web analytics

Tape of ACC-Pullar meeting raises more questions

Written By: - Date published: 7:06 am, April 30th, 2012 - 47 comments
Categories: ACC, Judith Collins - Tags: , , , ,

Another secret taping, another political scandal. A recording of Pullar and Boag’s meeting with ACC by Pullar appears to show that Pullar did not “blackmail” ACC as alleged. This raises serious questions about how Pullar’s name got into the public arena. And why hasn’t Collins ordered ACC to correct its version of events since its had the transcript for weeks?

If ACC has seriously mis-represented Pullar and Boag’s actions in its report to Collins on the leaking of 6,500 clients details to Pullar, could it also be ACC officials behind the leaking of Pullar’s name?

Until now, the only logical source of the leak had been Collins or her office – bureaucrats would never attack senior figures in the ruling party, ACC would not risk further damaging its reputation by maliciously releasing client information, and government ministers have form on releasing the private information of people who criticise them (eg Bennett and Fuller*).

The Standard’s sources in National pointed the finger at Collins.

Now, it seems credible it could have been ACC officials. Except for one major fact: only Collins’ office and senior ACC officials supposedly had Boag’s email to Collins.

If ACC is out of line, why hasn’t Collins acted? She’s obviously known the contents of the tapes are at odds with ACC’s version of events for weeks. Would ACC persist with it version of events if Collins told them not to?

If her staff are half-competent, Collins’ office must know by now who leaked Pullar’s name, if it didn’t at the time.

And why did the release of this story coincide with an anti-Boag campaign from Collins henchman, Cameron Slater? Why did Collins and Slater go nuclear at the mention of Simon Lusk’s name?

What role, if any, did National’s appointee to head ACC, John Judge, and Nat ACC board member John McCliskie play? If the leak came from ACC, where they acting rogue or at the minster’s behest and, if they were rogue, why hasn’t the minister punished them?

Isn’t it still more plausible that the leak of the Boag email came from the person it was sent to?

This all stinks. Either Collins and her office were involved or ACC is completely out of control under Collins’ watch and she has failed to reel them in when given the chance. Lets hope the various investigations get to the bottom of it. Although I don’t hold out a lot of hope.

And none of this changes the fact that Pullar should not have released the 6,500 ACC clients’ details. How that file happened to come into her hands, of all people, remains a huge unanswered question as well.

 

* – this to me, is the best argument against Collins’ defamation suit. Defamation is a statement that lowers the reputation of a person in the eyes of the public. Bennett was widely praised for doing what it is claimed Collins did, so what can be defamatory about saying Collins did it?

47 comments on “Tape of ACC-Pullar meeting raises more questions”

  1. rosy 1

    I’m trying to work out why it took so long for this to make the news. Stuff don’t say when they saw the transcript. Oh well, it seems a good enough story to keep the Banks’ saga away from the headline news story…

  2. Sarah 2

    “Pullar should not have released the 6,500 ACC clients’ details.”

    Pullar never released the 6500 ACC client details and she didn’t breach anybodies privacy – ACC did.

    So why are you saying she did?

    The Dominion Post received a file from Pullar WITHOUT any names in it.

    If Pullar hadn’t gone public :
    – there would possibly have been no breach notification by ACC
    – ACC privacy breaches would have continued unabated,
    – ACC would have kept publishing monthly reports containing the names of sensitive claimants, and they did for a further 3 months until March when the matter went public despite Pullar notifying them of the breach in December
    – there would be no inquiry into systemic privacy breaches by ACC
    – nothing would have changed

    Are you suggesting Pullar should have colluded with ACC in a cover up of the privacy breach by saying nothing?

    • toad 2.1

      As far as I am aware, Pullar did not release personal information to the media – she or someone close to her released a version of the files ACC sent to her with the information that could identify individual claimants redacted.

      • just saying 2.1.1

        Are you going to alter this post Eddie?

        It’s been known that Pullar did not breach other claimants’ privacy for some weeks now, but this line keeps being repeated.

        Like her or loathe her, Pullar is a whistle-blower. Even if she believes that blowing the whistle might further her personal best-interests regarding ACC (and that would be unwise), she has a long record of trying to publicise how ACC treats people in her position. There are several inquiries into ACC happening as a result of her embarrassing ACC in this way.

      • An excellent article, and raises the right questions. However I agree with Toad, it is not accurate to say Ms. Pullar released the personal information in the spreadsheet. The information given to the Dom Post had the personal information removed to protect confidentiality of claimants.

  3. tsmithfield 3

    Your article suggests to me that there is more ammunition for Collins in her defamation suit, in that you appear to me to be suggesting that there are other plausible sources for leaks outside Collins and her office (which I believe I was suggesting myself when this topic was last doing the rounds here).

    Not that it means she will be successful of course. Only that her position is strengthened as a result of this. Is that your view?

  4. What will crush-less Collins do?

    If Judith Collins has any competence as a minister, we should see heads roll.

  5. Kotahi Tane Huna 5

    If senior ACC employees (eg: to ones it was sent to) leaked the Boag email, that means ACC is “rogue” (rouge is facepaint) all the way to the top, and if this is the case, it’s the minister’s responsibility anyway.

    Are we supposed to believe that the party of croneyism and inapproriate political interference/influence, the party that wants to privatise ACC, hasn’t got its sticky corrupt fingers all over this?

    Yeah right.

  6. Good brave questions Eddie.

  7. Lanthanide 7

    “The Standard’s sources in National pointed the finger at Collins.”

    Is it really The Standard’s (a non-thinking machine, remember) sources in National, or Eddie’s?

  8. Gosman 8

    I love how the attack line has now changed from being definately, without almost a shadow of a doubt, Judith Collins being responsible for the leak to her now being responsible for not dealing with those people in ACC who might now be responsible.

    • Lanthanide 8.1

      Yep, I found that amusing too.

      • Anne 8.1.1

        Umm… from memory, most of us attacked Judith Collins because we suspected she knew who had leaked the information but was pretending she didn’t… not that she had leaked it herself. Not surprisingly there was speculation as to how it may have happened and who may have been involved, but I think today’s revelation tends to confirm that Judith Collins did know where the leak had originated. Yet she was happy for others to be suspected of the ‘crime’ and on her own side of the political fence too. Interesting.

        • Gosman 8.1.1.1

          What was all that fuss with Mallard and Little then?

          Also from many of the comments on this thread it does indeed seem like many people here are thinking Collins had a direct link to the leaking of the e-mail

          http://thestandard.org.nz/they-eat-their-own/

          • Anne 8.1.1.1.1

            Ask Madam Crusher. She’s the one making all the fuss.

          • felix 8.1.1.1.2

            “Also from many of the comments on this thread it does indeed seem like many people here are thinking Collins had a direct link to the leaking of the e-mail”

            I just scanned that thread and of the 96 comments I found maybe 3 or 4 that hinted at what you say, and none that say it outright.

            As usual you’ve looked at the numbers and failed to understand the words.

            • Lanthanide 8.1.1.1.2.1

              Try reading the actual post itself, Felix:

              So, that leaves Collins and her office. Collins denied leaking the email to the media … but leaves a fair bit of wiggle room, doesn’t it? The tipline is, as they say, running hot – and the name on everyone’s lips is Lusk.

              To understand why Collins would give Pullar’s name to Simon Lusk for passing on to the Herald, you need to understand some internal National Party dynamics.

              Even Nats who don’t know, until now, exactly how Collins leaked and to whom will tell you the obvious – the leak can only have come from her office.

              • Rob

                “As usual you’ve looked at the numbers and failed to understand the words”. It looks like Felix jumped straight to the numbers and failed to even read the words.

                • Te Reo Putake

                  Felix wrote about the number of comments in the post Gosman referred to, Rob, not the comments on this post or indeed the post itself*. So it looks rather like it is you who failed to read the words. 
                   
                  *From Gossie’s comment:
                   
                  Also from many of the comments on this thread it does indeed seem like many people here are thinking Collins had a direct link to the leaking of the e-mail
                  http://thestandard.org.nz/they-eat-their-own/

                  • Gosman

                    If you want to get truly pedantic I could argue that the tone of the comments of people were generally supportive of the ideas expressed in the original post and that included a section, (that was highlighted by Lanthanide), which suggested that Collins was directly involved in the leak. However that wouldn’t really serve any purpose, much like yours and Felix’s comments here.

                    • McFlock

                      You could, but you wouldn’t simply because you would never stoop to diverting a thread with a semantic debate as to whether comments indicating “general support” for a post which  suggests the probable identity of a likely culprit equates to those commenters specifically “thinking Collins had a direct link to the leaking of the e-mail”?
                              
                      You would never stoop to such a thing… 

                    • Lanthanide

                      Sticking my oar in here, I didn’t notice that Gosman specifically referred to comments, so felix is correct in his counting.

                      I was referring more to his original comment:
                      “I love how the attack line has now changed from being definately, without almost a shadow of a doubt, Judith Collins being responsible for the leak to her now being responsible for not dealing with those people in ACC who might now be responsible.”

                      Which refers directly to Eddie’s posts, both this one and “They eat their own”.

                      But yes, this looks like more diversion from Gos: I understand his angle, but the words he chose to express it were poor.

                    • felix

                      “If you want to get truly pedantic I could argue that the tone of the comments of people were generally supportive of the ideas expressed in the original post “

                      But you won’t, because if you did I’d insist that you quote the bits you meant so we could discuss the “tone”.

                      And you won’t do that because it would become very apparent that your “many” is actually “very few”.

                      “However that wouldn’t really serve any purpose, much like yours and Felix’s comments here.”

                      My comment above only serves to point out that you’re bullshitting, and I happen to think it does so unequivocally. I get that it doesn’t serve any purpose for you, but I’m not actually here to serve your purposes. Believe it or not.

  9. ghostwhowalksnz 9

    Forensically this is very smart.
    First the email tracking software, then the recording of meetings – which is revealed much later after ACC has dug itself deeper into a hole.

    Its like CSI

    • Te Reo Putake 9.1

      It’ll be just like CSI when we have a dead body. I’ll settle for a dead political career though.

      • Gosman 9.1.1

        It doesn’t look like it will be Judith Collins though based on this rather pathetic attempt at linking her to the leak given the latest revellations. Perhaps you would settle for Trevour Mallard’s head?

  10. ianmac 10

    Well it is alright then. Mr Key questions the validity of the tape. Risky stuff?
    “”Yes there appears to be a difference of opinion although, as we know with recordings, that it might not be the entire recording,” he said.”
    I expect he will find another expert who says the tape says the opposite.
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10802432

    • Pascal's bookie 10.1

      It’s odd that he’d go out of his way to question the honesty of the account. A brush off due to the various investigations would have been the obvious thing.

  11. Tiger Mountain 11

    ullo, ullo, ullo what ’av we ’ere?….
    is this not a classic situation where it is better for ShonKey to be saying nothing? It is not a slow news day at least.

    “Key Questions Pullar Recording”
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10802432

    • ianmac 11.1

      Snap!

    • happynz 11.2

      From the same Herald article link…

      Speaking to TVNZ’s Breakfast today, Mr Key raised questions about the recording.

      “Yes there appears to be a difference of opinion although, as we know with recordings, that it might not be the entire recording,” he said.

      “I’m not saying it is or it isn’t, I simply don’t know, but the important point there is that there are three investigations going on … and I’m sure they’ll look at all of the information that’s there.”

      That’s gonna need an industrial-sized barrel of syrup to cover all that waffle.

      😀

  12. Akldnut 12

    If Fuller received the information as an email there should have been a disclaimer (I think theyre called) on the bottom threatening legal action/consequences and stating the relevant act if the information was diseminated/dissected in part or whole?

    So if spreading the information would have been illegal, the idea that she would have demanded the 2 yrs payment when she would have been prosecuted would seem fairly implausible.

    So someone in ACC would have been telling porkies.

  13. veryinteresting 13

    Isnt it very interesting.
    The levy payer protects themself from ACC by recording a meeting with them.
    ACC make public allegations.
    The transcript of the recording is released to ACC, ACC refuse to correct their public allegation.
    the PM is quoted:
    “”Yes there appears to be a difference of opinion although, as we know with recordings, that it might not be the entire recording,” he said.”

    wait a minute: I dont recall any such view being put forward on the issue of the Tea Tape.

    This should be an alert to take note – any time you have to meet with ACC record it!

    So i wonder why is it that when a levy payer records ACC and produces a transcript to prove the allegations false is the levy payers recording deemed to have doubt on it.

    we are all levy payers, these issues are cause for concern at the culture within acc hope you never have a serious injury requiring their ” rehabilitation”. BTW the Department of Labour who monitor ACC define rehabilitation as ” exit” .

  14. Kevin 14

    Collins has delivered papers to Mallard and Little last Friday regarding defamation over the source of the leaks. It is entirely possible that Collins was not a party to the leaks, and that she had nothing to do with the release of Bronwyn Pullar’s file.
    It is my view that the leaks could have only come from ACC themselves, from the highest level, and was a bungled attempt at managing damage regarding Bronwyn Pullar’s case and the subsequent fallout which resulted in the resignation of Nic Smith

    • Adele 14.1

      Kevin

      Mallard and Little have only received letters from lawyers advising them that proceedings are being commenced and they have yet to be served with papers. I get the impression that Collins is trying to bully an apology from Mallard and Little to prevent what will be costly litigation on her part (she is personally paying for the defamation proceedings against both parties).

      She may need to ask John Banks on how to source anonymous donations – however, I don’t think in her case Kim Dotcom will be all that forthcoming.

      [lprent: 3 parties. RadioNZ is also on her hit list. I suspect that most of the legal machinations will be directed at them as the weaker link. That way she may get a figleaf apology from one party to cover her embarrassed naked butt as she retreats in triumph. /sarcasm off]

  15. Anne 15

    Collins has delivered papers to Mallard and Little last Friday regarding defamation over the source of the leaks. It is entirely possible that Collins was not a party to the leaks, and that she had nothing to do with the release of Bronwyn Pullar’s file.

    Not only is it possible, it’s beginning to look like it may be probable. However, the point of contention is:

    Did Judith Collins know it was an ACC inspired leak and if so, why did she declare she had no idea who was responsible? She may not have known the name of the ACC staffer who facilitated the leakage, but she must have known what was going on and seemingly chose to be part of the cover-up.

    • Gosman 15.1

      She may have known the source of the leak. She may also be a Reptillian space Alien sent down to rule over us. Unless you have evidence you are merely speculating.

  16. Carmen D 16

    Eddie, do you still contend that Collins leaked the email? A simple yes or no will suffice.

    We await your reply.

    • Ross 16.1

      I think she did leak the email. She provided the email to ACC when the email apparently said it was not to be given to anyone. She printed out the email when it is not clear why she would do so. She has failed to account for her actions. She has made it clear she dislikes Pullar. Paula Bennett made it clear she disliked Natasha Fuller before she (Bennett) disclosed private info to the media.

  17. tsmithfield 17

    “The Standard’s sources in National pointed the finger at Collins.”

    Perhaps this brings into question the wisdom of relying on “sources” within the enemy’s camp. A counter-intelligence op perhaps?

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • How to earn ‘good’ returns on your KiwiSaver
    The National Government admitted last week that it will not be taking any responsibility for KiwiSaver funds that invest in cluster bomb, landmine, and nuclear weapons manufacturers. New Zealanders care deeply about whether or not their money is being used ...
    GreensBy Julie Anne Genter
    1 hour ago
  • Disability sector is in a ‘slow burning crisis’
    Disability advocates say the sector is in crisis and broken, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says.  “A roundtable at Parliament organised by the Labour Party, heard today how National has left disability services chronically underfunded. ...
    20 hours ago
  • NZ fisheries depend on the environment – they should protect it
    The attitude of the fishing industry and the National Government to our oceans, and the life within it, still amazes me. Like many New Zealanders, I find it perplexing that an industry which depends entirely on the long-term health of ...
    GreensBy Eugenie Sage
    21 hours ago
  • Bigger is not always better with local government reform
    I have written previously about the overwhelming opposition expressed by local councils and community members to the latest Local Government reforms.  The Select Committee heard more submissions this week, specifically about some of the unintended consequences that may arise from ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    21 hours ago
  • Labour calls for state of emergency on homelessness
    Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford is calling on the Government to declare a state of emergency over the nation’s homelessness crisis. “There are 42,000 people homeless and living in severe housing stress while the National Government behaves like a possum ...
    2 days ago
  • Labour calls for state of emergency on homelessness
    Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford is calling on the Government to declare a state of emergency over the nation’s homelessness crisis. “There are 42,000 people homeless and living in severe housing stress while the National Government behaves like a possum ...
    2 days ago
  • Government must review state sector retirement investment
    The State Sector Retirement Savings Scheme has no business investing in companies which manufacture cluster bombs, anti-personnel mines and nuclear weapons, Labour MP and Parliamentarians for Global Action executive member Su’a William Sio says. “I endorse the call made by the ...
    3 days ago
  • Councils shouldn’t rush into Easter Trading
    City and district councils must ensure they don’t rush into trading on Easter Sunday ahead of local body elections next month, Labour’s Pacific Islands Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio says. “This decision must be taken seriously and only after extensive ...
    3 days ago
  • Minister can’t wash hands of illegal KiwiSaver investments
    The Minister responsible for appointing default KiwiSaver providers should take responsibility for ensuring they act legally, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. “The National Government has now had confirmed what they were told more than a week ago – that ...
    3 days ago
  • Fixing our broken economy
    Globally, the “neo-liberal” consensus is rapidly vanishing (I use quotation marks because there are some in Aotearoa who deny such a thing as neo-liberalism exists). Regardless of the debate around its meaning, neo-liberal is a useful descriptor for the general ...
    GreensBy Julie Anne Genter
    4 days ago
  • Fixing our broken economy
    Globally, the “neo-liberal” consensus is rapidly vanishing (I use quotation marks because there are some in Aotearoa who deny such a thing as neo-liberalism exists). Regardless of the debate around its meaning, neo-liberal is a useful descriptor for the general ...
    GreensBy Julie Anne Genter
    4 days ago
  • Government railroading Maori Land Bill through
    Maori Development Minister Te Ururoa Flavell seems determined to railroad his Te Ture Whenua Maori Bill through despite the large number of submitters in opposition to the bill, says MP Meka Whaitiri, whose Ikaroa-Rāwhiti electorate contains nearly 30 per cent ...
    4 days ago
  • A national day to commemorate NZ land wars
    It’s fantastic that the government has agreed to a hold a national day commemorating the New Zealand land wars. Announced at Kingi Tūheitia’s 10th koroneihana celebrations, alongside the return of Rangiriri Pā to the Kingitanga, the news marked a significant ...
    GreensBy Marama Davidson
    4 days ago
  • A national day to commemorate NZ land wars
    It’s fantastic that the government has agreed to a hold a national day commemorating the New Zealand land wars. Announced at Kingi Tūheitia’s 10th koroneihana celebrations, alongside the return of Rangiriri Pā to the Kingitanga, the news marked a significant ...
    GreensBy Marama Davidson
    4 days ago
  • Government turns a blind eye to struggling sole parents
    Social Development Minister Anne Tolley’s claims that her Government’s work with sole parents is her biggest success are in tatters after a major increase in homelessness amongst that group, says Labour’s Social Development spokesperson Carmel Sepuloni. “Anne Tolley is seriously ...
    4 days ago
  • Time has come for state apology on abuse
    Labour is today calling on the Government to issue an apology for historic abuse in state institutions. Speaking after the launch of Elizabeth Stanley’s book “The Road to Hell; state violence against Children in Post-war New Zealand”, Labour’s Justice spokesperson ...
    4 days ago
  • It’s OK to have a few slaves, just not too many? Minimum wage loophole hasn’t gone away
    New Zealand still needs legislation to ensure adult New Zealanders are not exploited by being taken on as contractors for less than the equivalent of the minimum wage, says Labour list MP David Parker.  “My Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment ...
    4 days ago
  • Lessons from the Future of Work Commission: Building Wealth from the Ground Up
    Good morning, and thank you for attending today’s Future of Work Seminar here in Wellington. I want to particularly acknowledge Beth Houston who has spent many hours pulling together the programme for today’s event, and to Olivier and the staff ...
    4 days ago
  • Cooking 4 Change at the Auckland City Mission
    On Tuesday evening I participated in the launch of the ‘Cooking 4 Change’ recipe book, which Metiria and I both contributed our favourite recipes to. Along with Dick Frizzell, Trelise Cooper, Tiki Taane, Erin Simpson, Jono & Ben, Colin Mathura-Jeffree, a couple ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    5 days ago
  • Cooking 4 Change at the Auckland City Mission
    On Tuesday evening I participated in the launch of the ‘Cooking 4 Change’ recipe book, which Metiria and I both contributed our favourite recipes to. Along with Dick Frizzell, Trelise Cooper, Tiki Taane, Erin Simpson, Jono & Ben, Colin Mathura-Jeffree, a couple ...
    GreensBy James Shaw
    5 days ago
  • Backbencher Matt’s Bill is a Doocey
    The latest National Member’s Bill pulled from the ballot is yet another waste of Parliament’s time and shows the Government’s contempt for the House and the public with much more important issues needing debate, says Labour’s Shadow Leader of the ...
    5 days ago
  • Gun laws creaking under the strain
     Questions have to be asked  after surprising revelations at the Law and Order Select Committee about the police and their ability to manage the gun problem in New Zealand, says Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash.  “The lack of resources is ...
    5 days ago
  • Most homeless are working poor – Otago Uni
    The finding by Otago University researcher Dr Kate Amore that most homeless people are in work or study is one of the most shocking aspects of the housing crisis, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Social service agencies report many ...
    5 days ago
  • Māori seats entrenched by Tirikatene Bill
    National and the Māori Party need to support my member’s Bill which is designed to entrench the Māori electorate seats in Parliament, Labour’s Te Tai Tonga MP Rino Tirikatene says. “Under the Electoral Act the provisions establishing the general electorates ...
    5 days ago
  • Trade dumping bill could hurt NZ industries
    The Commerce Select Committee is currently hearing submissions on the Trade (Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duties) Amendment Bill. This bill worries me. I flagged some major concerns during its first reading.   I am now reading submissions from NZ Steel, ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers
    6 days ago
  • Just 8 per cent of work visas for skills shortages
    Just 16,000 – or 8 per cent – of the 209,000 work visas issued last year were for occupations for which there is an identified skills shortage, says Labour Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway. “The overwhelming majority of the record number ...
    6 days ago
  • Hard won agreement shouldn’t be thrown away
    The Government should ignore talk across the Tasman about doing away with the labelling of GM free products, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King. “Labelling of genetically modified products was a hard won agreement in 2001 by Australian and the ...
    6 days ago
  • National’s privatisation Trojan horse
     The National government is using the need to modernise the school system as a Trojan horse for privatisation and an end to free public education as we know it, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “There is no doubt that ...
    6 days ago
  • Shameless land-banking ads show need for crackdown
    The fact that more than 300 sections are shamelessly being advertised on Trade Me as land-banking opportunities during a housing crisis shows the need for a crackdown on property speculators, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Of the 328 ...
    6 days ago
  • Standard and Poor’s warning of housing crisis impact on banks
    The National Government’s failure to address the housing crisis is leading to dire warnings from ratings agency Standard and Poor’s about the impact on the strength of the economy and New Zealand banks, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Standard ...
    6 days ago
  • Ihumatao needs action not sympathy
    The Petition of Save Our Unique Landscape (SOUL) calling on Parliament to revoke Special Housing Area 62 in order to protect the Ihumatao Peninsula and Stonefields, has fallen on deaf ears, says the Labour MP for Mangere Su’a William Sio.  ...
    6 days ago
  • Another delay to justice system reform for victims of sexual violence
    I believe most, if not all, New Zealanders would expect our court system to uphold the dignity of complainants, hold perpetrators to account for crimes including sexual and domestic violence and uphold the crucial right to a fair trial. Yet ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    6 days ago
  • Another delay to justice system reform for victims of sexual violence
    I believe most, if not all, New Zealanders would expect our court system to uphold the dignity of complainants, hold perpetrators to account for crimes including sexual and domestic violence and uphold the crucial right to a fair trial. Yet ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    6 days ago
  • Student visa fraud & exploitation must stop
    The Government must act immediately to end fraud and exploitation of international students that threatens to damage New Zealand’s reputation, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. ...
    7 days ago
  • Government needs to show leadership in reviewing monetary policy
    The Reserve Bank’s struggles to meet its inflation target, the rising exchange rate and the continued housing crisis shows current monetary policy needs to be reviewed - with amendments to the policy targets agreement a bare minimum, says Labour’s Finance ...
    7 days ago
  • Local democracy under threat
    The National Government is in the process of gutting our local democracy through it’s Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). We’ve been hearing submissions from councils, and a few community members, all around the country who are deeply ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    1 week ago
  • Local democracy under threat
    The National Government is in the process of gutting our local democracy through it’s Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). We’ve been hearing submissions from councils, and a few community members, all around the country who are deeply ...
    GreensBy Jan Logie
    1 week ago
  • Slash and burn of special education support
    Slashing the support for school age children with special needs is no way to fund earlier intervention, Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins says.  “National’s latest plan to slash funding for children with special needs over the age of 7 in ...
    1 week ago
  • National’s Pasifika MPs must have free vote
      Pacific people will not take kindly to the Government whipping their Pacific MPs to vote in favour of a  Bill that will allow Sunday trading  at Easter, says Labour’s Pacific Island Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio.  “We are seeing ...
    1 week ago
  • Maritime Crimes Bill – balancing security and free speech
    Parliament is currently considering the Maritime Crimes Amendment Bill, which would bring New Zealand up to date with current international rules about maritime security. The debate around the Bill reflects two valid issues: legitimate counter-terrorism measures and the right to ...
    GreensBy Kennedy Graham
    2 weeks ago
  • Rio Olympics captioning – setting the record straight
    In the House on Thursday, my colleague, Labour Party spokesperson on Disability Issues, Poto Williams asked a great question. After which the Minister, Nicky Wagner, stood up and finally publicly acknowledged the National Foundation for the Deaf for funding the ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers
    2 weeks ago
  • Rio Olympics captioning – setting the record straight
    In the House on Thursday, my colleague, Labour Party spokesperson on Disability Issues, Poto Williams asked a great question. After which the Minister, Nicky Wagner, stood up and finally publicly acknowledged the National Foundation for the Deaf for funding the ...
    GreensBy Mojo Mathers
    2 weeks ago
  • Teachers’ low wages at the centre of shortages
      Figures that show teachers’ wages have grown the slowest of all occupations is at the heart of the current teacher shortage, says Labour’s Education Spokesperson Chris Hipkins.  In the latest Labour Cost Index, education professionals saw their wages grow ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government’s Tax Law undermines common law principles
    A tax amendment being snuck in under the radar allows changes to tax issues to be driven through by the Government without Parliamentary scrutiny, says Labour’s Revenue spokesman Stuart Nash. “The amendment allows any part of the Tax Administration Act ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government slippery about caption funding
      The Government has refused to apologise for taking the credit for funding Olympic Games captioning when the National Foundation for the Deaf  was responsible, says Labour’s spokesperson on Disability Issues Poto Williams.  “This shameful act of grandstanding by Ministers ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Default KiwiSaver investments should be reviewed
    The investments of the default KiwiSaver providers should be reviewed to make sure they are in line with New Zealanders’ values and expectations, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Most New Zealanders would be appalled that their KiwiSaver funds are ...
    2 weeks ago
  • New ministry should look after all children
    The Government has today shunned well founded pleas by experts not to call its new agency the Ministry for Vulnerable Children, Labour’s Spokesperson for Children Jacinda Ardern says.  “Well respected organisations and individuals such as Children's Commissioner Judge Andrew Becroft ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Triclosan – nasty chemical will be reassessed
    Last week my campaign for this chemical to be reassessed by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) took another step forward. After many months of waiting, the EPA have agreed that triclosan needs to be reassessed. Triclosan is an ingredient in many ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • Triclosan – nasty chemical will be reassessed
    Last week my campaign for this chemical to be reassessed by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) took another step forward. After many months of waiting, the EPA have agreed that triclosan needs to be reassessed. Triclosan is an ingredient in many ...
    GreensBy Catherine Delahunty
    2 weeks ago
  • Ratification okay but we need action
    Today’s decision to ratify the Paris agreement on Climate Change by the end of the year is all well and good but where is the plan, says Labour’s Climate Change spokesperson Megan Woods.  “The Government’s failure to plan is planning ...
    2 weeks ago

Public service advertisements by The Standard

Current CO2 level in the atmosphere