web analytics

Salmond on the new political era

Written By: - Date published: 9:31 am, September 6th, 2017 - 62 comments
Categories: jacinda ardern - Tags: , , ,

On Newsroom Dame Anne Salmond writes:

Dame Anne Salmond: It’s the end of an era

In New Zealand at present, a seismic shift is under way. Despite all the hype, this election is not really a contest between left and right. Instead, the tectonic plates between the generations are shifting.

Since the 1980s, New Zealanders have been gripped by neo-liberal doctrines. Here, life is understood as a competitive struggle among individuals. In this Darwinian contest, each seeks to minimise their costs and maximise their benefits, with individual success as the ultimate goal.

After more than thirty years of this kind of hyper-individualism, however, a young, smart generation is stepping up, who think very differently.

They focus on the long term future, and the quality of our relations with each other and the planet – Gen Zero on climate change, for instance; Marnie Prickett and Lan Pham in the debate over freshwater; Max Harris with his book The New Zealand Project; David Hall and his Policy Observatory website; or Dan Hikuroa on our relations with the ocean, among others.

These millennials are astute and free-thinking, with a refreshing optimism and generosity of spirit. Jacinda Ardern is one of this new breed of Kiwis. They make the neo-liberal die-hards seem moribund, stuck in an ideological morass.

‘Jacindamania’ is not just about an individual politician, however caring and attractive. It marks a changing of the guard between generations, and a time to try out new ideas.

Well worth reading the whole piece on Newsroom.

62 comments on “Salmond on the new political era”

  1. JanM 1

    Reading this article yesterday by this brilliant woman lifted my spirits enormously. Wow!

  2. gsays 2

    For me, this change was articulated by Jacinda a couple of times in the recent leaders debate.
    Early in the piece, the PM was droning on and on, Gower went to stop him and miss adern waved a hand dismissively and said something along the lines of “let him talk”.
    Later when asked what she brought to the table, as quick as a flash she answered “generational change and a vision for new Zealand” (my recall of what was said).

    The times are a changing.

    • When the individuals of a nation compete amongst themselves with no hope for better lives it inevitably results in the collapse of that nation.

      Capitalism with the inequality and the competition that it engenders simply destroys societies.

      This is something we’ve learned before hence the bans in all major religions on greed and usury. We’re having to learn it again because there’s always some people who think that they’re better than others and who will lead society down this path to destruction.

  3. AB 4

    “Things thought too long can be no longer thought” (Yeats)

  4. Strategos 5

    Bill was Rogers assistant in the old days. It may be premature to call it a rejection of the Rogernomes.

  5. tracey 6

    I hope the changing of the guard at the head of Labour heralds all of this. I am not kidding myself that those who have most benefitted from the last 40 years will slink away. Maybe to regroup and come again but nit gone for good.

    I suspect that will be her biggest hurdle, including from some with her own party.

    Thanks Prof Salmond for your wisdom. Again.

    • I am not kidding myself that those who have most benefitted from the last 40 years will slink away.

      Yep. This thread addresses that point:

      It’s all one big dynamic. Older people getting rich—unprecedentedly rich—by dismissing their obligations to society & young people’s future.

      Of course, it’s not just the old people getting rich but they are the ones that ushered in the Greed is Good paradigm that’s destroying our society.

      EDIT:

      Faced with that crisis, we hear the chorus of profitable inaction: gradualism, incrementalism and a “realism” that ignores physical reality.

  6. mike 7

    I desperately hope that Professor Salmond is right in sensing the seismic shift in generations that will sweep away the fatuous and destructive greed of neo-liberalism. It’s been a long time coming. Being a baby boomer has, over these years, become an embarrassing burden. Especially when we remember the promise and excitement of our political beliefs when we were the young people waiting for a seismic shift. When it came, our whole value system was hijacked by a group amongst us few realised was even there. As we focussed on peace and extending the great benefits New Deal politics had given us, our idealism blinded us to those who saw our pursuit of individual freedom as an opportunity to screw others, and our laziness in formulating new structures an easy beat. What we got in the end was a dictatorship. A dictatorship of salesmen, which grew into one of corporatisation and advertising. Its more recent focus on hatred for education and rational thought is the perfect corollary for a business dictatorship, in that the pursuit of profit at all costs requires base cunning, not study or reason. Inquiry tends to shine light into corners corporates would rather not have exposed. Salman Rushdie has recently pointed to the stupidity of, ‘this idea that the elite is now the educated class, rather than the wealthy class. So you’ve got a government with more billionaires in it than ever in history, but we’re the elite – journalists and college professors and novelists, not the ones with private planes and beach front properties in the Bahamas. It’s a weird time.”
    Many baby boomers have been hankering for the seismic shift Professor Salmond senses. After thirty years in purgatory I think we hanker for the shift even more than we did for our own. At least this time it seems we have a generation that’s prepared to work hard to achieve it.

    • JanM 7.1

      Very well said, Mike – I do hope the shift is successful. When you can see the possible end in sight, you begin to realise how much grief you have suppressed for so long. Hopefully, this time, we will be more aware of the ‘spoilers’ within

    • Strategos 7.2

      +1

  7. Bill 8

    Yup. There’s a sea-change underway throughout swathes of ‘the western’ world and the so-called “Washington Consensus” is looking shaky.

    But pretenders are attempting to ride that sea-change – Macron and Trudeau come to mind.

    So where’s Jacinda’s NZ Labour Party positioned? Is it more alongside Trudeau and Macron than it is it in step with Corbyn and Sanders?

    If the tone of press coverage can give any indication (and I think it acts as a reasonable barometer), then we’d have to conclude that Jacinda and NZ Labour are not the alternative to Liberalism many seem to hope for.

    Or there’s the observation that doing “better” (NZ Labour aspiration) is not doing differently. Just saying.

    • Pat 8.1

      you would appear to have company in your musings

      http://bowalleyroad.blogspot.co.nz/2017/09/jacindas-biggest-challenge-redefining.html

      ….time will tell, but one thing is for sure we do not need 3 more years of what we’ve had

      • Bill 8.1.1

        NZ is going to get another three years of Liberal governance led up by either National or NZ Labour. It would be preferable in my book to have that government led by NZ Labour.

        But seeing as how I’m no fan of Liberalism (never have been) I’ll be voting for a party that will hopefully have the wherewithal to make their tenure uncomfortable.

        Essentially, the beginning of end for Liberalism in NZ (if it’s to begin) commences after 23rd September, and it doesn’t unfold within the Beehive.

        • Pat 8.1.1.1

          if the end of (neo) Liberalism is to unfold then ultimately the Beehive will be involved

        • Incognito 8.1.1.2

          I reckon that the Beehive will be one of the last bastions of and possibly one of the last battlegrounds against (neo)liberalism. The Establishment will resist and fight back and retrench behind the last walls of its power. Never forget that the political system not only made it possible for (neo)liberalism to take hold and ‘flourish’ but also that (neo)liberalism in turn changed the political system to suit its ideological pursuits. In other words, the two are near-inseparable, inoperable and possibly incurable.

  8. Economic growth and progress is about serving your people.

    Actually, the economy is about ensuring that everyone has a good living standard, that no one is in poverty and that we live within the sustainable limits set by the environment.

    That pretty much rules out economic growth and rich people. Economic development on the other hand is a must have.

  9. Ad 10

    Stop looking for a thesis when you should just read what’s on the packet.

    You’ll get housing reform, transport reform, water reform, tax reform, labour reform, tertiary education reform, and health reform.
    Its no mystery. It’s published policy.

    There are no super-brains in her senior ranks. No hidden agendas either.

    Bowalley Road is mired in sickly nostalgia and hasn’t delivered anything except apocalyptic binge-purge cycles for a decade.

    If she makes it, it will be her way, with no mechanistic ideology, just well-forecast policy.

    • Pat 10.1

      assume thats aimed at me as i posted the Bowalley link….
      “You’ll get housing reform, transport reform, water reform, tax reform, labour reform, tertiary education reform, and health reform.
      Its no mystery. It’s published policy.

      agreed

      ‘There are no super-brains in her senior ranks. No hidden agendas either.”

      agree and disagree….the consequences of the agenda are deliberately withheld…and I’m comfortable with that.

      “Bowalley Road is mired in sickly nostalgia and hasn’t delivered anything except apocalyptic binge-purge cycles for a decade”

      largely disagree, CT would appear a fan of Keynesian theory (as am I to a degree).however his understanding 0f history and his intimate knowledge of the period of change in our recent past is invaluable when he writes his provocative articles

      “If she makes it, it will be her way, with no mechanistic ideology, just well-forecast policy.”

      largely agree, expect JA will indeed have a great personal influence over the direction any Labour led government takes , and on current outline that can only be for the better

  10. I am loving the generational change happening. I want the gnats out. Labour under JA is saying some really good things. I see the Greens doing well too. Overall it is all going really well. Let’s keep focused on the goals and keep working hard to get the gnats out.

  11. eco Maori/kiwi 12

    Yes another great lady joining in our fight for a change in the systems of New Zealand and the world. New Zealand is a world leader in changing systems for the better of the oppressed .

  12. Wayne 13

    Nothing Jacinda has said signals an end to neoliberalism if by that it means the basic structure of the economic system.
    More like Helen Clark, mark 2 but with a much less strict school marm aspect. And of course the interests and perspectives of a new generation.
    Justin Trudeau and President Marcon for instance have not embarked on whole economic change. To the extent Marcon has it is for a more market approach.

    • DSpare 13.1

      Wayne

      like Helen Clark, mark 2 but with… the interests and perspectives of a new generation.

      So; completely unlike Helen Clark, in other words (unless you mean that she they are both female leaders of Labour – in which case English is the same as Muldoon). As for; “strict school marm aspect”, I know it’s been said that; “the past is another country”, but I didn’t think that was what you were meaning when you said you were travelling overseas. How was the 19th century?

      Regarding; “an end to neoliberalism”, this is a voice your might be more likely to pay attention to:

      Bolger says neoliberal economic policies have absolutely failed. It’s not uncommon to hear that now; even the IMF says so… “”They have failed to produce economic growth and what growth there has been has gone to the few at the top,” Bolger says, not of his own policies specifically but of neoliberalism the world over.

      He laments the levels of inequality and concludes “that model needs to change.”

      http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/91769882/The-9th-floor-Jim-Bolger-says-neoliberalism-has-failed-NZ-and-its-time-to-give-unions-the-power-back

      • WILD KATIPO 13.1.1

        I want to know if the surf was great on his holiday in Afghanistan.

        They say the desert makes great mirages.

        Just as reliable as ‘ Waynes’ neo liberalism.

    • Andre 13.2

      “Neoliberalism (neo-liberalism)[1] refers primarily to the 20th-century resurgence of 19th-century ideas associated with laissez-faire economic liberalism.[2]:7 These include economic liberalization policies such as privatization, fiscal austerity, deregulation, free trade,[3] and reductions in government spending in order to increase the role of the private sector in the economy and society” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neoliberalism

      As Ad notes upthread, under Jacinda’s leadership we would be likely to get “housing reform, transport reform, water reform, tax reform, labour reform, tertiary education reform, and health reform”. But those reforms appear unlikely to increase privatization, fiscal austerity, deregulation etc, quite the opposite is more likely. So no, not neo-liberal. But not a revolution away from the mixed public-private economy we have now, either. It’ll be liberal, particularly socially liberal, but not neo-liberal.

      • tracey 13.2.1

        I certainly hope so. Of course the devil is always in definitions of things, such as, “reform”.

    • Stuart Munro 13.3

      Helen, for all her neo-liberalism, was still infinitely better than your vile kleptocracy Wayne. I just hope Jacinda has big enough teeth to savage the ministers who indulged in corruption.

      • That would be nice to see. Can’t happen though unless there’s already laws to bring them to justice.

        Of course, the big one would be the new government putting in place effective measures against corruption.

        • Stuart Munro 13.3.1.1

          We have laws on the books now quite adequate to punish the kind of frank corruption that has become commonplace under this failed administration – given the political will.

        • eco Maori/kiwi 13.3.1.2

          Draco T Bastard +100

      • Patricia Bremner 13.3.2

        Stuart, Jacinda has shown a deft ability to deal with problems as they appear.

        She has called as she sees it. So far I give her 3 out of 4. She could have handled the situation with Metiria with more generosity imo.

        She is a large picture player, so views problems from that perspective.
        “How does this effect the goal???”

        Her aims are lofty and indicate value stances, not wealth to be made.

        • Stuart Munro 13.3.2.1

          Yes – if she lives up to what seem to be her intentions she’ll do rather well.

          But in constitutional terms a rigorous scrutiny of the peculations of the outgoing kleptocracy is rather important – not merely in terms of contemporary justice, but to consolidate a precedent of less corrupt administrations for the future.

    • tracey 13.4

      “school marm”
      Still something of the sexist/misogynist ay Wayne.

  13. Richard Christie 14

    Dame Salmond seems to be writing with the misconception that Labour’s economic positioning is not essentially neoliberal.

    • tracey 14.1

      I think she writes from Hope Richard…

    • Pat 14.2

      if Labour are to greatly increase state/socail housing and implement a government run and funded affordable home programme (as stated) then that is a fundamental step away from the small government/market led ideology of neoliberalism…it cannot help but be the first step in unwinding 30 years of misconception.

      • McFlock 14.2.1

        that’s the thing that really bites my balls about the “Labour are neoliberal” argument: they want Labour to break in 100 days social and cultural attitudes that took decades to construct.

        If you promise unicorns to a population that expects to be lied to, they’re even less likely to believe you.

        • Stuart Munro 14.2.1.1

          I think many people would be quite satisfied with a change as rapid as that under Roger Douglas. Less even, as long as the direction and intention were unmistakeable.

          • McFlock 14.2.1.1.1

            Even if “many” equalled “most”, that’s the rub, ain’t it. How do you persuade people your direction and intentions are unmistakeable in an environment of chronic mistrust?

            • Stuart Munro 14.2.1.1.1.1

              I think a few good faith departures from the status quo would establish some credibility with those who are looking for more.

              We’re not really seeing the signals I’d expect if Labour were truly moving away from neoliberalism. Things like accommodating a few left voices (Hone springs to mind), or going some way to endorsing Metiria’s anti-poverty concerns.

              In this instance my use of ‘many’ referred to readers here, some of whom have indicated they want more from Jacinda than a makeover for Labour and to be rid of the rump of Key’s kleptocracy.

              That said, the things she said in the debate about housing being a right seem to indicate a thaw in Labour’s position. It’s just that things have got pretty bad, so that I at least hope that is a first step of many, rather than being all we’re going to see.

              • McFlock

                The key to keeping the momentum going is in their coalition partner. Greens will push them left, NZ1 will push back on some things.

                For me, it’s not about trust or credibility. It’s simply that Labour are better than national, and a non-national government needs Labour. Everything else is secondary to that – without a change in government, things will keep getting worse.

                How significant that change in government becomes is down to what pressure the governing parties are under to stick to their campaign rhetoric. The biggest pressure comes from their coalition partners.

                Remember, some of the best and longest-lasting policies from Lab5 came from their coalition partners or private members’ bills.

                • Richard Christie

                  they want Labour to break in 100 days social and cultural attitudes that took decades to construct.

                  100 days? Aww c’mon,

                  It’s been almost 30 years since the the fourth Labour Govt. There has been been ample time to signal any sincere turnaround in economic position. The sad truth is that Labour’s stance over that period has been a factor in embedding those neoliberal attitudes.

                  • McFlock

                    Well they weren’t going to wake up in 1991 and reverse course immediately, were they?

                    They’ve been changing over the last few elections. You might not have noticed. Now Labour’s well on course for change, the country will follow at its own pace.

    • Patricia Bremner 14.3

      When you consider the first policy was to discuss “conditions of work”, perhaps she is looking at the signals of change.

  14. Ad 15

    At 71 anything under 50 looks like generational change.

  15. Macro 16

    Frankly continued economic growth, in a finite world, is a scientific falsehood. When is Labour going to admit this?
    What is needed is not Economic growth – but achieving prosperity without growth, and that is actually not all that difficult – but some will have to give up a little to allow it to happen (and that is the difficult bit).

    • What is needed is not Economic growth – but achieving prosperity without growth, and that is actually not all that difficult – but some will have to give up a little to allow it to happen (and that is the difficult bit).

      QFT

      What we need is economic development – increasing diversity that caters to the local market and minimises international trade. It’s unlikely that we’ll see that though as Labour has been focussed upon trade for it’s entire being as the be all, end all of increased prosperity. This is why we have a national focus on farming despite the fact that agriculture only employs ~7% of the population and is the primary reason for the declining state of our enivironment.

    • Siobhan 16.2

      +1
      While we are at it, I personally am not going to vote for anyone who says we need ‘increased productivity’ to get wage growth. Productivity has been growing for…yonks. And sure, its a numbers game, with more people working more hours. And I realise that GDP per hour worked is stagnant….
      However most people who I talk to, orchard workers, supermarket workers, engineers of all types, teachers etc ALL talk about being expected to do more work as individuals, and that their workplaces are producing more with less staff.
      So whatever’s wrong..its nothing to do with the workers.
      Our wages are supposedly not growing due to productivity issues…yet ‘the economy’ and shareholder profits seem to be wonderfully ‘productive’.
      Without starting a debate about Venezuela…how about a “Law for the Control of Fair Costs, Prices and Profits” in NZ.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/sweden-welfare-profit/rpt-swedish-profit-cap-on-private-welfare-companies-to-be-put-before-parliament-idUSL8N1LK0RU

    • Patricia Bremner 16.3

      Jacinda made a statement that “Climate change” is her generation’s “Nuclear free ” moment.

      If all policy is through that basis, change is coming. Huge change.

      • Macro 16.3.1

        And yet Patricia Labour publishes Election adds like the one at the top of this Post saying:
        “Economic Growth and Progress is about Serving our People”
        which clearly shows they are still in lifting the boats by growing the economy ideology.

    • eco Maori/kiwi 16.4

      Macro we will have to give up the money sham and some people will lose all there power man there will be a lot of tears .

      • Macro 16.4.1

        Yeah I know! But there is a good book on the subject “Prosperity without Growth” By Tim Jackson which is worth a read.
        and
        “What is the Economy for anyway?” also excellent.

  16. Well , I’ve railed against neo liberalism frequently , – as a lot of people here and elsewhere have , – seems it just might be possible soon to finally be able to take a rest from that soon.

    Thirty three years of taking shit from fuckers like that is a long time to contain simmering anger.

    And watching thirty three years of their bullshit justifying of themselves and their greed by pouring salt in the wound of every worker each time they opened their filthy lying sewers they call their mouths on every TV and radio interview.

    Being a manual labourer / semi skilled tradie most of my life during that whole era , – I only know too bloody well what it was like , – for me and thousands of others , – and their ( usually young ) family’s.

    I knew what a pack of shitheaded pricks WINZ could be , – depending on who you happened to get on the day.

    Not only would I like to see a move away from neo liberalism , – but a working group set up to establish parameters definitive of neo liberalism, as an ideology , as a philosophy and as an economic theory. And that also includes recent historic economic theory’s as far back as the 19th century such as that expounded and promulgated by the likes of Friedrich Hayek among others. I would like to see that once defined , – measures were then taken to make certain practices illegal , and reinforced by regulatory practice.

    Think that too difficult?

    One has to look no further than the social democratic practices and Keynesianism practiced by New Zealand post 1945 – 1984. The most prosperous and egalitarian era of this country’s history.

    It would be possibly too much to ask for retrospective justice in regards to treason charges by manner of theft of a nations assets and the selling off of those assets at ridiculous prices via inside trading , – however , – there is enough out in the community today that would be baying for some sort of restorative justice met out to those who originally / currently plundered ( 1984 – present ) and ransacked , – and indirectly – caused the deaths of thousands due to their treasonous , anti community , individualistic self centered philosophy of neo liberalism and relegated hundreds of thousands of others to a life of near poverty. Let alone being responsible for the attempted weakening of our social democracy by such Free Trade Deals as the TTPA.

    New Right Fight – Who are the New Right?
    http://www.newrightfight.co.nz/pageA.html

  17. Incognito 18

    A very good post.

    I also got seduced and sucked in and drank from the neoliberal well and it tasted good initially and I came back for more. But it became too much of good thing. It seems I am not alone in this.

    • Well don’t feel bad,… chemical manufacturers employ the same tactic when making ant poison as well so you definitely are not alone .

      798265093789058794585968588695874579857894174856472933357969857798759947598774987978947469576957685768586576058608650609809863095688765786895765865768576857698579579409049767378798784794711598779743978945989978
      ants cant be wrong.

      Until they are dead.

  18. Peter 19

    “But, here’s the thing: Campaigns — especially those for president — are rarely won and lost on “carefully thought-out policies.” They are almost always won on emotions — positive ones or negatives ones. It’s a lesson Clinton should have learned when she lost the Democratic presidential primary back in 2008.” CNN 7 September

    I believe Dame Salmond is on to it. My guess is that Ardern is doing the better job of tapping into emotions. Her slogan does just that. She has the ability to connect emotionally with a wide range of people and address the issues of the next generation.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Prime Minister to visit Fiji and Australia
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will visit two of New Zealand’s most important Pacific partners, Fiji and Australia, next week. The visit to Fiji will be the first by a New Zealand Prime Minister in four years and comes during the 50th anniversary of Fijian independence and diplomatic relations between our ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    7 hours ago
  • Next steps in Criminal Cases Review Commission announced
    Justice Minister Andrew Little and New Zealand First MP Darroch Ball, have today announced the appointment of the Chief Commissioner of the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), the location, and the membership of the Establishment Advisory Group. Colin Carruthers QC has been appointed Chief Commissioner of the CCRC for an ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • Horticultural Ahuwhenua Trophy finalists announced
    Māori Development Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta and Agriculture Minister Hon Damien O’Connor co-announced the first horticultural finalists for the Ahuwhenua Trophy celebrating excellence in the Māori agricultural sector.  The three finalists are Ngai Tukairangi Trust from Mt Maunganui, Otama Marere Trust from Tauranga, and Hineora Orchard Te Kaha 15B Ahuwhenua ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • New support for students with dyslexia
    A new kete of resources to strengthen support for students with dyslexia will provide extra tools for the new Learning Support Coordinators (LSCs) as they start in schools, Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin announced today. The Minister launched the kete in Wellington this morning, at the first of three induction ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • Rental reforms progress to select committee stage
    The Government continues to make progress on a fairer and more secure rental market for renters and landlords with the First Reading of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill and its referral to the Social Services and Community Select Committee.  “Now is the opportunity for landlords, tenants and others who want ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Papua New Guinea Prime Minister to visit New Zealand
    Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister Hon James Marape will visit New Zealand from 21-25 February, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. “New Zealand and Papua New Guinea have a warm and friendly relationship. I look forward to welcoming Prime Minister Marape here and strengthening the relationship between our two countries,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Free school lunches served up to thousands
    Thousands of children have begun receiving a free lunch on every day of the school week, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said. The Government’s free and healthy school lunch programme is under way for 7,000 students at 31 schools in Hawke’s Bay / Tairāwhiti and Bay of Plenty / Waiariki, extending ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Social Wellbeing Agency replaces Social Investment Agency with new approach
    The Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni today announced a new approach that continues to broaden the Government’s social sector focus from a narrow, investment approach to one centred on people and wellbeing. Minister Sepuloni said redefining the previous approach to social investment by combining science, data and lived experience ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government to strengthen protections for whistleblowers
    The Government is strengthening the Protected Disclosures Act to provide better protection for whistle blowers, Minister of State Services Chris Hipkins said today. “The Protected Disclosures Act is meant to encourage people to speak up about serious wrongdoing in the workplace and protect them from losing their jobs or being ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • PM speech at Parliamentary Chinese New Year celebration 2020
    Nǐn hǎo (Hello in Mandarin). Xīn Nián Kuài Lè (Happy New Year in Mandarin) Néi Hóu (Hello in Cantonese). Sun Nin Fai Lok (Happy New Year in Cantonese) Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa. Thank you for your invitation to attend this celebration today. I would like to acknowledge ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • IPANZ Annual Address
    Kia ora. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki te Whare Pāremata. E ngā mana whenua ki tēnei rohe Taranaki Whānui, Te Upoko o Te Ika, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Raukawa – kei te mihi, kei te mihi, kei te mihi. E ngā mana, e ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • 2020 IPANZ Annual Address
    Kia ora. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki te Whare Pāremata. E ngā mana whenua ki tēnei rohe Taranaki Whānui, Te Upoko o Te Ika, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Raukawa – kei te mihi, kei te mihi, kei te mihi. E ngā mana, e ngā ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Tougher penalties for gun crime a step closer
    Tougher penalties for gun crime are a step closer with the passage of firearms reform legislation through another stage in Parliament. The Arms Legislation Bill has tonight passed its Second Reading. “The changes have one objective - to prevent firearms falling into the wrong hands,” said Police Minister Stuart Nash. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Arms Legislation Bill: Second Reading
    Introduction Mr Speaker We all know why we are here today. It has been a long journey. The journey did not actually begin on 15 March 2019. It began on 30 June 1997. Almost 23 years ago, Justice Sir Thomas Thorp told us what was wrong with our firearms legislation. ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New era for vocational education
    The Government’s work to put trades and vocational education back on the agenda took another major step forward today with the passing of the Education (Vocational Education and Training Reform) Amendment Bill, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said. “This is a watershed day for trades and vocational education. These law changes formalise ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Bill to Amend the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act
    Speeding up the return of Christchurch regeneration activities to local leadership is behind the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Amendment Bill introduced to Parliament today by Minister Megan Woods. “As we approach nine years since the February 2011 earthquake in Canterbury, and with the transition to local leadership well underway, the time ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Milford Track to partly reopen after storm damage
    Hundreds of New Zealanders and international visitors will be able to get back out into nature with the Milford Track partially reopening next week, after extensive assessments and repairs, the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage announced today. The popular Great Walk has been closed since 3 February after an extreme ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government drives low-emissions transport momentum
    Up to 110 new EV chargers nationwide in cities and regions 50 electric vehicles for ride-sharing The Government is helping deliver more infrastructure and options for low emissions transport through new projects, Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods says. Tauranga, Nelson, Levin, New Plymouth and Oamaru are just some ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Kiwis better off under Coalition Government
    New Zealanders are increasingly better off under this Government as wages rise and families have more disposable income, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. Stats NZ reported today that average household disposable incomes after housing costs rose 4.9% in 2019. This was the highest rise in four years and came as ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Another step towards restoring rights for screen production workers
    All New Zealanders need to have their voices heard at work to ensure we have an inclusive and productive economy. Today we introduce a Bill to do this for workers in the New Zealand screen industry, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Iain Lees-Galloway says. “The Screen Industry Workers Bill will ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Enhanced Taskforce Green for Southland and South Otago
    The Government has announced further help for the Southland and Otago regions to speed up recovery efforts from the floods.  “I’ve approved Enhanced Taskforce Green (ETFG), making $500,000 available to help with the clean-up in Fiordland, Southland, and the Clutha district in Otago,” Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni said.  ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Employers and Industry take the lead to connect students to vocational education
    Following the announcement that more than 340 schools will be funded to run events promoting vocational education, the Government has announced it will fund a further 257 events to be run by employers and industry. “These industry-run events will allow more than 30,000 students to connect with more than 2,000 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Rental reforms a step closer with the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill
    Today the Government is making progress on a fairer and more secure rental market for renters and landlords with the introduction of the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill in Parliament.  “This Bill includes a series of reforms to improve the wellbeing of the 609,700 households that live in rented homes, and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Biosecurity Minister announces world first eradication of pea weevil
    A Government programme to wipe out pea weevil has achieved a world first, with Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor today announcing the successful eradication of the noxious pest from Wairarapa. This means the nearly four-year ban on pea plants and pea straw was lifted today. Commercial and home gardeners can again grow ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Temporary Accommodation Service activated for Southland flooding
    Southland residents hit by flooding caused by heavy rainfall can now access help finding temporary accommodation with the Government activating the Temporary Accommodation Service, Minister of Civil Defence Peeni Henare announced today. “The Temporary Accommodation Service (TAS) has been activated by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to help ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Bridges: Over-hyped and under-delivered
    “Is that it?” That’s Finance Minister Grant Robertson’s response to Simon Bridges’ much-hyped economic speech today. “Simon Bridges just gave the most over-hyped and under-delivered speech that I can remember during my time in politics,” Grant Robertson said. “It’s not surprising. Simon Bridges literally said on the radio this morning ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Police to trial eye in the sky in Christchurch
    A trial deployment of the Police Eagle helicopter in Christchurch will test whether the aircraft would make a significant difference to crime prevention and community safety. “The Bell 429 helicopter will be based in Christchurch for five weeks, from 17 February to 20 March,” said Police Minister Stuart Nash. “The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Momentum of trade talks continues with visits to promote Pacific and Middle East links
    The Government has kept up the pace of its work to promote New Zealand’s trade interests and diversify our export markets, with visits to Fiji and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker. Building momentum to bring the PACER Plus trade and development agreement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Coalition Govt’s investment in Customs nets record drugs haul: 3 tonnes stopped at borders in 2019
    The Coalition Government’s investment in a strong border and disrupting transnational organised crime produced record results for stopping drugs in 2019, says Minister of Customs Jenny Salesa. The illegal drugs were seized at the New Zealand border by Customs, and overseas by Customs’ international border partners before the drugs could ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Separated scenic cycleway starts
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford today kicked off construction of a separated cycleway alongside Tamaki Drive. A two-way separated cycleway will be built along the northern side of Tamaki Drive, between the Quay Street Cycleway extension and Ngapipi Road. There will be a separate walking path alongside. Phil Twyford said giving ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Earthquake-Prone Building loan scheme: eligibility criteria announced
    Owner-occupiers of unit and apartments living in earthquake-prone buildings will have certainty about the financial support they’ll be eligible for with the release of criteria for an upcoming assistance scheme, Minister for Building and Construction Jenny Salesa says. The Residential Earthquake-Prone Building Financial Assistance Scheme will help unit owners facing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Travel restrictions to remain in place as coronavirus precaution
    Temporary restrictions on travel from China will remain in place as a precautionary measure to protect against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus. The restrictions which prevent foreign nationals travelling from, or transiting through, mainland China from entering New Zealand have been extended for a further 8 days. This position ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Over $1 million to help Tairāwhiti youth into employment
    Employment Minister Willie Jackson announced today that Tairāwhiti rangatahi will benefit from an investment made by the Government’s He Poutama Rangatahi (HPR) scheme. The funding will go to the Tautua Village, Kauneke programme and the Matapuna Supported Employment Programme which will fund 120 rangatahi over two years. “Both programmes work ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • School attendance has to improve
    All parents and caregivers need to ensure that their children go to school unless they are sick, Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin said today. “The school attendance results for 2019 show, across the board, a drop in the number of students going to school regularly,” the Minister says. “Apart from ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Crown and Moriori sign a Deed of Settlement
    A Deed of Settlement agreeing redress for historical Treaty claims has been signed by the Crown and Moriori at Kōpinga Marae on Rēkohu (Chatham Islands) today, Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Andrew Little has announced. Moriori have a tradition of peace that extends back over 600 years. This settlement ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Waikato Expressway driving towards completion
    Transport Minister Phil Twyford today with Māori King Tuheitia Pōtatau Te Wherowhero VII officially opened the country’s newest road, the $384 million Huntly section of the Waikato Expressway. The 15km four-lane highway with side and central safety barriers takes State Highway 1 east of Huntly town, across lowlands and streams ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • 3400 New Zealanders treated in first year of new hepatitis C treatment
    The rapid uptake of life-saving new hepatitis C medicine Maviret since it was funded by PHARMAC a year ago means the elimination of the deadly disease from this country is a realistic goal, Health Minister David Clark says. Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus which attacks the liver, proving fatal ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Kaupapa Māori approach for homelessness
      Kaupapa Māori will underpin the Government’s new plan to deal with homelessness announced by the Prime Minister in Auckland this morning. “Māori are massively overrepresented among people experiencing homelessness, so, to achieve different outcomes for Māori, we have to do things very differently,” says the Minister of Māori Development ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Government steps up action to prevent homelessness
    1000 new transitional housing places delivered by end of year to reduce demand for emergency motel accommodation. Introduce 25% of income payment, after 7 days, for those in emergency motel accommodation to bring in line with other forms of accommodation support. Over $70m extra to programmes that prevents those at ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Important step for new financial conduct regime
    Clear requirements for ensuring customers are treated fairly by banks, insurers and other financial service providers are included in new financial conduct legislation that passed its first reading today. “The recent reviews, by the Financial Markets Authority (FMA) and Reserve Bank of New Zealand, into the conduct of banks and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago