web analytics

A tale of three immigrants

Written By: - Date published: 8:52 am, July 29th, 2017 - 26 comments
Categories: national, national/act government, same old national, us politics - Tags: ,

The plight of three immigrants to our fair nation shows a stark contrast in treatment.

The first immigrant is a young Tongan, Moriah, who suffers from a complex array of health problems. From Radio New Zealand:

Moriah, 18 months old, was born with abnormal brain function and has a range of complex medical issues.

She was in the emergency room for a whole month before she was allowed home, and suffers from disorders such as high aspiration risk, severe reduced muscle strength and a hole in her heart.

She requires round-the-clock care, has to be fed through her nose and needs three doses of medicine each day.

The family have always been in New Zealand legally, whether on work or visitor visas, but now Moriah’s one-month visitor visa has expired.

The Immigration and Protection Tribunal has given the girl until March 2018 to stay in the country.

Sending the family back to Tonga is a likely death sentence for Moriah.

They have letters of support – from the Ministry of Health in Tonga, doctors from Auckland’s Starship Hospital, and a social worker – asking the government to allow Moriah to stay in New Zealand permanently due to the high risk she could die if she goes back to Tonga.

In a letter to the tribunal, her pediatrician explains how serious her condition is and offering support.

“Moriah needs the care that can be provided by a tertiary children’s hospital. It is essential for Moriah’s care that she remain in New Zealand,” the letter says.

And the family has done what they can to be productive and useful members of our community.

Ms Tu’inukuafe-Lupeitu’u said she arrived in New Zealand more than 10 years ago, her husband Filipe eight years ago and their two children were both been born in New Zealand.

She said they were not in New Zealand to abuse the immigration system.

“We’re [not] actually entitiled to any kind of supplement for renting or anything from WINZ, those things we’re not eligible for because we’re not [permanent residents],” she said.

“I know we’re responsible for our children … but after we get paid, [it’s] rent first … food, and sometimes we have to live with $30 per week.”

She said she got her a bachelor’s degree in New Zealand and she and her husband had always tried to work and contribute to the country.

She worked in manager roles at supermarket chain Nosh and Filipe was now single-handedly supporting the family as a vehicle dismantler.

I am sure the right will raise a number of criticisms of the notion that Moriah should be allowed to live in New Zealand permanently.  But I am more than happy for this to occur and for my tax dollars to be used so that Moriah can continue to live.

The second immigrant is Steve Jensen.  He and his family ran a very successful and popular cafe in the Lower Hutt.  Their problem was that they were too optimistic with their business projection which were originally submitted to Immigration and they have been punished for this even though their business is in the black as well as being very popular.  Again from Radio New Zealand:

The Associate Immigration Minister has declined to overturn a decision rejecting residency for an American family who were forced to leave the country for not meeting financial visa requirements.

Steve and Nancy Jensen moved to Lower Hutt with their four teenage children in 2013, where they bought a café and a half share in the building it’s in.

The Java Point Café and Bistro made a profit and employed several staff,

But Mr Jensen said the business plan their immigration advisor submitted when applying for their long-term business visas over-stated the cafe’s possible profit margins, and projected an unrealistic 45 percent increase in sales in the first three years.

He said the Immigration Department would not accept revisions to the business plan once it had been accepted.

Chris Bishop is trying to occupy the moral high ground and has said the Jensen family should have been allowed to stay.  This is populist posturing.  When you are a member of a government that has an aggressive punitive stance on immigration you should wear the cruel decisions.  All of them.

But it appears that strict adherence to the rules and policies is not always required.  For instance if you are a billionaire American with strange ideas and a desire to buy land in the South Island as a bolt hole from the pending Trumpocalypse in the United States this Government will grant you citizenship, even if you have only spent 12 days in the past five years in the country as opposed to the normally required 1,350 days.

And to really spice things up the Government through inept negotiations will allow you to walk away with all of the profits from a successful joint venture.  All $27 million of them.  The Government was played.

So a dedicated Tongan family with a health crisis and a dedicated American family who both were making a real contribution are shown the door.  But an uber wealthy American is given the red carpet treatment and citizenship despite his not meeting the policy.  And a big cheque.

This Government’s priorities are very clear.

26 comments on “A tale of three immigrants ”

  1. Keepcalmcarryon 1

    if the Tongan family were working on a dairy farm then fear not, dairy nz would be lobbying like hell for them to stay so the farmer gets his slave labour and the taxpayer foot the bill for the child’s care.

    It’s cold but remember every dollar spent keeping a non citizen alive is a dollar not spent keeping a kiwi alive. A government must govern for ITS citizens first.

    This government though is an absolute sell out to business and commercial interests.
    I sure wouldn’t call them hardline or particularly punitive. They care if you have money, not if you don’t.

  2. Brendan 2

    Don’t forget the Indian students that got dicked around by some shady paperwork that was not of their own doing.

  3. Johan 3

    Chris Bishop, typifies the lazy, gutless, do-nothing National MP mentality. Too many of our politicians readily pick up their inflated wage packets and perks without supporting their constituents. Steve and Nancy Jensen and their family were given the boot unfairly, despite making a tremendous contribution to the community.
    The unproductive waffle by Chris Bishop, …..”National MP Chris Bishop says the Jensen family’s application for residency should have been approved, but they can still ask to extend their visas”,….BS Chrissie. The Jensens receiving legal advice, and were told that they didn’t have a chance with the visa appeal.

    • Sam C 3.1

      Chris Bishop is one of the hardest working list MPs in parliament. Which is why he will romp home in the Hutt South electorate this election. Well deserved too.

      • Ethica 3.1.1

        He has a very good family-run spin machine. Hard working maybe in comparison with some other National backbenchers. But Ginny Andersen is running rings around him.

      • Johan 3.1.2

        Sure Sam, I believe you;-))))))))))))))))

  4. greywarshark 4

    We don’t need more cafe owners in NZ – we have a tsunami of them. So immigrants have to bring more advantages than that. Just because they come from the English-speaking group of nations doesn’t mean that they can automatically be welcomed as permanent citizens here. But if they were wealthy – different.

    We know that wealthy people who bring in and register their money, at least for a while, help boost our financial standing in the shonky measurements used by the financial fiddlers that are the leaders of the world. We need our injections of money from overseas like drug addicts inject their drug of choice. But Peter Thiel looks like a younger John Key. From the RW point of view he is a friend with benefits that are useful to the government.

    • Siobhan 4.1

      I’m inclined to agree, but still, funny isn’t it…we ‘need’ Migrant workers in the hospitality industry “because they are able to fill labour and skill shortages.’…but we don’t need uppity ones that might want to actually own a cafe. Especially ironic seeing as for so many of us the modern economy seems to be all about selling cups of coffee to one another.

    • Stuart Munro 4.2

      Thiel only looks young because he drains the blood of the young working poor.

      http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2016/08/peter-thiel-wants-to-inject-himself-with-young-peoples-blood

    • Johan 4.3

      To greywarshark,
      Your comment in paragraph one, is a gross generalisation, the need and success of a cafe depends on its location and how well it serves the community.
      The fact that you single out that they come from an English speaking group, indicates your inherit bias.

      • greywarshark 4.3.1

        Johan
        There is a bias in NZ for English speaking countries, one example is how we are in the spy circle of 5 Eyes, why our past PM lived half his time in Hawaii which is USA state, why we are so anxious about the results of Brexit and our accessibility to Britain, why we put up with Oz and their fascist tendencies. If you haven’t grasped this then you need to spend more time learning instead of showing your inherent bias by jumping at others statements out of your ignorance.

        • Johan 4.3.1.1

          greywarshark,

          That is why New Zealand keeps sucking up to the Chinese for better trade deals and loans?
          Mate, you need to remove that patch from one of your eyes. Your BS doesn’t impress me at all!!!

          • greywarshark 4.3.1.1.1

            Johan
            You are a bit confused. I say that the reason we are being asked to enable USA people to run a cafe and get residency or citizenship is because they are English speaking and from the USA and we are biased to accept their citizens. Then I point out how tied to English speaking countries we are. Which is obvious.

            Then you make some query about why are we looking to China for business. And say something about a patch in my eye.

            I don’t get your point and perhaps you don’t have a clear one in your own mind. We are trying to widen our trading partners and China was a move into a newly open market and they have tremendous amounts of cash in their middle class to spend so the government encourages them to come here and buy things. We are dependent on their money to keep NZ Limited going. Which you seem to agree with in 5.1.

            This is something you said at 10.02 am.
            Steve and Nancy Jensen and their family were given the boot unfairly, despite making a tremendous contribution to the community.

            I said at 10.38 am.
            We don’t need more cafe owners in NZ – we have a tsunami of them. So immigrants have to bring more advantages than that. Just because they come from the English-speaking group of nations doesn’t mean that they can automatically be welcomed as permanent citizens here. But if they were wealthy – different.

            Then Johan on 30/7 at 5.56 am.
            To greywarshark,
            Your comment in paragraph one, is a gross generalisation, the need and success of a cafe depends on its location and how well it serves the community.
            The fact that you single out that they come from an English speaking group, indicates your inherit bias.
            (I haven’t commented on that at all, just that we have plenty of cafe owners in NZ, and need no more even if they are from USA. You apparently have decided they should be allowed to stay because they impress you.)

            You like these people and think they should live permanently in NZ and not have to go home. Others have suffered the same in the past, some Germans who were running a cafe on west coast S.I. I was sorry about that but now we are suffering from the pressure of too many immigrants
            and the line has to be drawn.

            You note there are a lot of Chinese here and that the government is using their money to prop up the country. That is the bias that the NZ government has – for people with money. And if your people had more money they could have bought their way in also.

            I don’t like anybody being able to buy their way into residency or citizenship in this country – that is my bias. This is just to explain my belief. So
            you can’t label me with some mixed-up explanation that lurks in your mind.

            And 30/7 at 6 a.m. Johan you appear to say the same. So I don’t know what you are arguing about.

  5. Cinny 5

    Slightly off topic but relevant

    Immigration government flip flop was a topic on The Nation this morning.

    Minister was invited on the show but declined.

    How on earth do we get any answers if National avoids media questions ?

    • Johan 5.1

      Immigration is something that this National gov’t avoids talking about. Our whole false economy, “A Brighter Future”, is based on how many immigrants we can get through the door, and stuff the consequences.

  6. I am sure the right will raise a number of criticisms of the notion that Moriah should be allowed to live in New Zealand permanently. But I am more than happy for this to occur and for my tax dollars to be used so that Moriah can continue to live.

    I have no problems with that family simply being made citizens. But I also think that the young daughter be allowed to die. I don’t think we’ll be doing her or anybody else a favour by keeping her alive.

    But Mr Jensen said the business plan their immigration advisor submitted when applying for their long-term business visas over-stated the cafe’s possible profit margins, and projected an unrealistic 45 percent increase in sales in the first three years.

    He said the Immigration Department would not accept revisions to the business plan once it had been accepted.

    Which is ridiculous – nobody can precisely predict how a business is going to go. This is what makes provisional tax such a bloody fuck up for businesses across NZ and is being changed from the outdated system it was.

    But it appears that strict adherence to the rules and policies is not always required. For instance if you are a billionaire American with strange ideas and a desire to buy land in the South Island as a bolt hole from the pending Trumpocalypse in the United States this Government will grant you citizenship, even if you have only spent 12 days in the past five years in the country as opposed to the normally required 1,350 days.

    And Theil should never have been given citizenship. It was obviously citizenship for cash and those involved should be charged with some bloody thing and his citizenship revoked.

    • Graeme 6.1

      “And Theil should never have been given citizenship. It was obviously citizenship for cash and those involved should be charged with some bloody thing and his citizenship revoked.”

      I wonder if granting Theil citizenship wasn’t an expedient way around a security clearance issue with the work his company was doing for our government / spooks?

      Doesn’t make it excusable, but does give it some sort of logic in a dildoian way.

      As for Mr Jensen and family, there’s a young Indian couple who bought the convenience store across the road, I’d love to see the comparison between their business plan and actual figures. The difference here is that they bought a “proven” business of a guy who had a chain of them, rather than started from scratch.

      • One Anonymous Bloke 6.1.1

        a security clearance issue

        *snap*

        A way to make it “legal” for him to breach everyone’s privacy. Time the Proceeds of Crime Act was applied a little more evenly.

  7. UncookedSelachimorpha 7

    The whole idea of the “rich immigrants are good” idea is that it is supposed to make NZ a better place for everyone.

    So tax the hell out of esteemed citizen Peter Thiel and use the money to pay for Moriah – win-win and Peter Thiel will still be filthy rich.

  8. savenz 8

    Peter Thiel has 3 citizenships apparently, born in Austria, US citizenship and now NZ. Does it seem fair some people have 3 citizenships and can’t be bothered living in the countries, other people struggle to find a safe place to live?

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jul/21/peter-thiel-republican-convention-speech

    “In a 2009 essay called The Education of a Libertarian, Thiel declared that capitalism and democracy had become incompatible. Since 1920, he argued, the creation of the welfare state and “the extension of the franchise to women” had made the American political system more responsive to more people – and therefore more hostile to capitalism. Capitalism is not “popular with the crowd”, Thiel observed, and this means that as democracy expands, the masses demand greater concessions from capitalists in the form of redistribution and regulation.

    The solution was obvious: less democracy. But in 2009, Thiel despaired of achieving this goal within the realm of politics. How could you possibly build a successful political movement for less democracy?

    Fast forward two years, when the country was still slowly digging its way out of the financial crisis. In 2011, Thiel told George Packer that the mood of emergency made him “weirdly hopeful”. The “failure of the establishment” had become too obvious to ignore, and this created an opportunity for something radically new, “something outside the establishment”, to take root.”

    Now, in 2016, Thiel has finally found a politician capable of seizing that opportunity: a disruptor-in-chief who will destroy a dying system and build a better one in its place. Trump isn’t just a flamethrower for torching a rotten establishment, however – he’s the fulfillment of Thiel’s desire to build a successful political movement for less democracy.”

    • greywarshark 8.1

      Thanks for that interesting item on Theil savenz.

      Austria is an interesting country when one considers it was Hayek’s country (the economist that was one of the precursors to the neoliberal economics), Hitler came from there, and now Thiel with strong ideas about money and democracy.

      The Austrians lost a lot of their dominance in the world, they had an empire.
      Countries hate losing their empires, and it produces a huge and disrupting change that washes over the country. Perhaps we are still being affected by fallout from the past loss of power, position and pecuniary and material goods. I didn’t know much about their past and am really surprised at how ignorant I have been of their importance and leadership in development.

      Austria-Hungary before World War I – Alpha History
      alphahistory.com/worldwar1/austria-hungary/
      Austria-Hungary before World War I was an empire, the largest political entity in mainland Europe. It spanned almost 700,000 square kilometres and occupied …

      and
      Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austria-Hungary
      Austria-Hungary was a multinational state and one of the world’s great powers at the time. Austria-Hungary was geographically the second-largest country in Europe after the Russian Empire, at 621,538 km2 (239,977 sq mi),[5] and the third-most populous (after Russia and the German Empire).

      The Empire built up the fourth-largest machine building industry of the world, after the United States, Germany, and the United Kingdom.[6] Austria-Hungary also became the world’s third largest manufacturer and exporter of electric home appliances, electric industrial appliances and power generation apparatus for power plants, after the United States and the German Empire.[7][8]

    • The Other Mike 8.2

      Great links, Savenz. Another thread in the otherwise growing cloak of evidence that Capitalism is incompatible with modern society – except as a leach which devours all and gives nothing.

  9. Bill 9

    It seems common enough to refuse residency or citizenship on health grounds. Personally, I think it’s fucking monstrous.

    But then, we ain’t ever going to have that conversation. Apparently NZ (as well as plenty of other ‘first world’ countries) can’t afford to have poor and unwell people become a part of society.

    And it’s the poor bit that’s crucial. If Moriah’s parents had comprehensive health insurance for her and her condition, then I’m picking NZ Immigration would be fairly relaxed about it all.

  10. greywarshark 10

    How can we go on supporting people who can do little for themselves from the time of babyhood with either no brain function or just enough to be aware of being unable to live life as an individual? Why are their lives more important than another person who could have a life if we just helped them get water, grow crops etc.

    Do people have to be pathetically helpless before we can feel empathy or sympathy for them?

    Moriah, 18 months old, was born with abnormal brain function and has a range of complex medical issues.
    She was in the emergency room for a whole month before she was allowed home, and suffers from disorders such as high aspiration risk, severe reduced muscle strength and a hole in her heart.

    The problem is that we do not have a decent, respectful approach to living and dying and the expectations of citizens to decide what sort of life they want for themselves and their dependants. The parents cannot afford to look after the child that will never grow up to be independent. The state cannot afford the medical help required over years. The state can’t afford now the support services to those who can live independently. How can people make a reasoned and ethical decision about who is assisted or not, and whether the medical help will result with a beneficial end to enable independence. And why can’t we have better hospice funding so that people can die and receive good nursing care aided by relatives who could resign themselves to having done the best throughout the time of that person’s most active life?

  11. Daveosaurus 11

    Micky – your points are well made but I must take issue with the way Moriah is described as an ‘immigrant’. Assuming this is accurate:

    their two children were both been born in New Zealand.” (crap grammar verbatim from the RNZ web site).

    Born. In. New. Zealand.

    There’s a hell of a lot of palagis (or whatever Tongan for ‘palagi’ is) that should be kicked out of this country before kicking out Moriah.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Big online platforms to pay fair price for local news content
    The Government will legislate to require big online digital companies such as Google and Meta to pay a fair price to New Zealand media companies for the local news content they host and share on their platforms, Minister of Broadcasting Willie Jackson announced today. The legislation will be modelled on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Government to remove entrenchment from Three Waters legislation
    The Government will fix the Water Services Entities Bill this week by removing the entrenchment clause that was voted on during committee stages, Leader of the House Chris Hipkins announced today. “It was a mistake to put the entrenchment clause in and the Government will fix the issue as soon ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 hours ago
  • 10 new whare for Ngāi Tāmanuhiri kaumātua and whānau in Te Muriwai
    Associate Minister of Housing (Māori Housing) Peeni Henare joined Ngāi Tāmanuhiri and the wider Toitū Tairāwhiti collective, at the opening of 10 new homes built for kaumātua and whānau in Muriwai today.   “Every whare that is built and whānau that is transferred from inadequate housing to a warm dry ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    23 hours ago
  • Joint statement: Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand Foreign Minister Consultations
    Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Senator the Hon Penny Wong welcomed Aotearoa New Zealand's Minister for Foreign Affairs, Hon Nanaia Mahuta to Canberra today for biannual Australia – Aotearoa New Zealand Foreign Minister Consultations. The Ministers acknowledged the unique strength of the relationship between Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand, reaffirmed the shared ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Funding boost for kaupapa Māori response to homelessness
    Associate Minister of Housing (Homelessness) Marama Davidson has announced a significant funding boost today for kaupapa Māori approaches that support whānau into housing. $24.7 million will be allocated to support the delivery of He Ara Hiki Mauri – a tangata whenua-led response to homelessness. “Homelessness is not inevitable. By working ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Appointment of Judge of the High Court
    Auckland barrister David Gary Johnstone has been appointed a judge of the High Court, Attorney‑General David Parker announced today. Justice Johnstone graduated from the University of Auckland in 1991 with a BCom/LLB(Hons), and joined Bell Gully as a solicitor, practising in general commercial litigation. During 1993 and 1994 he studied at the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • MAIHI Whare Wananga celebrates innovative approach to Maori Housing
    New Maori Housing dashboard for better data sharing and better outcomes New development training programme to grow sector capability Associate Minister of Housing (Maori Housing) Peeni Henare today attended the annual MAIHI Whare Wananga hosted by Toitu Tairawhiti Housing Limited in Kaiti.   “Our MAIHI Whare Wananga is an opportunity ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New mental health facility a step closer for Gisborne
    Health Minister Andrew Little was at Gisborne Hospital today to mark the next step of Te Tairāwhiti’s new Te Whare Awhiora mental health facility build. The Health Minister turned a sod to mark the start of groundworks at the site, in preparation for the placement of a mauri stone. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • More rural broadband for regional communities
      New contracts will improve around 30,000 broadband connections in rural homes and communities Govt on track to see 99.8% of all New Zealanders receive access to improved broadband as a result of various connectivity programmes by the end of 2023, including those targeting rural regions Applications open for one-off ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Tauranga region to benefit from new funding and financing tool
    Tauranga will be the first region to use a new Government tool to raise funding for much-needed infrastructure. A Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) will be used to raise finance from private markets, which is then repaid via the levy on those who benefit from the infrastructure. The finance raised by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New committee established to drive better public health outcomes
    Some of the country’s most difficult health issues will be tackled by a newly established public health advisory committee, whose members have now been appointed. Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall says the new Public Health Advisory Committee will investigate and help address long-term health challenges facing Aotearoa. “We ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government and sector back innovative regional and wool projects
    $2.17 million for new food and fibre ventures in Taranaki $2.24m to develop high-value, sustainable cashmere industry $233,000 to prototype an acoustic, knitted textile product from strong wool for high-end commercial and residential interiors.  $530 million co-invested with business through the Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures fund  The Government closes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Statement on the death of Sir Murray Halberg
    New Zealand has lost one our true sporting icons with the passing of Sir Murray Halberg, Grant Robertson, Minister of Sport and Recreation said today. “Sir Murray was an extraordinary athlete. His gold medal in the 5000m at the Rome Olympic Games in 1960 has been immortalised as part of New ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Ministerial talks in Canberra to progress trans-Tasman relationship
    The importance of cooperation in the Pacific to support the region’s recovery and resilience will be a focus of formal talks in Canberra tomorrow between the Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta and her Australian counterpart Penny Wong. Nanaia Mahuta will meet Senator Wong for the second formal Foreign Ministers’ Consultations following ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Iwi and Government partnership delivers more rental homes for Pāpāmoa whānau
    Associate Minister of Housing (Māori Housing) Peeni Henare attended the official opening of 10 new rental homes built for working whānau of Ngā Pōtiki ā Tamapahore in Pāpāmoa today. “The Bay of Plenty region is one of many regions facing significant housing challenges and this Government is taking action by ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government investment to support growth of Māori businesses and jobs in the primary sector
    Total exports by Māori businesses have grown by 38% since 2017 to $872 million, with the majority from the food and fibre sector Launch of Rautaki mo te Taurikura action plan to support the continued growth of Māori food and fibre sector Support for Māori agribusiness innovation and workforce development ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government to address child abuse system failings
    The Government is adopting the majority of recommendations from an independent review into the actions of government agencies leading up to the death of 5-year-old Malachi Subecz, Minister for Children Kelvin Davis announced today. Following Malachi’s murder at the hands of his caregiver in 2021, Dame Karen Poutasi was appointed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • More tools to help Police deal with fleeing drivers
    Increase the maximum driver licence disqualification period for a second offence of failing to stop or remain stopped, from 12 months to between 12 months and 24 months; Amend the Sentencing Act 2002 so that a vehicle can be forfeited on conviction for failing to stop. Offenders could have their ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Govt books solid as global situation worsens
    The Crown accounts are in a solid position thanks to the Government’s careful financial management through a deteriorating global environment. For the four months to the end of October, the Operating Balance before Gains and Losses (OBEGAL) recorded a deficit of $2.8 billion, $274 million lower than forecast at Budget ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Expanded Dental Grants Available From Today
    ·       Increased Special Needs Grants for dental treatment are available to eligible New Zealanders available from today ·       New criteria means more Dental Treatment covered ·       People can now receive more than one grant in a year (any 52-week period), up to the maximum of $1,000 ·       Recent increases to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Exports tracking towards new record high growth
    Primary industry exports to reach new record high of $55 billion in 2023 Forecasts $2.9 billion higher than in June 2022 Tracking strongly towards a 4 per cent increase in the year ending June 2023, despite global downturn New Zealand’s record food and fibre export revenue is projected to reach ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New guidance for climate action at the local level
    The Government has released new guidance to support stronger links between New Zealand’s climate change goals, and local and regional planning. From today, it has become a legal requirement for local governments to consider the Government’s National Adaptation Plan and Emissions Reduction Plan when preparing or changing regional policy statements, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • World-first bedside blood test good for people, good for health system
    A single blood test that can diagnose heart attacks in minutes instead of hours, saving the health system millions of dollars and getting patients treated faster, is being rolled out in New Zealand hospitals, says Health Minister Andrew Little. “This research, led by emergency doctors at Christchurch Hospital, is ground-breaking,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New rongoā workstream announced alongside Therapeutic Products Bill
    A new workstream has been established within government to consider how rongoā might be protected in legislation. This comes as the Therapeutic Products Bill is introduced in Parliament today, Associate Minister for Health (Māori) Hon Peeni Henare said. “Under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, the Crown has an obligation to actively ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Therapeutic Products Bill introduced
    Legislation to modernise the way medicines, medical devices and natural health products are regulated has been introduced in Parliament today. The Therapeutic Products Bill replaces the Medicines Act 1981 and Dietary Supplements Regulations 1985 with a comprehensive regulatory regime that is fit for the future. Health Minister Andrew Little said ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New Climate Action Centre to support farmers maintain international edge
    New Climate Action Centre launched to support farmers reduce ag emissions through R&D investment 50:50 joint venture between Government and agribusiness to accelerate product development First Centre projects launched to get farmers the emissions reducing tools sooner Indicative funding commitment rising to $35 million per year by Joint venture partners, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Progress on firearms register and safety authority
    The launch today of a new firearms regulator to ensure the legitimate possession and use of firearms, and an online portal to apply for licences, marks a significant step towards modernisation and improvements in gun safety, Police Minister Chris Hipkins says.     Police is moving from being an administrator of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government sets out next steps for on-farm sequestration strategy
    Government to work with primary sector on developing a sequestration strategy Government confirms today it will bring all scientifically robust forms of sequestration into the Emissions Trading Scheme, starting from 2025. This will be done at full value, rather than at a discount, so farmers can realise the true potential ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Prime Minister concludes bilateral talks with Finnish PM
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Finnish Prime Minister Sanna Marin have concluded their first in person bilateral meeting in Auckland this morning. The Prime Ministers reiterated how their respective countries shared similar values and reflected on ways to further strengthen the relationship between New Zealand and Finland. “New Zealand and Finland ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Plan to boost value & lift sustainability of NZ forestry sector
    Sector ITP to grow domestic processing and low-carbon wood products Grow the wood processing sector by 3.5 million cubic metres (25%) by 2030 Grow export earnings from value-added wood products by $600 million by 2040 Increase the use of domestic timber in construction by 25% by 2030 The Forestry and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government supports more energy-saving projects to help more Kiwis save money
    17 community energy-saving education projects share $1.7 million Builds on success of previous Government projects that have supported more than 13,000 households and 440 energy education events with more than 80,000 LEDs distributed Helping households to reduce their energy bills and make their homes warmer and more energy-efficient, is the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Govt funds new 80-bed mental health unit for Canterbury
    The Government has granted final approval for a new 80-bed acute mental health facility at the Hillmorton Hospital campus, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “This is the second stage of Hillmorton’s major infrastructure redevelopment programme and is one of the largest investments ever made in New Zealand’s mental health infrastructure ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Māori education momentum rolls on with new wharekura
    A new Year 1-13 wharekura will extend Māori Medium Education into Porirua West from 2027, Associate Education Minister Kelvin Davis announced today. “The establishment of Te Kākā Kura o Ngāti Toa Rangatira will over time provide a local option for up to 200 tamariki and rangatahi on the western side ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Easing administrative burden on farmers through new integrated farm planning projects
    37 new investments to simplify planning and reduce paperwork for farmers and growers Targeted projects for Northland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay, Manawatū-Whanganui, West Coast, Canterbury, and Otago Resources, a digital wallet and template tools to help farmers develop and integrate their farm planning. The Government is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New Commerce Commission Chair appointed
    Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Dr David Clark has today announced the appointment of Dr John Small as the new Chair of the Commerce Commission. “Dr Small has made a valuable contribution to a broad range of the Commission’s work in his roles as associate member and member, which he ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Realising housing dreams for the Kāpiti Coast
    Much needed public housing is on the way for the Kāpiti Coast thanks to the Government’s purchase of a large vacant plot of land at 59-69 Raumati Road in Raumati Beach. “This purchase will ultimately mean more families have a place to call home and demonstrates our commitment to resolving ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Decarbonisation industry milestone reached in Timaru
    A pioneering boiler conversion project is now up and ready to go, using woodchips to make potato chips, while slashing emissions. “McCain’s newly converted coal boiler will reduce CO2 emissions at its Timaru factory by 95% and is an excellent example of the great climate gains we can achieve through ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Fiftieth Anniversary of Diplomatic Relations With China
    Chinese Embassy Reception Te Papa, Wellington   Tēnā koutou katoa, Da jia hao Let me first acknowledge Ambassador Wang Xiaolong, thank you for the invitation this evening, it is a pleasure to be here. I would also like to acknowledge current and former Parliamentary colleagues, as well as members of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Govt keeps AM on the air in Northland
    Minister of Broadcasting and Media Willie Jackson and Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty today announced a $1.48 million package to fund the repair and replacement of three transmission masts in Northland to ensure AM radio can stay on air in the region. “This funding will secure the reinstatement of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Multi million dollar package to tackle retail crime and reoffending
    A multi million dollar package to tackle retail crime and reoffending is the most significant crime prevention financial package in recent memory  New fog cannon subsidy scheme set up. Government to provide $4000 for all small shops and dairies in New Zealand who want a fog cannon installed, with shops ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago