web analytics

Paora Goldsmith, Māori history and identity politics

Written By: - Date published: 9:36 am, February 4th, 2021 - 73 comments
Categories: education, history, paul goldsmith, racism - Tags:

Holy hell.

Does anyone in National Party land vet their MP’s media?

Because they are coming out with the most outlandishly stupid stuff.

Like Paora Goldsmith who thinks that as part of New Zealand history our kids should be educated about how Smith and Caugheys developed their business model, rather than how the Treaty of Waitangi and the subsequent egregious breaches are fundamental parts of our history that have shaped Aotearoa New Zealand society.

From Simon Collins at the Herald:

New Zealand’s first draft plan to teach our own history in schools has been slammed as “unbalanced” by the Opposition National Party.

The long-awaited draft curriculum for what are called “Aotearoa New Zealand’s Histories” is structured around just three “big ideas” – all about Māori and colonisation. They are:

  • “Māori history is the foundational and continuous history of Aotearoa New Zealand.”
  • “Colonisation and its consequences have been central to our history for the past 200 years and continues to influence all aspects of Aotearoa NZ society.”
  • “Aotearoa NZ’s history has been shaped by the exercise and effects of power.”

The last idea is explained more fully as: “Individuals, groups and organisations have exerted and contested power in ways that have improved the lives of people and communities, and in ways that have led to damage, injustice and conflict.

“Ideologies and beliefs, from within and beyond Aotearoa NZ, underpin expressions of power and resistance and insisting on rights and identity.”

But National’s education spokesman Paul Goldsmith, who has written several books on NZ business and economic history, immediately attacked the first draft as “lacking in balance and needs revision”.

“The themes are mainly about identity and identity politics. That’s part of the story – but there are other elements to New Zealand’s history,” he said.

“How did we make a living as a country? How, in such a short space of time, did we attain one of the highest living standards in the world?

“Those basic questions don’t feature prominently. They deserve much more than a passing reference.

“New Zealand is also one the oldest democracies in the world, with strong traditions of freedom and the rule of law – which is rare in this world. How did those institutions develop? Again, this is not a central theme,” Goldsmith said.

“History is always contested. I encourage all New Zealanders to look at the proposals and submit on them.”

Paora misses the point.  Breaches of the Treaty of Waitangi, particularly in relation to land, allowed for the establishment of New Zealand’s farming sector which along with the extraction industries has allowed for our economy to form.  So the curriculum actually focuses on the central reason that our standard of living was so high, at least for some.

When you look at Paora’s bibliography you can see what he is fascinated by.  Alongside the books about John Banks and Don Brash he has written about Fletchers, the Myers family, a history of tax in Aotearoa, Alan Gibbs and William Gallagher.  Maybe he is hoping that a change in the curriculum to focus on business will mean that his books will become more popular.

And understanding the development of our democracy is assisted by understanding colonisation and its effects.  Basically we implemented an English system of Parliamentary rule but as time has passed and affected in no small way by Te Ao Māori our system has developed and progressed.

My initial reaction was that Paora was engaging in some good old racist dog whistling.  But having a look at what he has written about he is actually obsessed with how business has developed in New Zealand.  And thinks that it is the most important part of our history.

73 comments on “Paora Goldsmith, Māori history and identity politics ”

  1. Barfly 1

    word missing in final sentence between – most…………part

    [Oops thanks. Now corrected – MS]

  2. Enough is Enough 2

    To be fair I think you have misrepresented what Goldsmith is saying. He hasn't said the topics in the draft proposal should not be taught. He has not said that the Treaty and its history should not be taught.

    What he has said, is the curriculum should be broader. And I agree with him on that point.

    For example, it is impossible to understand modern New Zealand without studying the destruction that was brought on society by the reforms of the 4th Labour government, and the reasons why those reforms have been retained by all subsequent governments. What those reforms were, and why they were brought in, should be taught.

    Then you rewind from that to what our welfare state was and why it was created by the first Labour government. That is as equally important in understanding modern New Zealand.

    Goldsmith isn't rejecting the current proposals. He is suggesting we should be a bit broader which I think is a good thing.

    • Roy Cartland 2.1

      Kind of like in a "Blacks Lives Matter" / "All Lives Matter" sense?

    • woodart 2.2

      yes, good point enough is etc, recent history should be taught, i.e. the cost of deregulation in the housing sector in the nineties should be constantly thrown in the faces of goldsmith and his ilk. the dismantling of the welfare state and its resulting effect on the growing wealth and health gap, should also be in the curriculum. along with the effect on our water quality after intensive dairying.

    • Rae 2.3

      Yes, he said the curriculum should be broader, then all he could come up with to broaden it was "economy".

  3. Stuart Munro 3

    My grandfather was seven when he got his first flax cutting contract – there is quite a lot to be learned about how wealth was created, and how NZ was able to prosper – replete with lessons that, given Treasury's manifest inadequacy and the craven clinging to the failed mysticisms of Rogergnomics, NZ could really use. But Goldsmith is hardly an objective scholar in such an enterprise.

    I expect that colonial seizures correlated with as often as they caused relative prosperity – but the colonial governments certainly wrecked havoc on Maori attempts at monied enterprise, a form of oligarchic corruption that continues to this day in the corruption of entities like Southern Response, albeit along less racially defined grounds.

  4. Tricledrown 4

    Maori had successful businesses before the land wars they were very successful until confiscation and illegal sales by European settlers.

    Maori were exporting food to NSW and California as early European settlers were mainly City folk and didn't know how to farm or fish. Had Maori been allowed to continue farming and fishing businesses we would see Maori on the upper income scale as opposed to what has happened as disenfranchised ground down impoverished people who have the worst health,housing and wealth disparities.

    Goldsmith is parroting the white superiority ie Don Maori bash,Banks despicable denigrating Maori .While National want to win votes in the Maori electorates.

    Goldsmith forgets that none of his rich list heros would have made it but for the massive illegal land grab .

    • Gosman 4.1

      Some Iwi were very successful at developing their local economy and made lots of money supplying European urban settlements both here and in Australia from the mid 1830's to the 1860's . However they were not at the forefront of developing the pastoral economy that eventually formed the backbone of the NZ economy from the late 19th Century onwards as that required far more capital intensive methods of production. The fundamental problem with the Maori economy remains the same as it today. How to release the capital tied up in the land to fund development while still maintaining collective ownership over the land.

      • sam green 4.1.1

        Agree about the capital (then) but there are (now) plenty of hugely successful kiwifruit blocks in collective ownership, among other types of production.

      • left_forward 4.1.2

        The fundamental problem for NZ economy remains the same today – the colonialist's mechanistic worldview that land is a thing apart from nature – a tradeable commodity that can be owned and exploited. An unhelpful idea imposed by the newcomers upon tangata whenua and in breach of their Te Tiriti o Waitangi commitment to uphold Tino Rangatiratanga.

        • Gosman 4.1.2.1

          It is not unhelpful. The concept or property rights over land (and other things) has formed the driver for the modern capitalist economy. You might want to change that but people like me will oppose you as much as we can given the benefits we see that come from that approach.

          • left_forward 4.1.2.1.1

            NZers including yourself Gosman, through education, might begin to appreciate different historical experiences – developing understanding and appreciation of the experience of tangata whenua for example.

            Describing the land division and the related confiscation of Maori land as not unhelpful, reveals the limited scope of your understanding. I was referring to it being unhelpful to tangata whenua – it was obviously of benefit to those that stole the land!

            This being Waitangi Day, it is an appropriate time for you to contemplate how such a narrow view of history contributes to Maori inequity in Aotearoa today.

            Nga mihi mahana ki a koe.

        • Gosman 4.1.2.2

          How can private property rights over land be in breach of the Treaty when a specific article was written that essentially codified that as a principle?

          • Macro 4.1.2.2.1

            You know as well as anyone (or maybe you refuse to recognise it) that it was the abuse of that specific article by successive governments that is the subject of the grievance. It was blatant theft, and, in essence, a breach of The Treaty.

      • Patricia Bremner 4.1.3

        We have to own the different laws which disadvantaged Maori and empowered Settlers. Ownership building laws for instance.

      • Molly 4.1.4

        Local iwi were exporting produce, and assisted settlers before their land was confiscated, and distrbuted amongst those same settler families.

        I would expect that this situation was likely repeated in other rohe throughout NZ.

      • Tricledrown 4.1.5

        Gosman pastoral farming needed land without that land no business.

        To say multiple ownership and capital investment would have prevented Maori succeeding when they already had proven they could innovate and develop modern farming techniques ie in the Waikato with steel plows horses etc. Gosman your argument doesn't stack up.

        Running sheep on large tracts of land doesn't require massive investment but if Maori had still owned that land they would have benefited.

        Those pastoral lands were owned by a few wealthy aristocrats up until the 1890's when they were broken up by a left wing govt.Why because there wasn't much economic benefit to NZ.Employing a few slave waged workers and having vast stations that were poorly managed .so no economic benefit till refridgeration.

        King Dick saw the future of having smaller well managed farms providing more money to more people would help our economy develop.

        Refridgeration was the key to the expansion and profitability of pastoral farming that didn't happen till after most of Maori had lost theirs land and economic power with it.

        NZs economy was more dependent on gold mining until the mid 1870's.after gold ran out gold NZ's economy stayed largely in recession till King Dick started the welfare state ,Women got the vote ,state houses started to be built free primary education a pension for the elderly.all pushed by trade unions made more people well off expanding New Zealands economic base.

        Gosman so having multiple shareholders in a company you would think given your propaganda on multiple ownership pertaining to Maori would hinder all other multiple ownership models.yet now Maori are benefiting from a return of 1 to 3% of their economic base the other 97% remain uncompensated for if it was returned to Maori they would not be continually trashed by racist rednecks like you Gosman ,if Maori had kept their economic base from the 1840's the 97% not returned land stolen or confiscated Maori would be owning most of the wealthy upmarket suburbs and not a the bottom of every economic ladder.

        White supremacist colonial attitudes by dreary dinosaurs ie Banks Brash and Gosman.

        National will struggle to get any votes in the Maori electorates.

        • RedLogix 4.1.5.1

          racist rednecks like you Gosman

          It's abusive language like this which shames the left.

        • Gosman 4.1.5.2

          The areas of the country where the concentration of Maori land is the greatest today also coincide with some of the areas of the country with greatest amount of poverty. Part of the reasons is the land use is not as productive in these areas as others. There have been investigations on the causes of this and how to resolve it. As this press release from Shane Jones following one of these investigations highlights there is a problem with accessing sufficient capital to develop the land and that is what they are trying to make it easier for Iwi to do.

          "The Whenua Māori allocation assists Māori with access to financial capital which remains a challenge for landowners as the special status of their land means commercial banks are less willing to lend to them…"

          https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/enhancing-productivity-whenua-m%C4%81ori

          • Tricledrown 4.1.5.2.1

            Maori were left with the least productive land.

            And a system that denies Maori access to Capital because the banks can't sell the land to recover debt.

      • Tricledrown 4.1.6

        Gosman your full of it considering Maori were left with the least productive land and denied finances by European controlled banks.As well as legal hurdles set by Europeans.

        Also denied proper voting rights as most Maori were landowners the only NZ citizens allowed to vote at that time.Europeans made sure by voter suppression and only allowing 2 seats in parliament representing Maori as Maori couldn't read English European legislatures made sure they always held the upper hand.

  5. Gosman 5

    "Breaches of the Treaty of Waitangi, particularly in relation to land, allowed for the establishment of New Zealand’s farming sector which along with the extraction industries has allowed for our economy to form.

    So the curriculum actually focuses on the central reason that our standard of living was so high, at least for some."

    Not really.. While the confiscation of land in the Waikato and to a lesser extent Taranaki allowed the European farming sector to flourish in those places and gave a boost to Auckland the economic focal point of NZ for much of the 19th Century was much further to the South. Much of the Banking infrastructure was driven by the gold rushes in the Southern parts of NZ for example.

    The idea that British/NZ European and Maori interaction and conflict was the main driver behind the development of NZ is placing too greater weight on that element of NZ History. NZ did not become a wealthy nation because Europeans took all the land from Maori.

    • Tricledrown 5.1

      Gosman your 1950's white washed Version of NZ history is a cop out.

      Pastoral farming was barely profitable if Not for Maori farming settlers would have starved in NZ and NSW,European settlers took advantage of Maori lack of knowledge of the rights conferred as British citizens as very few Maori could speak English let alone read and write and had no lawyers representing them in the land transactions till the church's intervention in the mid 1880's they demanded when it was to late.

      That's what caused the wars greedy double dealing land agents etc.

      • Gosman 5.1.1

        Pastoral farming became extremely profitable after the 1850's. That is why it came to dominate the NZ farming sector.

    • Roy Cartland 5.2

      NZ did not become a wealthy nation because Europeans took all the land from Maori.

      Can you clarify – do you mean:

      "Because Europeans took all the land from Maori, NZ did not become a wealthy nation."

      or

      "NZ became a wealthy nation, but not because Europeans took all the land from Maori."

      or

      "Europeans didn’t take all the land, yet NZ became wealthy."

      • Gosman 5.2.1

        The last point is probably the most appropriate to the point I was trying to make. My apologies for the confusion.

        There was large scale land confiscation of Maori land (mainly in the 1860's) however the economic development of NZ did not rely on THAT land confiscation. Also confiscated land was not how the majority of Maori land fell in to European hands. This was still achieved via sales. Some of these sales were seriously flawed but many were quite legitimate.

        • Brigid 5.2.1.1

          "Also confiscated land was not how the majority of Maori land fell in to European hands. This was still achieved via sales. Some of these sales were seriously flawed but many were quite legitimate."

          If you're going to make this claim you really need to provide some evidence. Which of course you wont, because there is none.

          Meanwhile read a few books on the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863

          "Under the New Zealand Settlements Act, Waikato lost almost all their land and Ngāti Hauā about a third of theirs. But kūpapa (pro-government or neutral) Māori also lost land as the yardstick rapidly changed from guilt to convenience. Ngāti Maniapoto territory still under Kīngitanga control was untouched. In the long term, Taranaki Māori suffered most from confiscation in terms of land actually occupied."

          https://nzhistory.govt.nz/the-new-zealand-settlements-act-passed

          Where is the most profitable long established pastoral land? Waikato and Taranaki

          • Gosman 5.2.1.1.1

            The land is very profitable from a pastoral point of view now especially in regard to Dairying. However the early development of NZ was less focused on Dairying and more focused on meet and wool production. The areas that were the drivers of this were much more in the South.

            • DS 5.2.1.1.1.1

              In Taranaki, fungus exports to China (yes, really) were a major driver behind the development of late nineteenth century dairying… with the bloke responsible being an ingenious Chinese bloke called Chew Chong. New Zealand Economic History is indeed a fascinating thing.

          • Gosman 5.2.1.1.2

            Here is the map of the main areas of land that was confiscated. Some of the land that was taken was returned in the years after it was confiscated. what should be clear is that it is only a small proportion of the total land area. Purchases by the Crown was by far the major factor in transferring Maori land in to private non-Maori hands.

            https://teara.govt.nz/en/zoomify/28137/land-confiscation-map

            • Brigid 5.2.1.1.2.1

              "Some of the land that was taken was returned in the years after it was confiscated. "

              Which land? Where? When?

              Enough with the effing bullshit

        • Muttonbird 5.2.1.2

          With every comment you make on this thread you seem to contradict yourself.

          • Gosman 5.2.1.2.1

            In what way have I contradicted myself?

            • Muttonbird 5.2.1.2.1.1

              There was large scale land confiscation of Maori land.

              And,

              …land that was confiscated. What should be clear is that it is only a small proportion of the total land area.

              That is just one example.

    • Tricledrown 5.3

      Gosman as usual you are misleading in that European took all the land.

      With out the land Europeans would not have gained the wealth they knew would be gained acquiring cheap land by fair means or fowl.

      Today you would be prosecuted for fraud or insider trading..Taking advantage of fellow humans who didn't understand the Anglo Saxon way of doing business .

      Keeping Maori poor and disenfranchised so they don't take land disputes through courts or keeping the Majority (Maori were the majority of voters up until the 1870's) from representing themselves in parliament they would have had the political power to stop Europeans from conning them out of there economic base..

      That's how the colonial powers and double dealing land agents disenfranchised Maori while pretending to confer the rights of British citizenship knowing that Maori couldn't understand what it meant at the time.

  6. Ad 6

    The consultation document reads like a new teacher wrote it straight out of studying Paolo Frere's Pedagogy of the Oppressed. I think they're over-compensating for historical absences.

    My benchmark however is Belich's Making Peoples. That puts all streams of immigration into the strength of their impact, and of how they made history and made us together. And doesn't write in a way that doesn't get sucked into a binary of either history as written through a series of wars and victors, to history written through the framing of losers.

    As for Goldsmith, I get his point. The government didn't make us – and rarely narrates who we are. Most of our historical identity is formed through companies and their fate upon our families. So economic history is arguably just as important as, say, our history through wars.

    • Tricledrown 6.1

      Ad Maori farming and trading allowed migrants to establish but once established they destroyed Maori businesses.

      • Ad 6.1.1

        Again, there's no need to narrate history as perpetual tragedy.

        You could narrate Maori history of the last 50 years through the growth and effect of post-settlement Maori incorporations – that's where history touches actual lives now.

        • Tricledrown 6.1.1.1

          Ad had Maori been fully conferred the rights of British citizens there would be no tragedy.

          And we wouldn't be having this argument you obviously are not on the the receiving end other than receiving stolen goods.

          Legally Maori could have gone for the other 98% of land not compensated for but just the Wellington settlement would have cost us taxpayers $17 billion yet Maori accepted just 1% $170 million.

          Maori turned around and gifted some of that land received as partial non financial compensation back to all New Zealand as a nature reserve.

          Because the govt couldn't afford full settlement hundreds of billions Maori accepted the meagre 1to3% so long as there was a bigger slice of fisheries and surplus govt land being sold Maori wete given first option on buying that land .

          • Ad 6.1.1.1.1

            Your first claim is just an imagination exercise running a counterfactual history.

            The rest of it is just framing history as loss. Sure it's a part of it. Not most of it.

          • Gosman 6.1.1.1.2

            On what basis do you claim that the compensation just for Wellington should be $17 Billion?

            • Tricledrown 6.1.1.1.2.1

              Gosman go to Hansard 1996 Doug Graham minister of treaty settlements this was widely reported at the time.

              Maori agreed on a much lower settlement than the true value of lands illegaly confiscated .

              Maori agreed to a much lower settlement as the cost of settlement for just the confiscated land accross NZ at the time would have exceeded $350 billion .

              The govt of the day National said the level of debt needed to pay all that money would have stifled the NZ economy affecting Maori more than others especially urban Maori who have gained little out of treaty settlements.So Maori and National agreed to a $2 billion cap on cash settlements plus rivers fishing rights,and that Maori get first rights on govt surplus land being sold.

              Gosman you haven't any knowledge of the National govts treaty settlement.

              Maori have been far more generous to NZ ie bastion point legally they could have evicted all the wealthy NZers living in their multi million dollar homes on stolen Maori land but chose not to .

              The land that was eventually given back by the NZ govt was gifted to all NZ by Nga Puhi now is a reserve all New Zealanders can access.

              People like you Gosman that stir just for the kicks.ie kick Maori when they are down while enjoying the fruits of the I'll gotten gain have no understanding don't look for the truth just keep pushing the systematic racism buttons to cover up the real history of NZ.

    • Hunter Thompson II 6.2

      Brian Easton's "Not in Narrow Seas" is probably worth a look too, if you aren't deterred by the fact he is an economist (I haven't read it yet). He writes well.

  7. Red2 7

    Not sure why we are spending so much time getting exercised on a history that in the global scheme of things is pretty much irrelevant both in time ( 200 years at best documented ), global relevance, ( none) Magnitude ( ie what we call a war in its true sense over time, ancient and modem history would hardly rate as a skirmish) Similarly human history is dominated by colonisation, integration, one man colonist is another pioneer etc . It’s all a bit strange how as a nation we are just trying degrade into the past where at the end of the day NZ is just a factor of the March of human history not simply an epoch of Maori Pakeha interface over 250 years, to think otherwise displays and arrogance and ignorance

    [Permanent ban.

    You worked hard again today to skirt the ban even though I’d given you clear and strong advice twice only three days ago that you were allowed back on 7 Feb if you behaved or banned permanently if you didn’t: https://thestandard.org.nz/open-mike-23-01-2021/#comment-1777157 and https://thestandard.org.nz/open-mike-01-02-2021/#comment-1777158.

    You have been wasting Moderators’ [plural] time for years here and copped many bans, even a permanent one. Every time you’re banned, you try really hard to skirt the ban.

    You’re no longer allowed to play your games here – Incognito]

  8. Descendant Of Smith 8

    How, in such a short space of time, did we attain one of the highest living standards in the world?

    Ummm trade unionism, the adoption of socialist policies, the owning of infrastructure be the government, the willingness of Maori to share water for the greater good, the gifting of land by Maori for schools, hospitals, etc, 8 hour working day – 40 hour working week, government jobs for people with disabilities, …..

    • mac1 8.1

      Also enfranchisement of women, Old Age Pension (though withheld from Māori at first), the Liberals breaking up of the big estates- all helped with their early introduction in NZ.

      • solkta 8.1.1

        the Liberals breaking up of the big estates

        Sounds like code for stealing Maori land.

        • Ad 8.1.1.1

          A comment that well illustrates the need to know the history before commenting.

        • Enough is Enough 8.1.1.2

          Try this

          nzhistory.govt.nz/cheviot-estate-taken-over-by-government

          Its time we educated our people

        • mac1 8.1.1.3

          In looking for a suitable starter online for learning about the Liberal break up of the big estates (and thanks enough is enough for your citation), I found this.

          http://www.nzjh.auckland.ac.nz/docs/1992/NZJH_26_1_06.pdf

          It's an academically written account of this topic, but not one I expected.

          It begins. "The occupation and colonization of the North Island of New Zealand was advanced considerably between 1891 and 1911 by the Liberal government's purchase of some 3.1 million acres of Maori land between 1891 and 1911 and the sale of about a half million acres within the open market over the same period. This land was acquired for an average price of 6s 4d an acre. In direct contrast a mere 1.3 million acres was made available by the break-up of the great estates under the Lands for Settlement scheme at an average price of 84 shillings an acre."

          I need to read the whole document but the opening paragraph shows that my fifty year old understanding, with a little top up reading since NZ History in 1968, is also in need of revision and updating.

          We learned of the Cheviot and Kinloch estate breakups either missed or were not taught about the Liberal purchase of Māori NI land at a huge price difference.

          Another question then arises, as to the ethics of the purchases of the land that became the ‘big estates’.

  9. Sacha 9

    Goldsmith's choice of book subjects might just be pragmatic – only rich right-wingers have the means and the ego to retain a lackey to lovingly finesse their deeds.

  10. mac1 10

    As a former history teacher, I value especially the third major idea. To me the curriculum seems sound and as an historian knowing the value of the study of history appreciate the universality of the programme.

    Also, people will appreciate the canards of history, if all are taught it, which impinge on our social cohesion- for example, the so-called Land Wars, the fate of the Moriori.

    And they may well appreciate the injustices of our past which still influence us today. The recent 2020 publication of a report on cancer features the different outcomes between Māori and European in cancer statistics, treatment and morbidity, known about at least twenty years ago and even more historical in origin.

  11. KJT 11

    How about we really upset him and add the history of Trade Unions, and their support for human and especially, workers, rights to a decent wage and working conditions, education and housing. We could teach kids how to avoid being screwed by employers, fiance companies and landlords while we are at it.

    • Tricledrown 11.1

      If not for Trade unions and the establishment of the Labour Party wealth would have been concentrated in a few hands.

      Meaning not many businesses would have survived as you need customers with money .Those customers need good housing good health care good education to maintain a constant flow of money into businesses for them to succeed.

      The right wing do not understand this basic economic principle and continually undermine it for power and concentrating power in a few hands.

      Hence austerity for the poor and tax cuts for the wealthy ,tax increases for the poor user pays .

      Looking back at NZs economic performance it's so obvious that we have such low eratic economic growth under Tory selfish economic regimes.

      And steady continual growth under sharing left wing regimes.

      • Enough is Enough 11.1.1

        "wealth would have been concentrated in a few hands"

        Would have been?

        Wealth IS concentrated in a few hands

      • Cricklewood 11.1.2

        I do find it ironic that it was a Labour govt that set us on the path we are currently on and have been since the Lange govt, and that Labour govts post the post that govt have steadfastly refused to roll back those reforms and those that built on them instead tinkering around the edges…

    • Gosman 11.2

      How do people avoid being screwed by employers, fiance companies and landlords then? I would think the current government might be interested in your answer at least in regard to the last group.

      • Tricledrown 11.2.1

        Have a commerce commission that is fully funded to do its job quickly and properly.

        Landlords are following the market of supply and demand.

        The supply hasn't kept pace with the market from the early 90's till 2020 this year with 45,000 to maybe 60,000 house being built that level of construction would need to be maintained for 10 yrs to meet existing demand and future demands. Unlikely under the present model.

        NZ population increased by 500,000 in the last 10 years housing construction has only ramped up in the last 3yrs meeting the demand only 1 year in 30 other than the Canterbury Earthquakes which were replacement houses.

        • Gosman 11.2.1.1

          Oh so you want them to be taught the basics of Economics. I'm cool with that. The more people learn about economics the better I say.

  12. lprent 12

    Goldsmith is entirely interested in local business – the least important and most monopolistic (because of a small internal economy) part of our business community.

    As someone who has been working in businesses for the last 45 years – almost entirely export and tech related, I find his shallow and limited approach to business as being outright stupid and kind of pathetic.

    The internal business environment in NZ is just amateur hour. But I guess that is mostly where the National party lives. Small minded, noncompetitive, and completely lacking in competence and vision.

    • RedLogix 12.1

      The internal business environment in NZ is just amateur hour.

      When you've had the remarkable opportunity to have an uninterrupted one on one with the CEO of Bechtel for about an hour (we were the only passengers on a ferry ride and no cellphone coverage), you get a sense of what it takes to do professional business at a global scale.

      I asked him to tell me about his top three priorities – and his first answer was categorical – develop, empower and retain highly competent people who have integrity. That's pretty much a word for word quote.

      Second was the need to have strong systems of ‘governance’ in place and in operation.

      Third was managing and balancing off the competing interests of all the external stakeholders. Most large engineering projects these days have a critical dependency on what’s called ‘social license to operate’ that demands constant attention.

    • Tricledrown 12.2

      Lprent so true and succinct.

  13. RedLogix 13

    “Aotearoa NZ’s history has been shaped by the exercise and effects of power.”

    Reducing everything to nothing but the raw exercise of power is a sword that can be wielded by any hand.

    Democracy on the other hand is a system that attempts (albeit imperfectly) that attempts to moderate power in order to serve the greatest good.

    Maybe we should teach that.

  14. David 14

    While I admire the intent of the NZ history curriculum refresh, I find it surprising narrow in focus and scope. For example, the second objective of linking New Zealand’s recent 200 year history solely to colonisation. That seems to totally disregard the impact global events had on shaping New Zealand history over that period … two world wars for example. Over the past number of years I’ve taken various university history papers covering periods of New Zealand, Pacific, European and South American history. Without exception global context is always important in understanding national or regional history. We seem to be missing a trick here with such a narrowly focused curriculum.

    • mac1 14.1

      David, does not the third 'big idea' include global ideologies and beliefs and the events like wars that arose from them- colonialism, imperialism, fascism, anti-communism?

      These same ideas and ideologies drove our social history, our economic history, our system of government, our sense of nationhood.

      The stuff of history is there.

      Dr Michael Bassett argued recently that starting history in 1840 would be dishonest. Of course this was a ploy to allow him to attack Māori history prior to 1840.

      But, of course, as is the case when personal views ignore facts, the history curriculum was not limited as Bassett claimed. The first 'big idea' gives the lie to that. Secondly, any history of a period has to also acknowledge and understand what gave rise to the events, the history of that period.

      WW1 did not start in 1914 in terms of its causes. Some Germans regarded WW2 as a continuation of WW1, and so on.

      Good teachers of history, and the writers of the text books and historical material will ensure that history is taught properly.

      For, it has not been in the past. In our community paper today, I read this. "During part one of our investigation published last year about Stuff, we also realised New Zealanders, in general, are ignorant about this country’s history.”

      I look forward to being further educated in NZ history, as some of my scholarship is at least fifty years old, and today I found a recent academic work that proved that.

  15. Historian 15

    There are a few historical points I would like to reply to here.

    Firstly, even within the confiscation areas about a third of the land was returned to Maori ownership. This is why there are Maori settlements at places like Whatawhata, Kohanga and Waahi.

    Secondly the export oriented Maori economy in the Waikato in particular had collapsed by 1860 after flourishing during the boom years of supplying food to the Australian goldfields. This is acknowledged in the Waitangi Tribunal report at https://forms.justice.govt.nz/search/Documents/WT/wt_DOC_806544/Wai%20898%2C%20A026.pdf and other histories. East Coast Maori had lost most of their schooner fleet to storms and floods.

    Thirdly, the Maori population of New Zealand in the 1850s was between 50 and 60,000 and large parts of the country were uninhabited. Travellers could go for days without coming across a single village, look down at hundreds of thousands of acres without a house or a cultivation.http://www.enzb.auckland.ac.nz/document/?wid=492&action=null http://www.enzb.auckland.ac.nz/document/?wid=5028&page=0&action=searchresult&target=

    The cost of turning bush and swamp land into the productive pasture that underlies our prosperity as a country today was many times the value of the land. Think roads and railways, water troughs, felling and burning the bush, fences, cowsheds and shearing sheds for a start.

    It might also be noted that the tribes inhabiting Wellington in 1840 had seized it from the previous owners in bloody battle without paying a cent only a decade before the settlers arrived.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Vaccine mandate for border and corrections workers to end
    The Government has announced an end to the requirement for border workers and corrections staff to be fully vaccinated. This will come into place from 2 July 2022. 100 per cent of corrections staff in prisons, and as of 23 June 2022 97 per cent of active border workers were ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 hours ago
  • Emergency monitoring centre opened to keep New Zealand safer
    Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty officially launched the new Monitoring, Alerting and Reporting (MAR) Centre at the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) today. The Government has stood up the centre in response to recommendations from the 2018 Ministerial Review following the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake and 2017 Port Hills fire, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 hours ago
  • Waikato Expressway speed limit to change to 110km/h
    Transport Minister Michael Wood has welcomed the announcement that a 110km/hr speed limit has been set for the SH1 Waikato Expressway, between Hampton Downs and Tamahere. “The Waikato Expressway is a key transport route for the Waikato region, connecting Auckland to the agricultural and business centres of the central North ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    10 hours ago
  • Government listening to sector on NCEA
    Following feedback from the sector, Associate Minister of Education Jan Tinetti, today confirmed that new literacy and numeracy | te reo matatini me te pāngarau standards will be aligned with wider NCEA changes. “The education sector has asked for more time to put the literacy and numeracy | te reo ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    11 hours ago
  • Further Aotearoa New Zealand support for Ukraine
    $4.5 million to provide Ukraine with additional non-lethal equipment and supplies such as medical kit for the Ukrainian Army Deployments extended for New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) intelligence, logistics and liaison officers in the UK, Germany, and Belgium Secondment of a senior New Zealand military officer to support International ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Electoral changes will bring greater transparency for voters
    Changes to electoral law announced by Justice Minister Kiri Allan today aim to support participation in parliamentary elections, and improve public trust and confidence in New Zealand’s electoral system. The changes are targeted at increasing transparency around political donations and loans and include requiring the disclosure of: donor identities for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government invests to minimise gambling harm
    The Labour government has announced a significant investment to prevent and minimise harm caused by gambling. “Gambling harm is a serious public health issue and can have a devastating effect on the wellbeing of individuals, whānau and communities. One in five New Zealanders will experience gambling harm in their lives, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • More free flu vaccines and a second COVID-19 booster to groups at risk of hospitalisation
    The Government has widened access to free flu vaccines with an extra 800,000 New Zealanders eligible from this Friday, July 1  Children aged 3-12 years and people with serious mental health or addiction needs now eligible for free flu dose. From tomorrow (Tuesday), second COVID-19 booster available six months ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government backs action to drive strong wool growth
    The Government is investing to create new product categories and new international markets for our strong wool and is calling on Kiwi businesses and consumers to get behind the environmentally friendly fibre, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor said today. Wool Impact is a collaboration between the Government and sheep sector partners ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Veterans Minister pays tribute to service and sacrifice at Korean War commemoration
    At today’s commemoration of the start of the Korean War, Veterans Minister Meka Whaitiri has paid tribute to the service and sacrifice of our New Zealand veterans, their families and both nations. “It’s an honour to be with our Korean War veterans at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park to commemorate ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Matariki projects star in latest round of Tourism Infrastructure Fund
    Minister of Tourism Stuart Nash and Associate Minister of Tourism Peeni Henare announced the sixth round of recipients of the Government’s Tourism Infrastructure Fund (TIF), which supports local government to address tourism infrastructure needs. This TIF round will invest $15 million into projects around the country. For the first time, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Prime Minister’s Matariki speech 2022
    Matariki tohu mate, rātou ki a rātou Matariki tohu ora, tātou ki a tātou Tīhei Matariki Matariki – remembering those who have passed Matariki – celebrating the present and future Salutations to Matariki   I want to begin by thanking everyone who is here today, and in particular the Matariki ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • First Matariki holiday marked across New Zealand and the world
    Oho mai ana te motu i te rangi nei ki te hararei tūmatanui motuhake tuatahi o Aotearoa, Te Rā Aro ki a Matariki, me te hono atu a te Pirīmia a Jacinda Ardern ki ngā mahi whakanui a te motu i tētahi huihuinga mō te Hautapu i te ata nei.    ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Minister to attend second United Nations Ocean Conference in Portugal
    Oceans and Fisheries Minister David Parker will represent Aotearoa New Zealand at the second United Nations (UN) Ocean Conference in Lisbon, Portugal, which runs from 27 June to 1 July. The Conference will take stock of progress and aims to galvanise further action towards Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14, to "conserve and sustainably use ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government supports innovative dairy sheep sector to scale up
    The Government is boosting its partnership with New Zealand’s dairy sheep sector to help it lift its value and volume, and become an established primary industry, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor has announced. “Globally, the premium alternative dairy category is growing by about 20 percent a year. With New Zealand food ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government supports Buller flood recovery and longer term resilience
    The Government is continuing to support the Buller district to recover from severe flooding over the past year, Minister for Emergency Management Kieran McAnulty announced today during a visit with the local leadership. An extra $10 million has been announced to fund an infrastructure recovery programme, bringing the total ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Government outlines plans for future COVID-19 variants
    “The Government has undertaken preparatory work to combat new and more dangerous variants of COVID-19,” COVID-19 Response Minister Dr Ayesha Verrall set out today. “This is about being ready to adapt our response, especially knowing that new variants will likely continue to appear. “We have undertaken a piece of work ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Next steps for NZ UK free trade agreement
    The Government’s strong trade agenda is underscored today with the introduction of the United Kingdom Free Trade Agreement Legislation Bill to the House, Trade and Export Growth Minister Damien O’Connor announced today. “I’m very pleased with the quick progress of the United Kingdom Free Trade Agreement Legislation Bill being introduced ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Five new members join education Youth Advisory Group
    A ministerial advisory group that provides young people with an opportunity to help shape the education system has five new members, Minister of Education Chris Hipkins said today. “I am delighted to announce that Harshinni Nayyar, Te Atamihi Papa, Humaira Khan, Eniselini Ali and Malakai Tahaafe will join the seven ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Address to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons First Meeting of States Party
    Austria Centre, Vienna   [CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY] E ngā mana, e ngā reo Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you, Mr President. I extend my warm congratulations to you on the assumption of the Presidency of this inaugural meeting of States Parties to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. You ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 days ago
  • Govt makes sure support workers have right to take pay-equity claim
    The Government is taking action to make sure homecare and support workers have the right to take a pay-equity claim, while at the same time protecting their current working conditions and delivering a pay rise. “In 2016, homecare and support workers – who look after people in their own homes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Targeted second COVID-19 booster a step closer
    A law change passed today streamlines the process for allowing COVID-19 boosters to be given without requiring a prescription. Health Minister Andrew Little said the changes made to the Medicines Act were a more enduring way to manage the administration of vaccine boosters from now on. “The Ministry of Health’s ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Commerce Commission empowered to crackdown on covenants
    New powers will be given to the Commerce Commission allowing it to require supermarkets to hand over information regarding contracts, arrangements and land covenants which make it difficult for competing retailers to set up shop. “The Government and New Zealanders have been very clear that the grocery sector is not ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Plasterboard taskforce set up to ease shortages
    Ministerial taskforce of industry experts will give advice and troubleshoot plasterboard shortages Letter of expectation sent to Fletcher Building on trademark protections A renewed focus on competition in the construction sector The Minister for Building and Construction Megan Woods has set up a Ministerial taskforce with key construction, building ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • First Matariki public holiday celebrated with a unique broadcasting collaboration
    Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson and Minister for Māori Crown Relations Te Arawhiti Kelvin Davis announced today the inaugural Matariki public holiday will be marked by a pre-dawn hautapu ceremony at Te Papa Tongarewa, and will be a part of a five-hour broadcast carried by all major broadcasters in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Health volunteers recognised at Parliament
    Volunteers from all over the country are being recognised in this year’s Minister of Health Volunteer Awards, just announced at an event in Parliament’s Grand Hall. “These awards celebrate and recognise the thousands of dedicated health and disability sector volunteers who give many hours of their time to help other ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Trade Minister to travel to Europe, Canada and Australia to advance economic recovery
    New Zealand’s trade agenda continues to build positive momentum as Trade and Export Growth Minister Damien O’Connor travels to Europe, Canada and Australia to advance New Zealand’s economic interests. “Our trade agenda has excellent momentum, and is a key part of the Government’s wider plan to help provide economic security for ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Prime Minister to travel to Europe and Australia
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will leave this weekend to travel to Europe and Australia for a range of trade, tourism and foreign policy events. “This is the third leg of our reconnecting plan as we continue to promote Aotearoa New Zealand’s trade and tourism interests. We’re letting the world know ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Remarks to ICAN Nuclear Ban Forum session “The Ban is the Plan and this is Why”
    [CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY] Nga mihi ki a koutou. Let me start by acknowledging the nuclear survivors, the people who lost their lives to nuclear war or testing, and all the peoples driven off their lands by nuclear testing, whose lands and waters were poisoned, and who suffer the inter-generational health ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand leadership contributes to significant progress at the WTO
    New Zealand’s leadership has contributed to a number of significant outcomes and progress at the Twelfth Ministerial Conference (MC12) of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which concluded in the early hours of Friday morning after a week of intense negotiations between its 164 members. A major outcome is a new ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Meth addiction service launched in Eastern Bay of Plenty
    The Government has delivered on its commitment to roll out the free methamphetamine harm reduction programme Te Ara Oranga to the eastern Bay of Plenty, with services now available in Murupara. “We’re building a whole new mental health system, and that includes expanding successful programmes like Te Ara Oranga,” Health ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Creatives in Schools Round 4 open for applications
    Kura and schools around New Zealand can start applying for Round 4 of the Creatives in Schools programme, Minister for Education Chris Hipkins and Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni said today. Both ministers were at Auckland’s Rosehill Intermediate to meet with the ākonga, teachers and the professional ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Opening speech for MEETINGS 2022
    It is my pleasure to be here at MEETINGS 2022. I want to start by thanking Lisa and Steve from Business Events Industry Aotearoa and everyone that has been involved in organising and hosting this event. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to welcome you all here. It is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Reconnecting across the Tasman: Australia – Aotearoa New Zealand Foreign Minister Consultations
    Aotearoa New Zealand Minister of Foreign Affairs, Hon Nanaia Mahuta and Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Senator the Hon Penny Wong, met in Wellington today for the biannual Australia - Aotearoa New Zealand Foreign Minister Consultations. Minister Mahuta welcomed Minister Wong for her first official visit to Aotearoa New Zealand ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Global challenges reflected in March quarter GDP
    The volatile global situation has been reflected in today’s quarterly GDP figures, although strong annual growth shows New Zealand is still well positioned to deal with the challenging global environment, Grant Robertson said. GDP fell 0.2 percent in the March quarter, as the global economic trends caused exports to fall ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • One million New Zealanders vaccinated against flu
    More than a million New Zealanders have already received their flu vaccine in time for  winter, but we need lots more to get vaccinated to help relieve pressure on the health system, Health Minister Andrew Little says. “Getting to one million doses by June is a significant milestone and sits ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • NZ Principals Federation MOOT SPEECH -Friday 10 June 2022 
    It’s a pleasure to be here today in person “ka nohi ke te ka nohi, face to face as we look back on a very challenging two years when you as Principals, as leaders in education, have pivoted, and done what you needed to do, under challenging circumstances for your ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Provincial Growth Fund already delivering jobs and economic boost to the regions
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is successfully creating jobs and boosting regional economic growth, an independent evaluation report confirms. Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash announced the results of the report during a visit to the Mihiroa Marae in Hastings, which recently completed renovation work funded through the PGF. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Pre-departure tests removed from June 20
    Travellers to New Zealand will no longer need a COVID-19 pre-departure test from 11.59pm Monday 20 June, COVID-19 Response Minister Dr Ayesha Verrall announced today. “We’ve taken a careful and staged approach to reopening our borders to ensure we aren’t overwhelmed with an influx of COVID-19 cases. Our strategy has ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Foreign Minister to attend CHOGM
    Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta will travel to Rwanda this week to represent New Zealand at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Kigali. “This is the first CHOGM meeting since 2018 and I am delighted to be representing Aotearoa New Zealand,” Nanaia Mahuta said.  “Reconnecting New Zealand with the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago