web analytics

Garrett case another example of special treatment for elite

Written By: - Date published: 9:28 am, September 17th, 2010 - 64 comments
Categories: law and "order" - Tags:

Today’s Herald editorial writes:

Any case of identity theft involves calculated dishonesty. By any yardstick, Mr Garrett was fortunate to be discharged without conviction and to be granted name suppression.

So why did Garrett escape without a conviction?

It’s certainly not the normal outcome in these cases. The Dompost summarised half a dozen other cases yesterday:

2006: Frank Macskasy, 48, of Upper Hutt, is fined $2000 for forgery after using the name and details of a dead baby to get a passport. He said he had wanted to try The Day of the Jackal scam.

2006: Porirua man Dacey Jon Cameron is jailed for two years after attempting to obtain a passport in the name of a dead baby. Cameron changed his name by deed poll in 2004 to that of an infant who died almost four decades before and applied for a passport soon after.

2006: Peter Fulcher, a former kingpin in the Mr Asia drug syndicate, escapes a jail term despite admitting stealing the identity of a five-year-old who died in 1945, to obtain a passport.

2006: Rotorua man Christopher Mark Grose, 36, is fined $10,000 after stealing the identity of a dead baby to obtain a passport.

2005: William Kevin Roach, 49, a United States citizen, is jailed after admitting forgery charges. Also inspired by The Day of the Jackal, he assumed the identity of a baby after visiting a Tauranga cemetery.

2000: Jo-Anne Mary Cole, 43, is sentenced to 4 1/2 years’ jail after being convicted of fraud and passport offences. Cole also used the Forsyth techniques.

So why didn’t Garrett even get a conviction for the same offence others were being sentenced to jail for at the same time?

One part of the answer is that Garrett lied to the Court by telling it that he didn’t have any previous convictions (I’m no legal export but isn’t that perjury?).

Another reason is that he claims never to have used the passport (if you believe that…).

Nonetheless, this was a calculated act that damaged the integrity of our passport system and could have been used for major fraud, which distressed the family of the dead child hugely. And Garrett lied to the Police when confronted. (This guy sure lies a lot, eh?)

The more fundamental reason why Garrett got the soft treatment is exposed in the court records. If Garrett had been convicted he may well have been disbarred – lawyers don’t generally accept having (convicted) criminals in their midst. So, the judge went easy on a fellow lawyer to save his job and reputation.

Being part of the old boys’ club sure has its perks.

[Update: Garrett quits ACT]

64 comments on “Garrett case another example of special treatment for elite”

  1. comedy 1

    So Cameron Slater has a point ?

    • Bright Red 1.1

      about what? Slater was revealing the names of people whose names had been supressed to protect their victims.

      • Whaleoil 1.1.1

        Actually that is incorrect.

        Yes i was convicted on one s139 charge but all the others were s140 and from the original court orders the suprpession was at the request of the defendant.

    • paula 1.2

      [deleted]

      [lprent: As much as I personally dislike the SST, that comment dropped well over the edge. It was straight unsubstantiated defamation. ]

  2. jbanks 2

    I’m no legal export

    No, no you’re not. But more relevant, you’re no legal expert.

    • Blighty 2.1

      attention everyone! jbanks has found a typo! On the Interwebs!

      • mcflock 2.1.1

        be nice – for once he’s correct and someone else is wrong.

        Hell – I’m headed to my asteroid-impact bunker just in case this is a portent.

        • bbfloyd 2.1.1.1

          mcfloccy…you guys must be getting frantic if you think a minor spelling mistake discredits a statement. isn’t it about time you guys(rwnj) got a handle on reality?

          • mcflock 2.1.1.1.1

            How about you get a handle on context and therefore who I was suggesting that Blighty should be nice to?

  3. ianmac 3

    There is not only a question of privileges for “one of us”, but on the face of it there is a pretty huge variation in sentencing. I suppose the other factors have to be taken into account for those other criminals. Thus, had the Magistrate known of Garrett’s conviction for assault, would the discharge been the same?
    Incidentally. The other party in the assault case said that there was “no broken jaw in two places.” There were x-rays taken and they were sent on to NZ. Yet Garrett said that he had had his jaw broken by an assailant. MMmm.

    • Draco T Bastard 3.1

      The other party in the assault case said that there was “no broken jaw in two places.”

      Source?

      I must admit that I’m wondering how on earth you manage to break your jaw in two places when attacked from behind.

    • toad 3.2

      Garrett could easily clear up the issue of the broken jaw by releasing the x-rays.

      Unless, like the passport he said he never used, he’s destroyed them too.

      Mind you, having lied to the Police about the passport fraud until he reaslied they had enough evidence to ping him anyway, and apparently having then lied to the Court about having no prior criminal convictions after he pleaded guilty to the passport fraud, who would believe a work Garrett says.

    • Rex Widerstrom 3.3

      There is not only a question of privileges for “one of us”, but on the face of it there is a pretty huge variation in sentencing.

      Yes, while not denying Eddie’s assertion that being a lawyer (or some other member of “the club”) gives you a very good chance of being dealt with lightly, it can also have the reverse effect if the judge is of the opinion that you’ve broken a sacred trust, brought the profession into disrepute etc etc. My friend David Stevenson was dealt with overly severely for this very reason, I feel.

      As you say ianmac, there’s enormous disparity in sentencing – a “Mr Asia” associate gets zilch, the next example on the list gets a $10,000 fine and another gets prison?!

      The fine v prison disparity may be able to be explained by whether the fine was affordable by one man and not the other (and IMHO that shouldn’t be a reason to send someone to prison who would not otherwise) or whether use was made of the passports (it would have been useful if the DomPost had bothered to dig a little deeper and tell us).

      I’m certainly not in favour of minimum sentences or other attempts to tie the hands of the judiciary. But if you look at statistics for sentencing there are definitely outliers amongst judges. For instance there’s a Magistrate here whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver. If you’re before him for any traffic offence his favourite trick is to deny bail, thus giving you a de facto sentence of about 3 months jail while you await trial. This is well known – to such an extent that the police, if they like you, will schedule the prosecution for a day he’s not sitting – but nothing is done.

      A good start would be simple public reporting (yes, a “league table”!) showing the judges’ names, the offences and their sentencing patterns. Hopefully the system would then be more self-regulating.

  4. john 4

    I continue to believe ACT are nothing better than a bunch of white collar political criminals. To my mind the subversion of the so called Labour Party by the Rogernomes in the 80s is a crime far outweighing their current petty offences. That Mister Nice would have anything to do with this wild bunch says a lot about him!

    • ABC 4.1

      Does that include Helen Clark? She was integral to Rogernomics. Or how about the then Minister of Employment, Phil Goff. Not so surprising that he thinks workers trading their holidays is a good idea is it? In which case, what kind of party is Labour now? That any voter would have anything to do with the lot of them says much more.

      • Olwyn 4.1.1

        Helen Clark was a junior minister at that time, and stuck to her turf. She was not a rogernomics cheerleader. In her position you choose to stay and make changes where you can, or go, as Jim Anderson did. Neither action is dishonorable. What is dishonorable is to sell out on one’s principles all together.

        • Rex Widerstrom 4.1.1.1

          You may “choose to stay and make changes where you can” but if it becomes apparent that your power to do so is limited or non-existent the only honourable thing to do is walk away and clearly warn the voting public about the damage (or potential damage) being done by the people in control.

          I gave it six months, then pulled the plug and did what I could to warn people what Lhaws had in mind.

          “Choosing to stay and make (no) changes”, means you’ve put personal ambition ahead of public interest. While everyone who goes into politics has no shortage of the former, their true character emerges when it conflicts with the latter.

          Though he’s burned the goodwill off (and then some) since, and despite my naive belief that Lange would somehow find a way to sort out the mess, I admired Anderton for what he did at the time. I agonised for months over the possibility of a senior role in government, so I know it took guts to walk away from an actual senior role and into the possibility of obscurity.

  5. joe bloggs 5

    And a few other examples of special treatment for elite to add to Eddie’s collection:

    Mar 18 2006: Acting deputy commissioner Roger Carson said there was a prima facie case the Labour Party Pledge Card had breached the Electoral Act, which prohibits advertising promoting a party unless the party secretary has given written authorisation.

    Nov 24 2005: Police say they have enough evidence to charge Social Development and Employment Minister David Benson-Pope for allegedly assaulting students when he was a teacher, but they will not prosecute because the events occurred 23 years ago.

    July 9 2002: Police announce that there is sufficient prima facie evidence to consider charges of forgery pursuant to section 264 of the Crimes Act 1961 against Miss Clark and Mrs Bush.

    • ghostwhowalksnz 5.1

      While you are at . What about the AG inquiry in Bill Englishs claims for accommodation in Wellington or John Keys statuary declaration to live in his electorate ( when he didnt)

      • joe bloggs 5.1.1

        … not forgetting Phillip Field of course – guilty of 11 charges of bribery and corruption and 11 of perverting or obstructing the course of justice.

        Not only did the Labour Party refuse to apologise for Field’s, but they refused to even accept he was guilty.

  6. One part of the answer is that Garrett lied to the Court by telling it that he didn’t have any previous convictions (I’m no legal export but isn’t that perjury?).

    Not unless he was giving evidence but it is reason for the Law Society to open an investigation into whether or not he is a fit or proper person to continue to be able to practice law. Misleading a Court is about as serious as you can get.

  7. rich 7

    What interests me is that normally when there’s a notable case with name suppression, like that Auckland DJ getting a BJ, it gets reported to the full extent possible without breaching the order.

    Passport fraud is certainly a notable and unusual offence, as is the arraignment of a lawyer (who I think was already active in the SST). But we heard *nothing* about this case.

    Did the cops arrange for Garrett to be snuck in the back door of the District Court for a quick trial and sentence? Or did the media spike the story as conflicting with their narrative of Bad Brown Boys?

    • Bored 7.1

      I am awaiting Pollywogs contribution, he has said pretty much consistently that “if you are brown you are going down”.

      One wonders about the signals we send in our society when we are so dreadfully soft upon white collar crime and similar from the layer of society that we are supposed to look up to. Meanwhile we come down like a ton of bricks on the poor, disadvantaged etc for their crimes. What it tells me is that authority is far more worried that the lower orders will get “out of control” than it worried enough to police the offenses against the rest of us by the likes of Garrett.

      • Pascal's bookie 7.1.1

        What it tells me is that authority is far more worried that the lower orders will get “out of control” than it worried enough to police the offenses against the rest of us by the likes of Garrett.

        ….or otago university students

        • mcflock 7.1.1.1

          in which context?

          • Pascal's bookie 7.1.1.1.1

            What do you think would happen if a thousand odd south Auckland youths started setting bonfires in the street, blocking traffic and throwing bottles at police? I suspect we’d see many more convictions entered than what tends to have happened in Dunners.

            • mcflock 7.1.1.1.1.1

              dunno about that – they only reason there weren’t more arrests/convictions down here was because the police were too damned busy chasing and arresting others. And the videographers helped nab a load more over the following months as the footage was analysed.

              Don’t get me wrong, there is usually the discharge w/o conviction if the crime will screw up their career and is pretty minor, but in the more noteworthy events of the past few years they were shit out of luck. And the look of stunned surprise when they found that out was quite funny. And that’s not including the liberal application of semi-discriminate force by the police at the time.

              • Puddleglum

                I see what you’re saying but I think PB’s right when he says that a South Auckland rampage of similar proportions would bring a harsher response. It’s well-understood that student disturbances don’t lead to wider problems (after all, 1968 was a long time ago).

                A rampage in South Auckland – probably quite correctly – would make police, the judiciary and politicians very twitchy over cascade effects, broader social unrest and, ultimately, social upheaval – and you never know where that might end. (Think of the riots in Bradford and other English cities in recent years.)

                It’s one thing to have the sons and daughters of the middle class get drunk and senseless. As you pointed out, even those ‘children’ would be stunned to find out their actions were taken as a serious threat to society.

                It’s another thing to have widespread violence occuring in a deprived, oppressed and marginalised group in a society. Then there’s real trouble. Who knows, some opportunist radical might even try to turn the upheaval into organised resistance.

                Deep down in their bones, that’s what those who are doing ok out of the way things are really fear. In a lot of ways, mainstream politics is simply an argument over how best to handle that potential threat.

                • mcflock

                  But I would say that the widespread violence that clocked off in a few incidents in Dunedin were nowhere near the sort of level of widespread violence that would clock off in say Porirua – I’m thinking of alienated Algerian immigrant riots in Paris, or Redfern riots/protests against Aus police treatment.

                  It serves no purpose to say “these people are treated more leniently than these other people” if one group’s activities are more imminently dangerous and committed than the other’s.

                  I’m not that saying racism and classism is not reinforced by the police and judicial system, just that the Dunedin:Porirua comparison isn’t it. If, on the other hand, we were talking just basic ordinary crimes (like stealing a pie from a corner store), and see whether a white rich student is charged/diverted/convicted as opposed to a m/p unemployed school leaver, then that would be more interesting social commentary. For some reason lifting a pie is more prejudicial to the career of somebody hoping to graduate in a couple of years than to the career of a kid looking for a job now.

                  • Puddleglum

                    Agreed, though it’s all bound up together – and that was part of what I was trying to say.

                    Racist responses can be understood as based on fear about the “imminently dangerous” situation that arises when one ‘race’ oppresses another. Suppression of slave revolts in the Caribbean in the late 18th/ early 19th centuries were carried out in emphatically racist ways and backed by racist rhetoric but were basically about fear of the “imminently dangerous” nature of the general social situation (i.e., slavery).

                    Similarly, the fact that “the widespread violence that clocked off in a few incidents in Dunedin were nowhere near the sort of level of widespread violence that would clock off in say Porirua” is partly because of an implicit understanding (by police, judiciary, ‘middle New Zealand’) of the different social settings.

                    Who knows, maybe someone of lower SES (white or brown) might be given a harsher sentence (for pie stealing) because of the same implicit understanding of the social setting (e.g., fear that the oppressive conditions they live in means they will be more likely to re-offend). That’s pretty much the same, isn’t it, as fear that violence by young brown people in Porirua is more likely to ignite more widespread violence than that ignited by mainly white young people (and ‘students’) in Dunedin?

                    Both cases – the Porirua riot and the pie stealing – represent equally “interesting social commentary” from that perspective.

                    • mcflock

                      So is the actual threat level in an area of group disorder always the same?
                      Is a disorderly group of males posing up for cameras and girls of the same threat level as a disorderly group of genuinely angry males who have been alienated and discriminated against?

                      I would say no.

                      A difference in response is not necessarily based on race or class, the actual threat level needs to be kept in mind. The Porirua kids might have a better reason to riot, but it doesn’t mean they’re as wussy as a 2nd year BCom.

            • ryan 7.1.1.1.1.2

              The only entire shopping malls destroyed by drunken youths in the thousands are in WEST auckland.. NACT keep it up and they will strike the world cup, mark these words.

      • pollywog 7.1.2

        Man… i’m about done on the subject…

        The whole political/judicial system is eurocentrically biased since its inception over 150 years ago and theres not the slightest bit of concerted effort to truly change it as long as the voter base electing succesive gov’ts, of whatever political leaning, pander to the inherent eurocentric cultural bias and the sellout uncle Tom’s accept the token gestures of political inclusivity, at the expense of speaking out on these issues.

        What’s any of the political reps got to say on this, and more so i’m asking the question of the Su’a Sio’s, the Peseta Sam’s, The Carmel Sepuloni’s and even the prospective Kris Fa’afois ?

        From personal experience to media reporting, TV programmes targetting poor people and low budget crime, to abuse of name supression, to conflicts of interest with judges affecting their rulings, to soft sentencing for those of ‘good breeding’, even to property rights for rich beachfront owners differing from rightful Maori owners and lower priced leases of Maori owned land to favoured leasees…it’s fucking criminal

        but the definition of criminal is measured on a sliding scale of factors that have nothing to do with the punishment reflecting the severity of the crime.

        I attended a presentation by NZ’s top Pasifikan policeman a few nights ago. A man of 30 plus years in the force whose ranks reflects the time invested. His voice cracked and tears welled up as he recounted stories of the ‘dawn raids’ of the 70’s where even he, as a teenager, was pulled over by cops and questioned as to his legitimacy status despite being NZ born and was close to arrest because he couldn’t produce his birth certificate as he was walking home.

        He made mention of ‘pig patrol’ volunteers from the Polynesian Panthers, who tailed police in finding the paddy wagons which signalled the taskforce specifically targetting Pasifikans. These ‘panthers’ then went on to advocate for those in police interviews and in court. Panthers, who, i have no doubt, would have been considered ‘uppity niggas’ that don’t know their place.

        While the times have overtly changed on ‘the thin blue line’ it doesn’t seem to have changed much in the judiciary system where like B said… If you’re brown you’re going down.

        So where’s our Pasifikan political reps speaking for us on this and advocating for us in parliament ? Wheres the one bi partisan voice reaching out across the house to echo these sentiments ? Wheres the condemnation of Maurice Williamson in joking about us having our ‘papers in order’ to Oscar Kightley, a member of the NZ Order of Merit.

        I CANT FUCKING HEAR YOU !!!

        just like our voices in the street cant be heard by wider society, yet the actions of not being heard, in us becoming a silent and invisible underclass, are reflected in our embarassing health, education and employment statistics.

        The current solution from the current gov’t, being to build more prisons in partnership with private enterprise to put more of us in jail and put more money into the rich eurocentrists who perpetuate the cultural bias that primarily contributes to said embarassing stats, is reminscent of ‘the final solution.’

        as long as we’re positively portrayed as the jovial, happy, humble, fat roly poly christian then sure…”lifes a gas and then you die” and as for the rest, jail us and sterilise us so we cant breed more criminals.

        That, coming from a lying, fraudulent, violently offending law and order spokesperson whose crimes were knowingly covered up by himself, the judiciary and his parliamentary boss is why, beyond the initial anger, a deep set frustration sets in that says..

        aint a damn thing gonna change anytime soon.

        ahhhh…Ok now i’m done, for today at least 🙂

        • Bored 7.1.2.1

          Thanks Polly, knew you would deliver. have a top weekend.

          • pollywog 7.1.2.1.1

            storm’s coming in, i’m all outta firewood and the chainsaws blunt…dammit

            …but still i’ll have a better weekend than a lot of others who’re wayy worse off than me

            you have a top weekend yaself…B

            never let the fuckers grind ya down !!!

        • BLiP 7.1.2.2

          as long as we’re positively portrayed as the jovial, happy, humble, fat roly poly christian then sure…”lifes a gas and then you die” and as for the rest, jail us and sterilise us so we cant breed more criminals.

          Couldn’t agree more. Did you see Carmel’s post over at red Alert?

  8. Name 8

    Garrett’s just one of the 99% of politicians who give the rest a bad name.

  9. randal 9

    so garret is an elite.
    out with it.
    what has he got to be elite about.
    we (that is the people ) want to know.

  10. burt 10

    As his mentor always said; “move on”.

    hey great he’s resigned eh… it was the only right thing to do and it’s a pity his mentor validated herself rather than did what was right.

  11. ak 11

    He’s gone. Just remains now as to whether he takes Hide with him – and whether Hide rakes Grinny on the way down. On the latter, watch for the results of a deal.

    • toad 11.1

      No, he’s gone from ACT, not from Parliament – at least yet. But as a list MP who resigned from his party becasue of personal disgrace rather than policy differences, staying on as an MP would be completely untenable.

      • burt 11.1.1

        Taito managed to hang in pretty well but I doubt ACT will provide the level of shelter that Labour did….

  12. rich 12

    Didn’t stop Donna Awatere-Huata.

    Thing is, Garrett (and Boscawen) bought their way in with a big donation. Maybe ACT will realise that while auctioning list spots might be in line with neocon principles, it doesn’t make for a high quality of candidate.

  13. burt 13

    So far with the exception of Rodney disgraced ACT party members move on – big contrast to disgraced Labour and National party members who tell us to move on.

  14. Zeebop 14

    Garrett should resign. He obviously is too stupid to be an MP, he must have known
    his mug was on a fake passport somewhere, and that being the Law and Order
    shrill for the extreme right ACT would bring him to the attention of every
    criminal investigator. How dumb was that? Someone immediately picking up
    a copy of the passport application and saying, that’s sure isn’t, it can’t be,
    yes, it is, it’s Garrett MP for law and order! Garrett knew the police were investigating
    the Israeli passport fraudsters and it was inevitable they’d go over old unused
    passports, use new databases of births, deaths, etc..

    Garrett could have saved ACT by bowing out then, but he tired it on, just as we
    now find he didn’t tell the court about his Tongo assault conviction when the
    judge handed down the slap on the wrist for the passport fraud.

    WFT this guy is still a MP, why isn’t Hide, Key, Goff…

    Garrett is gone.

  15. randal 15

    you zoomin me rich dude.
    did garrett and boscawen really buy their seats?

    • Anne 15.1

      In effect Randal they did.
      Boscawen by making very generous donations starting in the mid 90s.
      Garrett via the SS Trust who also generously donated to Act over the years.

  16. toad 16

    Woohooo!!!!! More to come

    I was further advised that the only safe thing for me to do in the legal sense was to apply to the North Shore District Court – where my case was heard – for a waiver or discharge of the suppression order so I could be free to speak about my own case. That has now been obtained so I am freer to speak that I was, but issues have arisen regarding the affidavit I swore in that case which means I am unable to discuss that aspect of the case.

    Does that mean what I think it means – that he’s now being investigated for perjury?

  17. Lez Howard 17

    Good ridance to the little bag of snot Garret

  18. Noirth 18

    It’s the fascistic madman Garth McPricar needs to be looked at closely now……

  19. Swampy 19

    Why wasn’t Trevor Mallard prosecuted by the police for assault as a Government minister? Maybe it had something to do with being a Government minister at the time? Yet when Shane Ardern backed his tractor up the steps of Parliament, Helen’s government got the book thrown at him.

    Why wasn’t Labour prosecuted for stealing the $800,000, clear enough evidence against them? oops, they were the government? Why did they have to pay it back if they hadn’t broken the law?

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Christchurch trial new defense against fleeing drivers
    Darroch Ball, Spokesperson for Law and Order New Zealand First welcomes the deployment of an Eagle Police helicopter in Christchurch in what is a step towards fulfilling its long-standing goal to increase the use of police helicopters for the front line, particularly in addressing the scourge of fleeing drivers. Christchurch leads ...
    10 hours ago
  • Week That Was: A Government of progress
    It may have been the first sitting week of 2020, but our Government is already in full-swing - managing a strong economy, investing in infrastructure, and working to break the cycle of homelessness. Read below for all that, and more... ...
    3 days ago
  • Winston Peters calls Opposition “lemon suckers” during debate on gang numbers
    In a heated debate in Parliament, National's Deputy Leader Paula Bennett claimed that “nearly 1600 patched gang members have been added” since the Coalition Government took power. To illustrate her point, she altered a chart used by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to show her government’s progress in housing to instead ...
    3 days ago
  • Speech by the Rt Hon Winston Peters at Parliament’s Opening 2020 ‘We all Need Insurance’
    Speech by the Rt Hon Winston Peters at Parliament’s Opening 2020 "We all need insurance" This year New Zealanders are going to have a clear choice to make That choice is between: Optimism versus pessimism; More progress versus back to the future; Investment versus divestment; Unity versus division. New Zealand ...
    5 days ago
  • 8 ways the Big New Zealand Upgrade will change New Zealand
    The Government has announced the biggest investment in New Zealand’s infrastructure in a generation with the New Zealand Upgrade Programme. ...
    1 week ago
  • Shane Jones slams Auckland Airport’s board over runway closures
    Infrastructure Minister Shane Jones has slammed the Board of Auckland Airport following the airport's runway closing twice within two weeks due to maintenance. Around 2,000 passengers were affected by last week’s runway closures, according to 1NEWS. Another maintenance closure on January 24 saw two international flights and three domestic flights ...
    1 week ago
  • Public media business case a practical step
    Jenny Marcroft, Spokesperson for Broadcasting New Zealand First supports the commissioning of a business case to assess the viability of a new public media entity. “A strong media environment is critical for a healthy democracy. New Zealand First is a strong supporter of a diverse, independent media,” New Zealand First broadcasting spokesperson ...
    1 week ago
  • Week That Was: Waitangi
    This week, the focus was on Waitangi - a great opportunity to reflect on who we are, and who we want to be as a nation. ...
    1 week ago
  • West Coast tech firms and iwi get Provincial Growth Fund cash boost
    Pounamou and technology industries in the West Coast region are set to receive more than $2 million in Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) funding. This was announced by the Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau during Waitangi Day commemorations in Hokitika. He said $800,000 would be given to Development West ...
    1 week ago
  • Unemployment down, wage growth up proof of strong labour market
    Clayton Mitchell MP, New Zealand First spokesperson for Labour and Industrial Relations Unemployment and wage growth numbers released by Stats NZ today demonstrate a labour market in good shape with unemployment falling to 4.0%, the underutilisation rate falling to an 11 year low, and wage growth at a 10-year high ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand First welcomes official opening of Te Rau Aroha Museum
    Hon. Ron Mark, New Zealand First Spokesperson for Defence New Zealand First Spokesperson for Defence Ron Mark, welcomes the official opening of Te Rau Aroha, a new museum at Waitangi Treaty Grounds as part of our Coalition Agreement. “It is a great honour to be part of an effective Government ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Speech: Opening of Waitangi Museum Te Rau Aroha
    Rt. Hon. Winston Peters, Deputy Prime Minister Good morning, Let us start with important acknowledgements. First, this special day, in remembrance of the 28th Maori Battalion, is also to honour all those men and women who have risked their lives in the service of our country. Second, special guest Robert ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Winston Peters: “New Zealand will look to build on relationship with the UK”
    Foreign Minister Winston Peters says New Zealand will look to build on its relationship with the United Kingdom and recommit to the European Union, after the country officially left the continental union recently. The Minister said New Zealand already cooperates closely with Britain on defence and security issues and has ...
    2 weeks ago
  • FAQ – Everything you need to know about the Big New Zealand Upgrade
    Today, our Government announced the biggest infrastructure investment in a generation. We’re investing $12 billion to upgrade and build rail, roads, schools and hospitals across the country – modernising our infrastructure, preparing for climate change and helping to future-proof our economy. Find out everything you need to know about the ...
    3 weeks ago

  • Rental reforms a step closer with the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill
    Today the Government is making progress on a fairer and more secure rental market for renters and landlords with the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill in Parliament.  “This Bill includes a series of reforms to improve the wellbeing of the 609,700 households that live in rented homes, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Biosecurity Minister announces world first eradication of pea weevil
    A Government programme to wipe out pea weevil has achieved a world first, with Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor today announcing the successful eradication of the noxious pest from Wairarapa. This means the nearly four-year ban on pea plants and pea straw was lifted today. Commercial and home gardeners can again grow ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Temporary Accommodation Service activated for Southland flooding
    Southland residents hit by flooding caused by heavy rainfall can now access help finding temporary accommodation with the Government activating the Temporary Accommodation Service, Minister of Civil Defence Peeni Henare announced today. “The Temporary Accommodation Service (TAS) has been activated by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to help ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Bridges: Over-hyped and under-delivered
    “Is that it?” That’s Finance Minister Grant Robertson’s response to Simon Bridges’ much-hyped economic speech today. “Simon Bridges just gave the most over-hyped and under-delivered speech that I can remember during my time in politics,” Grant Robertson said. “It’s not surprising. Simon Bridges literally said on the radio this morning ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    10 hours ago
  • Police to trial eye in the sky in Christchurch
    A trial deployment of the Police Eagle helicopter in Christchurch will test whether the aircraft would make a significant difference to crime prevention and community safety. “The Bell 429 helicopter will be based in Christchurch for five weeks, from 17 February to 20 March,” said Police Minister Stuart Nash. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Momentum of trade talks continues with visits to promote Pacific and Middle East links
    The Government has kept up the pace of its work to promote New Zealand’s trade interests and diversify our export markets, with visits to Fiji and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker. Building momentum to bring the PACER Plus trade and development agreement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    15 hours ago
  • Coalition Govt’s investment in Customs nets record drugs haul: 3 tonnes stopped at borders in 2019
    The Coalition Government’s investment in a strong border and disrupting transnational organised crime produced record results for stopping drugs in 2019, says Minister of Customs Jenny Salesa. The illegal drugs were seized at the New Zealand border by Customs, and overseas by Customs’ international border partners before the drugs could ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • Separated scenic cycleway starts
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford today kicked off construction of a separated cycleway alongside Tamaki Drive. A two-way separated cycleway will be built along the northern side of Tamaki Drive, between the Quay Street Cycleway extension and Ngapipi Road. There will be a separate walking path alongside. Phil Twyford said giving ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Earthquake-Prone Building loan scheme: eligibility criteria announced
    Owner-occupiers of unit and apartments living in earthquake-prone buildings will have certainty about the financial support they’ll be eligible for with the release of criteria for an upcoming assistance scheme, Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa says. The Residential Earthquake-Prone Building Financial Assistance Scheme will help unit owners facing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Travel restrictions to remain in place as coronavirus precaution
    Temporary restrictions on travel from China will remain in place as a precautionary measure to protect against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. The restrictions which prevent foreign nationals travelling from, or transiting through, mainland China from entering New Zealand have been extended for a further 8 days. This position ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Over $1 million to help Tairāwhiti youth into employment
    Employment Minister Willie Jackson announced today that Tairāwhiti rangatahi will benefit from an investment made by the Government’s He Poutama Rangatahi (HPR) scheme. The funding will go to the Tautua Village, Kauneke programme and the Matapuna Supported Employment Programme which will fund 120 rangatahi over two years. “Both programmes work ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • School attendance has to improve
    All parents and caregivers need to ensure that their children go to school unless they are sick, Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin said today. “The school attendance results for 2019 show, across the board, a drop in the number of students going to school regularly,” the Minister says. “Apart from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Crown and Moriori sign a Deed of Settlement
    A Deed of Settlement agreeing redress for historical Treaty claims has been signed by the Crown and Moriori at Kōpinga Marae on Rēkohu (Chatham Islands) today, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little has announced. Moriori have a tradition of peace that extends back over 600 years. This settlement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Waikato Expressway driving towards completion
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford today with Māori King Tuheitia Pōtatau Te Wherowhero VII officially opened the country’s newest road, the $384 million Huntly section of the Waikato Expressway. The 15km four-lane highway with side and central safety barriers takes State Highway 1 east of Huntly town, across lowlands and streams ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • 3400 New Zealanders treated in first year of new hepatitis C treatment
    The rapid uptake of life-saving new hepatitis C medicine Maviret since it was funded by PHARMAC a year ago means the elimination of the deadly disease from this country is a realistic goal, Health Minister David Clark says. Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus which attacks the liver, proving fatal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Kaupapa Māori approach for homelessness
      Kaupapa Māori will underpin the Government’s new plan to deal with homelessness announced by the Prime Minister in Auckland this morning. “Māori are massively overrepresented among people experiencing homelessness, so, to achieve different outcomes for Māori, we have to do things very differently,” says the Minister of Māori Development ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government steps up action to prevent homelessness
    1000 new transitional housing places delivered by end of year to reduce demand for emergency motel accommodation. Introduce 25% of income payment, after 7 days, for those in emergency motel accommodation to bring in line with other forms of accommodation support. Over $70m extra to programmes that prevents those at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Important step for new financial conduct regime
    Clear requirements for ensuring customers are treated fairly by banks, insurers and other financial service providers are included in new financial conduct legislation that passed its first reading today. “The recent reviews, by the Financial Markets Authority (FMA) and Reserve Bank of New Zealand, into the conduct of banks and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Applications invited for $7 million Regional Culture and Heritage Fund
    Applications are now open for the fifth round of the Regional Culture and Heritage Fund Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Grant Robertson announced today.   “I am delighted to open this year’s fund which has some $7 million available to support performing arts venues, galleries, museums and whare ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Law Commission appointment celebrates Māori and women
    The Minister of Māori Development, Hon Nanaia Mahuta today congratulated Associate Professor Amokura Kawharu on her appointment as the next President of the Law Commission.  “Amokura Kawharu will be a standout in her new role, leading in an innovative and forward looking approach to the law reform process. She will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Associate Professor Amokura Kawharu Appointed Law Commission President
    Auckland University legal academic Amokura Kawharu has been appointed as the next President of the Law Commission, Justice Minister Andrew Little announced today.    Associate Professor Kawharu will take up her new appointment on 11 May 2020.   “I would like to congratulate Associate Professor Kawharu on her appointment,” Andrew ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Minister of Employment launches Youth Ready Employer Programme
    A programme for employers to help them engage effectively with younger employees was launched today by Minister of Employment, Willie Jackson. The Youth Ready Employer Programme contains a range of on-line templates that employers can easily access to help with employing and retaining young people in their businesses. The programme ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Budget 2020 date announced
    Budget 2020 will be delivered on Thursday 14 May, Finance Minister Grant Robertson announced today. “This year’s Budget will continue the Coalition Government’s focus on tackling the long-term challenges facing New Zealand while also preparing the economy for the future. “Those challenges and opportunities cannot be resolved in one budget, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Prime Minister’s tribute to former Prime Minister Mike Moore
    I move, That this House place on record its appreciation and thanks for the devoted and distinguished service to New Zealand by the late Rt Hon Michael Kenneth Moore, member of the Order of New Zealand, a member of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, an Honorary Member of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Agriculture Minister declares adverse event in Northland
    Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor has today classified the drought conditions in Northland as an adverse event for the primary sector, unlocking $80,000 in Government support. “This is recognition that the extreme and prolonged nature of this dry spell is taking its toll on our farmers and growers and additional support ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Police disrupt methamphetamine trade
    The Minister of Police says an operation to smash a trans national drug smuggling ring today will make a significant impact on the methamphetamine trade fuelling harm in our communities. Police have announced 10 arrests and the seizure of up to five million dollars’ worth of illicit drugs after an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Crown accounts in good shape to counter global challenges
    The Government’s books are in a strong position to withstand global headwinds, with the accounts in surplus and expenses close to forecast, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. The Treasury today released the Crown accounts for the six months to December. The operating balance before gains and losses (OBEGAL) was above ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Racing Safety Development Fund open for applications
    Race courses can improve safety with this year’s second round of funding from the Racing Safety Development Fund. Minister for Racing Winston Peters has announced the second funding round of 2019/20 is open with $347,875 available for distribution. “The racing industry is integral to the economic and social fabric of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government to fund Aids research
    The Government is committing $300,000 to fund research to update behavioural information to make sure HIV and STI prevention services are targeted appropriately in New Zealand. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Finance Minister Grant Robertson made the announcement at today’s Big Gay Out in Auckland. “There is much talk about ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Work to begin on a possible new public media entity
    The Minister of Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media has announced work will begin on a business case to assess the viability of forming a new public media entity.   “The Government must ensure New Zealanders have a strong independent public media service for decades to come, which means ensuring public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government support for communities impacted by flooding
      Minister of Civil Defence Hon Peeni Henare announced today that the Government will contribute $100,000 to the Southland regional Mayoral Relief Fund, to support communities impacted by the recent flooding in Southland.  Mr Henare says this week’s flooding has caused significant disruption to communities in the lower South Island.  ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New grants for seismic strengthening of heritage buildings
    Heritage buildings throughout New Zealand will benefit from the $1.1 million in Heritage EQUIP funding grants announced today. “These grants for seismic strengthening projects help private building owners get the advice they need to start building work or to get the work completed,” Grant Robertson says. “Timaru’s Grosvenor Hotel has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Next level results for game development industry
    A new survey has found New Zealand’s game development sector has grown beyond expectations and is on track to becoming a billion dollar industry in 2025, Economic Development Minister Phil Twyford says. “New Zealand’s interactive media sector grew by 42 per cent in last financial year to $203.4 million, according ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • More than 70 marae online through PGF
    Te Tii, the lower marae at Waitangi, is among more than 70 marae now connected to broadband internet thanks to the Provincial Growth Fund’s marae connectivity scheme, Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones said today. In February 2019, the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) allocated $21 million to connect rural towns ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • PGF supports West Coast connectivity
    The West Coast has had a funding injection of over $1.2 million from the Provincial Growth Fund, Under Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced at Waitangi Day commemorations in Hokitika today.  The PGF projects announced are:  $800,000 to Development West Coast for a Grey District Regional Digital Hub ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Agriculture Minister declares adverse event in Southland
    Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor has declared an adverse event for the Southland and Otago regions, unlocking Government support for farmers and growers. “Widespread flooding has resulted in severe disruption, with many people evacuated from their homes and many farms being affected by flood waters. It’s putting pressure on our farmers, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • PM announces public funeral service for Mike Moore
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced a funeral service for former Labour Prime Minister the Rt Hon Mike Moore, ONZ, AO. A public service will be held on Friday 14 February at 2pm at Dilworth School senior campus, 2 Erin Street, Epsom, Auckland. “The service will be a celebration of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Low unemployment shows economy in good shape
    Today’s news of low unemployment, rising wages and record numbers of Maori in work shows the economy is in good shape and that the Government is delivering better outcomes across New Zealand. “The Coalition Government has overseen a strong economy. Our investments in infrastructure, our focus on lifting wages of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Opening of Waitangi Museum Te Rau Aroha
    Opening of Waitangi Museum Te Rau Aroha 9.30am, 5 February 2020 [CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY] Good morning, Let us start with important acknowledgements. First, this special day, in remembrance of the 28th Maori Battalion, is also to honour all those men and women who have risked their lives in the service ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Support for crayfish industry after disruptions
    The government has agreed to help crayfish exporters to minimise the impact of trade disruptions caused by the coronavirus outbreak in China. Between 150 and 180 tonnes of live rock lobster are currently held in New Zealand in pots and tanks, at sea and on land, after export orders were ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago