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The Golfball and Sickle

Written By: - Date published: 12:38 pm, April 30th, 2008 - 55 comments
Categories: activism - Tags: , ,

Personally, I think it’s hilarious.

A brilliant piece of activism that got the public’s attention and raised the issue of why we have American spy equipment on our soil. All without any real harm done and no violence.

The wannabe semiotician in me loves that you’ve got a rag-tag bunch of ordinary people attacking a huge, featureless tool of secret State power. And with sickles!

Also, who knew those were just inflated covers? I thought they were some kind of far-out communications spheres

55 comments on “The Golfball and Sickle”

  1. insider 1

    Brilliant stunt. They are just weather shields for satellite dishes. You often see them over radar arrays as well.

  2. Matthew Pilott 2

    Insider – they also prevent people from seeing exactly where they’re pointed, which is an operational benefit. I’m not sure which is the primary and which is the secondary purpose, off the top’o’me noggin.

  3. roger nome 3

    Cool piece of activism. One comforting thing is that the echelon program that these structures are part of is becoming more and more irrelevant. i.e. they only intercept air-borne communications, whereas more and more information is being passed through fiber-optics, which a would be eavesdropper needs to physically tap into in order to monitor.

    It’s all in James Bamford’s most recent book:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Pretext_for_War

  4. Only someone from the left would find vandalism funny. I wonder what Nandor would say if a Anti Cannabis group, went on his property and pulled out his plants, or what would the left say if a group of Americans, did something similar to protest North Korea.

    This has totally blown up in the left’s face. Here was this huge spy base, they have been telling us, the big bad Americans are doing all sorts of bad things, but yet they were still able to climb the wall and get in.

    Don’t you think, if this was important to the USA, these guys would of got no where near it. Basically these protesters have proved that the States were right all along, they are doing legitimate activity.

    This is just the typical, chip on your shoulder, Anti American BS that the left gets off on.

    You guys need to grow up.

  5. Santi 5

    Steve Pierson, Professor of English, said “A brilliant piece of activism…. All without any real harm done and no violence.”

    Don’t you know the meaning of private property?

    Would you condone animal-right activists entering farms to set animals free? Where do you stop in your support of “activism”?

    Shame on you.

  6. Cool piece of activism or outright criminality? I guess that the Courts will be the judge of that.

  7. Felix 7

    Santi:

    “private property”

    Please expand.

  8. roger nome 8

    “Cool piece of activism or outright criminality?”

    Yes look at all the destroyed property, littering the surround ground. And the massacred bodies of the spy-base staff splayed throughout the grizzly scene. Won’t someone think of the US empire? Someone must bring these barbarians to justice!

  9. MikeE 9

    Criminal act of Vandalism.

    I don’t agree in certain governmnet departments existing, and you don’t see me letting off bombs under them (though I did find that scene in V for Vendetta particularily heart warming).

    Then again, it is a foreign government essentially spying on us…

    I’m of two minds on this one.

  10. Ben R 10

    I would have thought that following the bomb attacks in London, Madrid & Bali and threatened attacks in Australia, people would appreciate efforts to intercept terrorist communications?

    Having the spy base doesn’t mean we endorse every aspect of US foreign policy. Personally, I agree that the invasion of Iraq was a disaster, but I still think we need to try and prevent terrorist attacks. As Salman Rushdie says:

    It’s one thing to criticise the way in which the American government is behaving, or the British government, and I have a lot of criticisms of that in fact, nothing but criticisms,’ he says now. “But it’s another thing to fail to see that an enemy actually exists and is extremely serious about what he wishes to do.’ http://www.johannhari.com/archive/article.php?id=1002

    [yeah because these spy bases and all those American fighter jets have been so useful against backpack bombers. No-one denies there are terrorists, that doesn’t automatically mean Waihopai is needed. SP]

  11. Steve Pierson 11

    To state the obivous for our rightwing friends – not all vandalism is good, it depends on the reason, and breaking the law is not good but sometimes it is worth it in a just cause.

    santi. This is a side point but private property is not invoilable, ownership is not an absolute right of use. I do support the release of animals held in inhuman conditions. As to where I stop supporting activism – well, i don’t support people coming and peeing on the wall of your house becuase they don’t like you – so I guess the point is somewhere between that: freeing animals that are being treated inhumanely= good, peeing on your house because you’re not liked = bad.

    Remember, it’s you who are the extremist, the absolutist here. To me, there can be circumstances when breaching the law is ok if the cause is good and the payoff with the damage caused. It depends on individual circumstances. You believe any violation of private property is automaitcally wrong.

  12. Scribe 12

    Steve,

    How about ransacking an abortion clinic?

    As you say: not all vandalism is good, it depends on the reason, and breaking the law is not good but sometimes it is worth it in a just cause.

    Who makes the decision on whether the vandalism or law-breaking is “good”?

  13. higherstandard 13

    Good on the Prime Minister for calling it like it is.

    “Obviously it’s just imposing a cost on the taxpayer having to rebuild. That’s why I describe it as a senseless act of criminal vandalism”.

  14. Steve Pierson 14

    Like all politics, Scribe, it’s a matter of debate. It should be based on principle and reasoned argument and obviously reasonable people can sometimes disagree.

    But you would agree that in some cases activism that breaks the law is OK – like when anti EFA marchers (all ten of them) march with placards that don’t carry name and address. You think that’s ok don’t you?

  15. higherstandard 15

    SP

    Is it against the law when anti EFA marchers (all ten of them) march with placards that don’t carry name and address ?

    If so the law’s more of an ass than I suspected. Regardless I don’t see how this relates to the vandalism and associated cost to the taxpayer as highlighted in this post.

  16. Steve:

    So what you are saying here is, Vandalism is good, just as long if you believe in the political statement they are making.

    I have to disagree with that. Protest all you want, but what they did was wrong.

  17. Benodic 17

    Don’t you know the meaning of private property?

    Quick, someone tell Rosa Parks.

  18. Matthew Pilott 18

    Brett Dale, since we’re into some ignorant stereotyping, do you get off on extraordinary rendition to countries that torture, CIA-endorsed waterboarding, or the overthrow of democratic governments for fascist pro-US dictators?

    Sorry, but who needs to grow up?

  19. Macky 19

    Brett

    should we always obey the law mindlessly?

    because you seem to have the second part of that down pat

    [Macky, play nice. SP]

  20. Ben R 20

    “yeah because these spy bases and all those American fighter jets have been so useful against backpack bombers. No-one denies there are terrorists, that doesn’t automatically mean Waihopai is needed. SP”

    That overlooks the number of plots that have been foiled in Europe through intelligence sharing & intercepting communications.

    I don’t know that you’d describe ‘The Ploughshares’ as ordinary people either? They said they carried out their attack in the name of the “Prince of Peace”. They sound more like religious zealots.

  21. vto 21

    It’s a fine line between stability and anarchy. Just as well we have the state with its big bovver boots to get stuck in and do some bashing with when they are needed to control people. Eh Mr Pierson.

  22. Matthew Pilott 22

    Hey vto – you alluded to this on another thread – so what’s the alternative to ‘da 5-0’s if you don’t like state influence, out of interest?

  23. vto 23

    Ha ha my Pilott, excuse my rough manner but I was just trying to expose some hypocrisy (that is larger than political parties). Namely, that it is ok for the state to put the boot into that state-person relationship but not so for the person in the person-person relationship.

    I don’t have a complete answer developed in my head, but together with my earlier postage, what I am getting at is that today the physical approach as a means of dispute resolution is forgotten. Which ignores the vast majority of human history (and surely we are not so arrogant to think we do things better today than in the past).

    Its a big topic, and off-topic so I’ll stop there (btw, I’m not for the bash). But that’s what I was getting at. Some hypocrisy, and some forgotten history. And some stirring.

  24. Felix 24

    Short memories indeed.

    The most serious terrorist attack we’ve had here in living memory, the bombing of the Rainbow Warrior claimed one innocent life and caused irreparable damage to private property.

    One of the creepier aspects of this horrible event was that the U.S. (and other) intelligence agencies had been forewarned and chose not to tell us.

    With friends like these…

  25. vto 25

    That should have been ‘mr pilott’ not ‘my pilott’

  26. Like I said, you can protest all you like, but if you are going to support this type of vandalism against one country, you have to support it against other countries also.

    You cant pick and choose because of your own political beliefs.

    Can you imagine if a American immigrant living in New Zealand did this to an Arab Embassy, you will all be up in arms.

  27. Felix 27

    Brett, I can support anything I like based on my political (or any other) beliefs.

    I believe the the damage to the echelon spy station was politically relevant, mostly harmless and a bit theatrically amusing.

    What I can’t do is expect you to support anything based on my beliefs. And that’s ok with me.

  28. Steve Pierson 28

    Um. I can and do pick which causes to support based on my political beliefs. that’s what having political beliefs is all about.

    Try and get this straight in your head – the principle I’m arguing is not ‘all vandalism is good’. It is ‘sometimes a breach of the law can be justified for political reasons’ – in this case a minor breach for what I see as a good cause.

  29. You cant pick and choose because of your own political beliefs.

    You fu**kn moron.

  30. Sam Dixon 30

    from stuff:

    “neighbours of the base woke up this morning to a different skyline. The odd passer-by stopped to stare, and one by one the base’s neighbours pulled blinds or wandered out on to their lawns to realise the landscape was slightly altered.

    Sarah Rolston did not hear anything last night and said the sight of the balls from her front lawn this morning was “hilarious”.

    One neighbour who asked not to be named said “Dolly Parton is a bit lopsided at the moment.”

    – seem like the righties are a bit at odds with the locals down there

  31. Steve

    In saying “sometimes a breach of the law can be justified for political reason”

    then you would totally support someone from the right doing something similar in a form protest.

  32. higherstandard 32

    SP

    Try and get this straight in your head … in this case a minor breach for what I see as a good cause.

    What is this good cause Steve, perhaps you’d like to inform me and the rest of NZ so we can share in your delight that the public will be footing the bill for the repairs of this vandalism.

  33. Occasional Observer 33

    Yeah, what a momentous, heroic achievement, by standing up against the State like this. A million dollars of taxpayers’ money down the tubes.

    I look forward to the Standard praising a bomb attack against the Greytown WINZ office. Hell, with falling property prices, that can’t be worth more than a million dollars. Or how about an arson attack against a school? Or let some prisoners take the axe to a few cell blocks.

    Yeah, that’s what we’d like to see.

    [lprent: I’m sure that it is harder on your brain to deal with individuals, try anyway. Address the gripe to the poster]

  34. Felix 34

    No Brett, but you possibly would.

    Why is this so hard for you?

  35. higherstandard 35

    That’s great Brett so you’ll be stumping up with the million dollars in repairs then !

  36. Santi 36

    “..in this case a minor breach for what I see as a good cause.”

    A pathetic admission by Steve Pierson.

    It can hardly be a minor breach? You appear to condone trespassing and damaging provate property.

    A good cause? What about the bombing of anti-abortion clinics by religious fundamentalists? The attacks by the anti-whaling campaigners? Anti-globalisation mobs attacking American businesses?

    What’s a good cause to you?

  37. Steve Pierson 37

    ” Brett Dale
    April 30, 2008 at 5:14 pm Edit
    Steve

    In saying “sometimes a breach of the law can be justified for political reason’

    then you would totally support someone from the right doing something similar in a form protest.”

    – you’re still confused Brett. It would always depend on what the protest was and what it was against. My position that this was a great piece of activism that achieved it’s purpose, a purpose I find laudable, does not mean that I support any action in any political cause.

    Honestly, it’s like you can’t read.

  38. Steve:

    My point being, is you have condone vandalism only because the people who committed this crime sit on the same fence as you, thats it in a nut shell.

    Like I said, you should have the right to protest all you like, but to commit a crime and cost the tax payer hundreds of thousands of dollars is wrong.

  39. Tane 39

    Brett, the idea that a protest is immoral if it damages property is absurd. It’s the same mentality that led Dick Cheney to label Nelson Mandela a terrorist.

    Do you think Nelson Mandela is a terrorist?

  40. Steve Pierson 40

    Brett. I condone direct action, even if it might break the law, if I think the cause is worthy and the damage done is proportionate and ethical.

  41. Matthew Pilott 41

    vto – you may have been in moderation, because I missed your reply yesterday. As for “my Pilott” I almost crashed a plane once so I wouldn’t suggest it 🙂

    Going off topic to yours – as I see it, we have gone past lynch mobs, vigilante justice and codified our laws, vesting power exclusively in the state to enact them. So yes, it is an unequal relationship between the state and the people – that does not make it unjust!

    In other news:

    I heard that the cost of repairing the cover may be up to $1m. Now this is very out of line with my normal thinking, but I have a solution – a Private-Public Partnership.

    Before you think I’ve gone all Tory, hear me out.

    The government contracts Durex to fashion a new cover for the receiver dish. With their expertise, a project such as this should be easy. Now, the domes are virtually a tourist attraction, and well photographed. So, to recoup the $1m it will cost Durex to make the ‘cover’, they get prime, white-background advertising space on the side of the new dome!

    Waihopai – brought to you by Durex – keeping NZ safe for over 50 years

  42. Tane 42

    MP – brilliant.

  43. “All without any real harm done….”

    Well lets see, all three will get a criminal conviction- which will follow them around ever time they apply for a job. I understand one of them had several already, so that’s certainly no help to him.
    But hey, who care’s about them? its “cool” right Roger?

    Then there is the cost to the taxpayer of just under million dollars to replace the cover as pointed out and to fix the fences.
    Then there is the extra security costs in staff time and the cost of an investigation into the events of that night, police time and court costs including legal aid.

    But hey, no real harm and its ‘cool’. Yeah, right.

  44. Matthew Pilott 44

    Richard Hurst – that’ve done NZ an invaluable service. What if they were terrorists trying to blow the facility up? These heroes have demonstrated security deficiencies that could have resulted in the loss of the entire facility. $1 million – peanuts compared to the whole facility, and the lives, that could have been lost.

    Without their courage, our sensitive GCSB facilities could all be at risk. I think you should be a little more thankful.

  45. Oh, it was a public service…oh well in that case free beer and medals all round I should think!
    Funny, the actual group of sad nutters behind the whole thing aren’t saying it was done to help improve security there. I also note they happily sent a 24 years old young man with a long list of past convictions
    ( sadly none politically inspired) instead of going themselves. Wow that shows a lot of courage doesn’t it? The word exploitation springs to mind

  46. Matthew Pilott 46

    ’twas a pisstake, Richard, but if you were being charitable you could call it a felix culpa

    This 24 year old – you’re saying he wasn’t part of the organisation? And that he was coerced somehow into going? And that there were presumably some evil puppet-masters pulling his strings?

    What’s the typical age for being an adult these days? I know it’s 30 for hobbits, but this was Waihopai, not Matamata.

  47. Occasional Observer 47

    lprent:

    I was addressing my comment to all of the people who lauded this piece of mindless vandalism.

    To date, not a single member of the Standard’s regular posters has condemned the action. Many of the Standard’s posters and left-wing commenters have applauded it.

    Yes, it is hard to see that this is the individual position of a single commenter when so many of the Standard’s supporters evidently support the view that attacking a state-owned facility is appropriate, and not a single Standard supporter opposes it.

    You’re acting like a pissant little net-bully, lprent. Could your attempt at censorship possibly be even more vacuous? Just because you have a point of view, doesn’t mean anybody is interested in reading it.

    [lprent: So? They comment on what they choose to. I haven’t seen a post on the crappy weather in Auckland today either. It is of concern to me – I have to drive through it]

  48. vto 48

    Hey Someone Else’s Pilott, who said anything about ‘lynch mobs and vigilante justice’?

  49. Matthew Pilott 49

    I was making a vague attempt to describe a time before civilisation had codified law and vested power of law to the state…

  50. Occasional Observer 50

    lprent:

    For some reason you fail to make a distinction between events of nature–i.e., the weather–and the Standard’s key supporters, backed by the Standard’s posters, supporting a wanton act of vandalism against a taxpayer-owned facility.

    Your argument is so stupid, yet again, you get zero for effort. Stick to the geeky stuff, Lynn, if you’re not going to step up to the plate and come up with a decent argument.

    The fact is that Steve Pierson crossed the line with this post. Even Helen Clark–former peace activist and anti-American par excellence–has condemned this vandalism.

    [lprent: So? I wasn’t commenting on the post (in fact I haven’t read it).

    I was gently noting that you addressed the site as if it had a mind of its own and wrote the post – it didn’t.

    You then tried to tell the posters what they should write about. Hey, you are a guest on the site, normally valued, but not if you try to act as if you own the place. We’ve all seen adolescents acting up before (it is dreadfully boring). Act like one and you’ll be treated like one.

    If you want to control what is written on a blog – then start your own one and do it there.

    If you want to comment here, address the person – not the damn machine. Suggest to the posters what they should write about – don’t tell them. Tear holes in their thesis and assumptions, but don’t tear into them personally. It really isn’t that hard, and it is more effective. Do the negatives and I will as well and I’ve a much better toolkit.

    When you address the site, you address me and will get replied to by me. I’m perfectly willing to stick to the “geeky stuff”, and thats what I’d like to do. However I run the outside bounds of the site as one of my geeky roles. I could simply express some of my more nasty geek traits. It is a liberating experience, but takes time away from the important things in life – like code. So I prefer to just eliminate the problem.

    Would you like me to start on you? This is your last mild warning]

  51. Matthew Pilott 51

    I thought it was a funny gesture, when the costs were announced as minimal. Like patching up a bike tyre, I thought. I like to see things with enough ‘grey’ to allow a sense of proportionality to colour my judgement of an event. When I heard that it was $1m damage my thoughts changed rather dramatically and to the negative, but perhaps it was naive of me to expect something like that to cost bugger-all.

    This was, of course, the story at the time Steve posted the entry, OO, and why people generally supported it as a funny thing, or effective activim. If you’re being honest, you’ll note that Steve actually said “… All without any real harm done and no violence.

    This is no longer the case, but you have come in to this thread a day or two late.

    I suppose you could demand a retraction or update, but that’s just being a touch precious in my books. As is “steve pierson crossed the line“. You came in a bit late to make that call.

  52. lprent 52

    Ummm I just read the post and the comments.

    I’m with Helen on this, it is a very expensive prank. I can think of better things to spend the money on than providing a story for the news media to feed on.

    I’m not happy with people breaking into sites that probably have armed guards either. There is just too high a probability of someone getting hurt.

    As was commented above, it was useful for showing up a security hole. As was also commented, there is nothing to stop people from carrying out illegal acts – it is a matter for their own judgement.

    However they have to accept the consequences. In this case I hope that the book is thrown at them -they deliberately caused damage.

  53. higherstandard 53

    Gosh Matthew

    Very considered took you 12 hours to conclude it was costly vandalism enough time to mull it over.

    Guess that’s the difference between the profession I’m in having to make sometimes fairly rapid decisions on the merits of something and your own good profession.

    While I support anyone and everyones right to peaceful protest can I politely ask on behalf of the NZ taxpayer that Steve admits that protests such as this and the associated cost of the vandalism is unacceptable.

  54. Matthew Pilott 54

    Sorry HS, I didn’t realise I was on a stopwatch, or I would have posted that coment far earlier. I didn’t actually ‘conclude’ as suc, I went with what I read in the media. I’ll let you in on a little secret – as soon as I heard that it wasn’t a small repair bill (and more like a mil), I decided that they’d gone too far – but here’s the rub – I didn’t rush straight to this thread to post the comment!

    Somewhat less-than-sincere apologies,

    Matthew

  55. Tane:

    Actually technically Nelson Mandela was a Terrorist, he supported bombing government departments.

    Ghandai use to make adolescent girls sleep with him to see if he would be tempted, so he was a bit of a sicko.

    The Dali Lama follows a belief, that Slavery is okay.

    But I bet the severe liberal education system wont teach this. Still they all did so much good for the world, I guess we can forgive them.

    I just find it, nuts that you can compare what these protesters did to what Ghandai did and his battle against the British.

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    The Auckland Chamber of Commerce is the latest credible voice to call for a review of immigration and skills policy, leaving John Key increasingly isolated, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little. “The Prime Minister is rapidly becoming a man alone. He ...
    1 week ago
  • Better balance needed in Intelligence Bill
    Labour will support the NZ Intelligence and Security Bill to select committee so the issues can be debated nationwide and important amendments can be made, says Opposition Leader Andrew Little. ...
    1 week ago
  • Serco circus has no place in NZ
    A High Court judgment proves National’s private prison agenda has failed and the Serco circus has no place in New Zealand correctional facilities, Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • State house sell-off a kick in the guts for Tauranga’s homeless
    The Government’s sale of 1124 state houses in Tauranga won’t house a single extra homeless person in the city, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. “Tauranga, like the rest of New Zealand, has a crisis of housing affordability and homelessness. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Axing Auckland’s affordable quota disappointing
    Auckland Council has given away a useful tool for delivering more affordable housing by voting to accept the Independent Hearing Panel’s recommendation to abolish affordable quotas for new developments, says Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ae Marika! Māori Party Oath Bill fails
    The Māori Party must reconsider its relationship with National after they failed to support Marama Fox’s Treaty of Waitangi Oath bill, Labour’s Maori Development Spokesperson Kelvin Davis says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Police Minister all platitudes no detail
    The Police Minister must explain where the budget for new police officers is coming from after continuously obfuscating, Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart Nash says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Lost luggage law shows National’s lost the plot
    The Government has proven it can’t address the big issues facing the tourism industry by allowing a Members Bill on lost luggage to be a priority, Labour’s Tourism spokesman Kris Faafoi said. “Nuk Korako’s Bill drawn from the Members’ Ballot ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Hiding behind the law – but can’t say which law
    National is refusing to come clean on what caused the potential trade dispute with China by hiding behind laws and trade rules they can’t even name, says Labour’s Trade and Export Growth spokesperson David Clark. “National admitted today that an ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Work visas issued for jobs workless Kiwis want
    Thousands of work visas for low-skilled jobs were issued by the Government in the past year despite tens of thousands of unemployed Kiwis looking for work in those exact occupations, Labour’s Immigration spokesperson Iain Lees-Galloway says. “A comparison of the ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Kiwis nationwide now paying for housing crisis
    The Government’s failure to tackle the housing crisis is now affecting the entire country with nationwide house price inflation in the past year hitting 26 per cent, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “None of National’s tinkering or half-baked, piecemeal ...
    2 weeks ago
  • OCR cut piles pressure on Government
    Today’s OCR cut must be backed by Government action on housing and economic growth, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler’s monetary policy statement underlines the limits of Bill English’s economic management. He says growth is ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must explain the McClay delay
    Todd McClay must explain why it took two months for him to properly inform the Prime Minister about China’s potential trade retaliation, says Labour’s Trade and Export Growth spokesperson David Clark. “This may be one of the most serious trade ...
    2 weeks ago
  • OCR cut would be vote of no confidence in economy
    If Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler cuts the OCR tomorrow it would show that, despite his loudly-voiced concerns about fuelling the housing market, the stuttering economy is now a bigger concern, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. “Bill English and ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Leading medical experts back Healthy Homes Bill
    Leading medical experts have today thrown their weight behind my Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill, saying it will improve the health of Kiwi kids, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “The Bill sets minimum standards for heating, insulation and ventilation ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Minister, it’s time to listen to the Auditor General
    Minister of Health Jonathan Coleman needs to listen to the independent advice of the Auditor General and review the capital charge system imposed on District Health Boards, says Labour’ Health Spokesperson Annette King.  “The capital charge on DHBs has been ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Peas explain, Minister
    The Minister of Primary Industries needs to explain how the failure of its biosecurity systems led to the Pea Weevil incursion in the Wairarapa, Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor says “The decision to ban the growing of peas in ...
    2 weeks ago
  • PM’s police numbers wrong
    The Prime Minister has said that police numbers will increase in-line with population growth, however, the Police’s own four year strategy clearly states there are no plans to increase police numbers for the next four years, Labour’s Police spokesperson Stuart ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Ministerial double speak on GP Fees
      The Associate Health Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga was simply making it up when he claimed today that General Practitioners had been given money in the Budget to lower fees, says Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King.  “In a reply to a ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Government must close loophole in LVR rules
    The Government must urgently close a loophole in loan to value ratio mortgage restrictions which are stopping homeowners from buying new houses before they sell their old one, Labour’s Housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. “The Reserve Bank was forced to ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Bulk funding means bigger classes
    National’s plan to bulk fund schools can only result in bigger class sizes and a reduced range of subject choices, Labour’s Education spokesperson Chris Hipkins says. ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Time for John Key to sack his Housing Minister
    It is time for the Prime Minister to take serious and meaningful steps to address the housing crisis – and start by sacking Nick Smith as Housing Minister, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. “Clearly whatever it is National ...
    2 weeks ago
  • Coleman puts skids under cheaper GP visits
      Hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders with high health needs are missing out on cheaper GP fees as the cost of going to the doctor hits $70, Labour’s Health spokesperson Annette King says.  “The number of practices subsidised to ...
    3 weeks ago

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