web analytics

GST hike = tax cut for rich only

Written By: - Date published: 11:49 pm, March 14th, 2010 - 50 comments
Categories: gst, tax - Tags: , , ,

John Key on the coming tax money go round:

“it will make the bulk of New Zealanders either better off or a lot better off, and on a straight GST income tax no one will be worse off”

The tax changes leaked to the Sunday-Star Times:

  • GST up to 15%
  • $0-$14,000 bracket from12.5% to 10%
  • $14,000-$48,000 bracket from 21% to 19%
  • $70,000+ bracket from 38% to 33%
  • Some kind of tax tightening for landlords (expected to be partially passed on in rents)

Using these numbers, the IRD’s table of income distribution, and tables in the Tax Working Group’s report that shows how much of their income people pay on GST at different incomes, I’ve worked out the net reduction (or increase) in tax at different income levels:

While it’s good that the poor haven’t been ignored entirely (and I think the campaign by the Left can claim that victory) they’re getting the barest of compensation, a few cents a week assuming typical GST bills. Even up to $47,000, more than what 2.6 million taxpayers earn, the net tax cut is just $3 a week.

Higher income workers, from about $57,000 to $83,000 fare even worse – their increased GST bill outweighs their income tax cut because there’s no reduction to the 33% rate and they end up worse off.

So, are “bulk of New Zealanders either better off or a lot better off, and on a straight GST income tax [none] worse off”? No. 10% get a net tax increase and 80% of taxpayers get a net reduction of piddling size that will be overwhelmed for many by rent hikes.

Remember these numbers don’t (can’t) account for rent increases due to the changes in property tax. I support discouraging over-investment in housing but there needs to be compensation for renters, and less than $3 a week at best simply won’t cut it.

The real money, as was always National’s intention, goes to the rich. The total net tax cut for the 22,000 wealthiest taxpayers is over $200 million – more than the total for the poorest 2.5 million. Put it another way, for every dollar net tax cut the typical Kiwi gets the elite will get over $100. And they’re not likely to have to use that money (and more) to cover higher rent.

This is all nothing but a complicated way of taking money out of the pockets of working Kiwis and putting it in the pockets of the wealthy. No-one thinks that these tax changes will increase growth but they will increase inequality.

The whole idea of increasing GST should be scrapped and the housing tax reforms used to compensate low income New Zealanders first. But I don’t see that happening. The whole point of the exercise for National is to further enrich the wealthy at the cost of everyone else.

50 comments on “GST hike = tax cut for rich only ”

  1. Jim Nald 1

    With the GST trojan horse, National sets up NZ to enter the new decade with a huge wealth transfer to the rich 🙁

    • Lanthanide 1.1

      I said at the time of the last budget when they “postponed” the proposed taxcuts that actually what they were planning was tax reform, not tax changes.

      And what-do-ya-know, National’s tax cut response to Labour’s (that already favoured the wealthy wtih 39%->37% top rate reduction) clearly wasn’t what their constituency wanted, so they used this sham of the then-current plans being ‘postponed’, so they could be conveniently forgotten about and replaced with something that, if they’d originally proposed, they wouldn’t have been elected for (not when compared to Labour’s much more realistic plans).

      Hopefully NZ will wake up and kick them out at the first possible chance for this duplicitous PR scheme.

  2. Bored 2

    This is what your common Joe aspired to at the last election, and according to the polls still favours. Consequently my sense of outrage is somewhat muted, its the price to be paid by the common man for voting in this bunch of scumbags.

    Marty, on another note, “elite”…..being rich is one thing, they are not however the “elite”, it gives them a status thoroughly undeserved, please desist..

    • prism 2.1

      Oh to have that undeserving status, I must buy a Lotto ticket it’s my only chance of joining the elite, can’t do it any other way.

    • Clarke 2.2

      This is what your common Joe aspired to at the last election, and according to the polls still favours.

      There does seem to be solid and incontrovertible evidence that turkeys do actually vote for Christmas.

  3. tc 3

    Muldoon would be proud and envious of the msm doting and fawning over them into the bargain.

  4. Jenny 4

    “This is all nothing but a complicated way of taking money out of the pockets of working Kiwis and putting it in the pockets of the wealthy.”

    Marty, couldn’t agree more. Indeed GST since it’s introduction by Sir Roger Douglas was designed that way, and just as this subsequent increase in GST will, as you say “increase inequality” so did it’s inception.

    I see that you think that “The whole idea of increasing GST should be scrapped”. I and probably a lot of others would go further in thinking that GST should be scrapped altogether, and replaces with something like a FTT. Of course I realise that the Labour Party is deeply wedded to continuing GST.

    But how about this idea:

    http://unityaotearoa.blogspot.com/2010/03/hey-labour-mps-why-not-support-gst-off.html

  5. Good graph Marty. Crumbs for the poor and cake for the rich, again.

  6. Nice analysis Marty, but something doesn’t quite add up in the original SST article.

    I suspect, looking at the NZIER graph, that the SST neglected to spell out that the $48,000-$70,000 bracket would also fall under this option, to 30%. (I guess we’ll find out for sure when the NZIER report comes out this week whether that is what they did their modelling on.)

    • Marty G 6.1

      bugger, that’s just in the physical version is it?

      That would get rid of that negative patch but increase the cost a lot, and the bulk of the money would still be going to the wealthy.

      • Bright Red 6.1.1

        Nah, you’re right mate. There’s nothing in the physical version about cutting the 33% rate.

        The graphic is a real hash, claiming that you’ll get the same net tax cut at any point over income ranges – $100K and $145K for example. Clearly wrong to anyone who thinks about it even for a moment.

  7. The graphic is from NZIER, which doesn’t mean it’s automatically right but suggests there’s probably some sort of logic to it. My read of it is that the figures are supposed to be the average across each of the income bands they’ve given. Not sure that’s the clearest way to communicate this information but it does make at least some sort of sense.

    If you take (crudely) the mid-points of each income band and throw in the 30% rate, then the tax cut figures do seem to add up. (But Bright Red IS correct – the ‘Source’ doesn’t say anything about 30% – hmm . . . )

  8. Lanthanide 8

    “While it’s good that the poor haven’t been ignored entirely (and I think the campaign by the Left can claim that victory) ”

    No, because on the day of National’s speech, Key was on Campbell Live and said “tax cuts across the board”, so this was the plan all along.

    You’ve made multiple posts where he made comments afterwards that implied tax cuts wouldn’t be given to those on the lowest incomes (and each time I asked you to give a source for this, but you never did – some other poster tangentially answered that for me), but the fact stands that on national television on the day of the speech he said that tax cuts would be “across the board”, when directly asked by Campbell. I know Key flip-flops on a lot of things, but that’s not the sort of statement you turn back on lightly.

  9. Sookie 9

    I don’t get the lack of a cut to the 33% rate. Most middle income people, ergo a good chunk of National voters, get clobbered by the 48K to 70K rate. Surely it would be politically stupid to make these people pay more in tax through the GST hike? There are not enough rich pricks (thanks Cullen) to vote National in by themselves. There must be plans for some kind of cut to that rate, surely?

  10. TightyRighty 10

    the line you have imposed on the graph could equally be the same line if the graph measuered tax burden, and the line represented the impact of said burden if tax was raised. with a marginal tax system this is what you get. proportionality. this is hard to understand i know, but those who pay progressively more tax, get progressivley better off from tax reductions, because they pay more tax anyway. in a nutshell, if you don’t pay much tax, then you don’t stand to gain much. if you pay lots of tax, then you gain significantly more. the only real way to help the very lowest decile, is to increase welfare transfers. which helps nobody really.

    • lprent 10.1

      There is a much simpler way. Just cut the tax rate on the lowest tax bracket.

      It benefits every taxpayer without the ratchet effect you describe in the upper brackets. More importantly it reduces the direct tax burden on those who are least able to afford GST increases.

      • Lanthanide 10.1.1

        Or, alternatively, if you want to throw a little extra cash to those in the upper brackets (to encourage them to stay in NZ, or “invest in NZ” or whatever today’s slogan is), you can move the brackets upwards without changing their rate. This allows you to control exactly how much the people at the top gets and ensures that no one is taking tax cuts worth hundreds of dollars a week when the ‘average’ NZer is getting maybe $5-10 if they’re lucky.

        Everyone understands that cutting the rates will help those with the most money, but to imply that there is no other choice is simply disingenuous (or ignorant), TightyRighty.

        • Bright Red 10.1.1.1

          yeah, you should move brackets if you’re going to do anything, I think. The cost is set (doesn’t increase with inflation) and the cut is not open-ended.

        • TightyRighty 10.1.1.2

          i didn’t imply that, but take from what i said what you will. putting words in other peoples mouths is more disingenuous.

      • TightyRighty 10.1.2

        i’m actually more in favour of a tax free band, but i know what you are saying. it won’t however fix the distortions at the top end of the scale. moving the brackets as mentioned below will help that further, though the marginal tax system is the real problem. a flat tax system is the fairest way of fixing the current distortions. and if government could make do with less, then it is acheivable.

        • Pascal's bookie 10.1.2.1

          and if government could make do with less

          It’s not the government TR. It’s the people. They won’t vote for politicians that promise to make big enough cuts to services. They like those services.

          That’s why ‘tax cutting’ politicians campaign on ‘efficiency’ and ‘cutting the fat’. The fact that there is precious little fat to cut, and that there are no major efficiency gains to be made, mean that tax cutting pollies either don’t make substantial cuts (but rather just shift the burden downwards) or run up big deficits.

          • gitmo 10.1.2.1.1

            I dunno about the assertion that there’s precious little fat to cut.

            If you look at the growth in public spending increased quite dramatically (40-65 billion 2003-09) – even though there are some areas of public spending that have been maintained at a a very low level of growth during the same time period, certainly some of that spending has been prudent rainy day stuff – kiwisaver and cullen fund. But there has also been what I consider some crazy stuff that will come back to bite us and the politicians in the future such as WFF,ACC and lack of copayments by the public in health being too generous in my opinion and then there’s the anecdotal stuff that all of us dealing with the public sector and QANGOs have seen over the last couple of decades.

            • Pascal's bookie 10.1.2.1.1.1

              If the fat was there then it would of easily been found in the line by line reviews, trumpeted to high heaven, and cut to pay for meaningful tax cuts north of fifty dollars a week.

              The other things you mention, WFF etc, are policy choices. They are not ‘fat’ in the sense of spending you can eliminate without affecting services.

              In a sense, you’re exactly who the ‘trim the fat’ rhetoric is aimed at. You just interpret all your personal policy dislikes as ‘fat’ and assume that’s what they are talking about. If a government wanted to save money by eliminating that type of ‘fat’ though, they could just cmapign on eliminating the policy. But then they wouldn’t win because, as I said, too many people like those policies.

              • gitmo

                Too many people like getting things for free that we cannot afford…… yes I agree with you there. Both National and Labour have made a rod for their own backs over a few decades creating a population that has no notion of the cost of what is provided to them and an unwillingness to have a lessening of public support/control over their lives.

                This has lead to rather timid government unwilling to make the slow incremental changes where they probably need to.

              • Pascal's bookie

                But that’s not what I said.

              • Pascal's bookie

                (missed the edit window in reply to your new and improved comment)

                People like the services yes, and they won’t vote for cutting them. Left wing governments that support those services are put in the position of having to explain how they are going to pay for them. You get things like 99, where Labour campaigned on raising income tax to pay for things.

                Right wing governments hate taxes, and promise to cut them, but find that campaigning on cutting services gets them nowhere, so they tell lies, and make up silly stories about Laffer curves and what not.

                At the end of the day, they either cut taxes and services, (and get thrown out of office), cut taxes without cutting services, (and run huge deficits) or don’t cut taxes, (but shift the burden downwards to reward their mates).

              • TightyRighty

                could you please explain how cutting wff will result in service reductions? i know you say it is a policy choice, but i seem to remember labour never campaigned on introducing it. once that choice has been made, then of course it is electorally difficult for national to scrap. even if it was scrapped in favour of only reducing the tax burden for those people in the applicable tax bands, labour and the left would find a way to make it seem like it’s “benny bashing”.

                this is despite the fact that wff is a discriminatory tax and spend policy. it discriminates against the homosexual portion of society, the single portion of society, and the couples who choose not to have children for whatever reason, and couples who can’t due to health reasons. these people are taxed to provide benefits for those who choose, or or don’t choose to breed. the intro to the movie idiocracy shows the long term benefits of this.

              • Pascal's bookie

                It’s a service reduction because it’s cutting a ‘service’ provided by the govt.

                I’m defining service here as bassically anything the govnt does as a policy. It’s to differentiate between cutting taxes by having the government actually do less stuff, and having them cut taxes by doing the same stuff but more effeciantly.

                The latter story is the one right wing parties tell because, apparently too many people like the services more than they hate the taxes.

                Your peronal objections to the policy don’t change this. If the argument could be won on those grounds, then presumably it would be. But as it happens, people would seem to rather pay the tax than cut the sevices when the options are honestly put to them.

              • Lanthanide

                “it discriminates against the homosexual portion of society”

                I don’t know why you chose to separate out homosexual people from ‘singles’ or ‘the couples that choose not to have children for whatever reason’. Many gay people do have children.

              • TightyRighty

                what service though pascal? giving money to people based on their family status? that’s government largesse (vote-buying, pork barrel politics). it’s not a provided service like education, health, roads etc. so how would cutting it reduce services?

                defining policy as services is a long bow to draw. the governments review of mining land could reduce the tax burden on individuals, while maintaining the same level of services. is this a service? no, it’s policy, and on this site an unliked one. i don’t think i have phrased what i mean that well, but mondayitis has just hit.

                lanthanide, there are gay people with children, but i don’t think they are “many”. i’m pointing out that they are a section of society discriminated against by wff.

              • gitmo

                Taking the health system as an example we have a single purchaser of non hospital pharmaceuticals and like them or hate them spending growth has been very well constrained compared to most of our trading partners, but we have numerous DHBs and well over a hundred purchasing personnel within our hospitals where budgets are in tatters and spending is growth (some justifiably) is growing quite fast.

              • Pascal's bookie

                Good example.

                There are lots of costs in health. Correct me if I’m wrong but most (or at least a very large chunk) of the growth has been in wages. It’s also highly political, in that people care about it a lot, and care not only about how much service they get, but how it’s delivered.

                It’s easy for a govt to point at it and say “Ooh lookie lots of costs, and growth in costs, therefore there must be fat which we can cut to give you a tax cut”.

                I’m not denying that, as per your bugbear, there is a lot of duplicated services and what not that could possibly be eliminated to get some savings. But it’s not that simple.

                Firstly, most of the growth in costs comes from wages, new types of treatments, and new technologies. The savings that can be made through eliminating duplicated backroom (or frontroom) services aren’t really big enough to get you the sort of cash needed to pay for meaningful tax cuts.

                Secondly, a lot of the ‘inefficiency’ and what not associated with duplicated services is an unavoidable by product of how people like their healthcare to be delivered. People like their local hospitals, and like there to be as much local control of it as they can get. That means a higher cost to the whole system. It may not make sense, you and I might personally prefer the teeny tax cut we could get from centralising things, but that’s our bad luck. We either have to win the argument about centralisation, or stop promising the teeny tax cut.

                Some right wingers though, just pretend that tax cuts can eventuate without cost to the way people clearly want their government to operate (pun alert!), which is fundamentally dishonest. that’s what all this ‘trim the fat’ nonsense is about.

                Bullshitting the public that there really is a free lunch.

          • Pascal's bookie 10.1.2.1.2

            I think what I mean is fairly clear from the first comment TR.

            You can quibble away if you like, but it doesn’t change the fact that to cut taxes by any great deal, a government will need to cut spending.

            That spending is on things, so they will need to cut back on things they provide (or do, like income transfers). This is apparently not very easy to do if you want to retain political power, even though it allows you to cut taxes.

            ergo…. people prefer to have the government doing those things over tax cuts.

            • TightyRighty 10.1.2.1.2.1

              only people who stand to benefit from said things. if you bribe the voter, it’s very hard to get you’re bribe back. thats all it is. i see no one has still managed to adequately explain how a discriminatory tax package like wff can be seen as a progressive thing. and remember before bleating to long and loud about how this tax package makes people worse off, wff has made anyone who doesn’t qualify for wff worse off, as that is a tax cut they could have had themselves. it cuts both ways.

              • Pascal's bookie

                Obviously not everyone agrees about what things the government should do TR. But we have a system of government to decide who gets to say what gets done, and that system, at the moment, has the dynamic as I’ve described it.

                If you know of a better way of deciding what policies to follow, feel free to share it, but at the mo’ your response is just bleating about democracy.

                Tax cuts are also ‘bribes’, but people seem on aggregate to prefer the other ‘bribe’. Hence rightwing bs about ‘trimming the fat to provide a free lunch’.

        • lprent 10.1.2.2

          Fix the major distortions by pushing their tax rates into conformance – upwards.

          If you want a flat tax – make it a higher flat tax. Then you don’t have to cut services. Frankly people who think that there is a lot of fat (ie sufficient to massively reduce the expenditure a lot) in the provision of government services are dreaming. Pretty much everything is there for a reason. So to be able to radically reduce the size of government expenditure you have to reduce the services.

          I’d suggest that you start by looking at cutting the provision of superannuation and see how far you get. It is the biggest single cost in the system, and one of the ones that is growing the fastest with an aging population. The bill in that would have to be substantially reduced to achieve what you’re talking about.

          Of course you have this interesting retroactive problem of people having planned for decades on receiving superannuation. National based their super system on people providing provision of taxes to fund their parents super. Of course we could simply maintain taxes on the young to fund the current super system, while forcing them to provide for their own super. But somehow I don’t think that will work politically.

          Quite simply what you’re describing are bullshit pipedreams

  11. prism 11

    Looking at the tax steps – why would the 10% one stop at $14,000. People who earn as little as this are on really low wages. So take the 10% to $25,000 (always remembering that there is also GST to come off the PAYE taxed income). The consumer tax should push down the amount that lower income taxpayers are charged for PAYE.
    Next could be $25 – 50,000 at 20% – why not have tax in 5’s or decades, easy to calculate and straightforward.
    Then $50,000 – $100,000 at 25%
    $100,000-$300,000 at 33%
    over $300,000 at 40% – if there is anyone receiving this in salary.
    The re-arrangement of personal finance to trusts etc might result in lesser amounts but should still incur 33%. Getting a good amount of tax from the wealthy is the important thing, not whether they reallocate some to save a few percentage points.
    And finally each year allow for inflation. Let’s have some intelligence and certainty in tax and stop it becoming an election issue when it becomes so out of kilter because of lack of indexing. The tax percentages would remain the same the income steps each year would change allowing for inflation, to the nearest decade figure.

    • Lanthanide 11.1

      “The re-arrangement of personal finance to trusts etc might result in lesser amounts but should still incur 33%.”

      Except the current re-arrangement is to take someone on a salary greater than $70k and put them under $70k so they pay 33%. On the scale you’ve outlined, $70k will pay 25%, not 33%.

      Edit: Brainwave after I posted this: the tax-avoidance rate is based on the trust rate, which is currently 33%, so you are correct.

      • prism 11.1.1

        If I was right it was by accident Lanthanide. I have not been following all the moves exactly, just threw in what seemed like a reasonable homemade working tax vehicle (without going through extensive design stages, wind tunnel effects etc).

        The main thing that I think would help is to have the brackets inflation-adjusted I thing actually bienially (every 2 years) would be better and this would stop bracket creep into higher tax rates. It seems to me like kindergarten maths but then perhaps I am too simple to understand the awful complexities involved in this.

  12. felix 12

    Woohoo!! Told you my mate Mr Key would be able to deliver a “north of $50 a week” tax cut. And you all said he wouldn’t. So who’s looking stupid now eh?

    I mean sure, you need to bring in $180,000 a year to get it but just get off your arse and be a bit more ambitious whydontcha? Either up-skill or learn how to trade currency and you’ll be claiming your “north of $50 a week” in no time.

    And when I say “in no time” of course I mean “in quite some time”. Or “at no time” depending who’s asking. What time is it in Australia? Stop confusing me. North of $50 a week!!! YEAAAH!!!

  13. Herodotus 13

    So, are “bulk of New Zealanders either better off or a lot better off, and on a straight GST income tax [none] worse off’? No. 10% get a net tax increase and 80% of taxpayers get a net reduction of piddling size that will be overwhelmed for many by rent hikes.
    You should refer to red Alert and Trev M
    blog.http://blog.labour.org.nz/index.php/2010/03/11/a-big-group-that-will-be-worse-off-following-the-tax-cuts/
    You like him are play politics with this comment. You are mixing 2 policies and like him (I take it for me ) accept the assumption that Govt subsidise land owners and are willing for this to happen and that tax treatment for rentals will be kept?
    If that is the case for me then there will be no real review of the tax system and especially in this area, as you are scared of land owners. If so then how can anything bold happen. You are willing to let the rich take away money from PAYE earners?

  14. SPC 14

    Bill English on the budget this year.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/3439334/Public-sector-on-noti ce-for-Budget

    Notable for the first suggestion that there may be incentives to encourage/reward saving included
    to balance out the GST increase discouragement to spending. Which is sensible and so it’s about time this was included …. but what does he actually mean?

    The concept of a shift from consumption to saving would normally involve an increase in consumption tax (with compensation to those who cannot afford to save) and cuts to tax on investments for those who could afford to save.

    Thus not a cut in the top rate, but a reduction in tax on investment income (perhaps by reducing interest income by half – the inflation component – before it was taxed) and otherwise small business loan insurance (so banks will lend beyond the household property of the business owner) and R and D tax incentives.

    I suspect however the government is of a certain ideological bent called trickle down where those on higher incomes get reduced taxes on the presumption that they will invest the money in ways
    beneficial to the wider economy – in the real world we will note the school zone and beachfront property bidding war will heat up.

  15. SPC 15

    Reward the strong, punish the weak, and call it setting the right market incentives for the strong to flourish and the weak to perish.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/opinion/3438769/No-justification-for-cutting-the-pulse-of-the-nation?comment_msg=posted#post_comment

  16. ropata 16

    WFF = allowing working couples to mortgage themselves to the hilt and get the rest of society to pay for their asset accumulation

  17. godard 17

    …And then keep in mind that whatever tax cut you do get will have to be spent on all of the social services that get cut in the next 12 months.

Links to post

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Language provides hope for Tuvalu
    Climate change continues to present a major risk for the island nation of Tuvalu, which means sustaining te gana Tuvalu, both on home soil and in New Zealand Aotearoa, has never been more important, Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio said. The Tuvalu Auckland Community Trust and wider Tuvalu ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    14 hours ago
  • Minister Sio to attend Asian Development Bank meeting in Manila
    Associate Foreign Affairs Minister Aupito William Sio travels to the Philippines this weekend to represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) Board of Governors in Manila. “The ADB Annual Meeting provides an opportunity to engage with other ADB member countries, including those ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • United Nations General Assembly National Statement
    E ngā Mana, e ngā Reo, Rau Rangatira mā kua huihui mai nei i tēnei Whare Nui o te Ao Ngā mihi maioha ki a koutou katoa, mai i tōku Whenua o Aotearoa Tuia ki runga, Tuia ki raro, ka Rongo to pō ka rongo te ao Nō reira, tēnā ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New strategy unifies all-of-Government approach to help Pacific languages thrive
    A united approach across all-of-Government underpins the new Pacific Language Strategy, announced by the Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio at Parliament today. “The cornerstone of our Pacific cultures, identities and place in Aotearoa, New Zealand are our Pacific languages. They are at the heart of our wellbeing,” Aupito ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Upgrades for sporting facilities ahead of FIFA Women’s World Cup
    Communities across the country will benefit from newly upgraded sporting facilities as a result of New Zealand co-hosting the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023. The Government is investing around $19 million to support upgrades at 30 of the 32 potential sporting facilities earmarked for the tournament, including pitch, lighting and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Partnership supports climate action in Latin America and Caribbean
    Aotearoa New Zealand is extending the reach of its support for climate action to a new agriculture initiative with partners in Latin America and the Caribbean. Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced a NZ$10 million contribution to build resilience, enhance food security and address the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Landmark agreement for Māori fisheries celebrates 30th year
    The 30th anniversary of the Fisheries Deed of Settlement is a time to celebrate a truly historic partnership that has helped transform communities, says Parliamentary Under-Secretary to the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries Rino Tirikatene. “The agreement between the Crown and Māori righted past wrongs, delivered on the Crown’s treaty ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government backs initiatives to cut environmental impact of plastic waste
    The Government has today announced funding for projects that will cut plastic waste and reduce its impact on the environment. “Today I am announcing the first four investments to be made from the $50 million Plastics Innovation Fund, which was set last year and implemented a 2020 election promise,” Environment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Call for expressions of interest in appointment to the High Court Bench
    Attorney-General David Parker today called for nominations and expressions of interest in appointment to the High Court Bench.  This is a process conducted at least every three years and ensures the Attorney-General has up to date information from which to make High Court appointments.  “It is important that when appointments ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Depositor compensation scheme protects Kiwis’ money
    New Zealanders will have up to $100,000 of their deposits in any eligible institution guaranteed in the event that institution fails, under legislation introduced in Parliament today. The Deposit Takers Bill is the third piece of legislation in a comprehensive review of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand Act and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New fund to help more Pacific aiga into their own homes
    The Government has launched a new housing fund that will help more Pacific aiga achieve the dream of home ownership. “The Pacific Building Affordable Homes Fund will help organisations, private developers, Māori/iwi, and NGOs build affordable housing for Pacific families and establish better pathways to home ownership within Pacific communities. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • More than 100,000 new Kiwis as halfway point reached
    Over 100,000 new Kiwis can now call New Zealand ‘home’ after the 2021 Resident Visa reached the halfway point of approvals, Minister of Immigration Michael Wood announced today. “This is another important milestone, highlighting the positive impact our responsive and streamlined immigration system is having by providing comfort to migrant ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Maniapoto Claims Settlement Bill passes third reading – He mea pāhi te Maniapoto Claims Settl...
    Nā te Minita mō ngā Take Tiriti o Waitangi, nā Andrew Little,  te iwi o Maniapoto i rāhiri i tēnei rā ki te mātakitaki i te pānuitanga tuatoru o te Maniapoto Claims Settlement Bill - te pikinga whakamutunga o tā rātou whakataunga Tiriti o Waitangi o mua. "Me mihi ka ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • 50,000 more kids to benefit from equity-based programmes next year
    Another 47,000 students will be able to access additional support through the school donations scheme, and a further 3,000 kids will be able to get free and healthy school lunches as a result of the Equity Index.  That’s on top of nearly 90% of schools that will also see a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Healthy Active Learning now in 40 percent of schools across New Zealand
    A total of 800 schools and kura nationwide are now benefitting from a physical activity and nutrition initiative aimed at improving the wellbeing of children and young people. Healthy Active Learning was funded for the first time in the inaugural Wellbeing Budget and was launched in 2020. It gets regional ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Speech at 10th meeting of the Friends of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty
    Kia Ora. It is a pleasure to join you here today at this 10th meeting of the Friends of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty. This gathering provides an important opportunity to reiterate our unwavering commitment to achieving a world without nuclear weapons, for which the entry into force of this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Speech for Earthshot Prize Innovation Summit 2022
    Kia ora koutou katoa Thank you for the invitation to join you. It’s a real pleasure to be here, and to be in such fine company.  I want to begin today by acknowledging His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales and Sir David Attenborough in creating what is becoming akin ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New accreditation builds capacity for Emergency Management Volunteers
    Emergency Management Minister Kieran McAnulty has recognised the first team to complete a newly launched National Accreditation Process for New Zealand Response Team (NZ-RT) volunteers. “NZ-RT volunteers play a crucial role in our emergency response system, supporting response and recovery efforts on the ground. This new accreditation makes sure our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Govt strengthens trans-Tasman emergency management cooperation
    Aotearoa New Zealand continues to strengthen global emergency management capability with a new agreement between New Zealand and Australia, says Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty. “The Government is committed to improving our global and national emergency management system, and the Memorandum of Cooperation signed is another positive step towards ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Christchurch Call Initiative on Algorithmic Outcomes
    Today New Zealand, the USA, Twitter, and Microsoft, announced investment in a technology innovation initiative under the banner of the Christchurch Call.  This initiative will support the creation of new technology to understand the impacts of algorithms on people’s online experiences.  Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms play a growing role in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • JOINT PR: Trans-Tasman Cooperation on disaster management
    Hon Kieran McAnulty, New Zealand Minister for Emergency Management Senator The Hon Murray Watt, Federal Minister for Emergency Management Strengthening Trans-Tasman cooperation on disaster management issues was a key area of focus when Australia and New Zealand’s disaster management ministers met this week on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • More transparency, less red-tape for modernised charities sector
    The Charities Amendment Bill has been introduced today which will modernise the charities sector by increasing transparency, improving access to justice services and reducing the red-tape that smaller charities face, Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector Priyanca Radhakrishnan said. “These changes will make a meaningful difference to over 28,000 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Pacific visas reopened to help boost workforce
    Work continues on delivering on a responsive and streamlined immigration system to help relieve workforce shortages, with the reopening of longstanding visa categories, Immigration Minister Michael Wood has announced.  From 3 October 2022, registrations for the Samoan Quota will reopen, and from 5 October registrations for the Pacific Access Category ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Day Bill passes into law
    The Bill establishing Queen Elizabeth II Memorial Day has passed its third reading. “As Queen of Aotearoa New Zealand, Her Majesty was loved for her grace, calmness, dedication, and public service. Her affection for New Zealand and its people was clear, and it was a fondness that was shared,” Michael ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New investor migrant visa opens
    The new Active Investor Plus visa category created to attract high-value investors, has officially opened marking a key milestone in the Government’s Immigration Rebalance strategy, Economic Development Minister Stuart Nash and Immigration Minister Michael Wood have announced. “The new Active Investor Plus visa replaces the previous investor visa categories, which ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • New wharekura continues commitment to Māori education
    A new Year 1-13 designated character wharekura will be established in Feilding, Associate Minister of Education Kelvin Davis announced today. To be known as Te Kura o Kauwhata, the wharekura will cater for the expected growth in Feilding for years to come. “The Government has a goal of strengthening Māori ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • National minute of silence for Queen Elizabeth II
    A national minute of silence will be observed at the start of New Zealand’s State Memorial Service for Queen Elizabeth II, at 2pm on Monday 26 September. The one-hour service will be held at the Wellington Cathedral of St Paul, during a one-off public holiday to mark the Queen’s death. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Speech to the Climate Change and Business Conference
    Tēnā koutou i tēnei ata. Good morning. Recently I had cause to say to my friends in the media that I consider that my job is only half done. So I’m going to take the opportunity of this year’s Climate and Business Conference to offer you a mid-point review. A ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Government enhances protection for our most-productive land  
    Enhanced protection for Aotearoa New Zealand’s most productive land   Councils required to identify, map, and manage highly productive land  Helping ensure Kiwis’ access to leafy greens and other healthy foods Subdivision for housing on highly-productive land could still be possible in limited circumstances  The Government has today released a National ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Kieran McAnulty to attend Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction
    Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty will travel to Brisbane this week to represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the 2022 Asia-Pacific Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. “This conference is one of the most important meetings in the Asia-Pacific region to progress disaster risk reduction efforts and increase cooperation between ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Trade and Agriculture Minister to travel to India and Indonesia
    Minister of Trade and Export Growth and Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor will travel tomorrow to India and Indonesia for trade and agricultural meetings to further accelerate the Government’s growing trade agenda.  “Exploring ways we can connect globally and build on our trading relationships is a priority for the Government, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Poroporoaki: Cletus Maanu Paul (ONZM)
    E te rangatira Maanu, takoto mai ra, i tō marae i Wairaka, te marae o te wahine nāna I inoi kia Whakatānea ia kia tae ae ia ki te hopu i te waka Mātaatua kia kore ai i riro i te moana. Ko koe anō tēnā he pukumahi koe mō ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pacific Wellbeing Strategy sets clear path to improve outcomes for Pacific Aotearoa
    Strengthening partnerships with Pacific communities is at the heart of the Government’s new Pacific Wellbeing Strategy, Minister for Pacific Peoples Aupito William Sio announced today. “Working alongside communities to ensure more of our aiga and families have access to the staples of life like, housing, education, training and job opportunities ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Jobs on the horizon for more than 1,000 rangatahi
    Following on from last week’s Better Pathways Package announcement and Apprenticeship Boost 50,000th apprentice milestone, the Government is continuing momentum, supporting over 1,000 more rangatahi into employment, through new funding for He Poutama Rangatahi. “Our Government remains laser focused on supporting young people to become work ready and tackle the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZ/AU partnership to bring world-class satellite positioning services
    Land Information Minister Damien O’Connor today announced a joint Trans-Tasman partnership which will provide Australasia with world-leading satellite positioning services that are up to 50 times more accurate, boosting future economic productivity, sustainability and safety.  New Zealand and Australia have partnered to deliver the Southern Positioning Augmentation Network (SouthPAN), with ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Govt helps small businesses get paid on time
    The Government is adding to the support it has offered New Zealand’s small businesses by introducing new measures to help ensure they get paid on time. A Business Payment Practices disclosure regime is being established to improve information and transparency around business-to-business payment practices across the economy, Small Business Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Economy grows as tourism and exports rebound
    The economy has rebounded strongly in the June quarter as the easing of restrictions and reopening of the border boosted economic activity, meaning New Zealand is well placed to meet the next set of challenges confronting the global economy. GDP rose 1.7 percent in the June quarter following a decline ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Ambassador to China announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Grahame Morton as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to China. “Aotearoa New Zealand and China share a long and important relationship,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “As we mark 50 years of diplomatic relations between our nations, we are connected by people-to-people links, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • 1.4 million hectares of wilding pine control work in two years
    1.4 million hectares of native and productive land have been protected from wilding conifers in the past two years and hundreds of jobs created in the united efforts to stamp out the highly invasive weeds, Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor said. Speaking today at the 2022 Wilding Pine Conference in Blenheim, Damien ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • HomeGround – “a place to come together, a place to come home to”
    After 10 years’ hard mahi, HomeGround - Auckland City Mission's new home – is now officially open. “It’s extremely satisfying to see our commitment to providing a safety net for people who need housing and additional support services come together in a place like HomeGround, to create a better future ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago