web analytics

Labour on digital

Written By: - Date published: 7:52 am, July 11th, 2014 - 59 comments
Categories: Economy - Tags:

This morning Labour will be announcing it’s Digital Economic Upgrade (ICT policy).  “Streamed live to the world” at 8am at the link above.

As a dedicated member of the programming fraternity and often aghast at the stupidity of the how the government treats the digital community, I want to hear this.

So I will live blog some of this as it goes through.

7:53 First get coffee.

7:59 Pity that Labour don’t allow us to embed this thing properly.

8:04 First problem. How do I watch this damn thing?

8:09 Clare Curran announced a few days ago that they’d be doing a Chief Technology Officer (CTO) for the government. That is a good idea because at present government sucks when it comes to having any strategies at all.

8:11 Started on link above.

8:14 Getting seasick. Buy a tripod!!!

8:18 Open source the government

8:19 Exporting the intellectual property. Currently about $7 billion exports. 3rd largest sector in NZ, and fastest growing. It also has jobs.

8:21 Questions.. TPP etc.

8:25 Just got sent this

ICT policy factsheet (pdf)

ICT policy document Jul14 (pdf)

8:29 Usual strange questions for 8am in the morning. Reading the doc.

8:35 The fact sheet image

Digital economic upgrade

8:41 A lot of this is designed to

  • Fix the government waste, in particular the silo code. They need to move to open-source
  • The apprenticeship place is a good idea. Even now we’re running from behind with the training. Hands on works for getting jobs.
  • I like the idea of changing the points system for immigration to make experience as much as degrees. Anyone who works in the sector knows that the experience counts more than training. Training helps, but much of it is obsolete after a decade.
  • Startup support – yes! You need it to get projects started without mortgaging the parents house.

8:52 Finished. Labour – please please do not put that video up for watching.  Rest of the document looks good.

I’ll come back to the rest of this  announcement in comments. It looks like there is a separate announcement to be made on connectivity.

59 comments on “Labour on digital ”

  1. Tom Gould 1

    Picture is jerking all over and the sound almost inaudible. Not a good start …

  2. One Anonymous Bloke 2

    Wtf! Why has someone picked up the camera again?

  3. One Anonymous Bloke 3

    Whoever is responsible for the camera ‘work’? Utterly unwatchable.

  4. One Anonymous Bloke 4

    On the positive side Cunliffe was on the ball.

  5. infused 5

    Open Source the govt?

    Holy lol.

    Have fun with that.

    • lprent 5.1

      There is no particular problem with it. I flipped from microsoft to linux and open source in 2006 for all of my needs. About the only thing that there aren’t that many good alternatives for are games.

      You see companies advertising themselves as microsoft shops these days when job hunting employees. That is because it isn’t where most ICT people want to get employed these days. They want the mix of systems because that is where they see their jobs going to.

      You cross-platform most code these days as a matter of course. Certainly to windows versions, macs, iOS, and android at a minimum.

      • infused 5.1.1

        Swapping a desktop os is one thing. Swapping an entire platform is another.

        Cross platform code isn’t even a problem.

        Where needed, these systems already run on apache/php/ruby whatever anyway.

      • Draco T Bastard 5.1.2

        About the only thing that there aren’t that many good alternatives for are games.

        Which is the only reason why I still have Windows at all. And now that Steam is porting all the games that they have to Linux it won’t be long before I won’t even need it for that.

  6. lprent 6

    Many of the biggest tech companies in the world, including start-ups with Apple, basements Microsoft and student and Facebook dormitories.were born in garages,

    ‘Garage Grants’
    The variety of grants available from MBIE and NZTE as well as Labour’s R&D tax credits are generally not accessible to those with a creative idea that are just starting out.

    ‘Garage Grants’ will enable and support entrepreneurs in transforming their clever idea into
    something big.

    Successful applicants will receive individual training, mentoring and support from
    successful entrepreneurs, with up to $10,000 to build the first product and start the
    business.

    The fund will be administered through the Ministry of Business, Innovation and
    Employment and via existing accelerator programmes.

    Cost: $3.2 million contestable fund over four years.

    Ok. this is a bloody good idea. A bit like the incubator systems but a lot earlier in the development chain. Most incubator projects are after funding gets found and the steps to commercialism is started. Same idea as their “X Prizes”

    All small change, but useful for getting ideas to a useable form.

    • infused 6.1

      You do know this already exists?

      • lprent 6.1.1

        Depends what you mean. I know of stuff that is not in a particularly useful form and targeted at existing companies already selling.

        I know of things to get people into incubators run by universities.

        I don’t know of anything that starts at the very start of an idea.

        • infused 6.1.1.1

          There is a Wellington ICT incubator already. I forget the details of it.

          You also have grow Wellington and angel investors, both of which I’ve been involved with.

          Wellington ICT incubator is for start ups. Grow Wellington provides support to both, but mainly businesses that are already going.

          http://www.wellingtonnz.com/business/startups/incubators/

          • Colonial Viper 6.1.1.1.1

            Yes these incubators exist but all too often the “angels” have no idea what a tech start up actually need (dairy farmers and property developers with a bit of cash who think its fashionable to get into the game) or they’re just looking to leverage a good idea into the next big IPO within 18 months, with limited interest in developing the technology or the organisation organically.

            • yeshe 6.1.1.1.1.1

              +100% CV and worse, the so called ‘angels’ develop only to the point the IP ownership can be re-located to an offshore entity prior to sale to avoid tax on sale of IP which inevitably is to another offshore entity … we lose out twice. after tax payers have funded early development, tax avoided on sale and all jobs go offshore. barmy.

            • infused 6.1.1.1.1.2

              They are broken up in to many people with many backgrounds. Quite a few within IT.

    • Ant 6.2

      “Up to $10,000” seems a little low for kickstarting dev costs

      • Colonial Viper 6.2.1

        It’s very low. Two developer/owners paying themselves minimum wage for 2.5 months, working out of their bedrooms and providing for all other business expenses themselves.

  7. riffer 7

    Well on the plus side, OpenSourcing government will lead to lots of IT jobs.

    • infused 7.1

      Yeah, and a lot of extra expense.

      Most big govt departments have just merged and moved to new DCs on new platforms. It’s cost millions and it’s finally done.

      Hey, let’s go rip all that apart.

      Smart.

      • You_Fool 7.1.1

        Not our fault the NACTs are IT illiterate

        • infused 7.1.1.1

          They aren’t. After years of every department having their own systems, they are now all running on common systems.

          It all works very well.

          • Colonial Viper 7.1.1.1.1

            Doesn’t have to rip anything apart. But it does have major implications for development of the new IRD system.

            • Lanthanide 7.1.1.1.1.1

              I’m sure there are plenty of Open Source tax packages that let you run your own country of 4 million people, while meeting all NZ privacy standards and complex calculations around benefits, sources of income, ACC tax, fringe benefits, imputation credits, excise tax, GST etc, while also being flexible enough to add in new taxes like CGT and carbon tax.

              Alternatively: I’m sure there are many private organisations that would love to employ dozens/hundreds of developers to implement such a system, and then make it open source and give it away for free.

              • infused

                If it was that simple, we wouldn’t be having this discussion.

                IRD has something like 2000 VMs (Virtual machines).

                This sort of stuff needs to be specifically designed and designed in a way to scale over cloud infrastructure.

                Off the shelf software stops working once you get to the 50-100 user mark without heavy modifications to the code.

          • politikiwi 7.1.1.1.2

            I’d love to see the evidence for “they are now all running on common systems” – because that’s certainly not my experience in the Government IT sector.

            • infused 7.1.1.1.2.1

              The back end is mostly running at Revera on Microsoft Server 2008/2012, Exchange 2013/Lync etc.

              What’s presented to the staff is a different story.

  8. Ad 8

    Good as a gesture to Internet Party.

    But:

    no position on broadband rollout. This is a key National government initiative, being done across cities now. Cunliffe as previous Minister should understand its importance both to cities and to this governments credibility in economic development.
    no position on second broadband cable. Oddly, mentioned electricity costs, but not broadband costs.
    no position on aggregating Crown agency demand for broadband services, or for the use of Crown agencies in stimulating r & d. Eg common platform development for government departments, sourcing at least part of a job locally, using locals in some of the monumental cockups that Departments have made in the last decade, with all of the squillions that could have been circulated locally
    no position in the role of Universities, course structures, innovation hubs, etcetera
    Ie in general in the more direct role the whole of the public sector can do for digital industry development
    no tilt at school curriculum, which to me could offer English or code as a binary core subject

    I think I’ll stop there.

    I don’t believe this is an empty gesture, but it looks an almost non-instrumental gesture. I want a Labour governments that understands and operates the full range of policy levers available to it.

    • lprent 8.1

      There is a later ICT/communications announcement mentioned somewhere in this one.

      I’d guess that will cover it.

    • lprent 8.2

      There is a later ICT/communications announcement mentioned somewhere in this one.

      I’d guess that will cover it.

    • Draco T Bastard 8.3

      no position on broadband rollout. This is a key National government initiative, being done across cities now.

      Oh, FFS, the last Labour led government started the broadband upgrade process. National then gutted it, as they always do, and told people that they were getting a better deal.

      Tend to agree with you on the rest. Labour are still looking to the private sector to kickstart innovation using tax credits rather than having the government do it – just like the US government does. Their policies will fail just like privatisation failed and for the same reason – the private sector doesn’t do anything unless the government’s paying them. Time to cut out the private sector and just do it as part of government. It’ll be cheaper and more innovative.

      • Colonial Viper 8.3.1

        +100

        why do we need private sector companies – especially foreign ones – cutting corners on NZ infrastructure and shipping tax payer monies offshore.

    • Paul Campbell 8.4

      So this fibre roll out National promised us 2 elections ago …. I’m still waiting ….

      I guess the problem is that Chorus isn’t gouging us enough yet

  9. lprent 9

    And yet, most ICT employers feel that 6+ years of experience is more likely to meet skill needs than a degree and no experience.

    Labour will review the points system for the skills shortage list, with a view to more accurately recognising the value of work experience in Information Technology.

    Damn good idea. Basically ICT people coming out of university or even tech are trained monkeys. Useful only with someone competent wasted leaning over their shoulder and training them how to not screw up. That is why it is so damn hard to get hired straight out of a course.

    Same with the apprenticeship system

    This will help to encourage more people into the industry who were previously put off by the prospect of having to undertake training off-job and in their own time, and prefer the option of ‘learning while earning’.

    Labour has already indicated that, instead of paying young people to go on the dole, we intend to use it to subsidise businesses to take on apprentices. This policy would be available to the Information Technology industry as well.

    It is an awfully big ask for kids going into ICT to spend years training before they find out if they have any real aptitude in a real world environment for computer systems. In my experience most of the people who went through compsci degrees in my various stints at university, probably less than a quarter actually made it their careers after a decade.

    The continuous learning to stay in the ICT game is a real drag for most people. It is about 15-30% of your time per year (more earlier, easier later). A lot easier with the net and google. Still a lot of continuous study and testing. If you don’t do it then you rapidly become unemployable.

    Doing a mix of work and training is a better idea. Even better is that the ones who stay obsessed past the games and into work, can then find out if they want to invest time in a university or tech degree.

    Plus that is going to help a lot on the CV and for getting hired.

    • infused 9.1

      They shouldn’t need extensive training for it. An A+ course then go seek and entry level job. I’ve put heaps of them through my business.

      I’ve never though quals for IT are useful unless you are going in to specialised areas. If so, I’d do these after you gain employment as most employers will pay for them.

      • lprent 9.1.1

        Go and ask any recruiter.

        They don’t have too many problems placing people who have been through uni and did well. They have a hell of a problem placing anyone else. So that is about 5% of the people trained.

        They also have employers complaining that they can’t find anyone to employ,while at the same time there are a hell of glut of trained but no experience unemployable people.

        First question that damn near every employer asks me is if I am willing to “mentor”. I am but I put some pretty strict limits on it – and snap like a bastard if people violate those limits. It takes nearly 6 months to get someone with a compsci degree up to the point that they aren’t a pest to anyone competent. Apparently I’m a rarity for allowing employers to foist the kids on me.

        In actual fact I usually find that the compsci A+ employees are the most painful. They screw up because they think they know how to do things and they’re usually too arrogant to listen before screwing up.

        • infused 9.1.1.1

          The problem is, people doing IT for the money, not because they like IT. This is the big sticking point. The people I employ, all have a passion for IT. Since they have this passion, they generally have quite a good, solid foundation to begin with, as they tend to tinker in their own time.

          Yes, you have to mentor people, that’s just life. Better that, than have them pick up bad traits.

          Most old timers give your argument though, so it’s not surprising.

          • Colonial Viper 9.1.1.1.1

            The problem is, people doing IT for the money, not because they like IT. This is the big sticking point.

            Yes this is a major point.

            And it flows through to the single criticism I have of Labour’s one pager above. It comes through in phrases like “transforming a big idea into successful business”. Also another common phrasing you sometimes here “x $B of technology exports.” Which is all great, but as a perspective starts to limit the value of ICT to what clever technology endeavours can do to make capitalists money.

            NZ companies are already getting involved in developing technology for the security and surveillance industrial complex for instance. Which is of course now a multi-billion dollar industry. (Funded by tax payers dollars from around the world) Oh we as capitalists wouldn’t want to miss out on all these opportunities, would we?

            Where is our values statement or political position around this as a nation.

            Why don’t we have a vision of exporting clean, high purity, organic food, but also technology which has 100% privacy and security built into it, and no back doors?

            IMO real creativity in technology, and particularly in the open source community but also in examples of how the likes of Apple started up, doesn’t come from trying to create the next Angry Birds or FaceBook billion dollar IPO. It comes from a passion for making life and society better.

            So my question – where is the space to create valuable, innovative technology – and to make it available for free. Or to create self sustaining co-operative structures of technology development so that professionals do not have to keep going cap in hand to capitalists to do the kind of work and solve the kinds of problems that they are interested in.

            If Labour says it supports Open Source everything, then that capability and opportunity must be there.

            • infused 9.1.1.1.1.1

              “Why don’t we have a vision of exporting clean, high purity, organic food, but also technology which has 100% privacy and security built into it, and no back doors?”

              We already do. The company just won a huge international award. Can’t remember the name though.

              Apple is a bad example… they almost went bust years ago, and basically got bailed out by Microsoft. Microsoft kept them alive as kind of an internal joke.

              The reason Apple took off in recent times is they ditched their 2000 products and started to focus on just a few.

              Microsoft is probably a better example. But there’s heaps. WordPress being one. It’s filling a void with an innovative, easy to use product.

          • Draco T Bastard 9.1.1.1.2

            The problem is, people doing IT for the money, not because they like IT.

            That’s the society that we got from the neo-liberal revolution of the 4th Labour government. Every government since has maintained and strengthened that attitude. It is cause celebrè for this government as ideologised in the 90 day fire at will act.

        • Lanthanide 9.1.1.2

          Actually I think infused might have meant the certification called A+, not someone who got A+ marks in university.

          http://certification.comptia.org/getCertified/certifications/a.aspx

          A+ is about the equivalent of 6th form though so not really sure if that’s truly what he meant, because 6th formers typically aren’t worth hiring…

          • infused 9.1.1.2.1

            I did. Sorry if that was not clear.

            I’d hire someone with the passion and A+ over someone with a uni degree who’s just doing it for the money.

            I had one of those people. Clear difference in mind sets.

  10. lprent 10

    And yet, most ICT employers feel that 6+ years of experience is more likely to meet skill needs than a degree and no experience.

    Labour will review the points system for the skills shortage list, with a view to more accurately recognising the value of work experience in Information Technology.

    Damn good idea. Basically ICT people coming out of university or even tech are trained monkeys. Useful only with someone competent wasted leaning over their shoulder and training them how to not screw up. That is why it is so damn hard to get hired straight out of a course.

    Same with the apprenticeship system

    This will help to encourage more people into the industry who were previously put off by the prospect of having to undertake training off-job and in their own time, and prefer the option of ‘learning while earning’.

    Labour has already indicated that, instead of paying young people to go on the dole, we intend to use it to subsidise businesses to take on apprentices. This policy would be available to the Information Technology industry as well.

    It is an awfully big ask for kids going into ICT to spend years training before they find out if they have any real aptitude in a real world environment for computer systems. In my experience most of the people who went through compsci degrees in my various stints at university, probably less than a quarter actually made it their careers after a decade.

    The continuous learning to stay in the ICT game is a real drag for most people. It is about 15-30% of your time per year (more earlier, easier later). A lot easier with the net and google. Still a lot of continuous study and testing. If you don’t do it then you rapidly become unemployable.

    Doing a mix of work and training is a better idea. Even better is that the ones who stay obsessed past the games and into work, can then find out if they want to invest time in a university or tech degree.

    Plus that is going to help a lot on the CV and for getting hired.

    • karol 10.1

      Lynn, you will like [/sarc] Steven Joyce’s informed (?) response:

      Mr Joyce says Labour have truly missed the mark on ICT skills.

      “The demand in ICT is primarily for graduate-level software designers and programmers, not in the trades. That’s why we’re investing nearly $30 million dollars in our ICT grad schools for final year undergraduate and postgraduate training. They would be far better to endorse that approach,” Mr Joyce says.

      “And the party that has spent the last couple of months saying they need to tighten up on migration is now saying they want to encourage more migration in ICT. They need to make up their minds. Do they want to encourage skilled migrants or not?”

      • lprent 10.1.1

        Pretty clear that Joyce knows fuckall about ICT.

        The grads are just one bit. For instance I don’t think I have ever seen a university trained grad running around in a server farm. Or putting fibre into companies.

        Currently we import a lot of ICT immigrants with too little real world experience, and we virtually don’t import the ones without degrees. Outsight stupid.

      • Paul Campbell 10.1.2

        I’ve worked in this business for 35 years – 20 of them in Silicon Valley working for startups, I’ve interviewed/hired a lot of people over the years – fresh PhDs just out of Uni are possibly more difficult to use then fresh BScs – if anything there’s more ego that needs to be subsumed so you can learn to work with a team (OK I’m generalising a bit but it’s a real issue).

        I think if you want to better transition CompSci students into industry I think we’d do far better if we encouraged an internship year (rather more like an Engineering degree) which gets kids working in industry for most of a year, this allows students to learn about the real world, get some realistic expectations, something on their resume, and makes it easier for companies to try people out for a bit (at work [I still contract in the US] we take on 2-3 interns every summer and on average hire one of them).

        The local Polytech’s BIT degree involves a final year with a very real world project that puts them out into the community, I’ve been quite impressed with some of the students and their projects and have helped some of them working to turn their projects into real world.

        I think there’s a great (long term) advantage to having a CompSci degree – this is a business where you have to reinvent yourself every 5-10 years, you need that deeper background so you can change and adapt and keep the job interesting.

  11. karol 11

    What a strange time to live stream a new policy. How many people were they expecting to be watching between 8-9am on a weekday?

    • One Anonymous Bloke 11.1

      What serendipity that they can regard it as an alpha version. I hope they’ll live stream everything from now on, and buy a tripod.

  12. lprent 12

    Many countries provide a tax incentive to businesses investing in plant and equipment. This is done through a mechanism called accelerated depreciation.

    Labour has announced our intention to introduce a targeted accelerated depreciation regime, with one
    of the first industry areas covered being advanced manufacturing.

    This industry group includes the ICT Manufacturing industry, including the manufacture of physical devices or components that contain a software component, typically embedded in the device or product. The sector also encompasses computer and electronic office equipment, electric cables and wires, communication equipment and other electronic, professional and scientific equipment.

    Damn good idea. In the last decade the emphasis in NZ and most of the dollars earned in exports from ICT have shifted to two things.

    • Software as a hardware device
    • Software as a service

    Both currently ship most of their “manufacturing” offshore apart from the prototyping. Much of that will continue because of things like PCB costs as tail ends are so much lower than local, and there is so little point in running a SaaS business off local server farms for overseas because of our piss-poor cable situation.

    I have worked in both situations. A lot of near development and “production” work goes offshore because we can’t find adequate local plant even for small stuff.

    But there is lot of assembly work and work for the austrailasian markets that doesn’t get done here because the costs are so great for installation.

    This may help.

  13. Jenny 13

    Mana on digital

    Waatea News

    Te Wahanga Parakuihi Interviews Mana leader Hone Harawira, for Waatea Radio. (not time stamped.)

    TWP: The IT scene has come under some scrutiny the last day or two, you obviously weren’t at the net Hui, [Harawira was stranded by bad weather up North]
    I have just finished speaking to Ian Taylor and his talk about how we must factor in the digital age for the future of our Tamariki and Rangatahi was inspiring. And you have acknowledged that too, with your hook up with the big fella, with Kim? So you have obviously sensed, and the connections within Mana have recognised, that IT and the digital age is going to create some opportunities, and it is going to become really important for Tangata Whenua in the years ahead.
    Do you think that you were just a touch ahead of the game?

    Harawira: Well actually it’s our kids who are ahead of the game. And the whole Mana Internet Party link up came about as a direct result of some of the kids up here. One of them in particular came up to me and said, “Matua would you mind if I left Mana and joined the Internet Party?”

    I was, “What?”

    Anyway, I went away and had a really good think about it. Talked to some other kids.
    It became clear to me, that our kids are living in that world. And either we are going to be where our kids are aiming, so as, not to tell them what to do, those days are gone, but at least provide some guidance and help define Tikanga for the new world, or we are going to get left behind with everybody else.

    Then talking with Kim Dotcom. Man, where he is thinking in terms of all this digital stuff is mind blowing really. And I can’t wait for this relationship to develop to a point where our kids are not just living in that world but are driving that world – coming up with ideas to connect to the second cable if it comes – creating opportunities to put them on the highway to the world. All that sort of stuff.

    When I talk to my granddaughter, She’s 17 she’s at AUT, about some of the things she’s thinking about, and some of the things they do, it’s really, really positive. And I am glad that Mana is where we are, and I think it’s where Maori people need to be. And I sincerely hope that we are able to go to the next election with enough numbers to make that Maori digital connection a reality in New Zealand politics as well. Because I don’t want it to be just something that we talk about out here, I want it to be something that happens inside parliament so that we can drive things along, so that our kids are connected to the world.

  14. cricklewood 14

    The only thing I have heard of this until now was on the Radio News at 10am which consisted for the most part of something along the lines of
    Labour has announced that it will open a govt funded app store to allow a pathway for people to enter the app market, Labour ICT spokeswoman Claire Curran said she didn’t know how much it would cost but she was sure it wouldn’t be much
    Hostile media… But if that’s what she actually said to a reporter WTF

    • infused 14.1

      “Claire Curran said she didn’t know how much it would cost but she was sure it wouldn’t be much”

      lol?

    • lprent 14.2

      It is actually a app store for the government to purchase software from rather than the way the reporter reported it. I guess the journo didn’t read the policy doc.

      The policy doc linked to up above has values in for different parts and the extra funding required. That particular section says “Cost: Funded from within baselines”. So will come from within existing budgets by changing the means of how the government currently purchases software (ie their current systems really suck – I’ve seen it).

      • cricklewood 14.2.1

        That makes more sense… surely Claire Curran could have said as much rather than a snappy sound bite to reinforce the Labour is profligate theme …

  15. Draco T Bastard 15

    establishing ‘Garage Grants’ to support entrepreneurs in taking the first step in
    transforming a big idea into a successful business

    An interesting idea. Personally, I’d prefer a high level ($400 per week or higher) UBI and for the government to own the needed infrastructure such as fab plants that anyone can use. Then people wouldn’t need government grants to be entrepreneurial.

    reforming ICT project management across Government departments

    Need a government ICT department that actually does all that across all government departments instead of having each government department trying to do it for itself. The government is large enough to support such a department. This department would also provide the cloud services that government will need.

    • Francis 15.1

      That’s exactly what I’ve always thought. They can even use this department to create their own systems, rather than outsourcing to overseas companies (eg NovaPay)…

  16. Colonial Viper 16

    Verizon look set to lose major German govt telephony/ICT contracts because of their complicity with NSA spying.

    NZ is now very well known throughout the world as a FVEYEs partner.

    If the country is serious about becoming a major international ICT player then the business threats and opportunities around this changed landscape need to be seriously considered.

  17. millsy 17

    DTB: we had a government ICT department. It was called Government Computing Services. The Bolger administration sold it off and it became EDS which folded into Unisys. We also had Health Computing Services which was sold at the same time.

    The old NZPO also did some computing work prior to it getting chopped. I believe they had a service called PACNET which was an internet type service.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Environment Court Judge appointed
    Prudence Steven QC, barrister of Christchurch has been appointed as an Environment Judge and District Court Judge to serve in Christchurch, Attorney-General David Parker announced today. Ms Steven has been a barrister sole since 2008, practising in resource management and local government / public law.    She was appointed a Queen’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Government moves on climate promises
    The Government is delivering on its first tranche of election promises to take action on climate change with a raft of measures that will help meet New Zealand’s 2050 carbon neutral target, create new jobs and boost innovation. “This will be an ongoing area of action but we are moving ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Jump starting research careers
    The Government is investing up to $10 million to support 30 of the country’s top early-career researchers to develop their research skills. “The pandemic has had widespread impacts across the science system, including the research workforce. After completing their PhD, researchers often travel overseas to gain experience but in the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Project protects jobs and nature
    A Waitomo-based Jobs for Nature project will keep up to ten people employed in the village as the tourism sector recovers post Covid-19 Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says. “This $500,000 project will save ten local jobs by deploying workers from Discover Waitomo into nature-based jobs. They will be undertaking local ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Minister Shaw speaks with U.S. Presidential Envoy John Kerry
    Minister for Climate Change, James Shaw spoke yesterday with President Biden’s Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry. “I was delighted to have the opportunity to speak with Mr. Kerry this morning about the urgency with which our governments must confront the climate emergency. I am grateful to him and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs makes three diplomatic appointments
    Foreign Affairs Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today announced three diplomatic appointments: Alana Hudson as Ambassador to Poland John Riley as Consul-General to Hong Kong Stephen Wong as Consul-General to Shanghai   Poland “New Zealand’s relationship with Poland is built on enduring personal, economic and historical connections. Poland is also an important ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Major redevelopment of Wainuiomata High School underway
    Work begins today at Wainuiomata High School to ensure buildings and teaching spaces are fit for purpose, Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. The Minister joined principal Janette Melrose and board chair Lynda Koia to kick off demolition for the project, which is worth close to $40 million, as the site ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New expert group appointed to advise Government on Oranga Tamariki
    A skilled and experienced group of people have been named as the newly established Oranga Tamariki Ministerial Advisory Board by Children’s Minister Kelvin Davis today. The Board will provide independent advice and assurance to the Minister for Children across three key areas of Oranga Tamariki: relationships with families, whānau, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • COVID-19 vaccine slated for possible approval next week
    The green light for New Zealand’s first COVID-19 vaccine could be granted in just over a week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said today. “We’re making swift progress towards vaccinating New Zealanders against the virus, but we’re also absolutely committed to ensuring the vaccines are safe and effective,” Jacinda Ardern said. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New ACC Board members announced.
    The Minister for ACC is pleased to announce the appointment of three new members to join the Board of ACC on 1 February 2021. “All three bring diverse skills and experience to provide strong governance oversight to lead the direction of ACC” said Hon Carmel Sepuloni. Bella Takiari-Brame from Hamilton ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Economic boost for Southland marae
    The Government is investing $9 million to upgrade a significant community facility in Invercargill, creating economic stimulus and jobs, Infrastructure Minister Grant Robertson and Te Tai Tonga MP Rino Tirikatene have announced.  The grant for Waihōpai Rūnaka Inc to make improvements to Murihiku Marae comes from the $3 billion set ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Celebrating the Entry Into Force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons
    [Opening comments, welcome and thank you to Auckland University etc] It is a great pleasure to be here this afternoon to celebrate such an historic occasion - the entry into force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. This is a moment many feared would never come, but ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Supporting disabled people to stay connected
    The Government is providing $3 million in one-off seed funding to help disabled people around New Zealand stay connected and access support in their communities, Minister for Disability Issues, Carmel Sepuloni announced today. The funding will allow disability service providers to develop digital and community-based solutions over the next two ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Voluntary saliva testing offered to quarantine workers from Monday
    Border workers in quarantine facilities will be offered voluntary daily COVID-19 saliva tests in addition to their regular weekly testing, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. This additional option will be rolled out at the Jet Park Quarantine facility in Auckland starting on Monday 25 January, and then to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Next steps in firearms buy-back
    The next steps in the Government’s ambitious firearms reform programme to include a three-month buy-back have been announced by Police Minister Poto Williams today.  “The last buy-back and amnesty was unprecedented for New Zealand and was successful in collecting 60,297 firearms, modifying a further 5,630 firearms, and collecting 299,837 prohibited ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Jobs for Nature projects target iconic ecosystems
    Upscaling work already underway to restore two iconic ecosystems will deliver jobs and a lasting legacy, Conservation Minister Kiri Allan says.  “The Jobs for Nature programme provides $1.25 billion over four years to offer employment opportunities for people whose livelihoods have been impacted by the COVID-19 recession. “Two new projects ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Public Housing Plan announced
    The Government has released its Public Housing Plan 2021-2024 which outlines the intention of where 8,000 additional public and transitional housing places announced in Budget 2020, will go. “The Government is committed to continuing its public house build programme at pace and scale. The extra 8,000 homes – 6000 public ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Prime Minister congratulates President Joe Biden on his inauguration
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has congratulated President Joe Biden on his inauguration as the 46th President of the United States of America. “I look forward to building a close relationship with President Biden and working with him on issues that matter to both our countries,” Jacinda Ardern said. “New Zealand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Jobs for Nature funding will create training and employment opportunities
    A major investment to tackle wilding pines in Mt Richmond will create jobs and help protect the area’s unique ecosystems, Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor says. The Mt Richmond Forest Park has unique ecosystems developed on mineral-rich geology, including taonga plant species found nowhere else in the country. “These special plant ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Pre-departure testing extended to all passengers to New Zealand
    To further protect New Zealand from COVID-19, the Government is extending pre-departure testing to all passengers to New Zealand except from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “The change will come into force for all flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (NZT) on Monday ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Bay Cadets learn skills to protect environment
    Bay Conservation Cadets launched with first intake Supported with $3.5 million grant Part of $1.245b Jobs for Nature programme to accelerate recover from Covid Cadets will learn skills to protect and enhance environment Environment Minister David Parker today welcomed the first intake of cadets at the launch of the Bay ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Cook Islanders to resume travel to New Zealand
    The Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern and the Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Mark Brown have announced passengers from the Cook Islands can resume quarantine-free travel into New Zealand from 21 January, enabling access to essential services such as health. “Following confirmation of the Cook Islands’ COVID ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Supporting communities and landowners to grow employment opportunities
    Jobs for Nature funding is being made available to conservation groups and landowners to employ staff and contractors in a move aimed at boosting local biodiversity-focused projects, Conservation Minister Kiritapu Allan has announced. It is estimated some 400-plus jobs will be created with employment opportunities in ecology, restoration, trapping, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Border exception for some returning international tertiary students
    The Government has approved an exception class for 1000 international tertiary students, degree level and above, who began their study in New Zealand but were caught offshore when border restrictions began. The exception will allow students to return to New Zealand in stages from April 2021. “Our top priority continues ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Tiwai deal gives time for managed transition
    Today’s deal between Meridian and Rio Tinto for the Tiwai smelter to remain open another four years provides time for a managed transition for Southland. “The deal provides welcome certainty to the Southland community by protecting jobs and incomes as the region plans for the future. The Government is committed ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New member for APEC Business Advisory Council
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has appointed Anna Curzon to the APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC). The leader of each APEC economy appoints three private sector representatives to ABAC. ABAC provides advice to leaders annually on business priorities. “ABAC helps ensure that APEC’s work programme is informed by business community perspectives ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Govt’s careful economic management recognised
    The Government’s prudent fiscal management and strong policy programme in the face of the COVID-19 global pandemic have been acknowledged by the credit rating agency Fitch. Fitch has today affirmed New Zealand’s local currency rating at AA+ with a stable outlook and foreign currency rating at AA with a positive ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Additional actions to keep COVID-19 out of NZ
    The Government is putting in place a suite of additional actions to protect New Zealand from COVID-19, including new emerging variants, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “Given the high rates of infection in many countries and evidence of the global spread of more transmissible variants, it’s clear that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • 19 projects will clean up and protect waterways
    $36 million of Government funding alongside councils and others for 19 projects Investment will clean up and protect waterways and create local jobs Boots on the ground expected in Q2 of 2021 Funding part of the Jobs for Nature policy package A package of 19 projects will help clean up ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago