web analytics

Andrew Little: Middle New Zealand needs answers from English

Written By: - Date published: 12:48 pm, December 13th, 2016 - 205 comments
Categories: Andrew Little, bill english, john key, labour, national - Tags:

Text of an opinion piece that appeared today in Stuff.

Over Christmas, Bill English needs to come up with a plan to tackle the real issues facing middle New Zealand.

John Key’s promises – to lift up the underclass, to fix the housing crisis, to close the wage gap with Australia – have gone unfulfilled.

Will Bill English be any different? Key papered over problems – will English fix them?

When I asked him last week if he accepts his responsibility for the effects his decision have on real New Zealanders, he said no every time.

He doesn’t accept that there is a housing crisis, that the home-ownership rate has fallen to its lowest level in 65 years, that a third of the population faces average house prices of a million dollars, and 41,000 New Zealanders are homeless.

I met a real estate agent in Auckland recently who worries that his young adult son and daughter will never be able to afford a home. And he should know, he’s in the business.

The Kiwi dream is fast fading for thousands of New Zealanders.

Bill English doesn’t accept that there’s a link between him ripping half a billion dollars in so-called profit out of Housing New Zealand, and the fact state houses are so poorly maintained that the cold and the mould is making kids get sick and even die.

I’m sceptical that there will be a real difference because both the new prime minister and the new deputy prime minister have had housing portfolios for the past few years and housing issues have got worse.

Other cost-cutting has had equally devastating consequences. A 96 year old losing her homecare because the local hospital says they can’t afford it any longer, cancer patients not getting the latest medicines because Pharmac funding has been frozen, and now police numbers frozen for four years at a time of a rising population and crime.

The buck ultimately stops with the man who held the purse strings. Bill English has shown no inclination to face these problems and fix them.

No one ever opposed spending taxpayer funds sensibly and for best value, but that can’t be all a government does.

Savings today do not generate wealth tomorrow. And it’s the wealth-creation activity that’s been missing in action with this Government. Without it, we can’t lift wages and standards of living.

So where are the incentives for productive economic activity that generates jobs with good incomes? Where’s the encouragement for small business to expand? Where’s the support to enable business to take up new technology and invest in training staff in new skills?

New Zealand has problems so let’s get on and fix them. Let’s not say “it can’t be done” or “it’s too hard”. Labour’s got the positive plan to do it.

Labour will restore the Kiwi dream because we believe ensuring people have a place of their own, a decent place to live, is a first duty of government. We’ll build affordable houses for first-home buyers, ban foreign speculators who use our homes as gambling chips, and require all rentals to be warm, dry, and healthy to live in.

We have pledged to reverse National’s health cuts and plough extra funding into the care that Kiwis need, like homecare, GP visits, and the latest medicines.

We have said that education is key to opportunity and, so, we said that everyone should get three years of free tertiary education, and the government should subsidise apprenticeships.

We have committed to making our communities safer by undoing National’s cuts to police and putting a thousand more cops on the beat.

We have announced that Labour won’t leave young people to rot on the dole, like the current Government. We’ll employ them to do valuable work to improve the environment and their community, and build their skills while they’re doing it.

We’ll invest in regional infrastructure through our regional development fund, and build the projects that will get our cities moving – like light rail for Auckland.

To keep work and profits in New Zealand, we’ll make sure the government buys Kiwi-made whenever possible.

We can foster innovation and growth through research and development tax credits and tax incentives for new plant and equipment. We can give our people the opportunity to be the best they can be.

That’s Labour’s positive plan for the future. Let’s see if Bill English has one.

205 comments on “Andrew Little: Middle New Zealand needs answers from English”

  1. Grant 1

    Seems like the Media has an ongoing love affair with anything to do with the National Party. About time they got a divorce and played some reality TV? Let’s see how many grab this and run with it?

  2. Puckish Rogue 2

    “I met a real estate agent in Auckland recently who worries that his young adult son and daughter will never be able to afford a home. And he should know, he’s in the business.”

    “Last year before the election, I was chatting to a guy in my electorate who had just got home from work. In the middle of the conversation, he stopped and pointed across the road to his neighbour.”

    He said: “see that guy over there, he’s on a sickness benefit, yet he’s up there painting the roof of his house. That’s not bloody fair. Do you guys support him?”

    History repeating itself? 🙂

    • framu 2.1

      well, at least he didnt joke about tuhoe eating him 🙂

    • Karen 2.2

      PR – you really think the anti-beneficiary statement by Shearer is in any way comparable to what Little says about buying a home? I note you haven’t attributed Shearer’s statement so I am assuming you are being deliberately misleading and hoping readers think Little said this.

      Do you not think it is a problem that so many people feel they will never be able to buy their own home? Bet you own your own house.

      • Anne 2.2.1

        And for the record, lets be reminded of the identity of the adviser who ‘encouraged’ Shearer to run with that story. Yes, John Pagani.

        It was a good example of David Shearer’s lack of political experience at the time. In my view, Shearer’s downfall was caused by his former caucus backers catapulting him into the leadership before he was ready. Instead – and with the help of sections of the MSM – the party members and affiliates were blamed. It was patently stupid since they had no say in Labour leadership selections. In fact it was a result of the caucus debacle that members and affiliates went on to demand some say in future selections.

        Matthew Hooten is still spreading the false meme… it was the fault of the membership and those dastardly unions to this day.

        • Anne 2.2.1.1

          And Hooten isn’t the only one. I saw an article by Simon Wilson (of Metro fame) expressing the same meme just after Shearer’s imminent departure was announced last week. I’m on record here praising a couple of his recent epistles too. Might think twice about doing it in the future.

    • Cinny 2.3

      Hiyas PR… Depends what the person was on the sickness benefit for. His body could be fine, his mental health could have been the issue, not all sicknesses are visable or physically disabling.

      But hey someone had already labelled him, maybe if he was sitting on the couch all day playing video games rather than painting the roof it would have suited their pigeon holing more.

      So judgemental is the person whom you talked to PR and it’s a shame that beneficiary bashing is still alive and kicking.

      Will be a great day when the public are more aware of corporate tax crimes, maybe next time you could point that out to him PR. Educate him please… or would you rather keep him dumb and let him fester about his neighbour rather than thinking about the bigger picture.

      I wonder if the man offered to help him with painting the roof? Maybe he would have made a new friend and found out more as to why he is on the sickness benefit painting the roof and solved the hang up that he had with his neighbour.

      Try another analogy, this one has too many holes in it. Alphas does not however. JS

      • Chris 2.3.1

        Or his body could be stuffed but he gets up to paint the roof anyway because he can’t afford to pay anyone and nobody else is going to do it, running the risk of stuffing his body even more.

        The problem with the neo-liberal view to welfare is that “helping those most in need” is the line they require to make themselves appear human, but heaven help you if there’s even the slightest suggestion that the poor can experience even the tiniest smidgen of a normal life.

    • Sigh 2.4

      What on earth are you about? There’s no comparison whatsoever.

    • eek-a-mouse 2.5

      Speech should be tailored for the audience. This is his pitch to ‘middle New Zealand’ and like it or not ‘middle New Zealand’ includes real estate agents, and families that own one or more investment properties.

      As an anecdote – speaking to someone who has hands-on experience (ie, not an academic) in the field and relaying their hard-won wisdom – it works, and unlike the Bludger On The Roof story doesn’t directly throw anyone under the bus.

  3. Gosman 3

    So he’s discovered Middle NZ now has he? I thought he had some difficulty believing it existed. Or was that the center?

  4. Bob 4

    Why is it that Andrew Little can’t get through a speech without lying?
    Is the Government really doing that well that he doesn’t have enough material to fill a speech with the required amount of negativity?
    “cancer patients not getting the latest medicines because Pharmac funding has been frozen”
    https://www.pharmac.govt.nz/news/media-2016-06-09-funding-announcements/

  5. Sorrwerdna 5

    Show me the money Andy

  6. Observer (Tokoroa) 6

    .Grossly unfair
    .
    .I think it is very wrong of Andrew Little to tell National and their supporters that there is a Housing Crisis. Who in Gods name does he think he is. Why can’t he be more like comfy National people?

    John Key and Paula Bennett recently went out of their way to explain to New Zealanders there is very adequate housing in New Zealand. Billy English found such an excess of houses in Auckland that he proceeded to get energetic and sold them off to his friends here and overseas.

    Paula drove the point home by charging many homeless families hundred of dollars per week to be in slummy run down motels. She sent them a bill that would take a lifetime to pay off. Billy English smiled upon her warmly, for making so much additional money. Which he can give to his friends the land owners.

    I think it is time that Andrew Little realised that the monied people of New Zealand don’t want too many houses. Because in the Governments view the great majority of kiwis are layabout scum – and deserve nothing.

    I am not making a word of this up. The English man and the Bennett woman are avid promoters of inequality; degradation and Dickensian cruelty.

    Vote National – Vote Poverty and Cruelty

  7. Carolyn_nth 7

    He lost me at “Middle New Zealand”

      • Carolyn_nth 7.1.1

        1, What on earth is Middle New Zealand? (is it like Middle Earth?).
        2. It’s not something I can identify with – pretty sure it doesn’t include me, renters, or anyone a little deviant.
        3. It just seems like another way of aiming for the “centre”
        4. I would’ve thought a Labour Party would be focusing a lot on those struggling the most in our very unequal society.

        • Leftie 7.1.1.1

          “I would’ve thought a Labour Party would be focusing a lot on those struggling the most in our very unequal society.:

          Labour are.

          Share of growth for middle NZ plunges to new lows

          “The share of the economy going to middle New Zealand is set to drop to new lows, with working families missing out on $100 a week by 2020, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little. ”

          “According to Treasury figures middle New Zealand will receive just 36 per cent of the proceeds of growth by 2020, compared to 51 per cent under the last Labour Government. That’s $100 a week that families are worse off.”

          “New statistics this week revealed growing inequality in New Zealand, with the top 10% now owning almost 60% of our national wealth. This will only get worse as middle New Zealand’s share of the economy continues to shrink under National. ”

          “This is not the New Zealand we want. The only way to turn it around is to change the government,” says Andrew Little.”
          <a href="http://www.labour.org.nz/share_of_growth_for_middle_nz_plunges_to_new_lows

          • Carolyn_nth 7.1.1.1.1

            Well, according to the stats Bernard Hickey has been quoting, it’s renters particularly who have been going backwards under the Nats’ watch.

            Little above in his article focus on the “kiwi dream” of home ownership. To me too much focus is put on pushing people towards home ownership.

            We renters, then, just become an after thought.

            • Chris 7.1.1.1.1.1

              A guess would be that Little would say part of the answer is increased home ownership brings rents down but yes, Labour hasn’t focused properly on the incomes of the poorest NZers for the last eight elections. What’s worse is that there’s not a jot of evidence anything’s going to change this time, either. It’s a no-go zone. “Shhh, don’t mention the war… (on the poor).”

              • Leftie

                You would say that Chris Nat fan troll, that never, ever holds National, (that has been the government for 8 years), to account.

              • Leftie

                You would say that Chris Nat fan troll, that never, ever holds National, (that has been the government for 8 years), to account

            • Leftie 7.1.1.1.1.2

              Carolyn_nth. We renters are not an after thought, becasue Labour and the opposition parties have been talking about that too.

            • Leftie 7.1.1.1.1.3

              Hope this one posts. Carolyn_nth. You were querying “Middle New Zealand.” Didn’t realize that i had to cover everything. We renters do not even register on the National government mind, and we are not an after thought where the opposition are concerned, as Labour and the opposition parties have been talking about that too.

              • Carolyn_nth

                Yes. I’m a leftie, too.

                But the real need is for representation of the struggling classes. Focusing on “the middle” is a managerialist thing, that has been part of neoliberal times.

                Once Labour was for working people – especially the ones struggling the most. None of th=is mythical “middle” waffle.

                • Leftie

                  Did I question your leftiness? Labour is getting back to it’s roots, and Labour and the opposition’s focus is not exclusive, it’s on everyone.

                • Chris

                  Don’t be fooled by Loftie’s name, Carolyn. He’s no more a leftie than John Key’s centrist. He’s a shill for the Labour Party, a Labour-can-do-no-wronger. Show the slightest bit of criticism of his beloved party and he’s pounding the keyboard. Not sure if he’s paid to do it, but if he’s not there’s certainly a strong connection between our son Loftie and the Labour Party that means he’ll tolerate nothing but uncritical adoration for Little and his neo-liberal mainstreamers. Put simply, Loftie is a dangerously unthinking supporter of the status quo. And that’s pretty fucking dangerous.

                  • Leftie

                    OOPS careful there Chris, you just dropped your facade, your blue colours are showing. I don’t think there are many people that are fooled about you, pretender, now that’s you being dangerous, so that’s rich coming from a Nat fan troll like yourself. You are trolling and by getting personally abusive like that, shows you don’t have an argument.

                • Chris

                  Forgot to mention, too, that if you show criticism of Labour Loftie labels you a National Party supporter. That’s about as far as his logic goes. Quite humourous, but more dangerous than anything, especially if his views are representative of most Labour supporters. Everything that’s wrong with the so-called left in New Zealand.

                  • Leftie

                    But you didn’t criticize Labour, you were too busy criticizing and abusing me for having an opinion. Thanks for proving my point about you.

                • Chris

                  Spot on, Carolyn.

            • One Anonymous Bloke 7.1.1.1.1.4

              How so? Increased home ownership implies that renters have the ability to save more and a realistic chance of amassing the deposit for a house.

              They don’t have to spend the extra cash on that if they don’t want to.

        • Sigh 7.1.1.2

          It’s actually how most New Zealanders – and most voters – see themselves. The vast majority of people self-identify as ‘middle’ and it makes political sense to reach out to those voters if you want to win an election.

          • Carolyn_nth 7.1.1.2.1

            What evidence shows that? Myself, I just don’t see myself as “middle” anything.

            • Leftie 7.1.1.2.1.1

              Others might thought Carolyn_nth

              • Carolyn_nth

                It’s a circular thing. The more media and (left) politicians focus on “the middle” the less options people have to identify with.

                Once many people stood up and talked strongly about being working class.

                Now lots of people have given up voting because they don’t feel represented, or that their struggles are being taken seriously enough.

                • Leftie

                  I do not see left politicians focusing solely on the middle though.

                • Chris

                  Precisely. Labour keeps talking about “working NZers”. They fail to acknowledge that the middle is quickly being filled by people that aren’t in regular full-time employment. That’s why Labour isn’t resonating with what’s now become “middle NZ”, whatever the fuck that’s ever meant. The 40 hour week and everything that comes with that, ain’t the norm no longer. The sooner that Labour, and the unions, realise that the better. That’s not going to change for a long time, though. Union people feel too cushy in their nicely paid office jobs, feeling self-righteous about their “values”. Don’t get me wrong, unions do a great job and represent people who’re being screwed over. But if they really wanted to make a difference they’d be upending their traditional structures by joining wholly with the beneficiary and unemployed “workers” to represent the ever increasing precariat, not just paid up employed people. The whole union model has become outdated. Some kind of UBI may well be the preferred answer, but regardless the left lobby needs to get with the times and start properly representing the whole *group* that’s being fucked over, not just the employed *signed up members*. Almost all of the change that’s going on, particularly because of technology, the unions can’t control. We might be able to influence who benefits from technological change, but even that’ll be difficult. The left needs to concentrate on what it can influence, and that’s how we structure the means by which those on the lowest incomes feed their families. Fundamental change is required. Nothing less will suffice. Unions take up a large part of the left lobby. For this reason they have a responsibility to change to ensure all workers, employed or unemployed, get a fair go. If unions keep hogging a particular territory within the left then the precariat’s just going to get bigger and bigger. The union movement needs to ask itself whether this is what it wants.

          • Leftie 7.1.1.2.2

            Well said Sigh.

          • Leftie 7.1.1.2.3

            +1 Sigh. Well said.

  8. wellfedweta 8

    The real issues facing middle NZ are:

    1. The lowest interest rates in, well, a very long time.
    2. The lowest inflation rate in, well, a very long time.
    3. Record number of jobs.
    4. The first increase in real benefits in over 40 years.
    5. Improving housing affordability.
    6. An expanding economy.
    7. Low debt to GDP.
    8. Increasing real wages, after a period before 2008 of declining real wages.

    And Andrew Little wants to change things?

    • Paul 8.1

      It’s paradise, eh?
      Just like Paul Henry and Mike Hosking tell me.

      Just ignore this

      • Paul 8.1.1

        And this.

      • wellfedweta 8.1.2

        I didn’t say it was paradise. But I’m happy to hear you’re ideas about how we address the issues you raise, rather than have you take up space with video clip sound bites.

        • Paul 8.1.2.1

          Step #1. Acknowledging that the level of inequality and poverty in New Zealand is a major issue.
          You suffer from a sickness, caused by neo-liberalism.

          The first step is always going to be admitting that there is a problem.

          • wellfedweta 8.1.2.1.1

            So you have no ideas at all of how to resolve the issue?

            • Paul 8.1.2.1.1.1

              Well I have passed Step 1.
              Have you?
              There is little point discussing steps 2 onwards if you cannot acknowledge the issue.

              • wellfedweta

                So you have no ideas then. Cleared that up.

                • Cinny

                  I think the first step in change is becoming aware of your own bullshit.

                  Has poverty, inequality, homelessness, suffering increased in the last eight years? Why yes, yes it has. Do you need some solutions for poverty? Well let me take the work out of it for you, happy to help you WellFed

                  “Labour will work with any party that is committed to ending child poverty. We’ve got the ball rolling with a member’s bill that locks into law child poverty measures and a management plan, and I have personally committed to ending child poverty.

                  “Labour’s plan starts with good well-paying jobs, affordable housing, and properly-funded core public services like health and education so that every kid gets the best start in life,”

                  http://www.labour.org.nz/labour_committed_to_eliminating_child_poverty

                  The Green Party’s billion dollar plan to reduce child poverty includes:

                  Creating a new top tax rate of 40 percent above $140,000, harmonise the trust tax rate with the top income tax rate, and introduce measures to make it harder for people to avoid paying their fair share of tax, generating close to $1 billion a year;

                  Investing that revenue to fund:

                  A new Children’s Credit that will give an extra $60 a week to families currently missing out, at a cost of $400 million a year;
                  A non-discriminatory Parental Tax Credit of $220 a week in the first weeks of life for the poorest children, costing $29.4 million a year;
                  A $500 million per year investment in children’s health and education to reduce the harm caused by poverty.

                  https://www.greens.org.nz/policy/fairer-society/reducing-child-poverty

                  And finally the UBI

                  • wellfedweta

                    So, again, not a single original idea.

