web analytics

Let’s Lynch the Landlord

Written By: - Date published: 9:45 am, August 3rd, 2015 - 53 comments
Categories: accountability, class war, health, human rights, same old national, tenants' rights - Tags: ,

An extraordinary threat to the privacy of Christchurch clients of Relationships Aotearoa has been revealed this morning. A callous, grasping commercial landlord was trying to leverage money out of liquidators PriceWaterhouseCoopers by refusing them permission to remove and secure a roomful of sensitive files.

The landlord, Les Rawlings, had allowed a freelance journalist access to the records, presumably in a bid to strong arm the liquidator. PWC say they communicated immediately they took over with the  30 landlords across the country in order to secure and uplift the files held in the various buildings RA leased. It appears Rawlings had seized on this situation as an opportunity to make money that he wouldn’t normally be able to get under a liquidation. There are very few polite words to describe this kind of manipulative behaviour.

Also behaving despicably is the journalist, Beck Eleven. She accessed the site, took photos and then had the temerity to post this on her blog:

“On a personal note, I am sorry if this causes distress to people who have used the service and fear their files were left in the open. However, I believe this kind of privacy breach must be exposed so it doesn’t happen again.”

Get that? She’s the one exposing the clients to risk, she’s a party to the privacy breach, but she’s sorry if it causes “distress”. Still, at least she’s got one close supporter. Her uncle; the landlord Les Rawlings!

This situation sucks. Minister Anne Tolley should apologise to the RA clients this morning or she should be gone by lunchtime.

Destroying Relationships Aotearoa was her doing and she was told in no uncertain terms that there could be considerable harm to the vulnerable clients of RA at the time she closed them down. And this morning, that harm has been visited on them by a rapacious landlord and a disingenuous journalist.

My heart goes out to the clients of Relationships Aotearoa. They have been very badly let down and I can only imagine the horror they are feeling this morning. Happily, after bringing in lawyers, PWC have been able to secure the files.  But they would never have been in this situation if it wasn’t for the half arsed foolishness of Minister Tolley.

In the TS post linked to above is this line:

Time will tell but I suspect that the next few weeks is going to show the transition process to be a colossal f*&k up.

Yep. Never a truer word said.

Shame on the landlord. Shame on the journo. Shame, shame, shame on the Minister.

 

Re: the post title. It’s a song by the Dead Kennedys. Please don’t actually lynch the landlord. He may be an arse, but that would be going too far.

53 comments on “Let’s Lynch the Landlord ”

  1. Anno1701 1

    The Landlord’s here to visit
    They’re blasting disco down below
    Sez, “I’m doubling up the rent
    Cos the building’s condemned
    You’re gonna help me buy City Hall

  2. weka 2

    This is also a reminder about how few rights we have over information we share with others. Once a client shares something with a practitioner, that information becomes the property of the practitioner, and often the practitioner’s clinic (which means many people have access). The client has some limited rights in terms of accessing copies of that information, but they don’t have control or ownership of the information itself.

    The Privacy Act, and to some extent the Health and Disability Act, offer some protection in terms of what can be done with that information by the practitioner, but as this example with RA shows there are other forces that can and will take precedent. Often a breach has to occur before privacy rights will be enforced by the state.

    This is only going to get worse as notes and other information are increasingly digitised and systems are set up for information sharing that pay lip service to individual needs and rights. i.e. information sharing is becoming a priority over privacy, and systems are increasingly functioning for the system rather than the individual they are meant to be serving.

  3. Bill 3

    Too much ‘he said she said’ stuff around this.

    PWC claim the landlord stonewalled.
    The landlord claims he was told that the lease was going to be picked up by the new providers.

    Meanwhile, it would appear reasonable – all things being equal – that the landlord seek rent owing.

    As for Beck Eleven, well if PWC were negligent, then it would appear appropriate to blow the whistle on their lax arrangements, no? As she say’s (and putting aside claims that the landlord refused in some way to hand the documents over)

    The photos speak for themselves but it remains murky as to why no privacy transition plan or document shredding plan was put in place.

    edit: Maybe some qualifiers in lieu of some of the bold definitive statements in the post wouldn’t go amiss?

    • weka 3.1

      Yeah, just looking at the journalist’s blog post, it raises a few issues for me.

      One is why didn’t RA make sure that the files were secured before vacating? Leaving the dirty dishes is not a good look. It’s possible that RA in Chch believed that the files were secure, but maybe they also just walked out on the day and left it to the Ministry to sort. So who is it that has actual responsibility here? (that’s a question for a journalist to find the answer to and I’d suggest it involves a decent conversation with the Privacy Comissioner).

      I’d like to know how Eleven knows what the contents of the boxes are. I can’t tell from the photos. Has she opened the boxes? Looked at actual files? And has she breached the Privacy Act in doing so?

      • “I’d like to know how Eleven knows what the contents of the boxes are. I can’t tell from the photos. Has she opened the boxes? Looked at actual files? And has she breached the Privacy Act in doing so?”

        She did not open boxes, but she did look at files in boxes that were already open. As to whether that’s a breach of the Act, my guess is yes, but a relatively minor one, given that she did not divulge specific information.

        • weka 3.1.1.1

          It’s not minor. No-one has a right to look at private information unless they have good reason to believe that the person who the information is about would be ok with that (plus the usual legal reasons eg police access). Opening a box is no different to opening a file. That a box was open doesn’t equate to permission.

          If she can look at the files and that’s a minor issue, why not the landlord? Or a passer by when the door was unlocked and open?

          btw, what’s your source on that?

          • te reo putake 3.1.1.1.1

            Actually, you are right, weka. Either way it’s not minor. It’d be worse if details were released, of course. It reminds me of the PM’s office accessing Labour’s files. Even if the door is open, it’s your choice to enter.

            My source is the journalist, Beck Eleven. We had a brief exchange on twitter this morning and she confirmed she had looked at names and addresses, but did not rifle through the files. I’m happy to accept that was the extent of her viewing of the files.

            I extended an invitation for her to reply here as well. Happy to hear from her uncle as well, if there is a different position to be put.

          • Colonial Viper 3.1.1.1.2

            It’s not minor. No-one has a right to look at private information unless they have good reason to believe that the person who the information is about would be ok with that (plus the usual legal reasons eg police access).

            She investigated as much as was required in her capacity as a journalist to ensure that the story she was writing and the facts that she was using was accurate.

            Her actions are protecting the people whose information has been left lying all around the country, not compromising it.

            • weka 3.1.1.1.2.1

              I’m guessing that RA protected the identity of their clients. This means that the counsellor considered the names and address of the clients to be prviate and confidential in the same way as details of any counselling issues. Some counsellors will make that explicit to the client. It doesn’t matter that Eleven is a journalist, she didn’t have permission.

              You can of course argue that her breaching privacy serves the public good, but I don’t think you can argue that she didn’t breach privacy (based on what I’ve seen so far).

              “Her actions are protecting the people whose information has been left lying all around the country, not compromising it.”

              Why did she need to read names and addresses to do that?

            • Ergo Robertina 3.1.1.1.2.2

              It’s a valid story but It’s bad journalism. No comment from Relationships Aotearoa, MSD, or the liquidator in the blog post.
              It looks like Cary in the comments is RA strategic adviser Cary Hayward, which may have prompted the update to clarify the status of the locks.
              Especially given the story involves a family member she should have been more scrupulous about this before publishing.

    • McFlock 3.2

      Fair enough to seek rent owing, but why allow a journalist access to client files?

      That’s the bit that takes it from “dealing with liquidation like a normal person” and “leverage before ethics”, imo.

      • Bill 3.2.1

        I’m assuming he was a bit of an arse. But maybe he was genuinely outraged at the inaction of PWC and the whole MSD clusterfuck around the transition and privacy? And then, as he had a niece who was a journalist, thought it right to shed some light on the situation? I dunno.

        • greywarshark 3.2.1.1

          @Bill
          That’s the impression I received. A picture tells on a thousand tories. Good on them for doing an expose’ on the lack of responsibility of the government.

  4. McFlock 4

    I’m thoroughly gobsmacked.

    The landlord and the “journalist” are disgusting.

    • Bill 4.1

      Well, it could be as the landlord claims. It could be that PWC left the files there to be ‘adopted’ by the new tenant/provider. The new provider doesn’t take the premises in the end. Meaning, the landlord has a reasonable claim for monies for ‘not the most secure’ storage.

      Or it could be as PWC claim.

      Point is, we don’t know which version of events is true.

      • weka 4.1.1

        and irrespective of which version is true, I’d like to see a statement from the Privacy Comissioner about who owns the files. The landlord appears to be saying he does (he owns all property left behind), but even if that’s true he still has to abide by the Privacy Act. I’m not sure giving a journalist access does that. Nor does leaving doors unlocked.

  5. ankerawshark 5

    I am shocked that files were left in boxes (as opposed to locked cabinets) in a building no longer leased by RS.

    I am sorry but I don’t blame the landlord as such. He may be a prick, but he is not responsible for clinical files. Nor do I blame the journalist. It needed to come to light in order to deal with it.

    RA and whoever was taking the work over (I think it was MSD) should have liaised over securing the files. It is their responsibility.

    This should have been done professionally and in a thorough manner, i.e. paying for confidential storage.

    • Bill 5.2

      Basically ankerawshark. Neither rocket science nor particularly deep levels of awareness required to figure out some basic procedures and safeguards.

    • lprent 5.3

      Who knows the details?

      The MSD didn’t fund. RA went into liquidation because they were apparently completely out of funds prior to the appeals to the MSD. When no further funding was provided, a liquidator took over. By the sounds of it RS were probably evicted/locked out from many of their premises.

      Ultimately the MSD needs to secure the files because they were meant to be transitioning clients from one provider to another. That would include past clients. MSD should have been completely aware that RA were shutting down from a position of debt.

      To me it looks like MSD ignored their responsibilities. Bearing in mind how political the decisions about RS were, the minister is completely culpable.

      • John Shears 5.3.1

        Nicely put Iprent.

      • adam 5.3.2

        If you have dealt with a receiver type situation via a social services/community organisation – it is bloody awful. My experience, as the the guy brought in by a mate to help out as the state government, rolled a place. Yes, in Australia.

        It was the last 2 weeks, and like RA they thought they would survive, so it was in reality, day to day. On the last day when the, contracts were cut – the money run out – the banks stopped all credit, cold. We had been told in the morning to be out by lunch time. Similar deal I hear for RA, a very short time to react to closing. So the workers are running around like they have got a million things to do in two minutes, trying to do what they think is best – it was that depressing experience – coupled with lots of tears, frustration, and anger.

        Now, this has happened before, and will happen again. The ministry, and in particular the Minister knew that credit would stop, and that the receives would be brought in. So she would also know, she has to take responsibility for her actions, because she left no choice for those involved. NO choice to protect those they had served, no choice to do the right thing – the Minister took away choice and then washed her hands of the affair.

        I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – what do you do when you have a government that has no moral compass?

        • lprent 5.3.2.1

          That is my view as well. There would have been few realisable assets and no future income. So there would have been no way to have a particularly orderly shutdown. This would have been completely obvious.

    • Colonial Viper 5.4

      I think Beck Eleven has done what needed to be done as a journalist and made it clear that the Government has put hundreds of people and a lot of confidential information at risk. Describing her actions in writing this situation up as “despicable” is way over the top.

      • In my opinion that it’s not over the top, CV. She didn’t declare her relationship to the landlord and she chose to look at the files. It strikes me that she was acting more as a PR for her uncle than as a journalist. A reverse Glucina, if you like. But the real responsibility lies with Anne Tolley. This situation could not have arisen if she hadn’t acted so brutally to close RA. A managed exit could, and should, have been organised. Her prime responsibility was to the clients and she has failed them abysmally.

        • Colonial Viper 5.4.1.1

          Not declaring her relationship to a news source makes her despicable as a journalist? Or do you see that she spun the facts or misrepresented them in her Uncle’s favour? Please clarify why you see it this way. Have you ever seen Sabin declare that his brother is a National MP when reporting on NZ politics?

    • Bill 5.5

      Hmm. From the Carmel Sepuloni link below (comment 7 by OAB) it appears that Deloitte’s were contracted to manage the transition. Which begs the question of why PWC were looking to get office access and/or why Deloitte’s weren’t liaising with the landlord over the files.

    • Karen 5.6

      +1 ankerawshark

      Relationship Services and/or MSD are responsible for this situation, not the landlord or the journalist who has exposed the problem.

  6. shorts 6

    at what point do we level our finger of blame back at those who forced RA to colapse leaving this mess in the first place – the people who wouldn’t allow a smooth transition from RA to whomever is picking up the pieces (not the vulture receivers)

    • tc 6.1

      All roads lead to the minister and yet another example of the incompetance of tolley and her minions.

      Higher standards anybody ?

  7. One Anonymous Bloke 7

    Carmel Sepuloni raised this back in June.

    The private case files of hundreds of Relationships Aotearoa clients are sitting in boxes in offices around the country as the wrangling over their transition to other agencies continues, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni.

    “PwC as liquidator has permission to access the files, but there are technical issues around their removal – making a fiction of Social Development Minister Anne Tolley’s assurances no-one would be without support during the handover.

    “To add to that MSD’s Murray Eldridge and the Privacy Commissioner have been at odds over the complexity of the file transfer process, with the Commissioner expressing considerable annoyance at MSD claiming it would be straightforward.

    “RA had asked for three months to work with their clients in moving them to the Government’s preferred service providers. Instead MSD only offered them 10 weeks, during which they would receive no funding.

    Boxes all over the country. Ten weeks without pay. Why does everything National touches turn to shit?

    • Bill 7.1

      Yup. I think that in conjunction with ankerrawshark’s comment above, that this is the actual story; not some flapping over a landlord and a niece with a camera.

      • weka 7.1.1

        There are Privacy Act issues here in addition to the MSD/RA ones.

        None of what’s in that link precludes the landlord trying to extort money (I have no idea if he did btw). It’s not like such extortion wasn’t going on after the quakes.

        It’s still unclear to me who owns the files, and who has responsiblity. If I was a client of RA, I’d be thinking it was RA as they’re the ones I shared my information with.

        • Sarah 7.1.1.1

          Hi Weka

          Declaration: I am a former employee of Relationships Aotearoa (RA). When we were operational and when we closed no information collected about a client was shared with anyone without explicit client consent. In the last 2 weeks of operation counsellors tried to contact all open cases to see whether they wanted to transition to another provider, and if they did whether they gave consent for their file to be shared.

          • weka 7.1.1.1.1

            thanks Sarah. Did RA clients have to sign a privacy form when they were first taken on?

            • Sarah 7.1.1.1.1.1

              The obligations were on RA to only share their information with consent. Clients were informed of their right to privacy. Likewise before receiving information from a community referral we would require the referrer to have sought consent from the client before passing information.

              This is, or should be, common and best practice.

              • weka

                Thanks Sarah, that wasn’t quite what I was asking. How can RA know it has consent? I was wondering if clients were asked to sign a general waiver when they first came into the service.

    • keyman 7.2

      that is there elected roll to fuck everything up

  8. vto 8

    Beck Eleven has never been worthy of a read… she is just another white middle class female journalist who [deleted] and has excessive opinions

    [And you appear to be a sexist git. Write about the issue, or don’t write at all. TRP]

    • vto 8.1

      oh diddums. Here let me write it again.

      Mike Hosking is just another white middle class male who [deleted] and has excessive opinions

      I seen plenty such written which get let through without moderator bigotry being imposed.

      The hypocrisy shown around here at times is truly laughable

      [There’s no hypocrisy, VTO, different mods see things in different ways. However, we all moderate according to the site rules. Banned for a week for reproducing the deleted phrase. TRP]

  9. dv 9

    AND also, have the clients been passed on to the new provider?

  10. Sam C 11

    Still… for someone so keen on journalistic integrity (according to her other posts anyway), Ms Eleven could surely have declared her relationship with the landlord and let readers come to their own conclusions.

  11. Old Mickey 12

    The landlord and journo have behaved appallingly, its a long bow to blame the minister for this. The RA saga isn’t over yet, and when the receivers call in the SFO it will be interesting to see what everyone has to say.

  12. Ad 13

    Top work TRP; entirely appropriate outrage.

    Nearly three terms of the worst database and privacy-violating government we have ever had.

    • tc 13.1

      It’s not a violation if you re-write the rules and hide behind a friendly force that refuses to charge potential breaches.

  13. weka 14

    Having just spoken with the Operations Manager in charge I can confirm that these files were in a locked room (with pin access) in a locked building when staff left the building for the last time. Two managers oversaw the handover of keys to the landlord. Someone with keys to the building and access to the pin on the door would have needed to open the room up in order for these photos to be taken. This must have occurred at some point after the closure of RA.

    Cary 8/2/2015 16:46:53

    http://www.beckeleven.co.nz/blogcolumns/relationships-aotearoa-privacy-and-protection-no

    Back in the landlord’s court then.

    • Bill 14.1

      I thought he’d already clarified that the ‘office’ door was unlocked that day because the files were due to be picked up?

      Should he or PWC or Deloitte have come to a more secure arrangement? Yes.

      Thing is, I can’t quite understand why PWC or who-ever didn’t just turn up some weeks ago – with or without cops, lawyers or whatever – get a locksmith to remove the lock, empty the room and be done with it.

      Hmm – except that Strand were going to be taking over the lease. Which would partially explain the files being left in situ. But then, that doesn’t explain allegations that the landlord was seeking to extort monies from PWC.

      • weka 14.1.1

        “I thought he’d already clarified that the ‘office’ door was unlocked that day because the files were due to be picked up?”

        Hard to know what happened because we’re working piecemeal, but I was under the impression that the door was left open. Not that it was unlocked for pick up once the picker uppers had arrived. If so, that’s not good. Eleven seemed to be implying that the MSD/RA/PWC were neglectful but it looks like the landlord was as well. It makes a mockery of her assertion that the files should have been secured somewhere where homeless people wouldn’t break in if the room was left open for the afternoon or whatever.

        I think she’s probably tried to do something good here, but there does look like a conflict given the family connection and I think she’s dropped the ball professionally in a few ways. I’m wondering how experienced she is as a journo. It looks like someone who doesn’t quite know what they are doing.

        I don’t know what rights receivers have in a situation like that in terms of breaking locks.

        One other thing occurs to me. Eleven writes a column for the Press. Interesting she’s put this on her blog rather than trying to get it published in a newspaper.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Joint media release on the occasion of the meeting between European Commission President von der Ley...
    European Commission President von der Leyen and Prime Minister of New Zealand Ardern met in Brussels on 30 June 2022. The encounter provided an opportunity to reaffirm that the European Union and Aotearoa New Zealand are longstanding partners with shared democratic values and interests, aligned positions on key international and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • New Zealand secures major free trade deal with European Union
    Export revenue to the EU to grow by up to $1.8 billion annually on full implementation. Duty-free access on 97% of New Zealand’s current exports to the EU; with over 91% being removed the day the FTA comes into force. NZ exporters set to save approx. $110 million per annum ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Biggest Year for Clean Cars on Record
    57,000 EVs and Hybrid registered in first year of clean car scheme, 56% increase on previous year EVs and Non Plug-in Hybrids made up 20% of new passenger car sales in March/April 2022 The Government’s Clean Car Discount Scheme has been a success, with more than 57,000 light-electric and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    16 hours ago
  • Police Wing 355 includes the highest ever proportion of Wāhine Māori
    Police Minister Chris Hipkins congratulates the newest Police wing – wing 355 – which graduated today in Porirua. “These 70 new constables heading for the frontline bring the total number of new officers since Labour took office to 3,303 and is the latest mark of our commitment to the Police ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • New RBNZ board takes up role from 1 July
    Members with a range of governance, financial and technical skills have been appointed to the Reserve Bank Board as part of the shift to strengthen the Bank’s decision-making and accountability arrangements. The Reserve Bank of New Zealand Act 2021 comes into force on 1 July 2022, with the establishment of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    17 hours ago
  • New measures to help manage COVID-19 as country stays at Orange
    New Zealand to remain at Orange as case numbers start to creep up 50 child-size masks made available to every year 4-7 student in New Zealand 20,000-30,000 masks provided a week to all other students and school staff Extra funding to schools and early childhood services to supports better ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • NZ to join International Court of Justice case against Russia
    Aotearoa New Zealand will join Ukraine’s case against Russia at the International Court of Justice (ICJ), which challenges Russia’s spurious attempt to justify its invasion under international law. Ukraine filed a case at the ICJ in February arguing Russia has falsely claimed genocide had occurred in Luhansk and Donetsk regions, as ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    19 hours ago
  • New advisory group provides enduring Māori expertise for Te Aorerekura delivery
    The Government has taken another step forward in its work to eliminate family violence and sexual violence with the announcement today of a new Tangata Whenua Ministerial Advisory Group. A team of 11 experts in whānau Māori wellbeing will provide the Government independent advice on shaping family violence and sexual ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    22 hours ago
  • Making work better for Kiwi women
    Te Mahere Whai Mahi Wāhine: Women’s Employment Action Plan was launched today by Minister for Women Jan Tinetti – with the goal of ensuring New Zealand is a great place for women to work. “This Government is committed to improving women’s working lives. The current reality is that women have ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    23 hours ago
  • Good Employer Awards celebrate food and fibre sector
    The food and fibre sector acknowledged its people and leadership at last night’s 2022 Primary Industries Good Employer Awards, a time to celebrate their passion towards supporting employees by putting their health, welfare and wellbeing first,” Acting Minister of Agriculture Meka Whairiti said. “Award winners were selected from an extraordinary ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • PM's comments to NATO session
    Kia ora koutou katoa.  It is a rare thing to have New Zealand represented at a NATO Summit. While we have worked together in theatres such as Afghanistan, and have been partners for just on a decade, today represents an important moment for our Pacific nation.   New Zealand is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Veterans Minister announces new focus on mental health for veterans and their whānau
    Te Arataki mō te Hauora Ngākau mō ngā Mōrehu a Tū me ō rātou Whānau, The Veteran, Family and Whānau Mental Health and Wellbeing Policy Framework “We ask a lot of those who serve in the military – and we ask a lot of the families and whānau who support ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Minister to advocate for Small Island States
    Associate Minister of Foreign Affairs Aupito William Sio has been appointed by the United Nations and Commonwealth as Aotearoa New Zealand’s advocacy champion for Small Island States.  “Aotearoa New Zealand as a Pacific country is particularly focused on the interests of Pacific Small Island Developing States in our region.  “This is a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Increased support for households to pay local council rates
    An estimated 100,000 low income households will be eligible for increased support to pay their council rates, with changes to the rates rebate scheme taking effect from 1 July. Local Government Minister Nanaia Mahuta has announced increases to both the maximum value of the rates rebate, and the income threshold ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • He Oranga Poutama expanded into four new regions
    A long-standing physical activity programme that focuses on outcomes for Maori has been expanded to four new regions with Government investment almost doubled to increase its reach. He Oranga Poutama is managed by a combination of hapū, iwi, hauora and regional providers.   An increase in funding from $1.8 million ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Wellington’s rapid transit option progresses to next stage
    The Government is progressing a preferred option for LGWM which will see Wellington’s transport links strengthened with light rail from Wellington Station to Island Bay, a new tunnel through Mt Victoria for public transport, and walking and cycling, and upgrades to improve traffic flow at the Basin Reserve. “Where previous ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Keynote remarks: Tech 4 Democracy Summit, Madrid
    To Provost Muniz, to the Organisers at the Instituto de Empresa  buenas tardes and as we would say in New Zealand, kia ora kotou katoa.  To colleagues from the State Department, from Academia, and Civil Society Groups, to all our distinguished guests - kia ora tatou katoa. It’s a pleasure ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • On June 28, 2022, a meeting took place in Madrid between the President of the Government of the Kingdom of Spain, Pedro Sánchez Pérez-Castejón, and the Prime Minister of New Zealand, Jacinda Ardern, who was visiting Spain to participate in the Summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization as one ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • More young Kiwis able to travel and work in Spain
    A six-fold increase in the Aotearoa New Zealand-Spain working holiday scheme gives a huge boost to the number of young people who can live and work in each other’s countries, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says. Jacinda Ardern and Spanish President Pedro Sánchez Pérez-Castejón made the Working Holiday/Youth Mobility Scheme announcement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Supporting local government candidates
    A significant barrier has been removed for people who want to stand in local government elections, with a change to the requirement to publish personal details in election advertising. The Associate Local Government Minister Kieran McAnulty has taken the Local Electoral (Advertising) Amendment Bill through its final stages in Parliament ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Govt passes law to protect consumers in banking and insurance sector
    New financial conduct scheme will ensure customers are treated fairly Banks, insurers and non-bank deposit takers to be licensed by the FMA in relation to their general conduct Sales incentives based on volume or value targets like bonuses for selling a certain number of financial products banned The Government ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New law paves way for greater supermarket competition
    Legislation that bans major supermarkets from blocking their competitors’ access to land to set up new stores paves the way for greater competition in the sector, Minister of Commerce and Consumer Affairs Dr David Clark said. The new law is the first in a suite of measures the Government is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Vaccine mandate for border and corrections workers to end
    The Government has announced an end to the requirement for border workers and corrections staff to be fully vaccinated. This will come into place from 2 July 2022. 100 per cent of corrections staff in prisons, and as of 23 June 2022 97 per cent of active border workers were ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Zealand's Commonwealth relationships strengthened at CHOGM
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta has concluded a visit to Rwanda reaffirming Aotearoa New Zealand’s engagement in the Commonwealth and meeting with key counterparts. “I would like to thank President Kagame and the people of Rwanda for their manaakitanga and expert hosting of this important meeting,” Nanaia Mahuta said. “CHOGM ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Emergency monitoring centre opened to keep New Zealand safer
    Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty officially launched the new Monitoring, Alerting and Reporting (MAR) Centre at the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) today. The Government has stood up the centre in response to recommendations from the 2018 Ministerial Review following the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake and 2017 Port Hills fire, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Waikato Expressway speed limit to change to 110km/h
    Transport Minister Michael Wood has welcomed the announcement that a 110km/hr speed limit has been set for the SH1 Waikato Expressway, between Hampton Downs and Tamahere. “The Waikato Expressway is a key transport route for the Waikato region, connecting Auckland to the agricultural and business centres of the central North ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Government listening to sector on NCEA
    Following feedback from the sector, Associate Minister of Education Jan Tinetti, today confirmed that new literacy and numeracy | te reo matatini me te pāngarau standards will be aligned with wider NCEA changes. “The education sector has asked for more time to put the literacy and numeracy | te reo ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Further Aotearoa New Zealand support for Ukraine
    $4.5 million to provide Ukraine with additional non-lethal equipment and supplies such as medical kit for the Ukrainian Army Deployments extended for New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) intelligence, logistics and liaison officers in the UK, Germany, and Belgium Secondment of a senior New Zealand military officer to support International ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Electoral changes will bring greater transparency for voters
    Changes to electoral law announced by Justice Minister Kiri Allan today aim to support participation in parliamentary elections, and improve public trust and confidence in New Zealand’s electoral system. The changes are targeted at increasing transparency around political donations and loans and include requiring the disclosure of: donor identities for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government invests to minimise gambling harm
    The Labour government has announced a significant investment to prevent and minimise harm caused by gambling. “Gambling harm is a serious public health issue and can have a devastating effect on the wellbeing of individuals, whānau and communities. One in five New Zealanders will experience gambling harm in their lives, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • More free flu vaccines and a second COVID-19 booster to groups at risk of hospitalisation
    The Government has widened access to free flu vaccines with an extra 800,000 New Zealanders eligible from this Friday, July 1  Children aged 3-12 years and people with serious mental health or addiction needs now eligible for free flu dose. From tomorrow (Tuesday), second COVID-19 booster available six months ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Government backs action to drive strong wool growth
    The Government is investing to create new product categories and new international markets for our strong wool and is calling on Kiwi businesses and consumers to get behind the environmentally friendly fibre, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor said today. Wool Impact is a collaboration between the Government and sheep sector partners ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Veterans Minister pays tribute to service and sacrifice at Korean War commemoration
    At today’s commemoration of the start of the Korean War, Veterans Minister Meka Whaitiri has paid tribute to the service and sacrifice of our New Zealand veterans, their families and both nations. “It’s an honour to be with our Korean War veterans at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park to commemorate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Matariki projects star in latest round of Tourism Infrastructure Fund
    Minister of Tourism Stuart Nash and Associate Minister of Tourism Peeni Henare announced the sixth round of recipients of the Government’s Tourism Infrastructure Fund (TIF), which supports local government to address tourism infrastructure needs. This TIF round will invest $15 million into projects around the country. For the first time, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Prime Minister’s Matariki speech 2022
    Matariki tohu mate, rātou ki a rātou Matariki tohu ora, tātou ki a tātou Tīhei Matariki Matariki – remembering those who have passed Matariki – celebrating the present and future Salutations to Matariki   I want to begin by thanking everyone who is here today, and in particular the Matariki ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • First Matariki holiday marked across New Zealand and the world
    Oho mai ana te motu i te rangi nei ki te hararei tūmatanui motuhake tuatahi o Aotearoa, Te Rā Aro ki a Matariki, me te hono atu a te Pirīmia a Jacinda Ardern ki ngā mahi whakanui a te motu i tētahi huihuinga mō te Hautapu i te ata nei.    ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Minister to attend second United Nations Ocean Conference in Portugal
    Oceans and Fisheries Minister David Parker will represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the second United Nations (UN) Ocean Conference in Lisbon, Portugal, which runs from 27 June to 1 July. The Conference will take stock of progress and aims to galvanise further action towards Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14, to "conserve and sustainably use ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government supports innovative dairy sheep sector to scale up
    The Government is boosting its partnership with New Zealand’s dairy sheep sector to help it lift its value and volume, and become an established primary industry, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor has announced. “Globally, the premium alternative dairy category is growing by about 20 percent a year. With New Zealand food ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government supports Buller flood recovery and longer term resilience
    The Government is continuing to support the Buller district to recover from severe flooding over the past year, Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty announced today during a visit with the local leadership. An extra $10 million has been announced to fund an infrastructure recovery programme, bringing the total ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government outlines plans for future COVID-19 variants
    “The Government has undertaken preparatory work to combat new and more dangerous variants of COVID-19,” COVID-19 Response Minister Dr Ayesha Verrall set out today. “This is about being ready to adapt our response, especially knowing that new variants will likely continue to appear. “We have undertaken a piece of work ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago