web analytics

Joyce’s dirty deals: money laundering at SkyCity

Written By: - Date published: 11:05 am, April 17th, 2012 - 30 comments
Categories: crime, Steven Joyce - Tags: ,

The Greens have revealed that criminals are laundering millions of dollars through SkyCity, taking their gambling losses as the price of coming out with clean, untraceable money. The Government’s sleazy ‘law for sale’ deal with SkyCity would only make it worse by allowing more anonymous, higher stake gambling on the pokies. Instead, we should be clamping down.

SkyCity should be under a duty to determine that its high-rollers came by their money legitimately. Just like if you go into a bank and try to deposit a large amount of cash, they’ll ask questions under their FATF obligations to prevent money laundering.

It’s not like a lot of people can afford to come to a casino and drop hundreds of thousands, even millions of dollars.

Internal Affairs says that the cashless pokies that SkyCity wants as part of its deal to build a white elephant convention centre would also make problem gamlbing worse: “the ticket machines can allow gamblers to dissociate themselves from reality by not using “real” money; gamble uninterrupted for long periods; increase gambling credits by $500 a time, rather than the $20 cash limit; be less likely to be identified as problem gamblers”.

So, an easier route for SkyCity’s criminal customers to launder their money (with SkyCity making a profit on the transactionl) and a more dangerous option for problem gamblers. Someone, tell me what New Zealand gets out of Steven Joyce’s dirty deal again?

30 comments on “Joyce’s dirty deals: money laundering at SkyCity”

  1. Kotahi Tane Huna 1

    So the proceeds of crime flow directly from criminals to the National Party, through the bowels of Sky City. Why would they have a problem with that: wealth buys legitimacy in right-wing circles.

  2. freedom 2

    a quick (and obviously rhetorical) question… Why not impose the same 37 % community return onto ALL gambling at Casinos that is imposed upon Club and Pub machines ? If the business thinks it is too high then they can go to another country. Yes i also believe that should include Lotto.

    Wouldn’t it be great if those hundreds of millions of dollars were paid to an [Aotearoa Trust] which was effectively a revenue collection service for the community/education/welfare programmes that are progressively being eliminated.

    I know, naive and futile thoughts, but it won’t stop me believing they would make a real difference.

    • freedom 2.1

      addendum to my comment above,
      Yes i also believe that should include Lotto and the TAB

  3. DJ 3

    Wow talk about trying to create a news item.

    Point 1: I have been to the casino many times and it is never full. If it were full and had a queue out the door to get in, then I would agree that more machines will attract more people. But this is not the case.

    Point 2: That Herald article refers to 5 cases over 3 years? And you pick up on that and call for the world to end. Someone from the right persuasion points out 5 families rorting the benefit system and you bleet about bene bashing.

    Can’t win with you lot.

    • Kotahi Tane Huna 3.1

      “The world to end” – are you having some comprehension problems (perhaps as a result of the low IQ that your conservative viewpoint indicates is likely)?

      Not “the world” – the corruption and money laundering, and the solicitation and acceptance of bribes by the National Party – that is what people would like to see an end to. Can you tell the difference between that and “the world”?

      • DJ 3.1.1

        So again you have nothing constructive to say other than play the man.

        I have to laugh at you (but won’t make the same judgements you do coz I know nothing about you), but I can tell you exactly what my IQ is and exactly where I sit on the list of IQs in this country. So you see not only were your assumptions wrong again, but it sort of makes you sound a wee bit jealous. Sort of like small man syndrome.

        Anyway back to my point. I agree with the laundering part of the post. But that is not the issue. The criminals will launder anywhere they can. Shut one door and they make another.

        My point was, this is not news. This has been going on for ages, and having a convention center and some more machines neither kills it or fuels it. It’s just hypocrisy to bleat about this and not all the other rorts happening in the country doesn’t matter what side of the political fence you are on.

        Are you also saying that no one in the Labour party gets kick backs from any business or union? Because that would be pretty naive really.

        • Kotahi Tane Huna 3.1.1.1

          How nice for you that you are one of the minority of right-wingers with a decent IQ – don’t shoot the messenger I’m just repeating robust scientific findings.

          Funny how you claim I have nothing to add, then address the substantive points I made – sort of like schizophrenic man’s syndrome.

          The National Party sells policies to overseas business interests. In your mind, is that the equivalent of Labour being funded by democratically run unions that represent New Zealand workers?

        • Lanthanide 3.1.1.2

          “My point was, this is not news. This has been going on for ages, and having a convention center and some more machines neither kills it or fuels it.”

          This is called “shining the spotlight on something”. The public has a very very limited attention span (helped along by the media), so when we start having a public discussion about a casino getting special treatment from the government, it’s worth looking at all aspects of how a casino operates.

          Not sure how well your IQ stacks up if you couldn’t work this out.

        • Roy 3.1.1.3

          Actually you probably don’t know exactly where your IQ sits unless it is very close to the mean, because the result becomes less and less accurate as you move away from the mean and by the time you are 2 standard deviations or more away from the mean, comparisons between different individuals more than 2 standard deviations higher, or between different individuals more than 2 standard deviations lower, become hopelessly inaccurate.
          Oh yes, and the mean has been moving up over the years, too.

    • freedom 3.2

      DJ,
      tens of millions of dollars (conservatively) that are the proceeds of criminal activity are laundered every year through the tables and machines of Sky City and other Casinos in NZ.
      Casinos are globally acknowledged as one of the principal vehicles for laundering dirty money.

      If the Casino is always so empty, where does all the profit come from? If the money is legit then the Casino should have no problems asking its patrons for some sort of verification of its origin.

      More troublesome, is that if your comments are accurate and so few people are gambling then there are some very wealthy people with some very serious gambling problems. As those with means often have influence, what other areas of their lives are in dissaray and prone to poor judgement?

      • DJ 3.2.1

        Indeed there probably are. But’s let’s focus on the crime. If you close the casinos down, they launder somewhere else don’t they?

        • freedom 3.2.1.1

          great, so close the casino, then the ‘other places’ will surface and can be properly identified and steps can be taken, and so on and so on and so on. There are only so many ways to efficiently launder large sums. Make no mistake DJ we are talking hundreds of millions of dollars.

          Please explain exactly where these sums will be processed if the casinos are removed? Community pokies?, hardly. Cash purchases of property? a lot harder these days. On the Stock market? even harder thanks to contemporary reporting structures for cash purchases. Laundering illegal funds was one of the reasons Casinos were created in the first place.

          The remaining processes involve trusts and the like but even then the creation and maintenance of such funds are under much tighter scrutiny, even if the transparency of a trust’s beneficiaries is still less than optimum.

          Honestly what is the worst that can happen if all Casinos were closed?

        • bbfloyd 3.2.1.2

          how stupid do you have to be before you don’t realise the utter stupidity of that statement??….

          “they launder somewhere else don’t they?” … of course they will you pillock… that’s the point of the exercise.. that’s not even close to an acceptable excuse to encourage it at sky city….

          setting up shell(front) companies is the time honoured method to launder money… using a casino is faster, that’s all…. and setting up legitimate businesses to launder money does two things… first, it doesn’t cause a larger, compounding gambling problem issue that the community is the victim of,.. and two, it actually can create jobs…(someone has to work those businesses) …..

          video rental outlets have been a popular front in the past… there are many others.. takeaway bars, pubs, even two dollar shops would do it…the list is endless….

          and by the way have you been around the casino and asked people in there how much money they individually have gambled away? or does doing a head count and averaging an arbitrary figure for each body suffice to make an “informed” guess? would the figures quoted by sky city itself be a more accurate measure of how much money is sucked out of circulation through gambling losses?

          let me know when the tranquilisers wear off would you….

        • Lanthanide 3.2.1.3

          “If you close the casinos down, they launder somewhere else don’t they?”

          And? We should just give up? We should just make laundering money completely legal anyway?

          People use Casinos to launder money because it’s easy to do so. Forcing them to use other methods will reduce crime because it won’t be as easy to get money out of the crime. Other laundering methods may also be easier to detect, resulting in more prison sentences for the criminals.

          Can you come up with any logical reason for why we shouldn’t clamp down on a known avenue of significant money laundering?

    • Craig Glen Eden 3.3

      “I would agree that more machines will attract more people. But this is not the case.”

      So why do Sky City want more Machines then ? Why would they want this deal convention Center for more machines.Shits and giggles maybe? Because thats right Corporates just love giving stuff away for nothing!

    • Colonial Viper 3.4

      Point 1: I have been to the casino many times and it is never full. If it were full and had a queue out the door to get in, then I would agree that more machines will attract more people. But this is not the case.

      Meh, you may have been to the casino “many times” but the casino has 24/7 records of its machine utilisation.

      And it wants MOAR machines, not less. And since those machines are $100K each, I’m betting (haha) that it believes that they will be very profitable.

  4. Draco T Bastard 4

    Get rid of cash and have every transaction in the country tied to an IRD number. Money laundering then becomes impossible as every transaction becomes traceable.

    EDIT: Ban the bloody pokies.

  5. Deano 5

    SkyCity boss:

    He said the casino was too small for the number of people who wanted to use it.

    “If you come here on a Wednesday night or a Friday night, the property is full.

    “It is uncomfortable. You can’t enjoy it anymore. We clearly want to expand our business. There is clearly demand for it.

    “There will continue to be demand for it. We think it is a very good business and a business worthy of promoting and expanding.”

    – so, he’s got too many problem gamblers and wants space for more. We have a limit for a reason, to contain problem gambling. Raising the limit when it’s reached somewhat undermines its purpose.

  6. Adrian 6

    Wednesday and Friday nights are interesting? Why those nights? Friday I get, pay is transferred on Thursday night but what payment is made on Tuesday night, Super?

  7. toad 7

    And check out SkyCity’s problem gambler creation scheme

    The irony is that the technology used for Premier Rewards could be used to identify and bar problem gamblers. But that’s not what SkyCity are using it for. They’re using it to create more problem gamblers.

  8. Money Laundering is a 3 stage process which includes placement, layering and integration. As has been pointed out in other comments, casinos make it fairly easy to place money into the financial system. In the US, Casinos are considered financial institutions from the perspective of money laundering. This requires them to report large cash in or out transactions to the government. Casinos have been regulated as Financial Institutions since 1985, and the regulations are continually refined to make it more difficult for criminals.

    The machines mentioned in this article are attractive to money launderers because of the anonymity they provide. They want to be anonymous from a “money in” perspective. Criminals are quite happy to have the “winnings” documented, because a tax form from a casino provides proof of a legitimate source of the funds, which is the ultimate goal of laundering money.

  9. Gareth 9

    I would.ve thought that they.d be more likely to launder through table games anyway. The rate of loss on something like roulette is much lower.

  10. What do you expect from an ex-Wall St bank$ter, John Key, who was head of Derivatives for Merrill Lynch, and is still a shareholder in the Bank of America?

    The current Prime Minister of New Zealand – ‘perceived’ to be the ‘least corrupt country in the world’.

    How SHONKY is that?

    Penny Bright

    ‘Anti-corruption campaigner’

  11. What odds that he has shares in Sky City Penny / he’s a con-man first and formost.How the hell did the public fall for this sleaz.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Backbencher Matt’s Bill is a Doocey
    The latest National Member’s Bill pulled from the ballot is yet another waste of Parliament’s time and shows the Government’s contempt for the House and the public with much more important issues needing debate, says Labour’s Shadow Leader of the ...
    6 hours ago
  • Gun laws creaking under the strain
     Questions have to be asked  after surprising revelations at the Law and Order Select Committee about the police and their ability to manage the gun problem in New Zealand, says Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash.  “The lack of resources is ...
    6 hours ago
  • Most homeless are working poor – Otago Uni
    The finding by Otago University researcher Dr Kate Amore that most homeless people are in work or study is one of the most shocking aspects of the housing crisis, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Social service agencies report many ...
    9 hours ago
  • Māori seats entrenched by Tirikatene Bill
    National and the Māori Party need to support my member’s Bill which is designed to entrench the Māori electorate seats in Parliament, Labour’s Te Tai Tonga MP Rino Tirikatene says. “Under the Electoral Act the provisions establishing the general electorates ...
    11 hours ago
  • Trade dumping bill could hurt NZ industries
    The Commerce Select Committee is currently hearing submissions on the Trade (Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duties) Amendment Bill. This bill worries me. I flagged some major concerns during its first reading.   I am now reading submissions from NZ Steel, ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers
    1 day ago
  • Just 8 per cent of work visas for skills shortages
    Just 16,000 – or 8 per cent – of the 209,000 work visas issued last year were for occupations for which there is an identified skills shortage, says Labour Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. “The overwhelming majority of the record number ...
    1 day ago
  • Hard won agreement shouldn’t be thrown away
    The Government should ignore talk across the Tasman about doing away with the labelling of GM free products, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King. “Labelling of genetically modified products was a hard won agreement in 2001 by Australian and the ...
    1 day ago
  • National’s privatisation Trojan horse
     The National government is using the need to modernise the school system as a Trojan horse for privatisation and an end to free public education as we know it, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “There is no doubt that ...
    1 day ago
  • Shameless land-banking ads show need for crackdown
    The fact that more than 300 sections are shamelessly being advertised on Trade Me as land-banking opportunities during a housing crisis shows the need for a crackdown on property speculators, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Of the 328 ...
    1 day ago
  • Standard and Poor’s warning of housing crisis impact on banks
    The National Government’s failure to address the housing crisis is leading to dire warnings from ratings agency Standard and Poor’s about the impact on the strength of the economy and New Zealand banks, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Standard ...
    1 day ago
  • Ihumatao needs action not sympathy
    The Petition of Save Our Unique Landscape (SOUL) calling on Parliament to revoke Special Housing Area 62 in order to protect the Ihumatao Peninsula and Stonefields, has fallen on deaf ears, says the Labour MP for Mangere Su’a William Sio.  ...
    1 day ago
  • Student visa fraud & exploitation must stop
    The Government must act immediately to end fraud and exploitation of international students that threatens to damage New Zealand’s reputation, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. ...
    2 days ago
  • Government needs to show leadership in reviewing monetary policy
    The Reserve Bank’s struggles to meet its inflation target, the rising exchange rate and the continued housing crisis shows current monetary policy needs to be reviewed - with amendments to the policy targets agreement a bare minimum, says Labour’s Finance ...
    2 days ago
  • Slash and burn of special education support
    Slashing the support for school age children with special needs is no way to fund earlier intervention, Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “National’s latest plan to slash funding for children with special needs over the age of 7 in ...
    3 days ago
  • National’s Pasifika MPs must have free vote
      Pacific people will not take kindly to the Government whipping their Pacific MPs to vote in favour of a  Bill that will allow Sunday trading  at Easter, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio.  “We are seeing ...
    5 days ago
  • Maritime Crimes Bill – balancing security and free speech
    Parliament is currently considering the Maritime Crimes Amendment Bill, which would bring New Zealand up to date with current international rules about maritime security. The debate around the Bill reflects two valid issues: legitimate counter-terrorism measures and the right to ...
    GreensBy Kennedy Graham
    6 days ago
  • Teachers’ low wages at the centre of shortages
      Figures that show teachers’ wages have grown the slowest of all occupations is at the heart of the current teacher shortage, says Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins.  In the latest Labour Cost Index, education professionals saw their wages grow ...
    6 days ago
  • Government’s Tax Law undermines common law principles
    A tax amendment being snuck in under the radar allows changes to tax issues to be driven through by the Government without Parliamentary scrutiny, says Labour’s Revenue spokesman Stuart Nash. “The amendment allows any part of the Tax Administration Act ...
    6 days ago
  • Government slippery about caption funding
      The Government has refused to apologise for taking the credit for funding Olympic Games captioning when the National Foundation for the Deaf  was responsible, says Labour’s spokesperson on Disability Issues Poto Williams.  “This shameful act of grandstanding by Ministers ...
    1 week ago
  • Default KiwiSaver investments should be reviewed
    The investments of the default KiwiSaver providers should be reviewed to make sure they are in line with New Zealanders’ values and expectations, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Most New Zealanders would be appalled that their KiwiSaver funds are ...
    1 week ago
  • New ministry should look after all children
    The Government has today shunned well founded pleas by experts not to call its new agency the Ministry for Vulnerable Children, Labour’s Spokesperson for Children Jacinda Ardern says.  “Well respected organisations and individuals such as Children's Commissioner Judge Andrew Becroft ...
    1 week ago
  • Ratification okay but we need action
    Today’s decision to ratify the Paris agreement on Climate Change by the end of the year is all well and good but where is the plan, says Labour’s Climate Change spokesperson Megan Woods.  “The Government’s failure to plan is planning ...
    1 week ago
  • Stats changes can’t hide unemployment reality
    Today’s minor drop in unemployment numbers is nothing to celebrate given the changes made to the official numbers that cut thousands of people looking for work out of the jobless rate, says Labour’s Employment spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Making any comparisons ...
    1 week ago
  • Stats changes can’t hide unemployment reality
    Today’s minor drop in unemployment numbers is nothing to celebrate given the changes made to the official numbers that cut thousands of people looking for work out of the jobless rate, says Labour’s Employment spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Making any comparisons ...
    1 week ago
  • Auckland’s affordable homes plummet 72% under National
    Comprehensive new data from CoreLogic has found the number of homes in Auckland valued at under $600,000 has plummeted by 72 per cent since National took office, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “This data tracks the changes in ...
    1 week ago
  • Govt should face the facts not skew the facts
    National appears to be actively massaging official unemployment statistics by changing the measure for joblessness to exclude those looking online, says Labour’s Employment spokesperson Grant Robertson. “The Household Labour Force Survey, released tomorrow, no longer regards people job hunting on ...
    1 week ago
  • More voices call for review of immigration policy
    The Auckland Chamber of Commerce is the latest credible voice to call for a review of immigration and skills policy, leaving John Key increasingly isolated, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little. “The Prime Minister is rapidly becoming a man alone. He ...
    1 week ago
  • Better balance needed in Intelligence Bill
    Labour will support the NZ Intelligence and Security Bill to select committee so the issues can be debated nationwide and important amendments can be made, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little. ...
    1 week ago
  • Serco circus has no place in NZ
    A High Court judgment proves National’s private prison agenda has failed and the Serco circus has no place in New Zealand correctional facilities, Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • State house sell-off a kick in the guts for Tauranga’s homeless
    The Government’s sale of 1124 state houses in Tauranga won’t house a single extra homeless person in the city, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Tauranga, like the rest of New Zealand, has a crisis of housing affordability and homelessness. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Axing Auckland’s affordable quota disappointing
    Auckland Council has given away a useful tool for delivering more affordable housing by voting to accept the Independent Hearing Panel’s recommendation to abolish affordable quotas for new developments, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ae Marika! Māori Party Oath Bill fails
    The Māori Party must reconsider its relationship with National after they failed to support Marama Fox’s Treaty of Waitangi Oath bill, Labour’s Maori Development Spokesperson Kelvin Davis says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Police Minister all platitudes no detail
    The Police Minister must explain where the budget for new police officers is coming from after continuously obfuscating, Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Lost luggage law shows National’s lost the plot
    The Government has proven it can’t address the big issues facing the tourism industry by allowing a Members Bill on lost luggage to be a priority, Labour’s Tourism spokesman Kris Faafoi said. “Nuk Korako’s Bill drawn from the Members’ Ballot ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Hiding behind the law – but can’t say which law
    National is refusing to come clean on what caused the potential trade dispute with China by hiding behind laws and trade rules they can’t even name, says Labour’s Trade and Export Growth spokesperson David Clark. “National admitted today that an ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Work visas issued for jobs workless Kiwis want
    Thousands of work visas for low-skilled jobs were issued by the Government in the past year despite tens of thousands of unemployed Kiwis looking for work in those exact occupations, Labour’s Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “A comparison of the ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwis nationwide now paying for housing crisis
    The Government’s failure to tackle the housing crisis is now affecting the entire country with nationwide house price inflation in the past year hitting 26 per cent, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “None of National’s tinkering or half-baked, piecemeal ...
    2 weeks ago
  • OCR cut piles pressure on Government
    Today’s OCR cut must be backed by Government action on housing and economic growth, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler’s monetary policy statement underlines the limits of Bill English’s economic management. He says growth is ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must explain the McClay delay
    Todd McClay must explain why it took two months for him to properly inform the Prime Minister about China’s potential trade retaliation, says Labour’s Trade and Export Growth spokesperson David Clark. “This may be one of the most serious trade ...
    2 weeks ago
  • OCR cut would be vote of no confidence in economy
    If Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler cuts the OCR tomorrow it would show that, despite his loudly-voiced concerns about fuelling the housing market, the stuttering economy is now a bigger concern, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Bill English and ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Leading medical experts back Healthy Homes Bill
    Leading medical experts have today thrown their weight behind my Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill, saying it will improve the health of Kiwi kids, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “The Bill sets minimum standards for heating, insulation and ventilation ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Minister, it’s time to listen to the Auditor General
    Minister of Health Jonathan Coleman needs to listen to the independent advice of the Auditor General and review the capital charge system imposed on District Health Boards, says Labour’ Health Spokesperson Annette King.  “The capital charge on DHBs has been ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Peas explain, Minister
    The Minister of Primary Industries needs to explain how the failure of its biosecurity systems led to the Pea Weevil incursion in the Wairarapa, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor says “The decision to ban the growing of peas in ...
    2 weeks ago
  • PM’s police numbers wrong
    The Prime Minister has said that police numbers will increase in-line with population growth, however, the Police’s own four year strategy clearly states there are no plans to increase police numbers for the next four years, Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ministerial double speak on GP Fees
      The Associate Health Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga was simply making it up when he claimed today that General Practitioners had been given money in the Budget to lower fees, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “In a reply to a ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must close loophole in LVR rules
    The Government must urgently close a loophole in loan to value ratio mortgage restrictions which are stopping homeowners from buying new houses before they sell their old one, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “The Reserve Bank was forced to ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Bulk funding means bigger classes
    National’s plan to bulk fund schools can only result in bigger class sizes and a reduced range of subject choices, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Time for John Key to sack his Housing Minister
    It is time for the Prime Minister to take serious and meaningful steps to address the housing crisis – and start by sacking Nick Smith as Housing Minister, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Clearly whatever it is National ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Coleman puts skids under cheaper GP visits
      Hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders with high health needs are missing out on cheaper GP fees as the cost of going to the doctor hits $70, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says.  “The number of practices subsidised to ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Police indifference over dine-and-dash appalling
      The fact that the police couldn’t be bothered investigating a dine–and-dash in Auckland is appalling and shows an indifference that is unacceptable, says Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash.  “The way it stands these men have got away scot free ...
    3 weeks ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere