovering the bodies wouldn’t be that great in the scheme of things and surely Solid Energy would want to inspect the mine to see what can be done to recover it. Dept of Labour should also be dead keen on a recovery effort so they can get the mine forensics people in to try & discover what caused the explosion. Waiting won’t make it any easier or cheaper.

    The risk argument doesn’t seem to weigh up. There’s apparently no longer any risk of explosion so the risks can be managed just like the risks of deep sea diving are managed.

    This is huge failure of government IMO, can’t help but wonder if it’s really about bureaucratic arse covering.

    • Colonial Viper 10.1

      I’m struggling to understand why they’re doing this. The costs of recovering the bodies wouldn’t be that great in the scheme of things and surely Solid Energy would want to inspect the mine to see what can be done to recover it. Dept of Labour should also be dead keen on a recovery effort so they can get the mine forensics people in to try & discover what caused the explosion

      1) Of course the costs aren’t that great; individual development stages of the Pike River coal mine were priced at $50M or $100M apiece. The programme to recover the bodies would cost maybe $2M to $3M. No much more than David Bain’s legal aid costs.

      2) Do they REALLY want to discover what caused the explosion? Does the Government REALLY want this saga to to be headline news again for another month or two?

      3) The West Coast electorate has to be punished for going back to Labour.

      This country is quietly going to the dog house, from the top down.

      • DH 10.1.1

        “1) Of course the costs aren’t that great; individual development stages of the Pike River coal mine were priced at $50M or $100M apiece. The programme to recover the bodies would cost maybe $2M to $3M. No much more than David Bain’s legal aid costs.”

        I think it would cost more than $2-3m, there’s a lot of risk elimination involved and that doesn’t come cheap these days. $5-10m would likely be more realistic but if all the reasons for entering the mine were consolidated that’s still not big sums & fully justified IMO.

        If they put it to tender I have no doubt there would be plenty of offers from parties prepared to do it, what’s risky for some people is meat & drink for others.

        “..2) Do they REALLY want to discover what caused the explosion? Does the Government REALLY want this saga to to be headline news again for another month or two?”

        I think that’s a factor, too many high-up bureaucratic careers at stake

        ..3) The West Coast electorate has to be punished for going back to Labour.

        Could be, this mob in power do seem a pretty spiteful bunch

        • Colonial Viper 10.1.1.1

          I think it would cost more than $2-3m, there’s a lot of risk elimination involved and that doesn’t come cheap these days. $5-10m would likely be more realistic but if all the reasons for entering the mine were consolidated that’s still not big sums & fully justified IMO.

          I do wonder where is the feasibility study? The shortlist of recovery options to be investigated? The preliminary plans and budget estimates?

          Its totally weird that the Government has declared this a no-go and yet have released zero justification behind it. I wish we had a real media in this country.

    • Reagan Cline 10.2

      Cynically – maybe the announcement that the bodies will be recovered is being saved for a more politically opportune moment.

  11. Kevin 11

    I can empathise with the families of the miners who are probably feeling betrayed at this moment by John Key who has broken a solemn promise to them. That broken promise will finish the political careers of any National candidate on the Coast because they won’t be trusted again. The folks of the West Coast are straight up and down on their word, a man’s word is his word, if you can’t keep it, you are s..t.
    Personally I think the mine should be closed and sealed because now it is a grave.

  12. Gruntie 12

    I see Audrey Sycophantic Young is spinning the crap for Donkey in the Herald again – please … Fuckng possers

  13. Gruntie 13

    I see Fran Sycophantic O’Sullivan is spinning the crap for Donkey in the Herald again – please … Fuckng possers

  14. ghostwhowalksnz 14

    Its a game of bluff- Key is daring the media to say hes a liar- and they darent to do it.

    Fancy Pants Hoskings last night was saying to the PR families , surely he meant he would do anything ‘reasonable’.

    Just how he gets that version , not having been at the personal meetings, is fairly obvious- Keys spin doctors have had a chat before he goes on air.

    • vto 14.1

      You are right it is a game of bluff. But it is clear which bluff will prevail.

      (Hosking and his ego, political views and silly hair just get in the way. He should get out of the way)

      quicksand comes to mind

  15. captain hook 15

    its obvious that keys word is not his bond.

  16. Key looked the Pike River families in the eye and promised to get their mens bodies out.

    It’s unclear because there’s no link to what he actually said, but if Key said something like “I promise to get the bodies out as soon as possible no matter what the cost” he’ was a fool and no one should have taken him seriously, it would have been impossible to make a solid promise like that.

    Does anyone know what he actually promised?

    • Colonial Viper 16.1

      Fuck you’re horrendous and inhumane, PG.

    • felix 16.2

      I seem to recall the words “whatever it takes”, I expect someone will have a link.

      I agree it was (if that’s what he said) a foolish thing to say, but I totally disagree that it shouldn’t be taken seriously.

      When the PM speaks to the nation, or to any group of citizens, we absolutely must be able to take his words at face value as true and correct.

      We have the absolute right to expect the PM to say exactly what he means, and the onus is entirely on him to meet that standard.

      The blame for any failure of communication in this regard can never be sheeted back to the people who quite rightly expect him to tell the truth at all times.

      In a crisis or the aftermath of a crisis this is especially crucial. This is the job.

      • Colonial Viper 16.2.1

        The thing is felix, the Key Govt has not even tried to demonstraste to the NZ people (let alone the Pike River families) that everything which should have been done, has been done.

        I mean, where are the studies, the investigation results and the data which show how truly difficult, dangerous and possibly impractical a recovery operation would be?

        If this analysis exists, why not hand it over to the families?

      • Pascal's bookie 16.2.2

        Yep. And his speech writers did a lot of good work, for which he rightly got a lot of credit.

        One of the lines he used to express committment to the miners’ families was this one:

        “New Zealand is a small country. A country where we are our all our brother’s keeper.”

        The government is the only entity that can put practice to that. the recievers have their job, the commission of enquiry has its job; but those jobs don’t necessarily look after the interests of those families, and they will sometimes conflict with those interests.

        It’s up to the PM to put substance to his pretty words. No one else.

        • Shaz 16.2.2.1

          Here I have found the speech from 2010. Pretty words indeed

          http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/newzealand/8155813/New-Zealand-mine-explosion-John-Keys-speech-in-full.html

          24/11/2010 “New Zealand is a small country. A country where we are our all our brothers keeper. …..” “We are a tough and resilient country. We care deeply for our fellow countrymen and women. We are a series of communities knitted together by a set of values and principles that have guided us together through good times and bad.”

          and for May 2012 ?? “and it is these values, these principles and this aspect of our deep inter-connectedness which have determined why my government has paid $7m of your taxes to the mine’s owners. It speaks to of our national characteristics of toughness and resilience when I say that we will be putting in place a plan to retrieve the bodies of the victims of this tragedy when and if it becomes economically viable”

        • Reagan Cline 16.2.2.2

          That’s right “our brothers keeper” even if a lot of those brothers, sisters, parents, grandparents live outside NZ – let alone the foreign shareholders and bankers people complain about.

      • Pete George 16.2.3

        I seem to recall the words “whatever it takes”, I expect someone will have a link.

        I agree the the PM has a responsibility to only imply or promise something that he is able to make sure can be done. And if communication isn’t adequate he and his advisers are the ones to blame.

        But that doesn’t exclude us from healthy skepticism of anything that’s said.

        I wonder what people expect? Remove the bodies at any expense? At what risk to those doing the recovery? Only remove those bodies of families that want them removed?

        Not all bodies are recovered from all disasters. People who have drowned are often not found. Bodies on mountains are sometimes left in inaccessible places.

        • McFlock 16.2.3.1

          Like Erebus? oh, wait…

        • Colonial Viper 16.2.3.2

          OMG PG is such a sad sack apologist. He’s not even asking for all the feasibility studies and investigations conducted of potential body recovery operations to be released to the families.

          Why is that information not being released to the families?

    • mike e 16.3

      puerile git making excuses again

      • Pete George 16.3.1

        Do you think we shouldn’t bother about the facts? I’ll condemn if the facts show that’s appropriate, but I don’t know what are the facts, and I don’t know what is PM spin, nor critical spin.

    • This is all I can find on it so far:

      Shortly after the tragic coal mine explosions last year, he visited the miners’ families in Greymouth. They told him their main focus was to retrieve their loved ones from the mine and Key apparently assured them the government would do everything possible to achieve that.

      Months later, early in the new year, Key effectively scuppered their hopes, saying he thought the mine would be sealed even though, he acknowledged, that was a decision for the receivers.

      “The government was fully committed to doing everything we could to making sure the bodies were removed and that full closure could be achieved for those families but that’s just not possible and it’s not an issue of money or time or commitment,” he said at the time.

      http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/columnists/john-hartevelt/5680326/PMs-Pike-River-response-a-rare-error-of-judgement

      That seems to fit with what I remember. The “promise” was never recorded. The only reports of what he said were as heard and repeated by family who were at the meeting. That can’t be relied on as accurate, they could have intepreted to fit with what they desperately wanted.

      • felix 16.4.1

        “I wonder what people expect? Remove the bodies at any expense?”

        If he said “anything possible” then yes. Because it’s possible, and he said it. If said “anything we can budget for without dislodging our other priorities” I’d give you a different answer, but no-one’s suggesting he said that.

        Essentially there are two possibilities:

        1. He didn’t really say “anything possible”, but people thought he did.

        2. He did say it.

        Assuming for a moment that he did say “the govt would do anything possible” to retrieve the bodies, then there are broadly speaking two possible responses.

        Mine is that he absolutely has to do it. Because it is possible, and he said he would, to a bunch of grieving families.

        Yours, if I understand you correctly, is that he doesn’t really have to because we should expect him to be bullshitting a bit, and we’re a bit silly if we don’t think he’s bullshitting a bit.

        Essentially (assuming 2, remember) your argument is that he lies, to a bunch of grieving widows, mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, and kids, and because we’re smart enough to know he’s lying we have to let him get away with it.

        • Pete George 16.4.1.1

          I’m not saying that at all. I don’t know what Key said. I haven’t seen anyone say with any certainty what he said. Unless that can be known, and it may never be possible to be sure, it’s a bit of a pointless argument.

          • felix 16.4.1.1.1

            Yes you are Pete. I don’t know for sure what Key said either but you’re not arguing that he didn’t say “anything possible”, you’re arguing that even if he did, what did people expect?

            Your statement “I wonder what people expect?” doesn’t make sense interpreted any other way.

            At least not as long as we’re presuming that people can expect to believe the PM, that is.

      • Socialist Paddy 16.4.2

        Yeah that is a great defence Pete.  

        The grieving families did not get their lawyers to check out the fecking statements of the Prime Minister to make sure that he did not have any wriggle room.  Therefore the Government can tell the grieving families to flock off.

        The good thing about politics sometimes is that it does not matter what you said, it matters what people think you said.  I hope the people of the West Coast and of New Zealand give the PM the middle finger for being a duplicitous arrogant prick.

        • felix 16.4.2.1

          Bang on Paddy.

          If he made an ambiguous statement to let people hear what they wanted to hear it’s even more damning, not less.

          • Pete George 16.4.2.1.1

            There’s a lot of “ifs” and no substantiable facts.

            It’s quite possible some of the people at the meeting would tend to hear what they wanted to hear no matter how precisely he worded it. That’s very common.

            In politics even precise words can be interpreted different ways, depending on if the “listener” is naturally for or against the speaker.

            And another possibility, without anything to substantiate it but as likely as the PM blatantly lying which has been claimed here – the family member interviewed after the meeting may have put a deliberate slant on the PM’s comment to try and pressure towards the outcome they wanted. And it’s also possible the PM didn’t dispute this so as not to create further upset for the families.

            If we ever get a recording of what Key said then we can make more definite judgement.

            • felix 16.4.2.1.1.1

              “There’s a lot of “ifs” and no substantiable facts.”

              Not really.

              As we agreed earlier, it’s entirely the PM’s responsibility to make sure his statements around such a delicate matter were crystal clear. So if there’s any misinterpretation it’s entirely his fault.

              It doesn’t really matter whether he used loose weasel words to deliberately mislead, or used loose and poorly thought out language because he sucks at doing important things.

            • vto 16.4.2.1.1.2

              Pete George – the used nappy always voluntarily wrapping himself around the politicians arses to soak up their shit.

  17. Jim Nald 17

    I can’t see what the issue is – he promised himself a media opportunity then and got himself that.

    /sarc

  18. G CAssidy 18

    One quote I found on a tv news website.. “For a sale to take place there has to be a transfer of the mining licence, the Government’s made it clear that a credible plan needs to be established before that sale can take place,” Key said.

  19. The worse betrayal in recent history.

  20. jack 20

    “it’s not an issue of money or time or commitment,” he said at the time. ”

    This is what John Key said to the families a year ago after the Pike River Mind said they couldn’t get them out.
    Key tried to reassure the family. But yesterday Key made the following statement:

    “”Solid Energy is expected to take all reasonable steps to recover the men in the Pike River mine, along with any commercial mining there in the future, as long as that recovery operation is safe, financially credible and technically feasible.”

    Financially credible??? Where as before he said money is not the issue. Key is disgusting. Profit
    over everything. The government is suppose to protect but Key is looking at the government as
    a 67 billion dollar commodity and he wants his mates and him to get some of that. He has no morals.
    Typical derivative trader. Just wants to collect his commision.

    I read this in the Herald. I am extremely upset for the family and sick to my stomach what Key is doing. Like some of you mentioned, where are the reports? Why haven’t the bodies been retrieved?? Nothing.. It sounds like the families know about as much as us.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10805355

    He didn’t have the guts to tell the family personally, he had to have his secretary write the above statement.

  21. captain hook 21

    somebody should ring him up and ask him.
    oh sorry.
    he’s in a meeting!

  22. Psychopathic caracteristics:

    The twenty traits assessed by the PCL-R score are:

    glib and superficial charm
    grandiose (exaggeratedly high) estimation of self
    need for stimulation
    pathological lying
    cunning and manipulativeness
    lack of remorse or guilt
    shallow affect (superficial emotional responsiveness)
    callousness and lack of empathy
    parasitic lifestyle
    poor behavioral controls
    sexual promiscuity
    early behavior problems
    lack of realistic long-term goals
    impulsivity
    irresponsibility
    failure to accept responsibility for own actions
    many short-term marital relationships
    juvenile delinquency
    revocation of conditional release
    criminal versatility

    How many of these traits does John Key possess? I easily count 14 including criminal versatility (Being a bankster predator and politician seeling of NZ’s assets and happily lying about shares, getting bodies out of mines, conflict of interest with his shares in Bank of America)

    • Jackal 22.1

      Obviously juvenile delinquency doesn’t currently fit the bill and his early life seems to be a secret hidden behind a fabrication so we don’t know about any early behavioral problems. But I think most of the other descriptive terms can arguable be used. Of course revocation of conditional release doesn’t apply… yet.

  23. Terry 23

    Would you buy a used car from this man?
    Not me!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9YDiHx8Ob8

  24. Jan 24

    Yes, there seem to be a lot of things Mr Key says that he then somehow retracts or claims to be misquoted on or argues the semantics. Used car dealer (or financial market wheeler/dealer) springs to mind.
    I can just hear the conversation between National and Solid Energy over the Pike River purchase:
    SE: So John / Gerry, why would we want to buy Pike River, when it’s too dangerous to go in?
    JK: Well, I’ll tell you what. Buy the place, don’t worry, we’ll give you a good price, the small creditors don’t need paying, then pretend to do a bit of investigative work for a year or so and just hold on. I know the land is DOC land, but we’re working on opening that all up to mining and I know we can swing you turning that place into an open cast mine, no worries. We’ll soften up the punters by concentrating on the Coromandel first, you know, distract them with a couple of small ones to get upset about, then forget them again,before we quietly change the rules on Pike River and you can get all the coal you want from there. Right Gerry?
    GB: yep, John, that’s normally how we do and I can’t see a reason why we wouldn’t do it here.

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    2 days ago
  • National’s housing crisis hitting renters hard
    National’s ongoing housing crisis is causing massive rental increases, with Auckland renters being hit the hardest, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 days ago
  • A Day with the PSA
    This week, along with Labour MP Kris Faafoi, I accepted an invitation to spend a day working alongside the good folk at the Public Service Association in Wellington. As the Workplace Relations and Safety spokesperson for the Greens, I was ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche
    2 days ago
  • A Day with the PSA
    This week, along with Labour MP Kris Faafoi, I accepted an invitation to spend a day working alongside the good folk at the Public Service Association in Wellington. As the Workplace Relations and Safety spokesperson for the Greens, I was ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche
    2 days ago
  • Government holds Northland back
    New information shows Northland remains the most economically depressed region in New Zealand, says Labour’s Regional Development spokesperson David Clark. “The latest Westpac McDermott Miller regional survey found that more Northlanders believe their local economy will deteriorate this year than ...
    2 days ago
  • Rebstock report into MFAT leaks a disgrace
    An Ombudsman’s report on the Paul Rebstock investigation into MFAT leaks shows the two diplomats at the centre of the case were treated disgracefully, says Labour’s State Services spokesperson Kris Faafoi.  “The Ombudsman says one of the diplomats Derek Leask ...
    2 days ago
  • More families forced to turn to food banks for meals
    Increasing numbers of families are having to go to food banks just to put a meal on the table, according to a new report that should shame the Government into action, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. ...
    2 days ago
  • We have a housing emergency in New Zealand
    Auckland, New Zealand, where house prices have risen 20 percent in the last year alone We have a housing emergency in New Zealand.  Like many people we are ashamed and angry that in a wealthy country like ours, we have ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage
    3 days ago
  • We have a housing emergency in New Zealand
    Auckland, New Zealand, where house prices have risen 20 percent in the last year alone We have a housing emergency in New Zealand.  Like many people we are ashamed and angry that in a wealthy country like ours, we have ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage
    3 days ago
  • Aussie reforms signal trouble ahead for school funding plan
    Plans by the Government to return to bulk funding are likely to see increased class sizes and schools most in need missing out on much-needed resources, Labour’s Acting Education spokesperson Grant Robertson says. “The signaled return to bulk funding is ...
    3 days ago
  • Toxic Sites – the down low on the go slow
    In  2011, I negotiated an agreement with the National Government to advance work on cleaning up contaminated sites across the country. This included establishing a National Register of the ten worst sites where the creators of the problem could not ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    3 days ago
  • Aucklanders face new motorway tax of up to $2500 a year
    The Government wants to tax Aucklanders thousands of dollars a year just to use the motorway network, says Labour’s Auckland Issues spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Officials estimate the average city commute is 11.8km. This means for the average Aucklander commuting five ...
    3 days ago
  • 15 corrupt bank managers identified in student fraud
    New information show 15 bank managers in India have been identified by Immigration New Zealand as presenting fraudulent documents on behalf of foreign students studying here, Labour’s Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “Documents obtained by Labour under the Official Information ...
    3 days ago
  • National leaves Kiwi savers the most vulnerable in OECD
    News last week that Israel’s Finance Minister will insure savers’ bank deposits means New Zealand will be left as the only country in the OECD that has no deposit insurance to protect savers’ funds should a bank fail. Most Kiwis ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    4 days ago
  • Comprehensive plan for future of work needed
    A Massey University study showing many New Zealanders are unaware of the increasing role of automation in their workplace, highlights the need for a comprehensive plan for the future of work, says Grant Robertson, Chair of Labour’s Future of Work ...
    4 days ago
  • Another National Government failure: 90 day work trials
    On Friday last week, the Treasury released a report by MOTU economic consultants into the effectiveness of the controversial 90-day work trial legislation. The report found that there was “no evidence that the policy affected the number of hires by ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche
    4 days ago
  • Iraq mission extension case not made
    The Prime Minister has not made the case for extending the Iraq deployment another 18 months nor the expansion of their mission, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little.  “Labour originally opposed the deployment because the Iraqi Army’s track record was poor, ...
    5 days ago
  • Denial is a long river
    William Rolleston from Federated Farmers made the absurd claim on RNZ on Saturday that “we actually have very clean rivers”. This statement doesn’t represent the many farmers who know water quality is in big trouble and are working to clean ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    5 days ago
  • Denial is a long river
    William Rolleston from Federated Farmers made the absurd claim on RNZ on Saturday that “we actually have very clean rivers”. This statement doesn’t represent the many farmers who know water quality is in big trouble and are working to clean ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    5 days ago
  • Melanoma deaths could be avoided by an early access scheme
      The tragic death of Dunedin’s Graeme Dore from advanced Melanoma underlines the cruelty of this Government in promising a treatment but delaying for months, says Labour’s Health Spokesperson Annette King.  “Graeme was diagnosed with Melanoma last year. He used ...
    5 days ago
  • Assessing the Defence White Paper
    The Government’s recently released Defence White Paper has raised questions again about New Zealand’s defence priorities, and in particular the level and nature of public funding on defensive capabilities. The Green Party has a longstanding belief that priority must be ...
    GreensBy Kennedy Graham
    5 days ago
  • Kiwis’ confidence drops again: Economy needs a boost
    Westpac’s consumer confidence survey has fallen for the seventh time in nine quarters, with middle income households ‘increasingly worried about where the economy is heading over the next few years’, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “This survey is a ...
    5 days ago
  • Relocation grant simply kicks can down the road
    The response by state house tenants and social agencies to the Government’s rushed plan to shift families out of Auckland tells us what we already knew – this is no answer to the chronic housing shortage, Opposition Leader Andrew Little ...
    5 days ago
  • Peace hīkoi to Parihaka
    On Friday a Green crew walked with the peace hīkoi from Ōkato to Parihaka. Some of us were from Parliament and some were party members from Taranaki and further afield. It was a cloudy but gentle day and at one ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    5 days ago
  • Children’s Commissioner right to worry about CYF transition
    The Government must listen to the Children’s Commissioner’s concerns that young people under CYF care could be ‘negatively impacted’ as the new agency’s reforms become reality, says Labour’s Children’s spokesperson Jacinda Ardern. “Dr Russell Wills has used the second annual ...
    5 days ago
  • Bill English exaggerates PPL costs to justify veto
    The Finance Minister has used trumped-up costings to justify a financial veto against parents having 26 weeks paid parental leave, says Labour MP Sue Moroney. “Bill English’s assertion on RNZ yesterday that the measure would cost an extra $280 million ...
    1 week ago
  • Government must refund overcharged motorists
    Labour is calling on the Government to refund motor registration fees to three-quarters of a million Kiwi motorists whose vehicles were wrongly classified under National’s shambolic ACC motor vehicle risk rating system, Labour’s ACC spokesperson Sue Moroney says.“Minister Kaye’s ridiculous ...
    1 week ago
  • 90-day work trials an unfair failure which must change
    A new Treasury report shows the Government’s 90-day trials haven’t helped businesses and are inherently unfair, Labour’s Workplace Relations spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “The Motu report found that 90-day trial periods had no impact on overall employment and did not ...
    1 week ago
  • Massey East houses a start but Nick Smith should think bigger
    The Massey East 196-home development is a start but the Government must think bigger if it is to end the housing crisis, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “It is great the Government is finally realising it needs to build ...
    1 week ago
  • More changes needed to ensure fewer cases like Teina Pora’s
    Teina Pora spent 21 years behind bars for a crime he didn’t commit, shafted by a Police investigation that prioritised an investigator’s hunch over the pursuit of credible evidence. Yesterday’s announcement that the government is to pay him $2.5m in ...
    GreensBy David Clendon
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand Labour sends condolences to UK
    The New Zealand Labour Party is sickened and saddened by the murder of British Labour MP Jo Cox, Labour Leader Andrew Little says. “Ms Cox was killed in cold blood while simply doing her job as a constituent MP. She ...
    1 week ago
  • Shameful refugee quota increase still leaves NZ at the bottom of the list
    Minister for Immigration Michael Woodhouse announced this week that the government will put off increasing the refugee quota by 1000 places until 2018.  It’s a shameful decision that undermines the Government’s claim that it takes its international humanitarian obligations seriously, ...
    GreensBy Denise Roche
    1 week ago
  • Paula Bennett as a victim hard to swallow
    The National Party spin machine has gone into overdrive to try and present Paula Bennett as the victim in the Te Puea Marae smear saga, says Labour Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Bill English in Parliament today tried valiantly to paint ...
    1 week ago
  • Voters to have the final veto on paid parental leave
    New Zealanders will have the final right of veto on a Government that has ignored democracy and is out of touch with the pressures and demands on families, says Labour MP Sue Moroney. “Today’s decision by National to veto 26 ...
    1 week ago
  • Collins should put Kiwis’ money where her mouth is
    Labour’s Police spokesman Stuart Nash is calling on anyone who has received a speeding ticket for going up to 5km/h over the 100km/hr open road speed limit to write to him and he will take it up on their behalf ...
    1 week ago
  • Where is the leadership on equal pay for work of equal value?
    The gender pay gap in the public service is worse than in the private sector. I’ve always found this particularly galling because I expect our Government to provide an example to the private sector on things like human rights, rather ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    1 week ago
  • Kiwis’ real disposable income goes nowhere for the year
    New Zealanders’ hard work for the last year resulted in no increase in real disposable income, showing Kiwis aren’t getting ahead under National, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Today’s GDP figures reveal that real gross national disposable income per ...
    1 week ago
  • Pora case a case to learn from
    Conformation that Teina Pora will receive $2.5million from the Crown for more than 20 years of wrongful imprisonment does not fix the flaws in our system that led to this miscarriage of justice, Labour’s Justice spokesperson Jacinda Ardern says. “The ...
    1 week ago
  • Government needs to start again with RMA changes
    The National Government’s proposed changes to the Resource Management Act have attracted more than 800 submissions, many of them critical of key aspects of the Resource Legislation Bill. There has been much criticism of the new regulation making powers given ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage
    1 week ago
  • Bennett’s briefing completely unacceptable
    It is completely unacceptable that Paula Bennett briefed her political staff on the police investigation into Hurimoana Dennis after her meeting with him, despite it having nothing to do with her social housing portfolio, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    1 week ago
  • Speech to Green Building Council
    Building smarter, greener cities It will be clear to anyone who has been watching the public debate on the housing crisis that housing in New Zealand is sadly far from being economically sustainable when Auckland has the fourth most unaffordable ...
    1 week ago
  • Paula Bennett has more questions to answer
    It is unthinkable that Paula Bennett’s press secretary went rogue and tried to smear the reputation of someone involved in helping the homeless, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “Political staff would not take such serious unilateral action without the ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Speech on Notice of Motion on Orlando
    Mr Speaker, The Labour Party joins with the government in expressing our horror at this atrocity and our love and sympathy are with the victims and their families. Our thoughts are with the people of Orlando and of the United ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Tiakina Ngā Wai – Swimmable Rivers Report June 2016
    The campaign to clean up our rivers was launched at the Green Conference at Queens Birthday weekend. However, the work prior to the launch goes back a number of years. Russel Norman and Eugenie Sage deserve full credit for the ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • We can do more: Refugee quota should be doubled
    New Zealand is a better country than National’s miserable increase in the refugee quota that ignores our obligations to the international community and people in need, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little. “It is a sad day when the Government can’t ...
    2 weeks ago

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