Hey Kids: Voting’s Fun!

Written By: - Date published: 7:05 am, May 19th, 2017 - 30 comments
Categories: democratic participation, elections, Politics - Tags: , ,

Update – youth decides to enrol after watching Jonathan Pie, gets 30,000+ retweets

30 comments on “Hey Kids: Voting’s Fun!”

  1. ianmac 1

    Always he nails it.

  2. Andre 2

    I want to hear Pie’s views on those that are politically passionate and engaged, but choose to waste their vote on someone that hasn’t got any chance of winning because nobody with a chance is good enough for them.

    • gsays 2.1

      Hi Andre, my view is that is what democracy looks like, the vote is not wasted.

      What is worse is our elected representatives listening and acting in the interest of lobbyists while ignoring what is best for their constituents.

      • Andre 2.1.1

        Given his comments about drawing penises on ballot papers, I suspect Pie would probably agree with that opinion, but would express it in a much more entertaining way.

        • dukeofurl 2.1.1.1

          You dont seem to get it.
          Pie doesnt exist.

          British actor and comedian Tom Walker plays a role.
          Its supposed to be a parody to fool people. hes appeared at the Edinburgh Fringe festival.

          It is by definition , Fake news

          • weka 2.1.1.1.1

            It’s not fake news, and it’s not parody. It’s satire. There’s a world of difference.

            • dukeofurl 2.1.1.1.1.1

              Not parody ?
              have you checked the definition of parody
              ” a work created to imitate, make fun of, or comment on an original work—its subject, author, style, or some other target—by means of satiric or ironic imitation.

          • Andre 2.1.1.1.2

            Sure. But are the opinions expressed by “Pie” actually Tom Walker’s genuine opinions? I quite enjoy Pie’s opinions, expressed for comedic effect. Walker’s actual opinions might be really boring.

    • Tautoko Mangō Mata 2.2

      You might be interested in listening to Tom Walker on a panel discussing the Trump election. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkoRODfEMyY
      He touches on some points that are relevant for us in the coming election.
      Engagement is important, rather than alienating to get those potential votes.

      • Andre 2.2.1

        Sure. So I much prefer hearing why particular policies from Mana or Socialist Aotearoa or Internet Party or whoever else are better than what Labour or Greens are offering. Just hearing complaints that Labour and the Greens are status-quo liberal sellouts doesn’t add anything to the conversation. Alienation cuts both ways.

  3. Draco T Bastard 3

    Still say that compulsory voting is necessary to a functional democracy.

    You do not have a right to vote but a duty.

    • michelle 3.1

      +100 Draco

    • David Mac 3.2

      What punitive measures would you bring in to play? Could beneficiaries pay their fine off over a number of years? A jail sentence?

      Reading the comments in here some people are of the opinion that New Zealand is a disgusting seething pit of gorging greeders. Yet many of those that live with the poop end of the stick can’t find 20 minutes to spare on a Saturday morning in 6 months time.

      Leading the horse to water and forcing it drink is one option, it’s rarely the right one. I think people need to coaxed into voting by providing them with a strong enough reason to do so. Sheeesh, we’re only looking for 20 minutes in September. People need to vote because they believe they have a chance of getting a house, not because a big stick is pushing them along to the booth.

      • Draco T Bastard 3.2.1

        Yet many of those that live with the poop end of the stick can’t find 20 minutes to spare on a Saturday morning in 6 months time.

        That probably has something to do with the gorging greeders – you know, the capitalists that refuse to pay enough for people to live on.

        I think people need to coaxed into voting by providing them with a strong enough reason to do so.

        No, people need to take responsibility for their society rather than shrug it off and that means a better education so that people know that voting and being politically active is their duty.

        • David Mac 3.2.1.1

          I’m not sure I want to live in a society whereby the members are forced to engage in it. Surely it’s a better idea to create a strong enough reason for people to want to get engaged, not forced to. Most NZers don’t share our hobby: Political landscape artists.

          If compulsory, how would you punish non voters?

          • Draco T Bastard 3.2.1.1.1

            I’m not sure I want to live in a society whereby the members are forced to engage in it.

            Then you’re welcome to leave.

            Surely it’s a better idea to create a strong enough reason for people to want to get engaged, not forced to.

            Being part of society should be strong enough reason.

            Most NZers don’t share our hobby:

            It’s not a hobby – it is an essential part of society.

            If compulsory, how would you punish non voters?

            Why would they need to be punished? Ridicule works fine, shame them for their apathy.

            • David Mac 3.2.1.1.1.1

              If NZ was morphing into what I perceive to be your version of Paradise I don’t think I’d be hanging around long Draco. I draw satisfaction from being good at something that brings value to our society and being rewarded accordingly. I like having my income geared to my output. I’d go somewhere that does things that way.

              If your contributions to The Standard are your primary occupation, yes it is much more than a hobby for you. I can’t afford for it to be any more than a hobby, I’ve got other stuff going on.

              I think we’ll need to agree to disagree. You think voting should be legally compulsory. I’d like to make people feel compelled to vote, under their own steam. Like we do now….a sweeter carrot is called for, not a bigger whip.

              • Draco T Bastard

                I draw satisfaction from being good at something that brings value to our society and being rewarded accordingly. I like having my income geared to my output.

                1. I’ve specified a minimum income (UBI@$20k) and a maximum income ($100k) there’s quite a bit of range in between.
                2. In the present system many get paid far more than they’re worth and they don’t even have to work for it. These people are called shareholders.

                If your contributions to The Standard are your primary occupation, yes it is much more than a hobby for you. I can’t afford for it to be any more than a hobby, I’ve got other stuff going on.

                nobody can afford for politics to be a hobby – not if they want to be free.

                I’d like to make people feel compelled to vote, under their own steam. Like we do now….a sweeter carrot is called for, not a bigger whip.

                The problem with that is that it leaves politics to those that take an interest and that only ever turns out badly. That is why we have National government after all.

                • David Mac

                  We need to play with the cards we’re dealt Draco. Too many NZers can name more Shortland Street characters than they can politicians. It doesn’t matter whether we think that is good or bad, it just is.

                  This is why the message has to be brutally succinct and on point. We’ve got 2 seconds because as Mr Pie says “Politics? Bleerrrg, Boring.”

                  eg: Want a house? You’ve got a date this September.

    • bwaghorn 3.3

      a $50 dollar voucher at voting with the option of donating it to a suitable cause would be the way

  4. Representative democracy, with parliamentarians elected, is described by some as elective aristocracy. An alternative, selection by lot, could be described as truly democratic. This has generally not been tried except as a way of obtaining advice or opinions. Too far out for politicians to dream of giving up some power. A good read is the book Against Elections: The Case for Democracy by David Van Reybrouck published in an English translation in 2016. We could have a second house of parliament selected in this way and any registered voter could have a chance of ending up in parliament, if they were willing. Better chance than winning the lottery.

    • Red 4.1

      what a stupid proposition, I would suggest the opposite re Athenian democracy makes more sense ie property ownership to vote, must be paying tax to vote and or pass an IQ or some form of test that shows you have a basic level of intelligence to vote, likewise to be an MP

      • fender 4.1.1

        “…. or pass an IQ or some form of test that shows you have a basic level of intelligence to vote…..”

        Are you sure you want to be prevented from voting, Red??

  5. rhinocrates 5

    Chart of the day from The Economist, a Venn diagram of polies shared or otherwise by the Tories, Labour, the Lib Dems and ULIP. Greens not mentioned. It has accompanying article as usual for the neoliberals characterises Labour polices as ‘far left’ when they’re mainstream in in Scandinavia. However, showing where parties overlap and diverge in their policies in graphic format is interesting:

    http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2017/05/daily-chart-13

    “For once, British voters can hardly complain that the parties are all the same.”

    It would be nice to see a similar presentation of the policies of political parties in NZ.

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