                    “Labour’s plan starts with good well-paying jobs, affordable housing, and properly-funded core public services like health and education so that every kid gets the best start in life,”

                    These are policies, they are platitudes. How is Labour going to provide ‘well paying jobs’ to people who are uneducated? We already fund core health and education services. Under 13’s receive free health care.

                    Now the Greens – that at least is a policy. It is free of platitudes, and is specific enough to analyse. My only concern is that I doubt very much an increase in the tax rate to 40% would raise anywhere near 1bn. But I give them an A+ for effort.

                    • Cinny

                      What is an original idea to you WFW? One that no one in the history of civilisation has ever come up with before?

                      What ideas do you have WFW?

                    • wellfedweta

                      “What is an original idea to you WFW? ”

                      An original idea is not a platitude, it is a policy. The Labour quote was nothing but a wish list. The Green quote was a policy.

                      An original idea is something you or another author suggests. The writers of reports such as that quoted don;t have to pay the nations bills. They can suggest spending billions of dollars without consequence or accountability.

                    • Leftie

                      What single original idea has the National government got, wellfedweta?

                    • WFW is an expert at shifting the debate and I’m not yet decided if he’s here for serious discussion or just trolling. I would suggest you don’t let him shift away the burden of proof by conceding to debate points like “your ideas have to be original, but mine don’t.”

                    • wellfedweta

                      “What single original idea has the National government got, wellfedweta?”

                      Actually, a lot. I’ll leave it to you tot read this http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/opinion/87485762/editorial-how-the-numbercrunchers-could-hold-the-key-to-our-biggest-social-ills

                    • Leftie

                      In other words, nothing.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “In other words, nothing.”

                      In other words, you didn’t even read the editorial, did you?

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      “A lot”

                      Translation: one idea: to apply predictive risk modelling to citizens.

                      Might be a good idea if the National Party didn’t use it as another excuse to practise post-natal eugenics. Oops.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “Translation: one idea: to apply predictive risk modelling to citizens.”

                      And your reference point is an opinion piece from Nanaia Mahuta? You are clearly detached from any kind of reality of what is going on.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      You need to do more homework.

                  • Paul

                    Cinny
                    Wasting your breath
                    WFW is a virulent troll.

                  • Leftie

                    +1 Cinny.

                    • Cinny

                      Thanks you fellas, dang WFW is busy all over the place, his little fingers must be on fire.

                      Nat’s must be in trouble if the trollo’s are busy beavers.

                      WFW keeps changing his mind, want’s an idea, so one supplies an idea, not good enough, he needs policy and then dictates his rules as to where ones information needs to come from, and the author of any ideas appears to be an important element in WFW requests.

                      Toooo funny, sounds to me like WFW is a BiBi wanna be, needs to control the information, doesn’t he? Lol lolz. Nite x

                  • Carolyn_nth

                    “Labour will work with any party that is committed to ending child poverty. We’ve got the ball rolling with a member’s bill that locks into law child poverty measures and a management plan, and I have personally committed to ending child poverty.

                    “Labour’s plan starts with good well-paying jobs, affordable housing, and properly-funded core public services like health and education so that every kid gets the best start in life,”

                    Now these are very good policies to be talking about – in newspaper columns. MSM, etc.

                    Plus GP anti-child poverty policies.

                    Plus, should also be talking about youth and adult poverty

                • Andrea

                  wellfedweta:
                  You say ” The lowest interest rates in, well, a very long time.” as if that’s somehow a ‘good’.

                  It’s not.

                  Not everyone wants to borrow. Only a few in all the population. So why do we keep enabling this subset of the population at the expense of accumulating capital to pay for future pensions? Or rewarding those who have saved with a fair return on their frugality?

                  In your first post you make a number of claims: low interest rates, low inflation, jobs, etc. Like chucking confetti out the car window to keep the elephants away…

                  If it is all so splendid – have we reached full employment for anyone of any age who wants paid work? If not – why not? We had it once, and for quite a while, too.

                  You did not mention our decrepit infrastructure and our aspirations as a tourism destination. Which was wise of you. Vanishing camping grounds, the most appalling loos in the First World and too few of them, rip-off prices, a ‘tax-em-all’ mentality, a dearth of multi-lingual speakers… So much for having the Prime Minister as Minister of Tourism. Too much time in the Koru Lounge.

                  So – instead of glibly flinging out small factoids to cover large gaps, and demanding that a commentator has answers to issues that our over-paid, under-trained political ‘representatives’ and public minions have failed to even part-way do anything other than the same old – you pause. You reflect. You offer your notions for consideration – without the foam of an irate spit bug at the end, eh?

                  • tracey

                    Lowest interest rates in along time? Sounds like a good time to borrow for investment. In say, kiwisaver. Buy when the market is low (post 2007) and you can ride out the highs and lows. But not this government, with its whizz-bang currency trader in charge. they broke the number one rule in that regard.

                    Oh and they broke the rule about tax cuts to the top end in a recession because it promotes saving and debt reduction (ie money out of the economy).

                  • wellfedweta

                    I will try to help you understand.

                    Low interest rates are good because they encourage businesses to invest.

                    Low interest rates are good because they make mortgages less of a burden on borrowers.

                    Low interest rates are good because they encourage investors into productive investment.

                    Low interest rates are good because they encourage spending and investment which in turn leads to economic growth.

                    That is probably as much as you absorb.

                    Finally your rant about the tourist infrastructure in NZ is utter bs. I travel frequently, and NZ is up with the very best.

                    • Leftie

                      Despite the “low interest” rates most kiwis still can’t afford to buy a house, and those who have over committed themselves with massive mortgages are living on a knife edge.

                      The fact is, low interest rates are not a sign of a good, strong economy, it is the opposite. Interest rates are being kept low in response to the tanking dairy industry, that National in it’s ideological madness has largely sold off to NZ’s main competitor, China.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “most kiwis still can’t afford to buy a house,”

                      Rubbish!

                      “The fact is, low interest rates are not a sign of a good, strong economy, it is the opposite.”

                      Oh dear. Low interest rates are a sign of sound government spending, government borrowing that is well managed, and low internal cost pressure. At present we have low ir’s, low inflation and solid growth. That is the ideal combination.

            • Chris 8.1.2.1.1.2

              You said there were no issues: “The real issues facing middle NZ are” followed by whole bunch things you say means everything’s fine. Now you’re asking “how to resolve the issue”? FFS.

              • wellfedweta

                Where did I say there were ‘no issues’?

                • Chris

                  “The real issues facing middle NZ are…” That was certainly the inference. If you didn’t say there were no issues then please enlighten us on what those issues are. Bear in mind, though, you’ve already said that what ever you think those issues are, they’re not real.

                  • wellfedweta

                    You inferred something and then claimed I said it. That is naughty. Don’t do it again.

                    Andrew Little used the phrase ‘real issues’. He then went on the list three issues, including what he termed a housing ‘crisis’.

                    He cited the following:

                    “that the home-ownership rate has fallen to its lowest level in 65 years, that a third of the population faces average house prices of a million dollars, and 41,000 New Zealanders are homeless.”

                    This is why Andrew Little is a failure, because he constantly misleads.

                    1. Home ownership across the planet is declining, and has been for decades.
                    2. One third of NZ’s population does not face average house prices of $1m. There is no need to pay the average house price anywhere. Sound housing is available in suburban Auckland for well under $1m.
                    3. 41,000 NZ’ers are not home less. The correct figure is around 10% of that. This is too may, but lying about the number doesn’t help.

                    • Chris

                      Thanks. You’ve finally said what three of the many real issues facing NZers are. Well done.

                    • tracey

                      “This is why Andrew Little is a failure, because he constantly misleads.”

                      And yet John Key succeeded for 8 years because he misleads. Funny old world.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “And yet John Key succeeded for 8 years because he misleads. Funny old world.”

                      In case you’re just waking up, all politicians mislead. You can tell when they’re doing it…their lips are moving. Some just also happen to do a reasonable job of other endeavours. Little failed with Pike River. He has done nothing but work in the union beltway.

                    • Leftie

                      And John key has done nothing but work in a derivatives trading bubble, and has failed in governing this country, no wonder he bailed out and did a runner.

                      John key failed Pike River, he lied to the families of those miners, and all he has been interested in, prior to doing a runner, was to cover it up.

                      Posting Whaleoil BS doesn’t help you.

                    • Wellfedweta

                      What was the lie? Post the actual text and source.

          • Leftie 8.1.2.1.2

            +1 on all of your comments Paul.

        • Johan 8.1.2.2

          You poor thing, having to sit through some reality.

    • wellfed, I wonder if you could clarify something for me? You have made a list (above) of what you call “The real issues facing middle NZ…” – I wonder if you’d mind explaining what “real issues” means to you, as my interpretation is that those would be “genuine problems” or “difficult challenges” we New Zealanders are facing. Your list seems to be of something else, making your claim seem entirely wrong. In any case, how are we “facing” those situations you’ve listed? Your message seems confused (I didn’t want to say “nonsensical” but it asks to be said, eh!)

      • wellfedweta 8.2.1

        My post was a play of Andrew Little’s words. His ‘real issues’ are, mostly, the fabrication of a desperate and failed politician.

        We live in a country that is lauded internationally as an example of sound economic management. We are ranked highly for our honesty, our transparency and our business environment. My belief is that fundamentally a mixed market system, with rewards shared by those who contribute to the national health, is the best system for NZ. Recent history proves that to be correct.

        • Robert Guyton 8.2.1.1

          Your use of slights and slurs when describing Andrew Little serve to mark you as a troll, wellfed, and I’m not sure why you persist in using them. I have to assume you get some sort of pleasure from causing people here discomfort by speaking that way about someone they/we back; a sort of “pull the wings off a fly” thing you have going. It does your argument no good at all and forces you into the position of berating all and sundry and convincing none of them. Your argument around poverty is weak as has been pointed out to you repeatedly, but you box on, knowing that you are causing frustration, pointless frustration of the sort that somehow pleasures you. The issue and public perception of poverty will be influenced by those with the most convincing approach and yours is patently unconvincing, as is that of the Government. As I said, Bill, Bennett et al. sound shrill on the issue and the majority of New Zealanders are not buying their mealy-mouthed excuses on the poverty issue, just as we’re not interested in yours here. It’s a matter of will and yours is lacking, in most part due to the lack of substance to your argument and to the actual situation tht you re so transparently misrepresenting. By all means keep on with your efforts but they are wasted here.

          • wellfedweta 8.2.1.1.1

            Well you’re wrong on several counts. The current government is the most popular in recent history, despite your claims about people needing convincing. And my comments about Little are nothing compared to the irrational rantings I have read from several posters here about John Key.

            Andrew Little is a failure. He has failed at every electoral contest he has entered. His work experience is seriously limited. He’s never run a business, employed someone, had to meet a payroll…

            • Johan 8.2.1.1.1.1

              To: wellfedweta
              Much of your description of Andrew Little would apply to three-term prime minister Helen Clark as well.

              • wellfedweta

                Yes. Although I’m not aware that Clark was ever dishonest or flip-flopped.

                • Johan

                  Where is your evidence, or is this one of your misinformation bit?

                • Leftie

                  wellfedweta. So you do admit that John key “His work experience is seriously limited. He’s never run a business, employed someone, had to meet a payroll…”

                  I doubt there was ever a more dishonest and flip flopper PM like John key. key has to be the most dishonest, lying, dirtiest politician this country has ever had.

                  • wellfedweta

                    John Key HAS run a business. He HAS employed people. He is NZ’s most popular PM ever. Do you seriously not do any research of you’re own?

            • Leftie 8.2.1.1.1.2

              wellfedweta. This comment and the others you have posted above are a load of rubbish. Pure spin.

              John key was an employee, he never ran a business, employed someone, had to meet a payroll… so your point is what exactly?
              John key is proof that a derivatives trader is the last person that should ever be allowed to be a PM. What a failure he and his government are, and that includes the old tired replacement leaders, after John Key shafted his own government and bailed out.

              • wellfedweta

                John Key managed vast sums of other peoples money. He did run a business (you need to do some research). And he has done a very good job running this country. The facts simply bely your negativity towards NZ.

                • Leftie

                  wellfedweta. Duh, that’s what currency traders do, they always gamble other people’s money, never their own, and you need to stop making up stories. John key was still an employee.
                  The facts say you are in denial and cannot tell fact from fiction. John key has done a thorough job of ruining this country.

                  • wellfedweta

                    John Key ran an international team of traders. He was head of Merril Lynch’s global foreign exchange team. He earned a small fortune, while Andrew Little was earning good money and amassing pretty much nothing.

                    There’s more, but that’s already far more than Andrew Little has ever achieved.

                    Andrew Little is a sincere man, with a strong sense of where he stands. I admire that. But PM material he is not.

                    • Leftie

                      And John key was still an EMPLOYEE and the mess he has left the country in shows Key is not PM material, no wonder he did a runner.

                    • Leftie

                      wellfedweta. And John key was still an EMPLOYEE and the mess he has left the country in shows Key is not PM material, no wonder he did a runner.

                    • Wellfedweta

                      Key inherited a mess, and has turned it around.

                      He inherited a large deficit and a further decade of deficits. He inherited a huge increase in spending with poor outcomes, particularly in health. He inherited an economy with high interest rates and inflation, and declining growth. Don’t take my word for it. The international community is lauding Key’s leadership. It’s sad a few grumbles don’t see this, but given his incredible popularity, most have.

            • tracey 8.2.1.1.1.3

              “He’s never run a business, employed someone, had to meet a payroll…”

              Neither has John Key. Parachuted into a VERY safe seat in Hobsonville does not a hard fought contest make.

              Lots of people have been popular but damaging or ineffective. Is that really one of your measures, how much people liked John Key? That seems quite superficial and fandomesque.

            • ropata 8.2.1.1.1.4

              weta can’t argue on substantive issues or policy so he reverts to smear tactics. A sad case of RRDS (rightie reality denial syndrome)

        • tracey 8.2.1.2

          “with rewards shared by those who contribute to the national health, is the best system for NZ. Recent history proves that to be correct.”

          How can you compare us to what hasn’t been done? What do you consider to be the number one most important thing that society delivers to, well, society?

          • wellfedweta 8.2.1.2.1

            “How can you compare us to what hasn’t been done?”

            I can compare today with the past.

            “What do you consider to be the number one most important thing that society delivers to, well, society?”

            Liberty. Prosperity. Safety. They are the most important things.

            • One Anonymous Bloke 8.2.1.2.1.1

              1. Liberty: as the NZ Law Society warned the UN in 2014, the National Party has attacked human rights and the rule of law.
              2. Prosperity. See child poverty.
              3. Safety. Rheumatic fever and car-based housing. Wormfarms.

              You pay lip service, then vote for the opposite. What a poxy hypocrite.

              • wellfedweta

                1. No, they haven’t. You may have swallowed all that, but you are but a few.
                2. We are a far more prosperous nation today than 8 years ago.
                3. We are a safer nation than 8 years ago. We have reduced the incidence of RF (thanks for that one!).

                • One Anonymous Bloke

                  1. The Law Society is a credible organisation, and you are whining and denying on a blog.
                  2. Public and private debt levels.
                  3. Wormfarms, car-based housing, violent crime.
                  4. You need to do more homework, you poxy lying hypocrite.

                  • wellfedweta

                    1. Post your evidence that NZ is a less free country today. Not warnings. Actual evidence. (I have noted your tendency to use out of date or speculative references and articles. I caught you out on it yesterday. I won’t let you get away with it.)

                    2. Debt levels tell only one side of a story. Government debt has grown because of the GFC (and I guess you would not have been happy if the government had not kept social spending going eh), private debt is often spent on investment. Once again you are being dishonest. GDP is up. That means we are more prosperous.

                    3. You don’t have a leg to stand on. http://www.health.govt.nz/about-ministry/what-we-do/strategic-direction/better-public-services/progress-better-public-services-rheumatic-fever-target. I am catching you out in your lies everyday, it seems.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      You need to do more homework.

                      Per capita GDP. What does that look like, you poxy lying hypocrite.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “Per capita GDP.”

                      Rising, despite a rising population. Pretty damn good. Even Grants hunt for bad news came up like a cup of hot sick.

                • McFlock

                  We have reduced the incidence of RF (thanks for that one!).

                  No we haven’t. It’s been unchanged within 95% confidence for the last 15 years. And the most deprived quintile of kids is 35 times more likely to get it than the least deprived. It’s a disgrace.

                    • McFlock

                      That’s first episode admissions (i.e. new cases), with no trend analyses or error margins. It also seems to work on total age population rate for a condition that is overwhelmingly child-targeting.

                      The actual burden of care is about 5 times higher than that for primary-cause admissions in kids, and has been static for 15 years.

                      But the ministry targets look pretty, I grant you…

                    • wellfedweta

                      “That’s first episode admissions (i.e. new cases), with no trend analyses or error margins.”
                      Yes, because that is the target being assessed.

                      “It also seems to work on total age population rate for a condition that is overwhelmingly child-targeting.”
                      RF appears in all age groups. It is most common between the ages of 5 and 15, and so any measure will reflect that.

                      “There has been a 14 percent decrease in first episode rheumatic fever hospitalisations since the Better Public Service rheumatic fever target was introduced in 2012. Between 2013 and 2014, which is where the latest drop has been recorded, first episode rheumatic fever hospitalisation numbers declined from 194 cases to 153.” http://www.hpa.org.nz/what-we-do/rheumatic-fever/2015-rheumatic-fever-awareness-campaign

                      The trend is down. It is interesting that would bring cause for complaint.

                    • McFlock

                      Yes, that is the target being assessed. It is not the sum total of rheumatic fever in NZ, which was the topic of conversation.

                      14% reduction in first case number appears good. But out of what population? And what’s the annual margin for error? Has that number been affected by a demographic bubble? Was there a testing bias when the target was introduced, which resulted in a move towards earlier detection and the figures didn’t really change at all?

                      How the hell do you assert that the trend is down when you haven’t done even basic trend analysis?

                    • wellfedweta

                      “How the hell do you assert that the trend is down when you haven’t done even basic trend analysis?”

                      Look at the graph McFlock. It shows a trend. Downwards. Trend analysis predicts the future…I’m referring to the real results of real action.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      It’s interesting that you would describe its inclusion in a non-exhaustive list of examples of a decrease in safety, as “complaint”.

                      Also interesting that you seized on it alone without considering let alone acknowledging the other entries on the list.

                      Or the wider point behind its inclusion: the precarious situation in which too many of our children find themselves.

                      If the rate really has declined (and – given the source – isn’t the result of creative accounting) that’s a good thing. The fact that it’s a statistic at all is a disgrace.

                    • McFlock

                      Trend analysis also tells you whether you’re seeing real results, or just shit that happened because the population changed or the observed population is so small it bounces around all over the place anyway.

                      All you’re doing is ignoring the actual topic of conversation so that you can refer to a “target” that might or might not be juked by the dhbs or simply have a lower incidence due to changes in the population subset that’s actually affected by the condition.

                      But then it’s not like you nat fanbois have any real achievements to point to.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “It’s interesting that you would describe its inclusion in a non-exhaustive list of examples of a decrease in safety, as “complaint”.”

                      I didn’t.

                      “Also interesting that you seized on it alone without considering let alone acknowledging the other entries on the list.”

                      I did address the others.

                      “If the rate really has declined (and – given the source – isn’t the result of creative accounting) that’s a good thing. The fact that it’s a statistic at all is a disgrace.”

                      The fact is that you raised it and I caught you out. And it really must stick in your craw that it is a National government that is fixing it.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “Trend analysis also tells you whether you’re seeing real results, or just shit that happened because the population changed or the observed population is so small it bounces around all over the place anyway.”

                      I have an idea you used a big word you really didn’t understand. Trend analysis is predictive. This program has been in place since 2012. The results are raw, but clear. You’ve got yourself in knots trying to explain them away.

                    • McFlock

                      Meh.
                      I simply used the term in the manner my colleagues and I have applied it for years.

                      I have an idea that you think the narrow way you use it (or had it defined for you in a first year bcom textbook) is the only possible way the term can be meaningfully used.

                      Either way, now you’re wriggling around with semantics in order to avoid the easily-understood point that whatever “trend” you think you’ve identified could be the result of system gaming, variation in population size, or is even simply random statistical noise that lets you pretend for another year that this government has actually managed to improve something, however implausibly.

                      And then next year if the number inconveniently goes up again you’ll cherry-pick another indicator that has fluctuated randomly.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “I simply used the term in the manner my colleagues and I have applied it for years.”

                      It was still incorrect. You’re trying to diss legitimate data by using big words you thought no-one else understood.

                      “Either way, now you’re wriggling around with semantics…”

                      Ah, no. The reality is the program began in 2014, and since then the results have been impressive. If this was a Labour government, you’d be singing it from the rooftops.

                    • McFlock

                      You’re not the arbiter of all meaning.

                      And yes, the program began in 2014. It still hasn’t affected hospital admissions, though. They’re still measuring numerators against the total population, rather than the effected population. And no “trend” has been identified with clear criteria – it’s just a blip you think you see.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “You’re not the arbiter of all meaning.”

                      “A trend analysis is an aspect of technical analysis that tries to predict the future movement of a stock based on past data. Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an idea of what will happen in the future.”
                      http://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/trendanalysis.asp

                      “And yes, the program began in 2014. It still hasn’t affected hospital admissions, though. They’re still measuring numerators against the total population, rather than the effected population. And no “trend” has been identified with clear criteria – it’s just a blip you think you see.”

                      So you see encouraging results, but your ideology won’t let you admit it. I get it now.

                    • McFlock

                      Seriously, investopedia? Stock prices? Like I said, your narrow definition isn’t the only one. Clue: patients aren’t stock prices.

                      question: did you go straight to investopedia, or did the “rend analysis” sections in wikipedia/britannica/peanuts encyclopedia not suit your purposes?

                      So you see encouraging results, but your ideology won’t let you admit it. I get it now.

                      Not my political ideology, though. My ideology that if someone makes a claim about improvement, they need to demonstrate it or GTFO. Using numerator-only information about targets as reported by organisations that have a history of gaming other targets, especially when the targets are only tangentially connected to the actual topic under discussion, is pretty fucking thin.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “did you go straight to investopedia,…”

                      “In project management, trend analysis is a mathematical technique that uses historical results to predict future outcome. ”
                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trend_analysis

                      “Method of time series data (information in sequence over time) analysis involving comparison of the same item (such as monthly sales revenue figures) over a significantly long period to (1) detect general patter of a relationship between associated factors or variables, and (2) project the future direction of this pattern.”
                      http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/trend-analysis.html

                      It pays not to use big words you really don’t understand.

                    • McFlock

                      Project management. nice.

                      From the same wikipedia article:

                      In statistics, trend analysis often refers to techniques for extracting an underlying pattern of behavior in a time series which would otherwise be partly or nearly completely hidden by noise. A simple description of these techniques is trend estimation, which can be undertaken within a formal regression analysis.

                      Your MoH link doesn’t even pretend to account for statistical noise, which is my oft-repeated point.

                      You managed to pretend to be a normal human being for a wee while, but now it seems that you’re just another tory who assumes that you can dictate everything down to the very language everyone else uses.

                    • wellfedweta

                      ” trend estimation,”…which is predictive. The future. You’re just looking silly now McFlock. Quit while you’re behind.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      🙄

                      It’s illiteracy.

                    • McFlock

                      I wish it were illiteracy.

                      Our weta suffers from the same object fixation that enables pilots to fly a pefectly fine airplane into the ground as they obssess over a 50c light bulb that’s blown.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “I wish it were illiteracy.”

                      McFlock you used a big word you didn’t know the meaning of. Obviously you’ve done that before and don’t like being caught out. Cut the evasion and own up. It is the right thing to do.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      “…time series…”. QED.

                    • McFlock

                      Where does “extracting an underlying pattern of behavior in a time series which would otherwise be partly or nearly completely hidden by noise” require the stock-market prediction that you are obsessed with?

                      Stop wanking and start thinking.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “Where does “extracting an underlying pattern of behavior in a time series which would otherwise be partly or nearly completely hidden by noise” require the stock-market prediction that you are obsessed with?”

                      Trend analysis is predictive, McFlock. You stuffed up. get over yourself.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      …trend analysis often refers to techniques for extracting an underlying pattern of behavior in a time series which would otherwise be partly or nearly completely hidden by noise…

                      Therefore, McFlock is right. QED.

                      Examples.

                      Further reading.

                      Maninthemiddle’s innumeracy on display again.

                    • McFlock

                      Trend analysis is predictive, McFlock. You stuffed up. get over yourself

                      And yet I’m not the one trying to apply an investopedia-sourced definition to epidemiology and pretending that it’s the only way every industry in the world uses it.

                      You’re a fly, my good weta. However, as I’m not quite so prescriptive as you in my understanding of language, it’s up to everyone to guess whether I mean you’re an archaic term for a taxi, a theatre curtain or set item suspened above the stage, an attractive lure used in fishing, or just an annoying insect that spreads microscopic particles of shit all over the place.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “…an investopedia-sourced definition to epidemiology and pretending that it’s the only way every industry in the world uses it.”

                      You tried that earlier, and I provided other references to support my point. My advice to you…stop using words you don’t understand to try to make yourself look good. This example shows you just make an arse of yourself.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      ..and I provided references that prove my point, and practical examples to rub your face in it.

                      Just one example that doesn’t fit your narrow definition would have sufficed.

                      Google “trend analysis example” for more face-chafing humiliation.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “..and I provided references that prove my point, and practical examples to rub your face in it.”

                      Are you and McFlock the same person? If so, I’ll start replying to you again, but only under McFlock’s posts, as his persona doesn’t show signs of having missed his meds.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      My point is that McFlock is right. As the references and examples show. Tamino’s example is particularly relevant, because he discusses noise in an existing time series, both of which terms McFlock’s cites already mentioned.

                      None of the examples I gave have anything to do with Epidemiology, another of McFlock’s references.

                      Here’s an example of that: Rapid increase in hospitalization and mortality rates for severe sepsis in the United States: A trend analysis from 1993 to 2003.

                      Objective: To determine recent trends in rates of hospitalization, mortality, and hospital case fatality for severe sepsis in the United States.

                      Design: Trend analysis for the period from 1993 to 2003….

                      The above paper was published in 2007.

                      QED.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “The above paper was published in 2007.”

                      Hi McFlock v 2.

                      It is still irrelevant. Trend analysis is predictive, otherwise there is no point to it. And the definitions I quoted back that up, as does the context of the discussion. Good try though.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      Trend analysis is predictive.

                      Trend analysis is useful. Say for example, a right wing gimp believes in market dogma and history proves them wrong via trend analysis, and they are humiliated by the World Bank and IMF and UNICEF and the Salvation Army and everyone else they can’t defund, and then we change the government, the right wing gimp’s rabid failure won’t predict anything about their replacement’s chances of doing a better job,

                      That would be like comparing apples with wingnuts, and yet trend analysis can still help us quantify exactly how much fail wingnuts are.

                    • wellfedweta

                      “Trend analysis is useful.”

                      Because it is predictive.

                      “Say for example, a right wing gimp believes in market dogma and history proves them wrong via trend analysis, and they are humiliated by the World Bank and IMF and UNICEF and the Salvation Army and everyone else they can’t defund, and then we change the government, the right wing gimp’s rabid failure won’t predict anything about their replacement’s chances of doing a better job,”

                      Well that may be true. If it ever happened. But of course there’s the reality. NZ’s economy is a global ‘star’. We have the fourth highest growth rate in the OECD. We have the highest employment, minimum wage and average wage in history. Beneficiaries have just received the first real increase in benefits in over 40 years. Exports are up 13% in the past 3 years (yes, despite low dairy prices). NZ’s net external debt is at it’s lowest since 2003. Interest rates are at their lowest since adam was a boy. That is some achievement.

                    • One Anonymous Bloke

                      That is some achievement.

                      How can you measure it without trend analysis?

                      QED. Thanks for helping me illustrate my point: McFlock is right.

                    • McFlock

                      lol

                      Looking at the trend of weta’s comments, it appears that they are a genuine idiot, rather than a normal person who just had a bit of a bad day when the initial sample was taken.

                      I’m not predicting what any of weta’s particular responses will be, of course, but the vast majority of their comments have been unnaturally stupid, so I suspect that’s their natural level of ability, poor little insect.

  9. greywarshark 9

    The polls are going mad apparently to find out just what answers if any English should give. I had one that after a pause announced that it was a political survey and would take 90 seconds. Intrigued I carried on and after a few party identifying qs we got onto a solid phalanx of ones about Bill English as finance minister and in charge of housing. At the end it said thank you and that appeared to be it. No polite explanations as to what entity was being nosy or at the end a proper thank you from the firm running it. Absolutely graceless and lacking identification of which party or for what reason the information was being gathered.

    • Anne 9.1

      Sounds like David Farrar’s Curia research co. doing some soundings for Bill English.

    • Mrs Brillo 9.2

      It is fairly easy to spot at some stage, and Mr Brillo and I take a great deal of pleasure in messing with their expectations, as we are pretty sure they have our names, addresses, ages and maybe an estimate of our income. It’s a harsh version of the truth they’ll get from us.

      In addition, We ask the name of who owns the research company and who their client is. They may not tell us, but we assume that National conducts most of the political surveying, and we know the name of Labour’s usual research co.

      To hell with them.

      • Anne 9.2.1

        It is fairly easy to spot at some stage…

        It is indeed. A few months back I was called by a researcher and I spent 5-10 minutes answering a bunch of bland questions. I cannot remember the details now but the last question was obviously the $60,000 question. I said to the hapless caller something to the effect… oh, so that was the purpose of your call. Why didn’t you say so from the start instead of wasting my time on a bunch of dumb patsy questions? then hung up.

        I’ve never been called since so suspect I’ve been removed from the list. 🙂

        • Mrs Brillo 9.2.1.1

          Nice one , Anne, we’ll remember that!

        • LOL.

          That is terrible survey design. The important questions should be relatively early but not at the very beginning so you have time to “warm up” to the survey with the easy stuff, precisely so that you’re not wasting time if someone refuses to answer a critical question.

        • tracey 9.2.1.3

          I still remember being called prior to the last election and polled on my preferred party leader of all the current leaders. However, the Greens were not offered and Bill English was… When i said “but he isn’t a leader” there was a long pause and the reply was “that is what I was told to aak”

      • One Anonymous Bloke 9.2.2

        If you can identify them, tell them Blinglish is good. Give him a high rating. Lie to the fuckers. Monkeywrench.

    • Jenny Kirk 9.3

      Yeah – I had one very similar – sounds exactly the same as yours, Greywarshark – about an hour ago. And with none of the usual identification.

    • Did they identify which company they were with, out of curiosity? It’s likely it was either UMR doing opposition research, or Curia doing internals for the Nats.

      • greywarshark 9.4.1

        Matthew W
        For some reason it made me laugh, I was probably desperate for a laugh and so I didn’t wait for a reasonable number of seconds, and don’t know whether there was a pause and then some final sign off.

        I had the feeling it was automated. To the questions about Bill English there were 4 numbers for options, agree, neutral, don’t agree, not sure was the wording I think. So could have been a bot.

        • Right, so whoever it was, it was defs an internal- all the public polling firms identify themselves as a matter of practice.

          Likely a curia bot as I expect UMR actually employs people to do their internals, lol.

  10. pete 10

    Little said: We’ll..

    • attack climate change
    • become carbon neutral by 2025
    • aggressively reduce inequality
    • be publishing a strategic long term plan as our compass bearing in mind the impact our decisions have on future generations
    • nationalise banks
    • close tax loopholes and make everyone pay their fair share
    • repeal union unfriendly legislation
    • plan how to deal with job losses due to automatisation
    • favour widespread grassroot support over a few wealthy donors
    • make education free
    • make hospital care free
    • all kiwisaver accounts managed by the government and used to invest in NZ

    If it only were true…

    What he did say was: blah blah blah…

    • Atiawa 10.1

      Is there any political party saying those things? If so, who? If not, why not?

      • Draco T Bastard 10.1.1

        They haven’t said anything like that because they still believe in capitalism and, as such, are in thrall to the banks and capitalists.

  11. Guerilla Surgeon 11

    FFS, everyone since Roger Douglas at the very least, has promised to close the wage gap with Australia. It’s one of those things they say, but they haven’t got a clue on how to do it. Or they don’t want to do it which is probably a lot more likely.

    • ropata 11.1

      Gareth Morgan could probably do it but the thieving 1% will use every dirty tactic to thwart him. Can’t have wage growth, that might impact shareholder profit.

      Ref: fig 4.1, page 17

      Click to access research-who-benefits-from-productivity-growth.pdf

      “The LIS (labour income share) has declined in the measured sector of the New Zealand economy since the late 1970s (Figure 4.1). Over the late 1970s to 2010, the LIS had a high of 65.9% in 1981 and a low of 53.9% in 2002. By 2010, the LIS was at 56.1%”

    • Draco T Bastard 11.2

      FFS, everyone since Roger Douglas at the very least

      Douglass didn’t because at that point in time, IIRC, we actually had higher wages. Douglass put us on the path to lower wages.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • New Zealand First calls for tahr cull halt
    Mark Patterson MP, Spokesperson for Primary Industry New Zealand First is supporting calls by hunters and the New Zealand Tahr Foundation (NZTF) to halt a large scale cull of Himalayan Tahr by the Department of Conservation in National Parks. The calls are supported by a 40,000 strong petition and the ...
    2 days ago
  • Response to Spin-off allegations
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand First leader Winston Peters today scoffed at suggestions that a team of six political operatives have been dispatched to New Zealand to assist his campaign. ‘As President Ronald Reagan once said, ‘there they go again.’ ‘The clickbait journos can’t ...
    2 days ago
  • Jenny Marcroft MP to represent New Zealand First in Auckland Central
    New Zealand First is pleased to announce Jenny Marcroft as the party’s election 2020 candidate for the Auckland Central electorate. Jenny spent years working in Auckland Central, having spent a vast proportion of her broadcasting career there. She says she, "knows the place and knows the people." Ms Marcroft says ...
    3 days ago
  • Creating jobs and cleaning up our rivers
    New Zealanders deserve healthy rivers and lakes that are safe to swim in - but they have been getting worse for decades. That's why, with our latest announcement, we're investing in projects that will help clean up our rivers and lakes and restore them to health, within a generation. ...
    4 days ago
  • Jacinda Ardern: 2020 Labour Congress Speech
    Jacinda Ardern's speech to the 2020 Labour Party Congress. ...
    4 days ago
  • Kelvin Davis: 2020 Labour Congress Speech
    Kelvin Davis' speech to the 2020 Labour Party Congress. ...
    4 days ago
  • Week That Was: Another week of major progress
    This week we moved into the second half of 2020 - and our Government delivered another week of big changes and major progress for New Zealanders. Read below for a wrap of the key things moments from the week - from extending paid parental leave, to making major investments in ...
    6 days ago
  • Green Party opposes RMA fast-track bill that cut corners on environmental safeguards and public cons...
    The Green Party has opposed the COVID-19 Recovery Fast-track Consenting Bill which shortcuts normal consenting processes under the Resource Management Act (RMA), reduces public participation and narrows environmental considerations. ...
    1 week ago
  • Site of new freight hub revealed
    Hon Shane Jones, Minister of Regional Economic Development A regional freight hub for the lower North Island will be built just northeast of Palmerston North, Regional Development Minister Shane Jones has announced. The Government is investing $40 million through the Provincial Growth Fund to designate and buy land and design ...
    1 week ago
  • Greens call for Guaranteed Minimum Income to alleviate skyrocketing debt with MSD
    Green Party Co-leader Marama Davidson is calling for the introduction of a Guaranteed Minimum Income to lift hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty and prevent more families entering into further debt with the Ministry of Social Development.  ...
    1 week ago
  • Winston Peters: Facts matter when taxpayer money is on the line
    There has been renewed focus on New Zealand First acting as a handbrake on the Government after our decision to not support Auckland light rail. We are a handbrake for bad ideas, that is true, but our track record since 2017 has seen New Zealand First constructively also serve as an ...
    1 week ago
  • Bill raising minimum residency requirement for NZ Super passes first reading
    Mark Patterson MP, New Zealand First List MP New Zealand First’s Fair Residency for Superannuation Bill passed its First Reading in Parliament today. The Bill makes a significant change to NZ Super by raising the minimum residency requirement from 10 to 20 years, after age 20. “Currently, a migrant of ...
    1 week ago
  • Harsher penalties for assaults on first responders one step closer
    Darroch Ball MP, Spokesperson for Law and Order A New Zealand First member’s bill in the name of Darroch Ball introducing a six-month minimum prison sentence for assaults on first responders has passed its second reading in Parliament. The new offence of "injuring a first responder or corrections officer with ...
    1 week ago
  • Criminal Cases Review Commission delivers Coalition promise
    Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Deputy Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand First welcomes the launch of the new Criminal Cases Review Commission, gifted with the name from Waikato-Tainui - Te Kāhui Tātari Ture, announced in Hamilton today by Justice Minister Andrew Little. “New Zealand First has long believed in and ...
    1 week ago
  • Greens welcome huge new investment in sustainable projects
    The Green Party is celebrating over $800m in new funding for green projects, which will get people into jobs while solving New Zealand’s long-term challenges. ...
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand First demands answers from Meridian Energy
    Mark Patterson MP, Spokesperson for Primary Industries New Zealand First is appalled that Meridian seems to have been unnecessarily spilling water from its dams to drive up its profits."While New Zealanders have been coming together in some of our darkest hours, we don’t expect power gentailers to waste water and ...
    1 week ago
  • Getting New Zealand moving again: June 2020
    We wrapped up the first half of 2020 with a busy month, taking additional steps to support New Zealanders as we continue with our economic recovery. We rolled out targeted packages to support key industries like tourism and construction, helped create jobs in the environmental and agriculture sectors, and set ...
    1 week ago
  • Māori union leader appointed to Infrastructure Commission board
    Hon Shane Jones, Minister for Infrastructure Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has welcomed the appointment of Maurice Davis and his deep infrastructure and construction experience to the board of the Infrastructure Commission. Mr Davis (Ngāti Maniapoto), is the seventh and final appointment to the board led by former Reserve Bank Governor ...
    1 week ago
  • Click-bait journalism at its worst
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Leader of New Zealand First New Zealand’s click bait journalism is taking a turn for the worse, with yet another example of sensationalist, wilful-misrepresentation of the facts. “New Zealand First has worked constructively with its Coalition partner on hundreds of pieces of legislation and policy, and ...
    1 week ago
  • Green Party proposes transformational Poverty Action Plan
    The Green Party is today unveiling its Poverty Action Plan, which includes a Guaranteed Minimum Income to ensure people have enough to live with dignity.     ...
    2 weeks ago
  • PGF accelerates Rotorua projects
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development The Rotorua Museum redevelopment and Whakarewarewa and Tokorangi Forest projects will be accelerated thanks to a $2.09 million Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) boost, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Week That Was: Getting people into jobs
    This week, we rolled out the next steps of our recovery plan, with new infrastructure investment, extra support for tourism operators, and a new programme to get Kiwis into agriculture careers. The global economic consequences of COVID-19 will continue to be a challenge, but we have a detailed plan to ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Coalition commitment establishing Mental Health Commission delivered
    Jenny Marcroft MP, Spokesperson for Health New Zealand First welcomes the passage of the Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill through its final reading in Parliament today fulfilling a coalition agreement commitment. “This is an important step in saving the lives of New Zealanders and delivers a key coalition commitment ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Whakatāne gets a $2.5m ‘turbo boost’
    Whakatāne has been given a $2.5 million boost to speed up previously funded projects and create more than 450 jobs in the next decade. Of those, the equivalent of 160 full-time jobs could be delivered in the next six weeks. Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters is in town to make ...
    2 weeks ago
  • $2.5m PGF funding to speed up economic recovery in Whakatāne
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister Fletcher Tabuteau MP, Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is investing $2.5 million to accelerate three infrastructure projects in Whakatāne, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. “This package is about ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Shane Jones calls out those holding drought-stricken Auckland ‘to ransom’ over water
    Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones is throwing his weight behind a bid by the Auckland Council to fast-track the more than doubling of the city's water allowance from the Waikato River. And he's coming out strongly against anyone who plans on getting in the way of this campaign. "It is my ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Another Green win as climate change considerations inserted into the RMA
    The Green Party is thrilled to see changes to the Resource Management Act (RMA) that mean consents for large projects can be declined if they will have significant climate change implications that are inconsistent with the Zero Carbon Act and Aotearoa New Zealand’s Paris Agreement obligations.  ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Navy vessel Aotearoa to arrive in New Zealand
    Hon Ron Mark, Minister of Defence The Royal New Zealand Navy’s new ship, Aotearoa, set sail for New Zealand on 10 June from the Republic of Korea, and is due to arrive in Auckland tomorrow, announced Minister of Defence Ron Mark. “Aotearoa is the Royal New Zealand Navy’s new fleet ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Racing Industry Bill passes third reading
    Rt Hon Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister for Racing Racing Minister Winston Peters has today welcomed the Racing Industry Bill passing its third reading, creating the legislative framework for revitalising the racing industry while limiting the need for future government intervention. “For too long our domestic racing industry has ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Green Party seek amendment to ensure all prisoners can vote
    The Green Party has today put forward an amendment to the Electoral (Registration of Sentenced Prisoners) Amendment Bill to ensure all people in prisons can vote in general elections. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Green Party welcomes new approach to delivering light rail
    The Green Party welcomes the decision to not proceed with Public Public Investment (PPI) delivery of Auckland’s light rail project and to instead run the process through the public service. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First welcomes PGF investment in Wairarapa Water
    Hon Ron Mark, New Zealand First List MP based in the Wairarapa New Zealand First List MP Hon Ron Mark welcomes the announcement of Provincial Growth Funding investment of $1.4 million to help secure the Wairarapa’s water supply. The funding boost will allow the Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC), and ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First MP Mark Patterson selected as candidate for Taieri
    New Zealand First list MP Mark Patterson has been selected to represent the party in the newly formed Taieri electorate at the upcoming election. Mr Patterson, his wife Jude and two daughters farm sheep and beef at Lawrence and Waitahuna. He previously stood in the Clutha-Southland electorate however boundary changes ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ground-breaking on NZ Post depot
    Hon Shane Jones, Associate Minister for State Owned Enterprises A new ‘super depot’ to be built for NZ Post in Wellington will create around 350 jobs during construction, Associate Minister for State Owned Enterprises Shane Jones says. Shane Jones today attended a ground-breaking and blessing ceremony for the parcel-processing depot ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Week That Was: Putting our economic plan into action
    Our strong economic management prior to COVID-19 - with surpluses, low debt and near-record-low unemployment - put us in a good position to weather the impact of the virus and start to rebuild our economy much earlier than many other countries. Now we're putting our plan to recover and rebuild ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Fleeing drivers hit new record-high yet again
    Darroch Ball MP, New Zealand First Spokesperson for Law and Order Recently released Police fleeing driver statistics have shown yet another increase in incidents with another record-high in the latest quarter. “This new quarterly record-high is the latest in a string of record-high numbers since 2014.  The data shows incidents ...
    3 weeks ago
  • Fletcher Tabuteau selected as candidate for Rotorua
    New Zealand First MP Fletcher Tabuteau is pleased to be confirmed today as the party’s candidate for the Rotorua electorate. Speaking at the Rotorua AGM for New Zealand First, Mr Tabuteau said this is an election that is incredibly important for the people of Rotorua. “The founding principles of New ...
    3 weeks ago

  • New Zealand to review relationship settings with Hong Kong
    Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters has announced that the New Zealand Government is reviewing the settings of its relationship with Hong Kong. “China’s decision to pass a new national security law for Hong Kong has fundamentally changed the environment for international engagement there,” Mr Peters said. “New Zealand remains deeply ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Funding for Whangārei’s infrastructure projects revealed
    Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones has announced details of a multimillion-dollar investment in Whangārei for infrastructure projects that will help it recover from the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 200 jobs are expected to be created through the $26 million investment from the Government’s rejuvenation package ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • Managed isolation and quarantine update
    Following a second incident in which a person escaped from a managed isolation facility, security is being enhanced, including more police presence onsite, Minister Megan Woods said. “The actions of some individuals who choose to break the very clear rules to stay within the facilities means that more resourcing is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Funding for Kaipara district community waste programmes
    Waste reduction and recycling programmes in Kaipara are set to get a boost with Associate Environment Minister Eugenie Sage today announcing a $361,447 grant from the Ministry for the Environment’s Waste Minimisation Fund (WMF) Sustainable Kaipara. “The new funding will allow Sustainable Kaipara to partner with local schools, kura, community ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Government will support the people and economy of Southland
    The Government will support the Southland economy in the wake of multinational mining company Rio Tinto’s decision to follow through with its long signalled closure of the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter. “This day has unfortunately been on the cards for some time now, but nevertheless the final decision is a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    13 hours ago
  • New transformational tools for the Predator Free 2050 effort
    New tools being developed to help boost Aotearoa’s Predator Free 2050 effort were unveiled today by Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage and Under Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau. A new rat poison, a camera with predator recognition software to detect and report predators, a new predator lure and a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • New Armoured vehicles for New Zealand Army
    The Coalition Government has approved the purchase of a fleet of Bushmaster vehicles to replace the New Zealand Army’s armoured Pinzgauers, Defence Minister Ron Mark has announced today. The new fleet of 43 Australian-designed and built Bushmaster NZ5.5 will provide better protection for personnel and improved carrying capacity. “The age ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Community-led solutions to prevent family violence
    The Government’s three prevention frameworks to reduce family violence in Aotearoa were launched this week by Associate Minister for Social Development Poto Williams.   The frameworks were developed in partnership with communities around New Zealand, and build on the work the Government has already begun with its new family violence prevention ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Govt confirms investment in better radiology and surgical services for Hawke’s Bay
    The Government is pleased to confirm funding for improvements to radiology and surgical services at Hawke's Bay DHB, Health Minister Chris Hipkins says.     "The Minister of Finance the Hon Grant Robertson and former Health Minister Dr David Clark approved funding for Hawke's Bay DHB’s redevelopment of their radiology facilities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Specialist alcohol and drug addiction services strengthened across New Zealand
    •    New funding for four beds at Napier’s Springhill Residential Addiction Centre •    A new managed withdrawal home and community service, and peer support before and after residential care at Tairāwhiti DHB  •    A co-ordinated network of withdrawal management services throughout the South Island •    Peer support in Rotorua and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Coastal Shipping Webinar
    Introduction, seafarers and POAL Good morning everyone, I am delighted to be online with you all today. Before I begin, I have to acknowledge that COVID-19 has disrupted the maritime sector on an unprecedented scale. The work of seafarers and the maritime industry is keeping many economies around the world ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Support for resilient rail connection to the West Coast
    A $13 million investment from Government will create jobs and improve the resilience of the rail connection between Christchurch and the West Coast, Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones and Regional Economic Development Under-Secretary Fletcher Tabuteau say. The funding comes from the tagged contingency set aside in Budget 2020 for infrastructure projects ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Major investment in safe drinking water
    The Government is investing $761 million to assist local government upgrade under-pressure water services across the country, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Local Government Minister Nanaia Mahuta announced today.  The announcement was made at the site of the water bore that was found to be the source of the fatal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Supporting stranded seasonal workers to keep working with more flexible options
    Recognised Seasonal Employers and migrant seasonal workers stranded in New Zealand will be able to continue working and supporting themselves with more flexible hours and roles, says Immigration Minister Iain Lees-Galloway. The time-limited visa changes are: Stranded RSE workers will be able to work part-time (a minimum of 15 hours ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Relief for temporary migrants, employers and New Zealanders who need work
    The Government is making immediate short-term changes to visa settings to support temporary migrants already onshore in New Zealand and their employers, while also ensuring New Zealanders needing work are prioritised, Immigration Minister Iain Lees-Galloway says. We are: Extending temporary work visas due to expire by the end of 2020 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Freshwater commissioners and fast-track consenting convenor appointed
    Professor Peter Skelton CNZM has been appointed as Chief Freshwater Commissioner and Alternate Environment Court Judge Craig James Thompson as Deputy Chief Freshwater Commissioner for the newly established Freshwater Planning Process (FPP). Environment Minister David Parker today also announced the appointment of Chief Environment Court Judge Laurie Newhook as the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Appointment of Judge of the High Court
    Auckland Queen’s Counsel Neil Campbell has been appointed a Judge of the High Court, Attorney‑General David Parker announced today. Justice Campbell graduated with a BCom and LLB (Hons) from the University of Auckland in 1992. He spent two years with Bell Gully Buddle Weir in Auckland before travelling to the United ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Feedback sought – Commercial Film and Video Production Facilities
    The Associate Minister for Greater Christchurch Regeneration, Poto Williams, is seeking feedback on a proposal to better enable the development and operation of commercial film and video facilities in Christchurch. The Proposal, developed by Regenerate Christchurch in response to a request from Christchurch City Council, asks that powers under section ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Govt launches bold primary sector plan to boost economic recovery
    The Government has launched a bold plan to boost primary sector export earnings by $44 billion over the next decade, while protecting the environment and growing jobs. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern today released Fit for a Better World – Accelerating our Economic Potential, a 10-year roadmap to unlock greater value ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Wellbeing of whanau at heart of new hub
    A new approach to prevent family harm that encourages greater collaboration across government and community groups is being celebrated at the opening of a new facility in Auckland. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern today opened the Multi-Disciplinary Family Harm Prevention Hub Te Taanga Manawa in Lambie Road in Manukau. The facility ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Report on Auckland Port Relocation
    The Government has released a major new report on the options for relocating the Port of Auckland’s freight operations while deferring any decision on the issue. “That decision needs to be informed by policy analysis that is still to be completed. As a result it will be up to a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Dual place names for Te Pātaka-o-Rākaihautū / Banks Peninsula features
    The history of Rāpaki is being restored through the inclusion of te reo in thirteen official place names on Te Pātaka-o-Rākaihautū / Banks Peninsula and around Lyttelton Harbour/Whakaraupō, the Minister for Land Information, Eugenie Sage, announced today.   “I am pleased to approve the proposals from Te Hapū o Ngāti ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government and Air New Zealand agree to manage incoming bookings
    Bookings for seats on Air New Zealand flights into New Zealand will be managed in the short term to ensure the Government is able to safely place New Zealanders arriving home into a managed isolation or quarantine facility, says Housing Minister Megan Woods.  “Last week Air Commodore Darryn Webb and I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • $80 million for sport recovery at all levels
    Grant Robertson has today announced the first major release of funding from the $265 million Sport Recovery Package announced at Budget 2020.  “Today we’re setting out how $80 million will be invested, with $54 million of that over the 2020/2021 financial year for organisations from community level through to elite ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Keeping ACC levies steady until 2022
    The Government is maintaining current levy rates for the next 2 years, as part of a set of changes to help ease the financial pressures of COVID-19 providing certainty for businesses and New Zealanders, ACC Minister Iain Lees-Galloway says. “New Zealanders and businesses are facing unprecedented financial pressures as a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Extended loan scheme keeps business afloat
    Small businesses are getting greater certainty about access to finance with an extension to the interest-free cashflow loan scheme to the end of the year. The Small Business Cashflow Loan Scheme has already been extended once, to 24 July. Revenue and Small Business Minister Stuart Nash says it will be ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New investment creates over 2000 jobs to clean up waterways
    A package of 23 projects across the country will clean up waterways and deliver over 2000 jobs Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Environment Minister David Parker announced today. The $162 million dollar package will see 22 water clean-up projects put forward by local councils receiving $62 million and the Kaipara ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Speech to Labour Party Congress 2020
    Tena koutou katoa  Nga tangata whenua o tenei rohe o Pōneke, tena koutou Nau mai, haere mai ki te hui a tau mo te roopu reipa Ko tatou!  Ko to tatou mana!  Ko to tatou kaupapa kei te kokiri whakamua  Tena koutou, tena koutou, tena tatou katoa   Welcome. I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • PGF top-up for QE Health in Rotorua
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is investing $1.5 million to ensure QE Health in Rotorua can proceed with its world class health service and save 75 existing jobs, Under Secretary for Regional Economic Development, Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. The PGF funding announced today is in addition to the $8 million ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Building a more sustainable construction sector
    A new programme, which sets a firm course for the Building and Construction sector to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, has been announced by the Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa. “A significant amount of New Zealand’s carbon emissions come from the building and construction sector.  If we’re serious ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • PGF funds tourism boost in Northland
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing more than $7.5 million in Northland ventures to combat the economic impact of the COVID-19 virus, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones have announced. The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) investment is going to the Northern Adventure Experience and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Four new projects announced as part of the biggest ever national school rebuild programme
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Education Minister Chris Hipkins today announced significant funding for Auckland’s Northcote College as part of the first wave of a new nationwide school redevelopment programme to upgrade schools over the next 10 years. The $48.5 million project brings the total investment in Northcote College to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • COVID-19: Support to improve student attendance and wellbeing
    The Government has opened an urgent response fund to support schools and early learning services to get children and young people back on track after the Covid-19 lockdown. “While we are seeing improvements in attendance under Alert Level 1 Ministry of Education data shows that attendance rates in our schools ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Fast-track consenting law boosts jobs and economic recovery
    The law to boost the economic recovery from the impact of COVID-19 by speeding up resource consenting on selected projects has passed its second and third readings in the House today. “Accelerating nationwide projects and activities by government, iwi and the private sector will help deliver faster economic recovery and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Whanganui Port gets PGF boost
    Five port-related projects in Whanganui will receive a $26.75 million Provincial Growth Fund investment to support local economic recovery and create new opportunities for growth, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “This is a significant investment that will support the redevelopment of the Whanganui Port, a project governed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • More support for Sarjeant Gallery
    Whanganui’s Sarjeant Gallery will receive an investment of up to $12 million administered by the Provincial Growth Fund to support its redevelopment, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. The project is included in a $3 billion infrastructure pipeline announced by Finance Minister Grant Robertson and Shane Jones yesterday. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Funding for training and upskilling
    The Provincial Growth Fund is investing nearly $2.5 million into three Te Ara Mahi programmes to support Manawatū-Whanganui jobseekers and employees to quickly train and upskill, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “Up to 154 local people will be supported into employment within the first year by these ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Statement from the Minister of Health Dr David Clark
      This morning I have formally tendered my resignation as Minister of Health, which was accepted by the Prime Minister. Serving as Minister of Health has been an absolute privilege – particularly through these extraordinary last few months. It’s no secret that Health is a challenging portfolio. I have given ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Scholarship placements for agricultural emissions scientists doubles
    Scholarships for 57 early-career agricultural emissions scientists from 20 developing countries is another example of New Zealand’s international leadership in primary sector sustainability, says Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Mr O’Connor, announcing the scholarships today, says hundreds of applications were received for this fourth round of the CLIFF-GRADS programme (Climate, Food ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Funding for Foxton regeneration
    A project to help rejuvenate the Horowhenua town of Foxton will receive a Provincial Growth Fund investment of $3.86 million, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced today. “This funding for the Foxton Regeneration project will be used to make the well-known holiday town even more attractive for visitors and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago