web analytics

Dual obligations

Written By: - Date published: 8:24 am, December 12th, 2009 - 19 comments
Categories: culture, Media, national/act government - Tags: ,

The more I ponder the scrapping of the TVNZ charter the dafter it seems. There are obvious downsides. What is the upside? What possible reason could there be to further weaken the already vestigial representation of our own culture on our main free to air TV channel? The only reason I’ve seen given is “dual obligations“:

The charter was criticised by some for giving TVNZ an impossible task in meeting dual obligations of a strong commercial performance as well as public broadcasting requirements.

Or as it was put in our comments: “The only credible media models are either ‘wholly Public’ or ‘wholly Private'”. Well I’m no media expert, but I call bullshit. Mixed public and private broadcasters can work just fine. The best known example of course is the BBC:

As we have sought to show in this chapter, the UK has a unique system of mixed public and private broadcasting that has been constructed over the past century on solid economic and cultural principles. It overwhelmingly reflects the lives and culture of the British people. It provides one of the most independent and trusted news services in the world. It makes learning opportunities available to all. And, because it is a universal system, it is able to bring large parts of the UK together. Once dismantled, it could never be rebuilt.

The Canadian CBC has a similar mixed model, as do various countries in Europe. In fact according to Wikipedia “Modern public broadcasting is often a mixed commercial model”.

The so called impossibility of “dual obligations” is just a smokescreen. Many organisations deal with dual (if not multiple) obligations. Any SOE for a start, which is expected to be both “(a) As profitable and efficient as comparable businesses that are not owned by the Crown” and “(c) An organisation that exhibits a sense of social responsibility by having regard to the interests of the community … and by endeavouring to accommodate or encourage these when able to do so.” Or how about Tertiary institutions, which have the dual obligations to run at a surplus of at least 3% and provide a world class education. Or District Health Boards with dual obligations of funding requirements and health targets. In fact, how about Parliament itself, which has the dual obligations of both fiscal and social responsibility (“Parliament makes laws and holds the Government to account for its policies, actions, and spending”).

Plenty of organisations cope with dual obligations and more. If TVNZ’s lavishly remunerated execs can’t cope then sack them and find some that can. Only – it isn’t really about dual obligations at all, is it. That’s just the smokescreen – so much humbug. What it’s really about is the same old story – maximising profits. Who cares about culture and national identity anyway. Not the Nats…

19 comments on “Dual obligations ”

  1. Tim Ellis 1

    What an interesting and thoughtful discussion to spark off on a Saturday morning, r0b.

    As Judy Callingham points out, there never was truly public service television in New Zealand, and the Charter was a mess and gave TVNZ quite conflicting goals that didn’t work.

    It might be nice to have a public service TV channel in New ZZealand, but I’m not sure it’s the biggest priority for the taxpayer as we’re clawing our way out of recession and the messy finances that the last government left us with. WIth a decade of deficits and a generation of indebted taxpayers ahead of us, I don’t think spending $300 million on a mini BBC each year is sustainable.

    • Tigger 1.1

      So why can we not create a model that works for us and delivers a public-oriented broadcaster? Let TVNZ make cash, let TV One serve the public and stop expecting it to all return money to the government.

      • Lew 1.1.1

        This is really the nub of it: the problem with public service broadcasting on NZ TV is not with the broad structural problem of serving two masters, but the narrow implementation problem of a vague and badly-enforced charter.

        L

    • Rex Widerstrom 1.2

      there never was truly public service television in New Zealand

      Ms Callinghan seems to have forgotten the NZBC, or the short lived BCNZ, let alone the NZBS.

  2. spot 2

    BBC as mixed ?

    The UK broadcast market itself is a good example of “mixed” broadcasting, with private companies also sharing in a slice of licence fees for PSB remit related programming, regional news, children’s programming etc (ITV, Ch4, S4C etc)

    The BBC itself as an example of mixed, and akin to TVNZ, not so sure.

    Licence fee funded and a curious legislative status rather than our “crown entity” TVNZ – most of any revenue it derives commercially via BBC Worldwide, JV production deals, publishing and kick-back on rights sale.

    A lot of the pressure on the BBC comes in the form of licence fee renewal conditions, which in themselves ensure certain “commercial behaviours”, but not in the same way as TVNZ is required to produce a return on asset.

    As an example, the BBC has over recent years had to come to grips with PSB reviews, its modern role (and cost). It has commercialised and then privatised a huge part of its distribution functions, its transmission functions, it’s engineering and technology group, and more recently attempted the same with it’s production and post-production areas.

    It has in effect done a lot to “sell itself off”, at least in terms of the supporting operations.

    TVNZ’s main problem is not the Charter, it has never stuck to that in any other way than lip service.

    It’s problem is a declining FTA advertising market, a legacy of costs and structure based on an old-school broadcast model and a well known inability to set a clear direction, adhere to it and drive the kind of investment and change needed to knock itself into shape.

  3. Jade 3

    Your arguments is spurious at best: you completely ignore the role of television licences.

    Using your first and primary example, that of the BBC, a quick look a their financial report of 2009, shows a graphical breakdown of income for the years ’06 – ’09 ¹. In total, BBC income from television licences made up roughly a good 75% of their total income each year, with the rest from advertisements, grants and ‘other’. In comparison, TVNZ for the year ending 2009 had total revenue of $384 million, of which, $298 mill or nearly 80%, was from advertising ². It’s clear BBC has a completely different model to TVNZ, so unless you propose instating a television licence, TVNZ cannot work as both.

    Also, a quick search through the book³ you linked to shows a similar model of income for European broadcasters: “Swiss… primarily financed through the licence fee and advertising” (p 254); in Denmark “DR is financed exclusively by license fees, TV-2 partially by advertising and license fees” (p 50) and 43% of the Austrian state broadcaster ORF is funded by license fees, 42% by advertising (p 8).

    ¹ http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/annualreport/pdf/bbc_ar_online_08_09.pdf, p. F07
    ² http://online.textpacific.com.au/default.aspx?cdn=0&xml=TVNZ_Annual_Report, p 10
    ³ http://books.google.com/books?id=_KRfXsBUBeAC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_navlinks_s#v=onepage&q=&f=false

  4. Deus ex Machina 4

    I can call bullshit too, and some of the biggest bullshit around is this idea of a ‘national culture and identity’.

    What passes for ‘national culture and identity’ on “our” broadcaster is a macho drumbeat that,we should all be rugby-loving, boozing, Australia-hating, sports-mad, anti-intellectual morons. My gorge rises at the number of times per day on the main national news when I am by its definition of a ‘Kiwi’ expected to rejoice at some sporting victory, or glow with internal warmth simply because some celebrity I’ve never heard of apparently thinks New Zealand is a great place to work/visit/buy up.

    Up to the 1940’s the UK was a nation of regional cultures and identities but the BBC levelled all that – “BBC English” replaced regional dialects and the ethos of Z-Cars and Coronation Street replaced the cultures of a thousand localities until they became simply historic curiosities. Any New Zealand ‘national culture and identity’ promulgated by the media will simply be what the media’s controllers think it is, or (worse) want it to be, and the sooner people return to looking at their neighbours to see what their culture and identity is, or should be, rather than the TV, the better.

    • Tigger 4.1

      National identity is only one part of the equation. Social cohesion is, these days, arguably more important. A public broadcaster can be an immensely powerful promulgator of social cohesion.

      • Oh yes. Just look at the way Fox News promulgates social cohesion in the US – there’s nothing promotes social cohesion better than a common enemy.

        The BBC’s stated mission is “To enrich people’s lives with programmes and services that inform, educate and entertain.” The moment TV starts PROMULGATING anything it steps beyond that remit and becomes a tool of mass persuasion, and that should never be allowed.

      • Draco T Bastard 4.1.2

        Social cohesion comes with talking to your neighbours not from staring at your television screen.

  5. chris 5

    Has anyone been to TVNZ’s offices? They’re quite sad how cramped and small they are

    captcha: cumming (lol)

  6. randal 6

    gosh what a lot of verbiage to describe the personal enrichment of an ideological claque who see any state activity simply as a vehicle to flog off for their own personal aggrandisement and going into government to achieve their desires.
    no matter.
    If the national party does perpetrate this act then they will be out on their ear very soon and any new government will have a clear field to set up a new state system without the accretions and hangers on that this one has managed to gather since its inception.

  7. Draco T Bastard 7

    TVNZ needs to get back to being a service that, get this, costs us. That service is to inform us of what our politicians are doing/debating and WTF else is happening in the world. It should not be an entertainment service.

      • Noko 7.1.1

        I agree with this, however if it had just one channel dedicated to this I wouldn’t be too disappointed.
        BBC is amazing, and the number of times we were shown a BBC produced video in any of the Sciences, Classics, History, English or even Drama throughout high school is more than I can remember. I don’t think we were shown one New Zealand produced video, because they are no resources as nearly as good as those the BBC has generated.

  8. Rex Widerstrom 8

    I think what Michael Grade means when he says:

    …the UK has a unique system of mixed public and private broadcasting…

    he’s referring to the BBC standing alongside ITV etc, surely? Not that the BBC has had forced upon it some dual personality as a (supposedly) quality programme maker and broacaster on the one hand and a voracious money- and ratings-grabber on the other?

    The ABC, for instance, has plenty of commercial operations, from it’s “ABC Shops” in shopping centres and online to various internet ventures to the provision of technology to other broadcasters. But these stand separate to their TV and radio programme making and broadcast operations, which have no commercial imperatives at all.

    I’m sure many people would be more than happy if TVNZ were to dump its advertising, start producing quality programming, and make it’s money selling Paul Henry bobble head dolls at the local Westfield because the commercial imperatives wouldn’t impact upon the on-air ones.

    And as for your argument that “SOEs can manage it”… well… it was the left which decried the SOE model when it was introduced and is still occasionally critical of it today, so it’s a little disingenuous to fall back on them as an example of supposed success in balancing conflicting obligations now.

    It’s an excellent model for some activities, not so much for others, as was proven with the entire Folole Muliaga debacle. Mercury Energy can’t be highly profitable as an energy supplier and worry whether people can afford their bills. It’s as daft as asking The Warehouse to discount Christmas toys for poor families. TVNZ can’t be profitable (or at least as profitable as it’s expected to be) while producing quality progamming.

    Anyway, it’s an apples-with-oranges argument. DHBs, for instance, ration government money. They’re not out there trying to get sponsorship from the local car dealer to fund the next hip replacement (though that surely can’t be far away).

  9. infused 9

    I don’t think I’ve watched much TV at all… I don’t see much of a point. This generation doesn’t watch TV. TV will be gone (in the current model) in 10yrs imo. Most devices stream youtube now and various other broadband services.

    Why even bother debating it?

  10. tc 10

    Alot of really spot on comments here which I’d sum up as:

    Lamenting that TVNZ should become a BBC/ABC is misplaced, it let the talented program makers go in the 90’s and has a commercial management/culture so it’s not achievable.

    TV’s a yesterday industry with most of its regular viewers now ageing or habitual viewers…..good broadband/technology sees it attracting very few new viewers to replace old.

    It’s a content game and TVNZ produces little or no desired content. Charter was a nice idea but decades too late as it should have been there from the start.

    The only saving grace would be a solid news/current affairs section but TVNZ doesn’t have that just kids running around and personality focused egos like Paul henry and Mark Sainsbury who as the flag bearers are shocking examples of it’s top talent.

    Sell sell sell……unlike Water/power TV’s not essential, in fact TVNZ are self serving and irrelevant and their election coverage in 2008 was embarrassing, as an example ot an area the nations voice should excel at. So flog it before Recycling Rick devalues it even more…..tis the national way after all.

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

  • “THE LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ZEALAND’S FIGHT AGAINST COVID.”
    Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • The legal and constitutional implications of New Zealand’s fight against COVID
    Speech to the New Zealand Centre for Public Law Tēnā koutou katoa Thank you for providing this opportunity to speak with you today as Attorney General. I’m here to talk about the constitutional consequences of Covid -19. I love the law. The way it exists with the consent of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 hours ago
  • Pharmac Review interim report released
    Health Minister Andrew Little has released an interim report by an independent panel reviewing the national pharmaceuticals-buying agency Pharmac. Pharmac was established in 1993 and is responsible for purchasing publicly funded medicines for New Zealanders, including those prescribed by GPs or administered in hospitals. The review, chaired by former Consumer ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 hours ago
  • Appointment to Network for Learning board
    Former MP Clare Curran has been appointed to the board of Crown company Network for Learning (N4L), Education Minister Chris Hipkins says. Hon Clare Curran served as a Member of Parliament for Dunedin South from 2008-2010. During this time, she held a number of ministerial portfolios including Broadcasting, Communications and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • Putting home ownership within reach of Pacific Aotearoa
    Pacific community groups and organisations will get tools to help them achieve home ownership with the implementation of the Ministry for Pacific Peoples (MPP) Pacific Housing Initiative, said Pacific Peoples Minister Aupito William Sio. In July 2021, MPP launched the Pacific Community Housing Provider Registration Support programme and the Pacific ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    8 hours ago
  • Coastal shipping will help keep New Zealand’s supply chain buoyant
    Transport Minister Michael Wood today welcomed the release of the Coastal Shipping Investment Approach State-of-Play report as an important step towards a more sustainable coastal shipping sector, which will further diversify New Zealand’s supply chain. “This Government is committed to strengthening our domestic supply chain by making coastal shipping a ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    10 hours ago
  • Response to Human Rights Commission's reports into violence towards disable people
    Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa.   Thank you for that introduction Hemi and thank you for inviting me to respond on behalf of Government to the release of these two important reports (Whakamanahia Te Tiriti, Whakahaumarutia te Tangata -Honour the Treaty, Protect the Person and Whakamahia te Tūkino kore ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    10 hours ago
  • Law change strengthens petroleum decommissioning regulation
    Petroleum permit and licence holders operating in New Zealand will now have an explicit statutory requirement to carry out and fund the decommissioning of oil and gas fields after a new law was given Royal assent today, says Energy and Resources Minister Dr Megan Woods. Once in effect The Crown ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    20 hours ago
  • New Zealand Response to assist peace and stability in Solomon Islands
    The New Zealand government has announced that it will deploy Defence Force and Police personnel to Honiara to help restore peace and stability. “New Zealand is committed to its responsibilities and playing its part in upholding regional security,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.  “We are deeply concerned by the recent ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Continued growth in volume of new home consents
    In the year ended October 2021, 47,715 new homes were consented, up 26 per cent from the October 2020 year. In October 2021, 4,043 new dwellings were consented Canterbury’s new homes consented numbers rose 31% to higher than post-earthquake peak. New home consents continue to reach remarkable levels of growth, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Saddle up for summer with cycle trail funding
    New investment will keep the best of New Zealand’s cycle trails in top condition as regions prepare to welcome back Kiwi visitors over summer and international tourists from next year. “Cycle tourism is one of the most popular ways to see the country ‘off the beaten track’ but the trails ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • New Zealand provides additional funding to COVAX for vaccine delivery
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced additional funding will be provided to COVAX to support vaccine delivery in developing countries. “New Zealand remains cognisant of the dangers of COVID-19, especially as new variants continue to emerge. No one is safe from this virus until we all are and this ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • COVID-19 Community fund providing support for 160 organisations focused on women and girls
    Minister for Women Jan Tinetti today announced financial support will be allocated to the 160 successful applicants for the COVID-19 Community Fund, to support organisations helping women/wāhine and girls/kōtiro in Aotearoa New Zealand affected by the pandemic. “COVID-19 has had a disproportionate effect on women around the world including in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Government delivers reactivation package as Aucklanders reconnect for summer
    A new support package will help revive economic, social and cultural activities in our largest city over summer, and ensure those in hardship also get relief. The Social Development and Employment Minister Carmel Sepuloni and the Economic and Regional Development Minister Stuart Nash have announced a Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Mobile services and broadband come to Chatham Islands for first time
    World class mobile and broadband services have been switched on for the 663 residents of the Chatham Islands, Minister for the Digital Economy and Communications, David Clark and Minister for Economic and Regional Development, Stuart Nash announced today. “This eagerly awaited network will provide fast broadband and mobile services to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Crown accounts reflect strong economy amid pandemic
    The Government’s financial accounts continue to reflect an economy that has performed better than expected, despite the latest Delta COVID-19 outbreak. The Crown accounts for the four months to the end of October factors in the improved starting position for the new financial year. Core Crown tax revenue was $2.5 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 day ago
  • Applications open for new 2021 Resident Visa
    The first round of applications for New Zealand’s new 2021 Resident visa open today (6am). “This one-off pathway provides certainty for a great many migrant families who have faced disruption because of COVID-19 and it will help retain the skills New Zealand businesses need to support the economic recovery,” Minister ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • More Vietnam Veterans to receive compensation for Agent Orange Exposure
    Minister for Veterans, the Hon Meka Whaitiri announced today that two new conditions associated with Agent Orange exposure have been added to the Prescribed Conditions List. Under the 2006 Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Crown and representatives of Vietnam veterans and the Royal New Zealand RSA. Vietnam veterans in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government commits to international effort to ban and regulate killer robots
    Minister of Disarmament and Arms Control Phil Twyford announced today that New Zealand will push for new international law to ban and regulate autonomous weapons systems (AWS), which once activated can select and engage targets without further human intervention. “While the evidence suggests fully autonomous weapons systems are not yet ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • New freedom camping rules – right vehicle, right place
    Tougher freedom camping laws will be introduced to prevent abuse which has placed an unfair burden on small communities and damaged our reputation as a high quality visitor destination. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has confirmed that new legislation will be introduced to Parliament following an extensive round of public consultation ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Government invests to support a classic Kiwi summer
    Vaccinated New Zealanders can look forward to Kiwi summer events with confidence, while artists and crew will have more certainty, following the launch of details of the Arts and Culture Event Support Scheme, Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Carmel Sepuloni announced today. “The Government recognises that the arts and ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Grace period for expired driver licences cruises into 2022
    Due to the ongoing Delta outbreak and extended lockdowns, all New Zealand driver licences and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will now be valid until 31 May 2022, Transport Minister Michael Wood announced today. “This further extension to the validity of driver licenses recognises that ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Delivered: 1,000 extra transitional homes
    A further 1,000 transitional homes delivered  New housing development starts in Flaxmere, Hastings  The Government has delivered the next 1,000 transitional housing places it promised, as part of its work to reduce homelessness. Housing Minister Dr Megan Woods is marking the milestone in Hastings at a new development that includes ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    2 days ago
  • Traffic light levels announced
    The levels at which different parts of New Zealand will move forward into the COVID-19 Protection Framework this Friday have been announced. Northland, Auckland, Taupō and Rotorua Lakes Districts, Kawerau, Whakatane, Ōpōtiki Districts, Gisborne District, Wairoa District, Rangitikei, Whanganui and Ruapehu Districts will move in at Red The rest of ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Financial support to move to traffic light system
    A new transition payment will be made available particularly for affected businesses in Auckland, Waikato and Northland to acknowledge the restrictions they have faced under the higher Alert Levels. Transition payment of up to $24,000 as businesses move into traffic light system Leave Support Scheme and Short Term Absence Payment ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Ambassador to Russia announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Sarah Walsh as New Zealand’s next Ambassador to Russia. “Aotearoa New Zealand and Russia have a long-standing relationship, engaging on a range of regional and global interests including disarmament and Antarctica issues. We also work together as members of the East ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • New Permanent Representative to the UN announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced the appointment of Carolyn Schwalger as Permanent Representative to the New Zealand Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York. “Aotearoa New Zealand is a founding member of the UN and we have worked hard to ensure our stance on human rights, ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    3 days ago
  • Further COVID-19 economic support for Cook Islands and Fiji announced
    Foreign Affairs Minister Nanaia Mahuta today announced a further package of support for the Cook Islands and Fiji for COVID-19 economic support and recovery. “Aotearoa New Zealand remains committed to supporting our Pacific fanau and vuvale to respond to the impacts of COVID-19 on their economies, and move towards long-term ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • New law will clear the air for tamariki in vehicles
    From today, it’s illegal to smoke or vape in most vehicles carrying children aged under 18 years old - whether the vehicle is moving or not. “Second-hand smoke poses an unacceptable risk to our tamariki and rangatahi,” Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall said. “We know children in vehicles ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Nine countries designated very high risk
    Nine southern African countries are being added to the very high risk countries list following public health advice around the newly discovered COVID-19 variant Omicron, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said. This afternoon, a public health risk assessment was carried out to assess the emerging evidence and any risk to ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    4 days ago
  • Foreign Affairs Minister concludes final stage of world trip
    Foreign Affairs Minister Hon Nanaia Mahuta today departed North America to return home to Aotearoa, concluding the last stage of her 17-day world trip. The final leg of her trip saw her visit the United States of America and Canada for a number of high-level discussions. While in Washington D.C., ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Milestone launch of Pacific Languages Unit
    Today’s official launch of the Pacific Languages Unit is a milestone for our Pacific communities, the Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio said. The Pacific Languages Unit brings together a new set of language supports within the Ministry for Pacific Peoples to provide advice, commission research, maintain standards, promote ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    5 days ago
  • Public Health Lecture – University of Otago
    Public Health - Lessons from New Zealand’s COVID-19 response and opportunities for the future E nga mana, E nga reo,                                          E nga iwi. Tēna koutou katoa. Ka huri ki nga mana whenua o te rohe nei. Tēna koutou. He mihi hoki ki a tatou kua tau mai nei I raro I ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • New Zealand statement on situation in Honiara, Solomon Islands
    Aotearoa New Zealand is deeply concerned by the events which have been unfolding in Honiara, Solomon Islands, since Wednesday. “New Zealand is a long-standing partner of Solomon Islands, and there are deep and enduring connections between our two countries,” Acting Foreign Affairs Minister David Parker said. “Our engagement in Solomon ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Nailed it! Over 500 apprentices get jobs boost
    Over 500 apprentices and cadets have been placed into work across New Zealand thanks to the Government’s booming build programme, that’s both constructing public houses, and maintaining older homes. Housing Minister Megan Woods announced the milestone today at a public housing construction site in Riccarton, Christchurch. “This Government’s investment in ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Investment to support maternal mental health
    Associate Minister of Health Dr Ayesha Verrall has announced an investment to help expand maternal mental health services in five District Health Boards. “Supporting parent’s mental wellbeing during their child’s first 1000 days, from conception to two years of age, is critical to the long-term emotional, mental and physical wellbeing ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Workplace vaccination requirements extended to cover Police and NZ Defence Force
    With the support of the organisations, additional vaccination requirements will cover sworn members, recruits and authorised officers of the New Zealand Police, and all New Zealand Defence Force staff. First doses of the vaccine for workers in these organisations are required by 17 January 2022, and second doses by 1 ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Aotearoa New Zealand and Canada to pursue greater Indigenous collaboration
    During her visit to Ottawa, the Honourable Nanaia Mahuta, New Zealand Minister of Foreign Affairs and Associate Minister for Māori Development, met with the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Canadian Minister of Indigenous Services, and the Honourable Marc Miller, Canadian Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, to further expand and develop the positive relationship ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    6 days ago
  • Māori vaccination rates reach 80% first dose
    Associate Minister of Health (Māori) Hon Peeni Henare today confirmed that Māori across the motu have now reached 80 percent for first doses of the COVID-19 vaccination nationally. “We have seen a huge increase in vaccinations for Māori throughout November, since the beginning of the month the increase for first ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago
  • Subsequent Children legislation to change
    The Government has today introduced legislation that will reverse provisions in the Oranga Tamariki Act as part of a path to rebuild trust and confidence in the organisation. “The Oranga Tamariki Amendment Bill makes a number of changes but by far the most important is the partial repeal of the ...
    BeehiveBy beehive.govt.nz
    1 week ago