web analytics

What the frack is going on?

Written By: - Date published: 10:02 am, December 17th, 2013 - 36 comments
Categories: Environment - Tags:

no-frackingRadio New Zealand reports:

Taranaki Regional Council insists it’s following international best practice in allowing fracking waste to be disposed of on farmland, even though the Canadian province it’s modelling itself on doesn’t allow such waste on agricultural land.

Fracking is the mining process that involves high-pressure injection of water and a cocktail of chemicals far below the earth’s surface to access oil and gas.

The regional council says it bases its controversial practice of putting the waste on farmland – an operation known as land-farming – on what Alberta is doing.

But the Alberta Energy Regulator has told Radio New Zealand it does not allow fracking waste to be applied to farmland and insists it be disposed of in industrial waste facilities.

It says fracking waste, as opposed to waste from traditional drilling operations, is not suitable for agricultural land.

Presuming the report is correct this is deeply concerning.  Because we could be putting our largest export industry at risk and our clean and green image is under further attack.

A variety of Government Departments and agencies were invited to comment on the issue on Nine to Noon this morning but none were available …

36 comments on “What the frack is going on?”

  1. greywarbler 1

    There were earlier comments on the fracking that went into NRT post.
    This morning on Radionz Kathryn Ryan interviewed independent expert Edmeads? Everything was fine that he found in his samples. Except that Greens Gareth Hughes said he sampled a postage stamp (me/sarc) and examples given to Hughes of problems indicated that was not the case. So even one example like that would have negated a finding of 100% satisfactory. So how come the anecdotal information wasn’t attended to first?
    No one else but the expert and Hughes would be interviewed. Three monkey stuff?

    • Macro 1.1

      Ryan’s interview of the “expert” was particularly useless.. No questioning of his research methodology or anything – just taking his word that all was ok. Useless!
      No questioning as to why Alberta has restricted the disposal of this crap…
      Nothing…
      Like a whitewash over a crappy job.

  2. aerobubble 2

    Fracking fluids? Not same as petroleum waste water? Hard to tell.

    So, you’ve just been hired CEO of a mining company, you need to get rid of losts of waste…

    …hire a guy to test land that’s had dump only the most lightly contaminated waste, maybe even the waste hydrocarbons have come from a refinery, so don’t measure the amount dumped, don’t measure the soil before dumping, but add to that, don’t test for toxic chemicals or arsenic, or all the nastiness in raw crude. Don’t take many at all samples either. Now give the green light to dumping toxic waste on land, sandy soil no less, like there would be any previous indication of leaching. I mean sand! Its so uniform preciously because its so temporary and porous.

    Sorry, but that’s not science. Don’t measure inputs, outputs, or measure stuff that would be there if they dumped the most toxic waste, I mean Canada has serious bureaucracy managing the waste and you think you can just dump it on a sand soil someplace? Oh, please your fired for bad publicity.

  3. joe90 3

    Charming.
    /

    In addition to friction reducers, other additives include: biocides to prevent microorganism growth and to reduce biofouling of the fractures; oxygen scavengers and other stabilizers to prevent corrosion of metal pipes; and acids that are used to remove drilling mud damage within the near-wellbore area [4].

    http://geology.com/energy/hydraulic-fracturing-fluids/

  4. Tracey 4

    The trc chair has said its an operational issue not a governance issue. I wonder if the ceo will be allowed to comment.

  5. weka 5

    “Presuming the report is correct this is deeply concerning. Because we could be putting our largest export industry at risk and our clean and green image is under further attack.”

    Sorry micky, but fuck industrial dairying and fuck our clean green image (both of which are extremely ecologicially damaging). The reason we’re in this situation is because the narrative has been shifted so far west that now our prime reasons for looking after the environment are economic. It doesn’t work* because it sees the environment as a resource there to serve our needs rather than being the very susbstance we need to survive and thrive.

    *or, it would work if we truly applied rationality to economics.

  6. vto 6

    This would have to be the single most unsustainable use of land ever…..

    “an operation known as land-farming ”

    No

    an operation known as land-consumption

    eating it so nobody else can use it again.

    unbelievable

    • weka 6.1

      +1000

      and the sleepy little hobbits just carry on gardening and thinking she’ll be right.

    • Lanthanide 6.2

      Land-farming is a well-known and standard way to deal with the waste from regular gas drilling exercises.

      Sure, sounds terrible on the face of it, but they wouldn’t be doing it if it was a problem.

      What is really at stake here is that for some reason Taranaki is using the same process for fracking waste, which is apparently not safe.

      • vto 6.2.1

        “… but they wouldn’t be doing it if it was a problem…”

        why on earth would this be so? Never stopped humanity before..

  7. adam 7

    I’m not surprised, this is nuts leading the brain dead. Our image of green is gone – like the wind. Our resources are the corporations play things – and they just don’t give a rats. Were is the green rebel alliance, were are the x-wings paint bombing the hell out of council building? Come on folks, really, when is enough, enough?

  8. philj 8

    It’s enough to put you off your ice cream and Democratic(?) government. Amazing how everything is connected. I. e. fracking and ice cream. The black and white economy of Taranaki is turning to a peculiar shade of brown.

  9. Colonial Viper 9

    Let’s see these firms publish the actual ingredients put into the ‘fracking fluids’ used to destroy the deep geologic formations in the fracking process.

    • uke 10.1

      Ok – presumably if you don’t want your family or friends (or anyone) to consume food produced on farms that practice “land farming”, best go organic.

      Have just emailed Common Sense Organics whether any of their suppliers “land farm” and will post their reply.

      • uke 10.1.1

        The reply:

        “Thank you for your query regarding our vegetables and whether the organic standards would allow mining waste. We have checked with BioGro, the major organic certifier, and the answer is ‘Definitely Not!’”

  10. toad 11

    Coincidentally, this research study into the endocrine disruptive effects of chemicals used in fracking was published just yesterday:

    http://endo.endojournals.org/content/early/2013/12/16/en.2013-1697.abstract?rss=1

    (Sorry, full article behind a paywall)

  11. tricledrown 12

    Seryaliarandfraudster.
    Come on facts and figures
    Please .Fiction doesn’t count.

  12. Truth lies 13

    The locals have concerns that the regional council is listening more the the sexy whisper of the corporate dollar rather than the people. Sounds like a classic case of not reading the whole report! Heads should roll.

  13. swordfish 14

    Alberta is by far the most right-wing, neo-liberal and socially-conservative province in Canada. And yet, EVEN THEY follow a far more enlightened policy on fracking waste-disposal than dear old Taranaki. Dear oh dear !

  14. Arandar 15

    Tonight RNZ says Taranaki Regional Council has announced there will be no more disposing of fracking waste on the land farms. Apparently once again they have decided to follow the ‘Best Practises’ of Alberta.
    Interesting what shining a little light into the dark corners can reveal. Just as well someone finally thought to ask Alberta what they actually do eh?

  15. Philj 16

    Thanks so much. This information gives me hope.

  16. aerobubble 17

    Pike River Coal Mine was state of the art, guessing that’s mining industry speak for best practice.

  17. RedLogix 18

    I was amused to note that a noticeable fraction of the hilarity focused on the use of “frack” as a swear word. No, it wasn’t a Battlestar Galactica reference; those who are familiar with fracking—that is, hydrofracturing technology, the latest popular excuse for ignoring the narrowing walls of industrial society’s increasingly harsh destiny—will understand the usage at once.

    Since fracking is a penetrative act carried out with no thought for anything but immediate gratification, it certainly counts as a profanity, and I’d like to encourage my readers to use it in everyday conversation whenever strong language is called for. For that matter, a good case can be made that those who think it’s appropriate to treat Mother Earth that way deserve to be called “motherfrackers.”

    http://thearchdruidreport.blogspot.com.au/2013/12/great-man-is-dead.html

  18. greywarbler 19

    RL
    💡

  19. yeshe 20

    Fracking companies entitled to licences on more than 60% of British land

    Assessment finds major fracking effort would create jobs and income for local communities, but require thousands of wells to be drilled and dozens of daily tanker journeys

    Guardian this morning …..

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/dec/17/fracking-huge-impact-uk-shale-gas-industry-revealed

  20. joe90 21

    Nice.

    An analysis of water samples from hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking,’ sites found the presence of hormone-disrupting chemicals, according to a new study published Monday in the journal Endocrinology.
    “With fracking on the rise, populations may face greater health risks from increased endocrine-disrupting chemical exposure,” senior author Susan Nagel told The LA Times.
    The study tested surface water and groundwater samples in Garfield County, Colorado — one county at the center of the U.S. fracking boom — and found elevated levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, or EDCs. The chemicals have been linked to infertility, birth defects, and cancer.

    http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/12/17/3073851/chemicals-fracking-water/

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • Advancing New Zealand’s trade agenda focus of Europe meetings
    World Trade Organisation reform, agricultural trade and a free trade agreement with the United Kingdom will be the focus of Minister for Trade and Export Growth David Parker’s visit to Europe this week. David Parker leaves on Tuesday for a series of meetings in the UK and Switzerland that aim ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    9 hours ago
  • Minister of Defence to visit counterparts in US and Canada
    The Minister of Defence, Ron Mark, departed today for the United States and Canada where he will meet with his counterparts.  While in Canada Minister Mark will meet with his counterpart, Minister of National Defence Harjit Sajjan.  “New Zealand and Canada are close friends, and share an instinctive like-mindedness on ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    12 hours ago
  • Government to deliver family carers $2000 pay rise, expand scheme to spouses this year
    The Coalition Government is delivering this year the changes to Funded Family Care the disability sector has long-asked for, says Associate Minister of Health Jenny Salesa. “Today we are announcing the details of our big changes to Funded Family Care, including an annual average pay boost of $2,246.40 for funded ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Ko te reo kua mū: Piri Sciascia
    Minister for Māori Development Nanaia Mahuta joins te ao Māori in their sorrow as they learn of the loss of one of the great orators and spokespersons of a generation – Piri Sciascia.  “The son of Pōrangahau was a staunch advocate for Māori development and served his people for over ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Minister opens new ecosanctuary at Cape Farewell
    A new ecosanctuary with a predator proof fence on Golden Bay’s Cape Farewell, which will restore a safe home for sea birds, rare native plants, giant snails, and geckos, was officially opened today by the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage. “There has been a fantastic community effort supported by the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Pacific partners work together to provide additional support to Australia
    The NZDF continues to support the Australian Defence Force (ADF) as it battles fires in Victoria and New South Wales, including by transporting Republic of Fiji Military engineers from Nadi to Australia, announced Defence Minister Ron Mark. On Saturday morning a NZDF Boeing 757 will depart New Zealand to uplift ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Kaikōura $10.88 million boost in tourism & business
    The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is investing $10.88 million to boost business and tourism opportunities in Kaikōura, Parliamentary Undersecretary for Regional Economic Development, Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. As part of the Kaikōura Marina Development Programme, the following two projects will receive PGF funding: A $9.88 million investment to begin the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Govt accounts in surplus, debt remains low
    The Government’s books are in good shape with the accounts in surplus and expenses close to forecast, Finance Minister Grant Robertson says. The Treasury today released the Crown accounts for the five months to November. The operating balance before gains and losses (OBEGAL) was above forecast by $0.7 billion resulting ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Auckland focus for first Police graduation of 2020
    The number of Police on the Auckland frontline is increasing with the graduation today of a special locally-trained wing of new constables. Police Minister Stuart Nash says the graduation of eighteen officers from Recruit Wing 333-5 means that more than 1900 new Police have been deployed since the Coalition Government ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Wairarapa gets $7.11m PGF water boost
    The Provincial Growth Fund is putting $7.11 million into creating a sustainable water supply for Wairarapa, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Regional Economic Development Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. The following two projects will receive Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) funding: A $7 million investment in Wairarapa Water Limited for the pre-construction development of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Progress with new Police station in Mahia
    Community safety and crime prevention in the East Coast community of Mahia has moved forward with the opening of a new Police station to serve the growing coastal settlement. Police Minister Stuart Nash has officially opened the new station, which was relocated almost 20 kilometres along the coast from the nearby ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Plans to protect the future of whitebaiting announced
    With several native whitebait species in decline the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage has today released proposals to standardise and improve management of whitebait across New Zealand. “The need for action for a healthy whitebait fishery has never been greater,” Eugenie Sage said.  “Four of the six whitebait species are ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New resource for schools to increase awareness and understanding of climate change
    A new Ministry of Education resource available for schools in 2020 will increase awareness and understanding of climate change, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “The resource, Climate Change – prepare today, live well tomorrow, will help students understand the effects of climate change at a local, national and global ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Getting more out of our most productive firms
    Finance Minister Grant Robertson has approved the terms of reference for an Inquiry into the economic contribution of New Zealand's frontier firms. Frontier firms are the most productive firms in the domestic economy within their own industry. “These firms are important as they diffuse new technologies and business practices into ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • NZDF sends more support to Australia
    The New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) is sending an Environmental Health Team, a Primary Health Care Team and a Chaplain to Australia, boosting New Zealand support for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) as it battles bush fires in Victoria and New South Wales, Defence Minister Ron Mark announced today. The ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • New Zealand joins partners in calling for full investigation into air crash in Iran
    Acting Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Rt Hon Winston Peters says that developments suggesting a surface-to-air missile is responsible for the downing of the Ukrainian International Airlines flight in Iran is disastrous news. “New Zealand offers its deepest sympathies to the families of the 176 victims. It is ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Staying connected to Australian agriculture
    Agriculture Minister, Damien O’Connor, says the Ministry for Primary Industries is continuing to stay connected to federal authorities in Australia as devastating fires affect the country.  “The Ministry is using an existing trans-Tasman forum for discussions on the agricultural impact of the fires and the future recovery phase,” says Damien ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Investment in schools – a commitment to communities
    Thousands of school-age children, their teachers and wider communities are benefiting from the Government’s multi-million dollar investment upgrading and renewing schools, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said today. “We want New Zealand to be the best place to be a child and that means learning in warm, comfortable and modern classrooms,” ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand Defence Force sends support to Australia
    Minister of Defence Ron Mark today announced New Zealand is sending three Royal New Zealand Air Force NH90 helicopters and crew, and two NZ Army Combat Engineer Sections as well as a command element to support the Australian Defence Force efforts in tackling the Australian fires.  The New Zealand Defence Force ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Better access to books for blind and low vision citizens on World Braille Day
    "Today is World Braille Day and I am delighted to announce that an international treaty giving blind and low vision New Zealanders access to books and literary works comes into force today,” Minister for Disability Issues Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “Today the Marrakesh Treaty and the associated amendments to the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • New Zealand to send further firefighter support to Australia
    The New Zealand Government is sending a further 22 firefighters to help fight the Australian fires. “The devastation caused by these fires is taking a substantial toll on our Australian neighbours and we will continue to do what we can to assist as they deal with this extremely dynamic, dangerous ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 weeks ago
  • Reducing the cost of education
    Twenty-two more schools have opted into the Government’s policy of providing $150 per child to schools who don’t ask parents for donations– bringing the total number of schools in the policy to 1,585. The Ministry of Education has accepted late opt ins past the November 14 deadline from schools that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago
  • Road deaths lower in 2019, but still more work to do
    “As we enter the new decade, my thoughts are with the families, friends and communities of the 353 people who lost their lives in road crashes last year. While the number of deaths is lower than in 2018 (377), this is still a staggering loss of life,” Duty Minister Iain ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 weeks ago